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Bette_Midler
Sep 20th, 2007, 07:32 PM
PARIS, France (AP) -- Floyd Landis has lost his expensive and explosive doping case. Arbitrators have upheld the results of a test that showed the 2006 Tour de France champion used synthetic testosterone to fuel his spectacular comeback victory in the race.

http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2007/SPORT/09/20/cycling.landis.ap/art.gif

The decision, handed down nearly four months after a bizarre and bitterly fought hearing, leaves Landis with only one more outlet to possibly salvage his title -- an appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

According to documents obtained by AP, and to be made public later on Thursday, the vote was 2-1 to uphold the results, with lead arbitrator Patrice Brunet and Richard McLaren in the majority, with Christopher Campbell dissenting.

The decision means that Landis, who repeatedly has denied using performance-enhancing drugs, must forfeit his Tour de France title and is subject to a two-year ban, retroactive to January 30, 2007.

If Landis does not appeal, he will be the first person in the 105-year history of the race to lose the title because of a doping offense.

"Today's ruling is a victory for all clean athletes and everyone who values fair and honest competition," U.S. Anti-Doping Agency general counsel Travis Tygart said.

It's a devastating loss for Landis, who has steadfastly insisted that cheating went against everything he was all about and said he was merely a pawn in the anti-doping system's all-consuming effort to find cheaters and keep money flowing to its labs and agencies.

Landis did not hide from the scrutiny -- invited it, in fact -- and now has been found guilty by the closest thing to a fair trial any accused athlete will get.

He had been planning a news conference in Los Angeles the day a decision was reached. Details were not immediately available.

In its 84-page decision, the majority found the initial screening test to measure Landis' testosterone levels -- the testosterone-to-epitestosterone test -- was not done according to World Anti-Doping Agency rules.

But the more precise and expensive carbon-isotope ration analysis (IRMS), performed after a positive T-E test is recorded, was accurate, the arbitrators said, meaning "an anti-doping rule violation is established."

"As has been held in several cases, even where the T-E ratio has been held to be unreliable ... the IRMS analysis may still be applied," the majority wrote. "It has also been held that the IRMS analysis may stand alone as the basis" of a positive test for steroids.

The decision comes more than a year after Landis' stunning comeback in Stage 17 of the 2006 Tour, one that many people said could not be done without some kind of outside help.

Flying to the lead near the start of a grueling Alpine stage, Landis regained nearly eight minutes against the leader, and went on to win the three-week race.

"Well, all I can say is that justice has been done, and that this is what the UCI felt was correct all along," Pat McQuaid, leader of cycling's world governing body, told The Associated Press by telephone.

"We now await and see if he does appeal to CAS.

"It's not a great surprise considering how events have evolved. He got a highly qualified legal team who tried to baffle everybody with science and public relations. And in the end the facts stood up."

Landis insisted on a public hearing not only to prove his innocence, but to shine a spotlight on USADA and the rules it enforces and also establish a pattern of incompetence at the French lab where his urine was tested.

Although the panel rejected Landis' argument of a "conspiracy" at the Chatenay-Malabry lab, it did find areas of concern.

They dealt with chain of command in controlling the urine sample, the way the tests were run on the machine, the way the machine was prepared and the "forensic corrections" done on the lab paperwork.

"... the Panel finds that the practises of the Lab in training its employees appears to lack the vigor the Panel would expect in the circumstances given the enormous consequences to athletes" of an adverse analytical finding, the decision said.

The majority repeatedly wrote that any mistakes made at the lab were not enough to dismiss the positive test, but also sent a warning.

"If such practises continue, it may well be that in the future, an error like this could result in the dismissal" of a positive finding by the lab.

In Campbell's opinion, Landis' case should have been one of those cases.

"In many instances, Mr. Landis sustained his burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt," Campbell wrote. "The documents supplied by LNDD are so filled with errors that they do not support an Adverse Analytical Finding. Mr. Landis should be found innocent."

