PDA

View Full Version : Columbia invites Ahmadinejad to speak


samsung101
Sep 21st, 2007, 04:45 PM
Let me get this straight....ROTC's are pushed off campuses by students and faculty,
people like Ward Connelly (Prop. 209 in California), Rumsfeld, Rice, Bush Sr., Howard
of Australia, and even former Clinton Secretary and Harvard President, Larry Summers,
are uninvited by college campuses for commencement speeches or seminar speeches.

Don't want those far right or middle of the road voices heard on free speech loving
college campuses. They send the wrong message!

BUT, Columbia has invited Ahmadinejad to speak to the faculty, and students.

Great.

The man who has advocated the elimination of Israel, and the West.

Who denies the existence of the Holocaust.

Who funds terror groups like Hamas and Hezbollah.

Who has shut down freedom of speech even more than the Ayotollah did among
the young in schools, of women, and anyone who disagrees with him.
Ask the kids who were beaten in their dorm rooms what they think of this man.

Who is supplying Iraq with Iranian terrorists, Iranian hardware, and Iraninan
money to keep up the pockets of violence and terror inside Iraq. That helps kill
Americans and Australians and British soldiers too.


This man is welcomed?
He will be applauded and cheered, no doubt.
Will he answer questions about promoting terrorism?
Will he answer why he wants Israel wiped off the earth?
Will he answer questions about how helped the 1979 hostage
taking occur and go on?

samsung101
Sep 21st, 2007, 04:49 PM
Bologna, he was not surprised by the anger his announced intent to visit
the fallen tower area created.

He knew it would create a buzz for him.
Get people riled up.
He could only gain more fame and honor among
the people who support him. See, how they fear him.

No, see how Americans might get mad enough to kill
the guy if he got near that spot out of anger, not fear.


The USA - by law - will also provide him with Secret Service
coverage as a diplomat.

As we do all the scummy diplomats at the UN - even old Hugo.


It really does make me want to see the UN leave NYC and go some
place else. Like Caracas.

Pureracket
Sep 21st, 2007, 05:05 PM
The university has made, and will make, it clear that they do not endorse the opinion.

If every speech given at a university is assumed to have the imprimatur of the university itself, THAT'S propaganda. No assumption is warranted.

wtf is he going to do, pull out his bat-nukes?
There was little to lose, and who knows what might have been gained. Dialog and discussion could well be our best weapon against bombs and slaughter. Maybe our only weapon.

HippityHop
Sep 21st, 2007, 05:07 PM
And the band played on.

MisterQ
Sep 21st, 2007, 05:57 PM
Columbia's president has made it clear in the past that he finds Ahmadinejad's opinions repugnant.

Still, he values the dialogue that this will produce -- you can read his statement on the decision to stand by the invitation here: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/news/07/09/ahmadinejad2.html

Qrystyna
Sep 21st, 2007, 07:16 PM
First of all, President Ahmadinejad actually has very little power. The real powerful person who has a say over everything in Iran is, of course, the Ayatollah.

Second, these "left wing" college campuses are very unlike to endorse his opinion since Ahmadinejad is socially on the extreme right of the political spectrum. I have a feeling the reason he's been invited is because he's generally an intelligent and well-spoken person that can open up the proper dialogue with the students of the campus.

Another thing to remember is that if the extreme religious right in the USA was able to hold power, the country would be something similar to Iran. Economically it would be different, but socially it would be similar.

griffin
Sep 21st, 2007, 07:37 PM
he's generally an intelligent and well-spoken person

He is a smooth liar, but I'm not sure that's really conducive to "proper dialog"

At least what he's been invited to is a forum, where he can be questioned and challenged. It's not as if he's just giving a speech or being given an honorary degree.

Morrissey
Sep 21st, 2007, 07:40 PM
Columbia University also wants publicity, why is it so hard for people to see that? Univerities all the time want controversial people to speak they love it. They love the free press.

samsung101
Sep 21st, 2007, 08:41 PM
Not that Columbia needs publicity, it does like the foreign coverage.

It needs the wealthy foreign students to keep attending, and paying the
$40, $50, $60,000 annual tuition. Ka-ching. Middle Eastern students
are plentiful in the USA, especially metropolitan places.

So, yes, they have an eye on their wallets in asking him to be there.

I just find it amusing they go out of their way (Elite liberal colleges
and faculty) to make sure they do not like or invite or cheer conservative
or moderate figures. It's not hard to find where Republican lawmakers or
writers are disinvited by colleges, or protested by faculty all the time.
It's commonplace.

I don't hear much faculty outrage over this invitation.
Why not invite Ward Churchill to give commentary and praise to our hostage
taking friend who grew into the President of his own country. Nice job.

Let him visit the tower site too...and let the NYPD and NYFD escort him, and
have some Iranian expatriates take care of him as well.

Volcana
Sep 21st, 2007, 08:56 PM
He is a smooth liar, but I'm not sure that's really conducive to "proper dialog"'Smooth liar' is the same thing as 'diplomat' in international politics.

Columbia getting him is a coup for them, when they're measured against similar schools. And they have a long history of inviting in politically objectionable types. They invited in representative from the Minutemen to speak a couple years back.

The point is, at a great university, the better access to different points, of view, from the original sources, the better off everybody is. It doesn't matter if he lies or tells the truth. Every word will be cross checked by thousands of sources after the fact. Legit grievances flagged as such, outrights lies, flagged as such. In theory, it's we in the West who don't fear to hear from all points of view.

Such fear of the mere words of Ahmadinejad, or any opponent for that matter, smacks of cowardice.

kiwifan
Sep 21st, 2007, 11:14 PM
I have no problem with any University inviting that goofy jackass to speak.

But if he took his clown act to ground zero he was going to get smoked; now that would be about as funny as that "Mysterious IAF Crater" in Syria. :devil:

That's all. ;)

Apoleb
Sep 21st, 2007, 11:25 PM
:yawn:

Another stupid rant by Samsung. Ahmedinajad is a leader of a hugely important country politically and economically. What's wrong in letting him express his opinions in a public forum, whether you hate him or love him? Oh wait. Maybe it's just because Samsung is desperately trying to find something to attack the "liberal" university system.

mckyle.
Sep 22nd, 2007, 03:21 AM
giving him the blueprints to one of america's most important colleges :o i expect it to be bombed within ten years...

CondiLicious
Sep 22nd, 2007, 03:49 AM
One of my best friends goes there and she is pissed off that her classes are being disrupted because of this.

Pureracket
Sep 22nd, 2007, 03:52 AM
One of my best friends goes there and she is pissed off that her classes are being disrupted because of this.Tell your friend that her college education isn't always going to be in the classroom.

Volcana
Sep 22nd, 2007, 05:20 AM
One of my best friends goes there and she is pissed off that her classes are being disrupted because of this.
I went there, and your friend doesn't appreciate what the university is offering, and she ought to save some money, and attend a school doesn't bring in the most important and influential people in the world to speak.

Scotso
Sep 22nd, 2007, 05:46 AM
This is disgusting. The guy is a terrorist. He shouldn't be allowed in this country.