And in at least one respect, Landis, who spent an estimated $2 million on his defense, was exonerated because the panel dismissed the T-E test. But in the arbitration process, a procedural flaw in the first test does not negate a positive result in follow-up tests.

"An arbitration panel is entitled to rely entirely on the IRMS analysis as an independent and sufficient basis for finding that an anti-doping rule violation has occurred," the decision said.

In his dissent, Campbell latched onto the T-E ratio test, among other things, as proof that the French lab couldn't be trusted.

"Also, the T-E ratio test is acknowledged as a simple test to run. The IRMS test is universally acknowledged as a very complicated test to run, requiring much skill. If the LNDD couldn't get the T-E ratio test right, how can a person have any confidence that LNDD got the much more complicated IRMS test correct?"

It was confusion like this that led to the system receiving the harsh review Landis was hoping for during a nine-day hearing in Malibu in May.

But Landis also took his share of abuse, and ultimately, USADA still improved to 35-0 in cases it has brought before arbitration panels since it was founded in 2000.

This was a nasty contest waged on both sides, with USADA attorneys going after Landis' character and taking liberties in evidence discovery that would not be permitted in a regular court of law.

Landis accused USADA of using a win-at-all-costs strategy and prosecuting him only to get him to turn on seven-time winner Lance Armstrong, who has long fought doping allegations that have never been proven.

Addressing "problematic behavior on the part of both parties," the panel wrote it would not revisit the conduct of either side.

"They are just part of the litigation war games the parties counsel engaged in between themselves," the decision said.

cnn (http://www.cnn.com/2007/SPORT/09/20/cycling.landis.ap/)

woosey
Sep 20th, 2007, 07:37 PM
shocking.

TheBoiledEgg
Sep 20th, 2007, 08:00 PM
wow, shocking not :tape:

everyone knew this last yr

Scotso
Sep 20th, 2007, 08:12 PM
What a dick.

LoveFifteen
Sep 20th, 2007, 08:16 PM
I can't believe he spent $2 million of his own money when it was obvious that he had doped. :tape:

He's should've admitted his guilt, writte a tell-all confessional, and cried on Oprah's couch. He probably would've earned $2 million doing that! :lol:

*JR*
Sep 20th, 2007, 09:39 PM
I don't think the CAS has ever ovaturned a guilty verdict for doping, as Sesil could tell Floyd.

gentenaire
Sep 20th, 2007, 10:15 PM
I don't think the CAS has ever ovaturned a guilty verdict for doping, as Sesil could tell Floyd.

I guess they didn't believe Floyd either when he said he'd been pregnant.

woosey
Sep 20th, 2007, 10:43 PM
wow, shocking not :tape:

everyone knew this last yr

don't get sarcasm i see.

ico4498
Sep 20th, 2007, 10:57 PM
when caught doping your m.o. must be; lie, arbitrate, litigate ... then lie some more. never say die.

a few years back i remember reading that there was no definitive test for synthetic hormones, they just look for elevated levels.

Scotso
Sep 21st, 2007, 03:36 AM
I can't believe he spent $2 million of his own money when it was obvious that he had doped. :tape:

He's should've admitted his guilt, writte a tell-all confessional, and cried on Oprah's couch. He probably would've earned $2 million doing that! :lol:

Where the hell did he get that much money?

homogenius
Sep 21st, 2007, 04:25 AM
Blaireau.He should've ask some advices to Armstrong before doing all this.At least, Lance was professionnal enough to never get caught.

mandy7
Sep 21st, 2007, 07:51 AM
I can't believe he spent $2 million of his own money when it was obvious that he had doped. :tape:

He's should've admitted his guilt, writte a tell-all confessional, and cried on Oprah's couch. He probably would've earned $2 million doing that! :lol:

he actually didn't just spend his own money, he also spend the money of some of his team mates at the time, the team gave him some money in advance, that was supposed to go to the teammates, but he never gave the money back and now the team doesn't excist anymore, so those other riders have no place to go and ask for the money they've earned
it's about 80.000,- for some of those riders

jrm
Sep 21st, 2007, 09:15 AM
Hallelujah ... it took them forever!!!