Still, he values the dialogue that this will produce -- you can read his statement on the decision to stand by the invitation here: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/news/07/09/ahmadinejad2.html

Nothing positive can come from giving this bigot another forum for his hatred. We don't need to allow such people in our nation to discuss how insane they are.

'Columbia getting him is a coup for them, when they're measured against similar schools.

And now they've firmly placed themselves at the bottom of that list in my opinion.

Such fear of the mere words of Ahmadinejad, or any opponent for that matter, smacks of cowardice.

Who fears his words? You don't need to give someone a red-carpet audience for their disgusting hate speech to prove you don't fear what they have to say. Further, it's an insult to the memory of the people that died on 9/11 to have that man anywhere near the site.

Another stupid rant by Samsung. Ahmedinajad is a leader of a hugely important country politically and economically. What's wrong in letting him express his opinions in a public forum, whether you hate him or love him? Oh wait. Maybe it's just because Samsung is desperately trying to find something to attack the "liberal" university system.

This man utters the same bullshit every single day from behind his altar in Iran. There's no reason to let him come here and do the same thing.

Apoleb
Sep 22nd, 2007, 06:24 AM
Further, it's an insult to the memory of the people that died on 9/11 to have that man anywhere near the site.

What does he, or Iran have to do with 911?

This man utters the same bullshit every single day from behind his altar in Iran. There's no reason to let him come here and do the same thing

There's an opportunity for people to directly discuss and challenge his ideas, many of them are a reflection of what a lot of people in the Middle East think. I hate him and I hate the current regime in Iran, but his views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for example are quite widespread in the Middle East. Getting to know the other point of view can hardly be negative. Furthermore, view how many of his comments were so badly misinterpreted on purpose or not by Western media, I do beleive there's a need for an event like this. For example, what he meant by "wiping Israel of the map" was the destruction of Israel as an independent political entitity and not the genocide or even expulsion of Jews in Israel. He made it clear on several occasions, but this comment was continuously used for propaganda purpsoes in the Western media.

And finally, I also think it will be good if a high US diplomat goes straight to Iran and gives a talk in an intellectual setting. I don't believe it will happen cause the rulers there are definitely the cowards.

Scotso
Sep 22nd, 2007, 06:35 AM
What does he, or Iran have to do with 911?

You know the answer to that question.

Getting to know the other point of view can hardly be negative.

We know his point of view.

Furthermore, view how many of his comments were so badly misinterpreted on purpose or not by Western media, I do beleive there's a need for an event like this. For example, what he meant by "wiping Israel of the map" was the destruction of Israel as an independent political entitity and not the genocide or even expulsion of Jews in Israel. He made it clear on several occasions, but this comment was continuously used for propaganda purpsoes in the Western media.

Oh wow, I can't believe I was so wrong about him. What a lovely guy. :rolleyes:

Apoleb
Sep 22nd, 2007, 06:37 AM
You know the answer to that question.



We know his point of view.



Oh wow, I can't believe I was so wrong about him. What a lovely guy. :rolleyes:

:confused: No I don't know answer to that question. :rolleyes: That's why I asked you. Again, what was his role or Iran's role in 911? Al Qaeda and Iran are hardly "friends."

No, most people in the West have no clue about what people in the Middle East think. And it seems like you don't have much to say, except just arguing for the sake of it.

Scotso
Sep 22nd, 2007, 06:49 AM
I didn't say he or Iran had a role in 9/11, but they're terrorists just the same. No doubt they cheered. They're responsible for the deaths of countless innocent people. Having them "pay respects" at such a site is disgraceful.

"Most people" in the West won't watch his little engagement. The people that will are already aware of his opinion. What is there to say? I don't think he should be allowed in this country.

meyerpl
Sep 22nd, 2007, 02:12 PM
I didn't say he or Iran had a role in 9/11, but they're terrorists just the same. No doubt they cheered. They're responsible for the deaths of countless innocent people. Having them "pay respects" at such a site is disgraceful.

"Most people" in the West won't watch his little engagement. The people that will are already aware of his opinion. What is there to say? I don't think he should be allowed in this country.
Actually, you did say so, or at least that was your clear implication and now you're back-peddling. President Bush does the same thing in reference to Saddam Husein and 9-11; repeatedly make the implication and when pressed back-peddle as you did.

The bottom line is, in the U.S. we have a thing called freedom of speech. The man is the recognized leader of a sovereign nation, the university has every right to invite him to speak and he can say whatever he likes, no matter how misleading or misinformed.......just like you. Aren't you both lucky?

Serenita
Sep 22nd, 2007, 03:30 PM
Who cares, i don't!

miffedmax
Sep 22nd, 2007, 04:21 PM
If Anne Coulter is allowed to speak on college campuses . . .

Scotso
Sep 22nd, 2007, 11:41 PM
Actually, you did say so, or at least that was your clear implication and now you're back-peddling.

No, I did not. And no, it wasn't implied. But if you get off on telling people what they really mean, go right ahead.

A Magicman
Sep 22nd, 2007, 11:51 PM
but his views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for example are quite widespread in the Middle East.

So? This is like "Eat more shit, thousands of flies can't be wrong".



But hey.... if American universities invite him, that's OK. You are judged by your shabby guest.

Our chancellor just invited the Dalai Lama ignoring the protests and threats of the commies in China. This is something to be really proud of. My two cents.

Apoleb
Sep 23rd, 2007, 12:11 AM
So? This is like "Eat more shit, thousands of flies can't be wrong".



But hey.... if American universities invite him, that's OK. You are judged by your shabby guest.



And this is coming from someone who had previously insulted a whole country and a bunch of millions of people by calling them "ultranationalists" and people who in their history brought nothing but destruction to the world (missing the irony that he's a German and a European calling a whole culture ultranationalist). So why should I take your opinion on ANYTHING pertaining to the area any more seriously than Ahmedinajad's?

And to directly answer what you're saying, you might think millions of people are wrong on a political subject that involves them, but the fact is that understanding their position is key to resolve the conflict and bring stability to the area. Based on my personal experience and my survey of the media and general political opinions, most people in the West are extremely limited in their knowledge and know pretty much nothing about the other point of view. Actually, even the Israelis tend to be much more understanding.

And yes, the stupid people might be the ones judging Columbia by their shabby "guest." Not the smart ones though.

Infiniti2001
Sep 23rd, 2007, 12:33 AM
I'm wondering if Iranians would welcome Duhbya with open arms had the UN been in Iran :shrug:

Iran President Lashes Out at U.S.
TEHRAN, Iran (Sept. 22) - A day before flying to New York to speak directly to the American people, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad struck a confrontational tone Saturday with a parade of fighter jets and missiles and tough warnings for the United States to stay out of the Mideast.

Three new domestically manufactured warplanes streaked over the capital during the parade marking the 27th anniversary of the Iraqi invasion of Iran, which sparked a 1980-88 war that killed hundreds of thousands of people. The parade also featured the Ghadr missile, which has a range of 1,120 miles, capable of reaching Israel.

Some of the missile trucks were painted with the slogans "Down with the U.S." and "Down with Israel." The parade also featured unmanned aerial surveillance drones, torpedoes, and tanks.

Tensions are high between Washington and Tehran over U.S. accusations that Iran is secretly trying to develop nuclear weapons and helping Shiite militias in Iraq that target U.S. troops. Iran denies the claims.

Washington has said it is addressing the Iran situation diplomatically, rather than militarily, but U.S. officials also say that all options are open.

"Those (countries) who assume that decaying methods such as psychological war, political propaganda and the so-called economic sanctions would work and prevent Iran's fast drive toward progress are mistaken," Ahmadinejad.

Iran launched an arms development program during its war with Iraq to compensate for a U.S. weapons embargo. Since 1992, Iran has produced its own jets, torpedoes, radar-avoiding missiles, tanks and armored personnel carriers.

"Those who prevented Iran, at the height of the war from getting even barbed wire must see now that all the equipment on display today has been built by the mighty hands and brains of experts at Iran's armed forces," Ahmadinejad said.

He is expected to address the American people directly in an interview with CBS's "60 Minutes" airing Sunday, and through appearances at the U.N., Columbia University and several other events.

His request to lay a wreath at the World Trade Center site was denied and condemned by Sept. 11 family members and politicians. Protests against his Columbia appearance are planned at the university and the United Nations by demonstrators angry at his questioning of the Holocaust and declarations that Israel will cease to exist.

Iran and the U.S. have not had diplomatic ties since militants took over the U.S. Embassy following the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Since then, the cleric-led regime has vilified the United States as the "Great Satan."

Despite Ahmadinejad's frequent anti-U.S. rhetoric, he has tried to appeal to the American people before. Recently, he told a live satellite television show that his country wanted peace and friendship with the U.S. Since coming to power in 2005, Ahmadinejad has also sent letters to the American people in which he criticized Bush's Mideast policy.

He is scheduled to address the General Assembly on Tuesday - his third time attending the New York meeting in three years. Last year, Ahmadinejad was harshly critical of U.S. policies in Iraq and Lebanon and insisted that his nation's nuclear activities were "transparent."

At the parade, Ahmadinejad repeated his demand for foreign forces to leave the region and urged the United States to acknowledge it has failed in Iraq. Outside the 160,000 U.S. troops in Iraq, there are 40,000 troops on U.S. bases in Persian Gulf countries and another 20,000 in Mideast waters.

"Nations throughout the region do not need the presence of the foreigners to manage their own needs. Foreign presence is the root cause of all instability, differences and threats," he said.

On the sidelines of the parade, the head of Iran's elite Revolutionary Guards, Mohammad Ali Jafari, said the event highlighted the "might of Iran's armed forces to its enemies," adding that Iran is ready to retaliate if attacked.

"Iran has drawn up plans to confront enemies in the face of any possible attack," the official IRNA news agency quoted Jafari as saying.

Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei also issued a warning against any launch of a limited strike on Iran.

"Military aggression against Iran in the form of a hit-and-run attack is not possible anymore," he was quoted on television as saying to the nation's top military leaders. "Anybody attacking us will become entangled with grave consequences."

The Bush administration is expected to soon blacklist a unit of Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organization, subjecting part of the vast military operation to financial penalties. The step would be in response to Iran's involvement in Iraq and elsewhere.

The U.S. is also leading a push in the U.N. Security Council for a third round of economic sanctions against Iran over its refusal to suspend uranium enrichment. Iran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes including generating electricity. The Security Council is not expected to take up the issue before October.

"Learn lessons from your past mistakes. Don't repeat your mistakes," he said in a warning to the United States over its push to impose more sanctions.

HippityHop
Sep 23rd, 2007, 03:14 AM
I will very interested to see if he is shouted down and not allowed to speak the way that the Minutemen and others were shouted down at Columbia.

On the very small chance that he is shouted down, it will be interesting and telling to see how the administration at Columbia responds to the people who disrupt his speech.

A Magicman
Sep 23rd, 2007, 09:43 AM
And this is coming from someone who had previously insulted a whole country and a bunch of millions of people by calling them "ultranationalists" and people who in their history brought nothing but destruction to the world (missing the irony that he's a German and a European calling a whole culture ultranationalist). So why should I take your opinion on ANYTHING pertaining to the area any more seriously than Ahmedinajad's?

And to directly answer what you're saying, you might think millions of people are wrong on a political subject that involves them, but the fact is that understanding their position is key to resolve the conflict and bring stability to the area. Based on my personal experience and my survey of the media and general political opinions, most people in the West are extremely limited in their knowledge and know pretty much nothing about the other point of view. Actually, even the Israelis tend to be much more understanding.

And yes, the stupid people might be the ones judging Columbia by their shabby "guest." Not the smart ones though.

Yes, I've said that about Turkey and that's still my opinion and yes I know my history and, like most of my fellow countrymen, I've learned from it (and don't deny a genocide like most of the people from the above mentioned country do). Prove me wrong about what I've said about Turkey instead of insulting me and I'm willing to change my opinion.

So why should I take the opinion of millions of people in that very region about Israel for serious - the same millions of people who believe to know that 9/11 has been carried out by the Jews and the CIA, by the same people who burn our embassies, flags and dolls of our peoples'leaders? Is there just one point, why I should take that seriously?

And please don't use taqqiya on here saying that poor Ohimakeadjihad was simply misquoted on his comments about Israel and that he just wants to destroy the "zionist entity" as a state and not rush the Jews into the sea.

Ending Israels existance as a Jewish state will have the Jews driven into the sea as a consequence of that. They will have no future in that region in a whatsoever looking "multicultural" state. I guess that you know that, too. I just have to make up, why you are talking differently and from what point of interest.

You don't have to take me more seriously as this furry guy, I don't care. I just make my point.

azinna
Sep 23rd, 2007, 12:25 PM
I will very interested to see if he is shouted down and not allowed to speak the way that the Minutemen and others were shouted down at Columbia.

On the very small chance that he is shouted down, it will be interesting and telling to see how the administration at Columbia responds to the people who disrupt his speech.

Interesting. Will also be on the lookout. Bollinger sent out a pretty stern email warning over the Minutemen issue.

Apoleb
Sep 23rd, 2007, 03:36 PM
Yes, I've said that about Turkey and that's still my opinion and yes I know my history and, like most of my fellow countrymen, I've learned from it (and don't deny a genocide like most of the people from the above mentioned country do). Prove me wrong about what I've said about Turkey instead of insulting me and I'm willing to change my opinion.

So why should I take the opinion of millions of people in that very region about Israel for serious - the same millions of people who believe to know that 9/11 has been carried out by the Jews and the CIA, by the same people who burn our embassies, flags and dolls of our peoples'leaders? Is there just one point, why I should take that seriously?

And please don't use taqqiya on here saying that poor Ohimakeadjihad was simply misquoted on his comments about Israel and that he just wants to destroy the "zionist entity" as a state and not rush the Jews into the sea.

Ending Israels existance as a Jewish state will have the Jews driven into the sea as a consequence of that. They will have no future in that region in a whatsoever looking "multicultural" state. I guess that you know that, too. I just have to make up, why you are talking differently and from what point of interest.

You don't have to take me more seriously as this furry guy, I don't care. I just make my point.

:haha:

Most retarded post of the month I guess? I think I had already answered you about Turkey in the other thread, but regardeless, do you really think I was going to spend time disproving such a retarded and racist claim? If you knew anything about Turkey or the Ottoman empire, you would've known that it was one of the most open and multicultural states of the world. When Jews were being slaughtered and kicked out of Europe, they went to the Ottoman empire and found a safe haven there, where they culturally flourished and reached high positions. That's I guess "brought nothing but destruction."

You learn from your history? :lol: You can't stop tripping on your irony, poor soul. First you call Turkish people "ultranationalist" knowing that Europe was the birth place of nationalism and Germany, hmm, one that excelled in "ultranationalism", and after all Ataturk tried to copy the European system. Second, you call for expelling Turks from Germany and come up with racist claims and generalizations. Is that what you call "learning from your history"? :rolls:

How do you even know that the majority of people in the ME or millions of them think that the CIA or Jews did 911? :weirdo: You have no clue ofcourse. You can judge Ahmedinajad on his intentions, but the fact remains is that he talked about Israel as a political entitity and said he doesn't want the expulsion of Jews in the area. Yet the Western media didn't bother to even point that out. They were just quick to make the Hitler *ahem* analogy. Ofcourse your racist self would think that Middle Easterners all think the same way. But I won't be spending any more time on you. My job is done here, cause I just wanted to expose your racism and bigotry. Now you can spend your time much better by preparing those gas chambers and ovens to send your Turks there.

HippityHop
Sep 23rd, 2007, 05:26 PM
Interesting. Will also be on the lookout. Bollinger sent out a pretty stern email warning over the Minutemen issue.

Yep. That'll teach 'em. :lol:

ROTC is not welcome at Columbia because of "don't ask, don't tell". But a man whose government hangs 16 year old kids for alleged homosexual behavior is welcomed. Go figure.

fioredeliberi
Sep 23rd, 2007, 05:49 PM
This guy is a clown, and basically he is going to give a clown talk.
Columbia just wants the publicity and the future revenues generated by potential students who are impressed by these sort of cutting-edge clown shows.
If some clown had slaughtered half the staff of Columbia U(and their families) in a terrorist attack and a rival U had asked a supporter of that clown to lecture later on their premises, Columbia U would be throwing a hissy fit and getting their panties in a twist, First Amendment aside.
Everyone spouts nonsense to justify their vested interests and univeristies as profit centres are sadly no different from big oil or weapons companies.

fioredeliberi
Sep 23rd, 2007, 05:53 PM
Well, what to do when you have "big education" ramming their own warped brand of morality down the throat of american culture. It's all just dollars to Columbia. Make it negative profit-wise for Columbia and they send that clown packing back to iran faster than you can shout the word "liberal wingnut".
It's so amusing to find such incredibly stupid people in america as in some of your universities.

*JR*
Sep 23rd, 2007, 06:45 PM
FWIW, OJ Simpson spoke (and then had to answer probing questions) @ Britain's prestigious Oxford Union in the late 90's. If the questions for Mr. Ahmandinejad are pre-screened to weed out ones that make him look bad, then its wrong. If he has to answer even hostile questions, it helps show that our system is superior to theirs. Maybe Columbia ought to invite that guy from Florida who asked Kerry those dumb questions. Then he can be dragged out again and yell: "Don't taze me, bro". :tape:

Infiniti2001
Sep 23rd, 2007, 07:28 PM
FWIW, OJ Simpson spoke (and then had to answer probing questions) @ Britain's prestigious Oxford Union in the late 90's. If the questions for Mr. Ahmandinejad are pre-screened to weed out ones that make him look bad, then its wrong. If he has to answer even hostile questions, it helps show that our system is superior to theirs. Maybe Columbia ought to invite that guy from Florida who asked Kerry those dumb questions. Then he can be dragged out again and yell: "Don't taze me, bro". :tape:

:lol: Not that I am violent in nature but if it were up to me, I'd dump the Columbia invite and let him visit ground zero where New Yorkers can take matters in their own hands :tape:

azinna
Sep 23rd, 2007, 07:28 PM
Yep. That'll teach 'em. :lol:

ROTC is not welcome at Columbia because of "don't ask, don't tell". But a man whose government hangs 16 year old kids for alleged homosexual behavior is welcomed. Go figure.

Yep. Wouldn't have wanted Bollinger to do anything more than that following the Minute Men situ. Definitely wouldn't have been down with him getting names of those involved, rounding them up and doling out individual and official reprimands. As for, the Ahmadinejad event, folks are already gathering and speaking in protest, pasting flyers on walls and sidewalks for a rally tomorrow at the very same spot the anti-MM folks rallied. If they end up storming the podium while Ahmadinejad is speaking, I would hope Bollinger responds in exactly the same way.

BTW: The way you've connected the ROTC and Ahmadinejad issues is more inventive than most, but I still think they're too many distinct factors involved in considering each decision.

ys
Sep 23rd, 2007, 10:17 PM
Is there any harm in someone's speaking? Evenif it is a troll of Ahmadinejad's caliber..

HippityHop
Sep 24th, 2007, 12:23 AM
Is there any harm in someone's speaking? Evenif it is a troll of Ahmadinejad's caliber..

Well at Columbia apparently there is harm in someone's speaking since they have shouted down speakers in the past.

fioredeliberi
Sep 24th, 2007, 09:41 AM
Many academics are like that. If you don't like their pet speaker, they say first amendment.
But when they don't like your pet speaker, they say racism, dangerous to young people, defamation, supremacism and unfairness.
In the end there is not much difference between a professor drinking his herbal tea and a AK-47 carrying bushman on a wife-poaching party.

azinna
Sep 24th, 2007, 04:11 PM
^Hmmm. Interesting take....Anyway, for those interested, below is President Bollinger's preemptive email. To be clear, his argument is based on the principle of academic freedom, which is related to but not exactly the same as -- more an extension of-- the basic freedom of speech argument.

Thoughts on Today's Forum

Dear fellow members of the Columbia community:

I would like to share a few thoughts about today’s appearance of
President Ahmadinejad at our World Leaders Forum. I know this is a
matter of deep concern for many in our University community and
beyond. I want to say first and foremost how proud I am of
Columbia, especially our students, as we discuss, debate and plan
for this highly visible event.

I ask that each of us make special efforts to respect the different
views people have about the event and to recognize the different
ways it affects members of our community. For many reasons, this
will demand the best of each of us to live up to the best of
Columbia's traditions.

For the School of International and Public Affairs, which developed
the idea for this forum as the commencement to a year-long
examination of 30 years of the Islamic Republic in Iran, this is an
important educational experience for training future leaders to
confront the world as it is -- a world that includes far too many
brutal, anti-democratic and repressive regimes. For the rest of us,
this occasion is not only about the speaker but quite centrally
about us -- about who we are as a nation and what universities can
be in our society.

I would like just to repeat what I have said earlier: It is vitally
important for a university to protect the right of our schools, our
deans and our faculty to create programming for academic purposes.
Necessarily, on occasion this will bring us into contact with
beliefs many, most, or even all of us will find offensive and even
odious.

But it should never be thought that merely to listen to ideas we
deplore in any way implies our endorsement of those ideas, or the
weakness of our resolve to resist those ideas, or our naiveté about
the very real dangers inherent in such ideas. It is a critical
premise of freedom of speech that we do not honor the dishonorable
when we open the public forum to their voices.

The great majority of student leaders with whom I met last week
affirmed their belief that this event, however controversial, is
consistent with the values of academic freedom we share at the
center of university life. I fully support, indeed I celebrate, the
right to peacefully demonstrate and engage in a dialogue about this
event and this speaker, as I understand a wide coalition of our
student groups are planning for today. That such a forum and such
public criticism of President Ahmadinejad’s statements and policies
could not safely take place on a university campus in Iran today
sharpens the point of what we do here. The kind of freedom that
will be on display at Columbia has always been and remains today
our nation’s most potent weapon against repressive regimes
everywhere in the world. This is the power and example of America
at its best.

Sincerely,

Lee C. Bollinger



My take on the message: it gets flowery at times, clouding the issues with nationalist rhetoric, especially at the end. The real matter lies with SIPA's wish to put on a year-long public and provocative dialogue on the Islamic Republic in Iran. Pretty much what academic freedom was setup for.

samsung101
Sep 24th, 2007, 05:03 PM
It isn't an issue of whether or not they have the right to invite him, of course they do.
Who said otherwise.

Columbia literally kicked out ROTC and any military recruiting decades ago. They didn't
want those killers on their campus. But, this killer, oh well, that's different, come
on down and have tea.

Columbia also did little to protect the right of the invited Minutemen to speak at
their campus. Instead, almost encouraging attendees to shout down the talker, and harass
them into not being heard at all.

Will the brave Columbia students shout down this guy?
Will the brave Columbia faculty scream and protest what he's done to academic freedom
in his own nation?
No, they will likely cheer, politely applaud, and give him a standing ovation.
They will say, see, he's a civil fellow. We don't need to worry about him.

We can hug and make nice.



Nice we live in a country where a pig like this has the freedom to be made into an insta-
celebrity by our elite universities and our elitist press corp., and yet, answer little to
nothing about where he has led Iran to, clamping down on speech in his own nation, arresting
students, and spreading his anti-Israel/never was a Holocaust/join me in killing Israel,
and spread sharia law worldwide policies. He's just misunderstood I guess.

azinna
Sep 24th, 2007, 05:16 PM
....
Will the brave Columbia students shout down this guy?
Will the brave Columbia faculty scream and protest what he's done to academic freedom
in his own nation?
No, they will likely cheer, politely applaud, and give him a standing ovation.
They will say, see, he's a civil fellow. We don't need to worry about him.

We can hug and make nice....

WTF are you talking about? Folks have been on public address since yesterday morning. There's currently a rally brewing at the center of campus. Sidewalks and walls have been plastered with his crazy quotes. Student editorials and blogs have been written arguing the University was wrong in inviting the man and engaging him in conversation..... I'm sure some students will want to storm the stage, but yeah, won't happen.....security for controversial talks post-Minutemen has been preemptive....But the public address system for those protesting today's talk is up...and at the exact same place where it was for the Minutemen.

Apoleb
Sep 24th, 2007, 05:24 PM
I'm just really wondering why I haven't put Samsung on ignore yet. Everytime I read one of her posts, my stomach literally turns. This post was almost nightmarish.

That was a very nice letter from Bollinger. People who are comparing Ahmedinajad to previous guests still don't get it yet. *sigh*

kiwifan
Sep 24th, 2007, 06:56 PM
Bollinger is letting him "have it" right now on stage.

Almost sounds like a trial, not a pep rally. :yeah:

And practically called him a petty and cruel dictator. :haha:

This is hilarious!!! :banana:

Infiniti2001
Sep 24th, 2007, 07:06 PM
Bollinger is letting him "have it" right now on stage.

Almost sounds like a trial, not a pep rally. :yeah:

And practically called him a petty and cruel dictator. :haha:

This is hilarious!!! :banana:

OMG!! I love it :lol: He has started his speech/whinning , but I have to leave :sad: I am so recording this :lol:

Apoleb
Sep 24th, 2007, 07:50 PM
OMG, he said they don't have homosexuals in Iran, and everyone is laughing. :haha:That's exactly what this event is good for. :)

FrchTwst
Sep 24th, 2007, 07:52 PM
I think its alright that he came to speak. But I don't agree with the oppression women and gays have in his country. But he made a few points before going to the college. Why does America think it can tell other countries what they can't and can have??

kiwifan
Sep 24th, 2007, 07:53 PM
OMG, he said they don't have homosexuals in Iran, and everyone is laughing. :haha:That's exactly what this event is good for. :)

I agree, this is the true magic of free speech. ;)

antonella
Sep 24th, 2007, 07:59 PM
Why does America think it can tell other countries what they can't and can have??

'"You see, in this world there's two kinds of people, my friend: Those with loaded guns and those who dig'

samsung101
Sep 24th, 2007, 09:35 PM
Bollinger did give a fitting opening.
However, he did so, in my view, only after
several days of outrage - especially in NYC -
over the invitation at all. From the right and
the left, he received criticism he was likely not
expecting - at that level anyway.

So, yes, I'm happy he said what he said.

However, it wasn't exactly brave of him.

As for old Adolf Jr., he said what he's said before.

Israel is a scourge, Holocaust didn't happen, all made up,
Islam will rule the world one day, no gays in Iran. He gave
his status quo speech....and for that, he was cheered by the
intelligent college crowd paying $45,000 a year to attend
Columbia. Those are our future leaders, cheering on this
idiot..... more so when he said in Iran, they would not open
a guest speech w/those kind of comments. No, I doubt they'd
invite anyone who disagrees w/him to speak at all.


Columbia and the National Press Corps did not distinguish their
bodies today....I do hope people listen to what he said at least.
Sharia law, growth of Islam around the world, Israel should be gone,
etc. Wake up people, he ain't our friend.

Infiniti2001
Sep 24th, 2007, 09:43 PM
In conclusion, Ahmadinejad is blowhard idiot, less dangerous than Bush and Darth Vader Cheney :shrug:

azinna
Sep 24th, 2007, 10:04 PM
Pretty special event. Great to be among so many people expressing such a range of opinions, without insults, fighting or anything close to violence.

Bollinger's opening was remarkable, folks were really surprised, cheering and on the whole almost proud. But Ahmadinejad came back with several strong points of his own. He proved himself to not be some complete kook, but certainly not trustworthy either.

Folks are now discussing and debriefing.

Meanwhile, traffic (both walking and motor) currently sucks.....

Apoleb
Sep 24th, 2007, 10:26 PM
Thoughts:

Very good event, and I believe Columbia has gained much more out of this than people would have thought.

I hope stuff like this can be made more often, and it'd hopefully make people see that most stuff is in the grey, neither black or white. Ahmedinajad's responses to research on the Holocaust were actually very smart, and I happen to agree with him. Putting people in prison for questionning a historical event is ridiculous, and if you take that position ofcourse it doesn't mean that you think it didn't happen or it's exagerated. The way he dealt with the student's response and his analogy with research in math and physics were very apt. Ofcourse though the irony is that discourse in Iran that challenges common religious beliefs is not open.

It was funny to see him trying to avoid the question on homosexual executions. He knows that he can't afford to say what he truly thinks, and at the end, he made a fool out of himself.

I can only now imagine Bush going to Iran and doing the same thing. Only thing is that he'll do a poorer job than Ahmedinajad. :o

BK4ever
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:03 AM
I fail to see what the issue is here. We have the number 1 terrorist in the world in the white house right now. This guy is small time compared to Dumbo. He should ask Dumbo for advice on how he came to be the most ruthless dictator.

Volcana
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:39 AM
Will he answer questions about promoting terrorism?He did.
Will he answer why he wants Israel wiped off the earth?He did. It was the first question asked and answered. His answer, quite as coded as the question was, 'I don't want Israel wiped off the map, I just don't care if it remains a Jewish state or not.
Will he answer questions about how helped the 1979 hostage taking occur and go on?He was not asked that. And note that Bollinger's office chose the question from those submitted by students.

Volcana
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:42 AM
Who fears his words? You don't need to give someone a red-carpet audience for their disgusting hate speech to prove you don't fear what they have to say. Having viewed the speech in its entirety, I defy you to find anything in it that a reasonable person would call 'disgusting hate speech'.

Further, it's an insult to the memory of the people that died on 9/11 to have that man anywhere near the site.Why? Iran didn't have anything to do with 9/11, and the Iranian government condemned that attack right away.

HippityHop
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:50 AM
Another dog and pony show, come and gone.

Volcana
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:51 AM
Well at Columbia apparently there is harm in someone's speaking since they have shouted down speakers in the past.
You're equating two vastly different things.

The University, as an academic institution, frequently invites controversial speakers. The students treat them differently. Columbia, the academic institution, clearly believes that there's no harm in even detestable speech (which Ahmadinejad's was not, incidentally).

Columbia's students, OTOH, are another matter. However, you will note that when the speaker from the Minutemen was shouted down, the University invited him back.

The University administration and the students are not the same entities.

Volcana
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:54 AM
In the end there is not much difference between a professor drinking his herbal tea and a AK-47 carrying bushman on a wife-poaching party.Other than the fact that the Bushmen don't 'poach' wives, or for the most part carry AK-47s? Or is that just your warled view of Africa?

The coffee drinking professors may also feel slighted.

Volcana
Sep 25th, 2007, 06:06 AM
As for old Adolf Jr., he said what he's said before.

Israel is a scourge, Holocaust didn't happen, all made up,
Islam will rule the world one day, no gays in Iran. He gave
his status quo speech....
I posted a link to a video of the speech in another thread. Everybody should check it out.

As for you samsung, you seem to be implying you actually saw the speech. Did you? If you did, you are lying about it's contents.

He did not refer to Israel as a 'scourge', far from saying the Holocaust didn't happen, he called it historical fact, he didn't say 'Islam will rule the world'. He gave a speech on knowledge and science as the highest expression of religion. I've seen a fair bit of footage on Ahmadinejad, and it's the first time I've heard him address that topic.

So, if, as you say, this is his 'status quo speech', would you might giving us a link to another video or transcript of a speech where he addressed this issue?

Samsung, you've got your political outlook, fine. But lying about it only undercuts your own position. Those who really care will see the video for themselves. Then they'll read your posts again, and you wind up losing what little credibility you have remaining.

cheo23
Sep 25th, 2007, 06:45 AM
Go Columbia!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I mean, seriously, like Columbia is the MOST liberal campus in all over the nation!!!!!!! It is so progressive and signals the government TO CHANGE their ASS!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Scotso
Sep 25th, 2007, 07:45 AM
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Halardfan
Sep 25th, 2007, 08:07 AM
The guy has said all manner of vile things. But he is not the guy with ultimate power in Iran, and his threats are generally empty.

I just feel he is the enemy of the month...the US right needs these boogeymen to justify the obscene amounts its spends on the military. Next month it will be Chavez, hey now Castro is on the mend he can come off the bench and do the job too.

Whitehead's Boy
Sep 25th, 2007, 08:51 AM
The problem with laws against Holocaust denial (in addition to the fact that it's against freedom of speech) is that it gives the impression there is a truth "we" try to hide, so "we" don't let them speak to cover our lies. If it's so obvious that the Holocaust happened, then there is no reason to worry to let them speak.

Young earth creationists, for example, might be insane and or deluded, but why should we stop them to speak? The more they try to defend their position, the more they make fools of themselves. It's all good, and it's called freedom of speech.

You either support freedom of speech or you don't. Hate speech? Questioning or denying a historical fact is not "hate", not even close.

fioredeliberi
Sep 25th, 2007, 09:06 AM
Samsung101, you got my support.

Having this clown over to speak at Columbia is one of the silliest things american academia can do. Great publicity for Columbia, though.

I reiterate, there is no bigger fool than a highly educated fool, and when people spout about the First Amendment, they are usually talking nonsense, because to them, the first A only applies if they agree with whatever politics the speaker is spouting. Get a speaker who espouses opposite from their pet politics and they will be screaming "Ban him, ban him" faster than they can run into a underaged whorehouse overseas. That's just human nature.

It's all about money and publicity. If israel were Columbia;s biggest donor, the admin of Columbia would be singing the opposite tune immediately, and be asking Netanhayu to give speeches despite the protests.

Academics are no different from protitutes in general, they just supply different services. Of course there are some decent and upright ones, but these seem to the minority these days.

Sam L
Sep 25th, 2007, 10:50 AM
I reiterate, there is no bigger fool than a highly educated fool, and when people spout about the First Amendment, they are usually talking nonsense, because to them, the first A only applies if they agree with whatever politics the speaker is spouting. Get a speaker who espouses opposite from their pet politics and they will be screaming "Ban him, ban him" faster than they can run into a underaged whorehouse overseas. That's just human nature.

A great example of this is Volcana. Browse through his venomous posts in this forum and you'll find that he has a lot of double standards.

But regarding your last paragraph. Please, let's not go overboard shall we? The real academics are doing their jobs in labs and classrooms and most of them probably don't even know who this person is. Just because Columbia's big wigs decided to let him speak there doesn't mean that all academics want or seek that attention. Respect!

Infiniti2001
Sep 25th, 2007, 12:48 PM
The guy has said all manner of vile things. But he is not the guy with ultimate power in Iran, and his threats are generally empty.


Add being a pussy to his repertoire :lol: The way he dodged the holocaust denial question was classic. You know he will sing a different tune when he gets on his own turf :shrug:

Volcana
Sep 25th, 2007, 01:09 PM
I reiterate, there is no bigger fool than a highly educated fool, and when people spout about the First Amendment, they are usually talking nonsense, because to them, the first A only applies if they agree with whatever politics the speaker is spouting. Get a speaker who espouses opposite from their pet politics and they will be screaming "Ban him, ban him" faster than they can run into a underaged whorehouse overseas.It may well be YOUR nature, but it's not human nature. As for the First Amendment, what's that got to do with anything? All it says is the GOVERNMENT shal not restrict speech. That's not even an issue here, so why bring it up?
A great example of this is Volcana. Browse through his venomous posts in this forum and you'll find that he has a lot of double standards.No I don't. Browse through my 'venomous' posts, and the one thing you'll find is consistency of applied standards. You just don't like the standard when results in opinions that disagree with your own.

HippityHop
Sep 25th, 2007, 03:58 PM
You're equating two vastly different things.

The University, as an academic institution, frequently invites controversial speakers. The students treat them differently. Columbia, the academic institution, clearly believes that there's no harm in even detestable speech (which Ahmadinejad's was not, incidentally).

Columbia's students, OTOH, are another matter. However, you will note that when the speaker from the Minutemen was shouted down, the University invited him back.

The University administration and the students are not the same entities.

Are you arguing that the students at a university have no connection with the representation of said university? Interesting theory.

samsung101
Sep 25th, 2007, 04:12 PM
Old Ahmad...whatever, got what he wanted: a forum to speak his crap, er', serious topics,
a forum to show the world via Al Jazeera and likewise how accepted he is, and how applauded
he was (and he was), and to deride the USA and Christianity and Judiasm and 9/11 and the Holocaust.

The only true gasp from the crowd of liberal nutroots was when he denied homosexuality in Iran.
Uh, you can deny the Holocaust, deny that 9/11 happened as it did, deny that Iran is giving
arms and money, and troops, to the terrorists in Iraq to kill American soldiers, that all
seemed okay to the students there...who did not boo or shout or hiss.... But, when you deny
homosexuality, oh no, did you hear that...he's crazy! That got them annoyed. The media too.

Amazing.



The President of the university should not have been rude to the man he invited to speak.
I may think he is a tyrant and a pig and a guy bent on killing more Americans every day....
but, hey, Columbia, you invited the guy. You extended the olive branch - stupidly. Then,
after public pressure, and alumni pressure, you insult the guy (truthfully insult him) -
and put him down. That was a little lame. I was happy to hear it, but, wrong format to do it.

Don't invite the guy next time.
He should do his UN thing, and that's it. Get out.
In fact, the USA should not allow him into the USA next time. Say no
to his Visa.



Do you think the University would have allowed known anti-Iranian students with a history
of loud protests into the auditorium? No. The Administration knows darn well who was in
there to listen to him, and they screened out those they felt would cause trouble, and
w/security. He had Secret Service details with him, as all diplomats in the USA get w/the
UN - on our dime. They would take zero chances w/unrest.


ROTC banned for years at Columbia.
Minutemen, treated like dirt at Columbia.
Most conservatives at commencements and college seminars are treated like dirt
at places like Columbia - for daring to have a different thought than the liberal
mainstream media and education system. But, the President of Iran, he's treated
like a King, minus a few insults from the school chief after alumni protestations
he was too soft inviting him at all. Ka-ching Columbia- you got what you wanted.

Publicity.

Hagar
Sep 25th, 2007, 04:16 PM
The USA - by law - will also provide him with Secret Service
coverage as a diplomat.

As we do all the scummy diplomats at the UN - even old Hugo

Hey, I think that the fact that the USA treats him as every other diplomat is good because it shows Ahmadinejad what it means to be in a country where freedom of speech rules.

HippityHop
Sep 25th, 2007, 04:18 PM
Old Ahmad...whatever, got what he wanted: a forum to speak his crap, er', serious topics,
a forum to show the world via Al Jazeera and likewise how accepted he is, and how applauded
he was (and he was), and to deride the USA and Christianity and Judiasm and 9/11 and the Holocaust.

The only true gasp from the crowd of liberal nutroots was when he denied homosexuality in Iran.
Uh, you can deny the Holocaust, deny that 9/11 happened as it did, deny that Iran is giving
arms and money, and troops, to the terrorists in Iraq to kill American soldiers, that all
seemed okay to the students there...who did not boo or shout or hiss.... But, when you deny
homosexuality, oh no, did you hear that...he's crazy! That got them annoyed. The media too.

Amazing.


The President of the university should not have been rude to the man he invited to speak.
I may think he is a tyrant and a pig and a guy bent on killing more Americans every day....
but, hey, Columbia, you invited the guy. You extended the olive branch - stupidly. Then,
after public pressure, and alumni pressure, you insult the guy (truthfully insult him) -
and put him down. That was a little lame. I was happy to hear it, but, wrong format to do it.

Don't invite the guy next time.
He should do his UN thing, and that's it. Get out.
In fact, the USA should not allow him into the USA next time. Say no
to his Visa.



Do you think the University would have allowed known anti-Iranian students with a history
of loud protests into the auditorium? No. The Administration knows darn well who was in
there to listen to him, and they screened out those they felt would cause trouble, and
w/security. He had Secret Service details with him, as all diplomats in the USA get w/the
UN - on our dime. They would take zero chances w/unrest.


ROTC banned for years at Columbia.
Minutemen, treated like dirt at Columbia.
Most conservatives at commencements and college seminars are treated like dirt
at places like Columbia - for daring to have a different thought than the liberal
mainstream media and education system. But, the President of Iran, he's treated
like a King, minus a few insults from the school chief after alumni protestations
he was too soft inviting him at all. Ka-ching Columbia- you got what you wanted.

Publicity.

Good points in the bolded section. You are wrong about one thing though. It's not amazing at all.

Apoleb
Sep 25th, 2007, 04:36 PM
Where did he deny the Holocaust in the event? Furthermore, everyone knows his opinion on the subject, so why should you expect the audience to react surprised? The point of it was to explain his positions and to address challenges to them. No one would expect him however to say homosexuals don't even exist when asked about homosexual executions.

Ofcourse, I would never expect Samsung or his sidekick retard Hippity Hop to ever realize that.

The President of the university should not have been rude to the man he invited to speak.


:haha: Had he done anything besides that, you would've been the first to rant about him. What a silly, vapid, hypocrite you are.

*JR*
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:20 PM
OMG, he said they don't have homosexuals in Iran, and everyone is laughing.
There aren't, he killed all of them already. :help:

BTW, Fred Phelps is likely to give him an award. :o

samsung101
Sep 25th, 2007, 05:20 PM
He did make a lot of the same comments and points found at Daily Kos, moveon.org, and
by the likes of Schumer, Waters, Waxman, Kucinich...so, guess it's all good.


He got what he wanted: newsbites that show American students cheering and applauding him.

Stalin called it out years ago: useful idiots.

Who help legitimize and promote a cause and a program they don't know much about,
but, approve of anyway. Allowing the dictator and thug to proceed with international
approval.

HippityHop
Sep 26th, 2007, 02:53 AM
Where did he deny the Holocaust in the event? Furthermore, everyone knows his opinion on the subject, so why should you expect the audience to react surprised? The point of it was to explain his positions and to address challenges to them. No one would expect him however to say homosexuals don't even exist when asked about homosexual executions.

Ofcourse, I would never expect Samsung or his sidekick retard Hippity Hop to ever realize that.



:haha: Had he done anything besides that, you would've been the first to rant about him. What a silly, vapid, hypocrite you are.

I should have known that this fool would crawl out of the woodwork to defend some madman from a certain group that cannot be criticized. Oh well.

Pureracket
Sep 26th, 2007, 03:14 AM
From how I understand it, Ahmadinejad wants questions answered . Could it be he questions the reasons why an American corporate leader like Prescott Bush would $upport Hitler? Or why George HW Bush supported Saddam? Or why did Bush ignore the warnings of the 9-11 attacks?

That being said, Ahmadinejad is a murderous cretin. This is what he does to homosexuals in his country:http://planetsean.blogspot.com/uploaded_images/GayTeenHangingIranISNA1-778777.jpg

HippityHop
Sep 26th, 2007, 03:30 AM
From how I understand it, Ahmadinejad wants questions answered . Could it be he questions the reasons why an American corporate leader like Prescott Bush would $upport Hitler? Or why George HW Bush supported Saddam? Or why did Bush ignore the warnings of the 9-11 attacks?

That being said, Ahmadinejad is a murderous cretin. This is what he does to homosexuals in his country:http://planetsean.blogspot.com/uploaded_images/GayTeenHangingIranISNA1-778777.jpg

How dare you slander this good man by posting these photoshopped lies? How do we even know that this is in Iran? There is nothing in that photo that proves that this is in Iran.
:mad:

Pureracket
Sep 26th, 2007, 03:35 AM
How dare you slander this good man by posting these photoshopped lies? How do we even know that this is in Iran? There is nothing in that photo that proves that this is in Iran.
:mad:
ok

SelesFan70
Sep 26th, 2007, 03:45 AM
How dare you slander this good man by posting these photoshopped lies? How do we even know that this is in Iran? There is nothing in that photo that proves that this is in Iran.
:mad:

:lol: :devil:

Apoleb
Sep 26th, 2007, 04:29 AM
I should have known that this fool would crawl out of the woodwork to defend some madman from a certain group that cannot be criticized. Oh well.

See, that's exactly why you are Samsung's sidekick retard. I was defending the reaction of the audience, you freak. Not him. :haha: But again, I wouldn't expect you to even understand that either.

www.rif.org (http://www.rif.org)

HippityHop
Sep 26th, 2007, 05:11 AM
See, that's exactly why you are Samsung's sidekick retard. I was defending the reaction of the audience, you freak. Not him. :haha: But again, I wouldn't expect you to even understand that either.

www.rif.org (http://www.rif.org)

Back to ignoring the assclown.

Apoleb
Sep 26th, 2007, 05:15 AM
Back to ignoring the assclown.

:spit: *dead*

You ignore me by quoting me? :haha: Thanks for making my night. I clearly hit a nerve, so I must congratulate myself. And as long as I have some of your posts to entertain myself when I'm bored, I will never ignore you. :hearts:

Hey, at least you actually respond unlike Samsung, so I'll give you credit for that.

HippityHop
Sep 26th, 2007, 05:36 AM
Interesting how many people think it's all about them. ;)

fioredeliberi
Sep 26th, 2007, 06:44 AM
When all is said and done, we basically got a clownshow and Ahmad got his publicity clips to show back home. I suggest Columbia ask a pornstar to give the next lecture as we need some sweetness and light after that clownshow.
Or I suggest they call Kim from North Korea and ask him to give his thoughts on the latest Pixar films.
What a clown show.

fioredeliberi
Sep 26th, 2007, 06:50 AM
But regarding your last paragraph. Please, let's not go overboard shall we? The real academics are doing their jobs in labs and classrooms and most of them probably don't even know who this person is. Just because Columbia's big wigs decided to let him speak there doesn't mean that all academics want or seek that attention. Respect!Sorry, Sam L, no offence to academics meant, was targeting the Columbia admin that invited him there. Academics can be just as brave and capable as anyone else in the general population. And for better or worse, tend to be more knowledgeable.

mankind
Sep 26th, 2007, 09:29 AM
:scared:

Xanadu11
Sep 26th, 2007, 01:13 PM
When all is said and done, we basically got a clownshow and Ahmad got his publicity clips to show back home. I suggest Columbia ask a pornstar to give the next lecture as we need some sweetness and light after that clownshow.
Or I suggest they call Kim from North Korea and ask him to give his thoughts on the latest Pixar films.
What a clown show.

Well Jenna Jameson has debated at the Oxford Union, haha.

Volcana
Sep 28th, 2007, 11:24 PM
Are you arguing that the students at a university have no connection with the representation of said university? Interesting theory.
No. I'm arguing that the students at a university have no connection with the administration of said university. (Using 'administration' as a verb in this case.) The students don't run the university, they attend it. I actually went to Cornell back when they had the students actually had a voting seat on the board. That is to say, the students had an actual say on how the university was actually run. As far as I know, that is not currently the case at Columbia.

Volcana
Sep 28th, 2007, 11:27 PM
Old Ahmad...whatever, got what he wanted: .... a forum to show the world via Al Jazeera and likewise how accepted he is, and how applauded he was (and he was), and to deride the USA and Christianity and Judiasm and 9/11 and the Holocaust.Of course, he did NOT 'deride the USA and Christianity and Judiasm and 9/11 and the Holocaust.' At least in that speech, in front of that audience.

And of course, the audience at Columbia was reacting to what was actually said in front of them.

Volcana
Sep 28th, 2007, 11:34 PM
http://planetsean.blogspot.com/uploaded_images/GayTeenHangingIranISNA1-778777.jpg
Replace the ski masks with white hoods, make the skin color of the victims a little darker, and maybe have 'God Bless America' playing ....

Volcana
Sep 28th, 2007, 11:49 PM
When all is said and done, we basically got a clownshow and Ahmad got his publicity clips to show back home.
Students at Columbia got to hear directly from, and ask questions of, a man representing a country we may well be asked to go to war against soon. Giving the current American administrations record about lying to start wars-for-profit, hearing directly from the other side of the potential conflict is exactly what real education is all about.

Now, they can take his answers, the answers he gave to their specific questions, and measure them against facts. When they hear or read people's opinions about Iran, they can measure them against the words of a representative of that country. Look at the first question he was asked.

"Do you want to destroy Israel, as a Jewish state?"

It's a 'Have you stopped beating your wife' question. Set up as a yes or no answer, when there is no honest yes or no answer.

Columbia students were well served by the invitation, less well served by the questions. But, if in fact, those were the students questions, the fact that they were horsshit questions is the students own fault.