It was obvious ... he lost 9 or 10 minutes on mountain stage and then the next day won time trail with minute ahead of everyone. You don't have to be a genius to figure that one out!

mandy7
Sep 21st, 2007, 09:19 AM
Hallelujah ... it took them forever!!!

It was obvious ... he lost 9 or 10 minutes on mountain stage and then the next day won time trail with minute ahead of everyone. You don't have to be a genius to figure that one out!

actually, he lost 8 minutes in a mountain stage
then in another mountain stage, he won that back
and in the final time trial he finished 3rd...

Princeza
Sep 21st, 2007, 09:48 AM
Finally

Super_Marion
Sep 22nd, 2007, 06:28 PM
I lost interest in cycling 10 years ago. The widespread use of performing enhancing drugs just rendered it meaningless as a competitive sport.

It also casts a shadow over the likes of Miguel Indurain and my own favorite Greg Lemond. Sad to say that, it casts suspicion over the achievements of everyone in the sport.

Btw, it's plausible for someone to lose 10 minutes on the mountains then win a time trial.

*stopped at SIDI Genius II.. Are we up to SG XV now?*

gentenaire
Sep 22nd, 2007, 09:50 PM
I lost interest in cycling 10 years ago. The widespread use of performing enhancing drugs just rendered it meaningless as a competitive sport.

Unfortunately, it's widespread in other sports as well, but they keep a lid on it. So in a way, it's worse in other sports because they can't be bothered to check.

Did you know Zinedine Zidane would go to Switzerland for 'new blood'? It was mentioned in passing. Had he been a cyclist, he would have been banned, it would have been world news and people would have gone on about how bad cycling is. In football, they prefer to ignore it, pretend that there's no doping problem. A lot of the cyclists who got caught recently got caught by tests that aren't done in other sports to begin with.

The whole Fuentes case involved lots of athletes, football players, even tennis players, but only the cyclists were named because the cycling union insisted on it.

ico4498
Sep 22nd, 2007, 11:17 PM
Unfortunately, it's widespread in other sports as well, but they keep a lid on it. So in a way, it's worse in other sports because they can't be bothered to check.

on the penny.

tennis, for example, had one of the most relaxed approaches to doping in sports (outside of baseball). their athletes seem, relatively, unscathed by doping. in large part because they turned a blind eye to even the possibility of performance enhancers. for tennis authorities, doping is a p.r. issue. a lax approach to drugs maintains their pristine illusion.

as long as individual sporting agencies are left with the charge to expose the ugly underbelly of a business interest thats both proprietary & profitable ... nothing is certain. much easier to ignore and deny.

Super_Marion
Sep 23rd, 2007, 12:42 PM
Unfortunately, it's widespread in other sports as well, but they keep a lid on it. So in a way, it's worse in other sports because they can't be bothered to check.

Did you know Zinedine Zidane would go to Switzerland for 'new blood'? It was mentioned in passing. Had he been a cyclist, he would have been banned, it would have been world news and people would have gone on about how bad cycling is. In football, they prefer to ignore it, pretend that there's no doping problem. A lot of the cyclists who got caught recently got caught by tests that aren't done in other sports to begin with.

The whole Fuentes case involved lots of athletes, football players, even tennis players, but only the cyclists were named because the cycling union insisted on it.

I fear you are right.

When Asafa Powell set that 9.74 world record the other week, the first thought that came to mind is that it must be drugs. Not simply because of the unbelievable time. But because he lost easily to Tyson Gay at the World Champs just 2 weeks before. The 2nd time he has 'underperformed' at a major championship.

What is the solution? No regulation... just let sports people take drugs, some will die of heart attacks others will be herculean heros, is that the way?

Or stricter penalties, tighter regulation, more testing, one strike and your out, miss even one test and your automaticly banned for life, is that the way?

Super_Marion
Sep 23rd, 2007, 12:45 PM
Gentenaire.. luv your avatar :lol: :lol: :lol: