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View Full Version : The case of the Jena Six...Show your outrage on Sept 20th


Cam'ron Giles
Sep 13th, 2007, 06:57 PM
Here's some background. Wear all black on Sept 20th to show your support for these young men...

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Six black students at Jena High School in Central Louisiana were arrested last December after a school fight in which a white student was beaten and suffered a concussion and multiple bruises. The six black students were charged with attempted murder and conspiracy. They face up to 100 years in prison without parole. The fight took place amid mounting racial tension after a black student sat under a tree in the schoolyard where only white students sat. The next day three nooses were hanging from the tree.
Jena is a small town nestled deep in the heart of Central Louisiana. Until recently, you may well have never heard of it. But this rural town of less than 4,000 people has become a focal point in the debate around issues of race and justice in this country.

Last December, six black students at Jena High School were arrested after a school fight in which a white student was beaten and suffered a concussion and multiple bruises. The six black students were charged with attempted second-degree murder and conspiracy. They face up to 100 years in prison without parole. The Jena Six, as they have come to be known, range in age from 15 to 17 years old.
Just over a week ago, an all-white jury took less than two days to convict 17 year-old Mychal Bell, the first of the Jena Six to go on trial. He was convicted of aggravated battery and conspiracy charges and now faces up to 22 years in prison.
Black residents say that race has always been an issue in Jena, which is 85 percent white, and that the charges against the Jena Six are no exception.
The origins of the story can be traced back to early September when a black high school student requested permission to sit under a tree in the schoolyard where usually only white students sat. The next day three nooses were found hanging from the tree.
Democracy Now! correspondent Jacquie Soohen has more on the story from Jena.

Report on the Jena Six by Jacquie Soohen, from an upcoming feature documentary by Big Noise Films (http://www.bignoisefilms.com/).
Jena 6 Defense Committee
PO BOX 2798
Jena, LA 71342 RUSH TRANSCRIPT
[I]This transcript is available free of charge. However, donations help us provide closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing on our TV broadcast. Thank you for your generous contribution.
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AMY GOODMAN: Jena is a small town nestled deep in the heart of Central Louisiana. Until recently, you may well never have heard of it. But this rural town of less than 4,000 has become a focal point in the debate around issues of race and justice in this country.
Last December, six black students at Jena High School were arrested after a school fight in which a white student was beaten and suffered a concussion and multiple bruises. The six black students were charged with attempted second-degree murder and conspiracy. They face up to 100 years in prison without parole.
The Jena 6, as they have come to be known, range in age from fifteen to seventeen. Just over a week ago, an all-white jury took less than two days to convict seventeen-year-old Mychal Bell, the first of the Jena 6 to go on trial. He was convicted of aggravated battery and conspiracy charges and now faces up to twenty-two years in prison. Black residents say race has always been an issue in Jena, which is 85% white and that the charges against the Jena 6 are no exception.
The origins of the story can be traced back to early September, when a black high school student requested permission to sit under a tree in the schoolyard, where usually only white students sat. The next day, three nooses were found hanging from the tree.
Democracy Now! correspondent Jacquie Soohen has more on the story from Jena.
JESSE BEARD: Black girls over there, black boys right here. Some black people standing right -- a couple. All the band geeks right there. White folks under the tree. And then you might -- it’s like…
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Jesse Beard, a freshman in high school and one of Jena 6, took us to where the nooses were hung.
JESSE BEARD: One day, I just wanted to -- maybe the first, second day, we started riding the bus, me and Robert. And we came through, and I seen something hanging there. I told Robert. He looked at it. He’s like, “Them nooses right there.” He was getting mad. Everybody was getting -- I started getting mad. By the time everybody came, they was trying to cut them down.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Robert Bailey, seventeen years old and a safety receiver for the school football team, is another of the Jena 6 facing life behind bars. He described his reaction to the nooses.
ROBERT BAILEY: It was in the early morning. I seen them hanging. I’m thinking the KKK, you know, were hanging nooses. They want to hang somebody. Real nooses, the ones you see on TV are the kind of nooses they were, the ones they play in the movies and they were hanging all the people, you know, and the thing dropped, those were the kind of nooses they were. I know it was somebody white that hung the nooses in the tree. You know, I don’t know another way to put it, but, you know, I was disappointed, because, you know, we do little pranks -- you know, toilet paper, that’s a prank, you know what I’m saying? Paper all over the square, all the pranks they used to do, that’s pranks. Nooses hanging there -- nooses ain't no prank.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: The school’s superintendent dismissed the nooses as a prank, and after three days’ suspension, the three white students who hung the nooses were allowed back to school. Caseptla Bailey, Robert's mother, said the school did not inform the parents of the incident.
CASEPTLA BAILEY: The school didn’t tell me. I didn’t know that it happened, so therefore I didn’t call to find out what happened on that particular day.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: To Caseptla Bailey, the meaning of the nooses was clear.
CASEPTLA BAILEY: It meant hatred, to the other race. It meant that “We’re going to kill you, you're going to die.” You know, it sent a message: “This is not the place for you to sit. This is not your damn tree. Do not sit here. You know, you ought to remain in your place, know your place and stay in your place. You’re out of your boundaries.” And the first thing now that the sheriff department or that the chief of police want to say that -- as well as the superintendent -- one had nothing to do with the other. Now, come on now!
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Most people we spoke to in Jena’s white community, however, see no connection between the students’ charges and race. Barbara Murphy, the town librarian, claims there isn’t a race problem in Jena.
BARBARA MURPHY: We don’t have a race problem. It’s not black against white. It’s crime. The nooses? I don’t even know why they were there, what they were supposed to mean. There’s pranks all the time, of one type or another, going on. And it just didn’t seem to be racist to me.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: A few days after the nooses were hung, the entire black student body staged an impromptu demonstration, crowding underneath the tree during lunch hour. Justin Purvis, the student who first asked to sit underneath the tree, described how the protest came about.
JUSTIN PURVIS: It was like, the first beginning, in the courtyard, they said, “Y’all want to go stand under the tree?” We said, “Yeah.” They said, “If you go, I’ll go. If you go, I’ll go.” One person went, the next person went, everybody else just went.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: The school responded to the protest by calling police and the district attorney. At an assembly the same day, the District Attorney Reed Walters, accompanied by armed policeman, addressed the students. Substitute teacher Michelle Rogers, one of the few black teachers at the school, was there. She recalls the DA's words to the assembled high schoolers.
MICHELLE ROGERS: The kids didn't say anything. They were listening. The kids were quiet. And so, District Attorney Reed Walters, you know, proceeded to tell those kids that “I could end your lives with the stroke of a pen.” And the kids were just -- it was like in awe that the district -- you know, Reed Walters would tell these kids that. He held a pen in his hand and told those kids that, “See this pen in my hand? I can end your lives with the stroke of a pen.”
JACQUIE SOOHEN: A series of incidents followed throughout the fall. In October, a black student was beaten for entering a private all-white party. Later that month, a white student pulled a gun on a group of black students at a gas station, claiming self-defense. The black students wrestled the gun away and reported the incident to police. They were charged with assault and robbery of the gun. No charges were ever filed against the white students in either incident. Then, in late November, someone tried to burn down the high school, creating even more tension.
Four days later, a white student was allegedly attacked in a school fight. The victim was taken to hospital and released shortly with a concussion. He attended a school function that evening. Six black students were charged with attempted second-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder, on charges that leave them facing between twenty and one hundred years in jail. The defendants, ranging in age from fifteen to seventeen, had their bonds set at between $70,000 and $138,000. The attack was written up in the local paper as fact, and DA Reed Walters published a statement in which he said, "When you are convicted, I will seek the maximum penalty allowed by law."
MINISTER: We have come today to stand against what we consider to be a great evil.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Since their arrest, the defendants’ families have been speaking out and fighting for the release of their sons. Two of the six, including Mychal Bell, who was recently convicted, were unable to make bond and have spent close to seven months in jail to date.
CASEPTLA BAILEY: No justice!
PROTESTERS: No peace!
CASEPTLA BAILEY: No justice!
PROTESTERS: No peace!
CASEPTLA BAILEY: No justice!
PROTESTERS: No peace!
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Caseptla Bailey began writing letters to state and national agencies, including the Department of Justice, immediately after the charges were filed.
CASEPTLA BAILEY: The first thing was devastation. You know, I was down when it first happened. You know, I was very devastated. I was hurt, upset, angry, mad, frustrated. You know, I had so many emotions, crying a lot of nights, you know, trying to figure out where can I go from here. You know, a lot of times when you're backed into a corner or you’re backed into a wall, naturally you're going to come out fighting. You know, you're not going to -- you’re either going to fall and die, or you're going to come out fighting.
You know, I’m just sending out these letters to anyone that would have a listening ear and to anyone that, you know, I thought that might help the situation. That's how I fight back, you know, by putting the pen to the paper.
They want to take these kids -- my son, as well as all these other children -- lock them up, throw away the key. You know, that's a tradition for black males. So they want to keep that tradition going, because they want to keep institutionalized slavery alive and well.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: At a friendly pickup game of football, Caseptla’s son Robert shows off the skills that made him a star player of the high school football team. Robert was in jail for over two months before his mother was able to raise the money for her son's bond using three pieces of property from different family members. Seventeen-year-old Robert Bailey has no criminal record.
ROBERT BAILEY: I ain’t got no criminal record, nothing. I ain’t got no probation, community service or nothing, nothing like that. The DA, he ain’t after finding the truth. That’s what a DA’s for, to after find the truth, you know, of the case. He’s just, you know, trying to put me up in a jail cell, for life. Fifty years, twenty-five to a hundred years, you can just say “forever.” Twenty years is forever, to me.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Robert wasn’t the only one with a promising future. All of the Jena 6 were athletes, and five of the six were on the high school football team. Marcus Jones, the father of seventeen-year-old Mychal Bell, has a stack of scholarship offers for his son.
MARCUS JONES: LSU, Southern Miss, Ol’ Miss, University of New York…
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Mychal is a star running back and a strong student who is being actively scouted by a number of colleges.
MARCUS JONES: We're not blaming the victim for the charges or none of that. The DA is a racist DA. You know, I’m not calling him out for being a racist. I’m calling him out as being a racist due to his track record. The reason we is taking a stand for our kids for what he’s not doing is right, ’cause, you know, we’re tired of it, you know, ’cause if we, you know, we sat down and lay back and let him railroad our kids, too, he’s going to continue to do that to black people in this town. You know, so we have to take a stand now. Somebody has to take a stand now. If not, he’s going to continue to fill the prisons up with black people more and more.
JACQUIE SOOHEN: Mr. Bell believes that his son is learning a valuable lesson from this experience.
MARCUS JONES: One of the best lessons that my son could learn that’s one of the best lessons: to know what it is to be black now. You know, if this don’t teach him what it is to be black now, I don’t know what will. But he’s seventeen now. You know, he’s got a lot of life left ahead of him. And the day he set foot out of jail, I’m going to tell him, I’m going to tell him again, “You know what it is to be black now. Here it is.” JACQUIE SOOHEN: For Democracy Now!, this is Jacquie Soohen, reporting from Jena, Louisiana.
AMY GOODMAN: That piece is from an upcoming feature documentary by Big Noise Films. Mychal Bell faces up to twenty-two years in prison when he’s sentenced July 31st. The five other students await trial on charges of attempted second-degree murder and conspiracy. They face up to 100 years in jail. When we come back from break, we’ll be joined by parents of three of the Jena 6, as well as the journalist who broke the story nationally.

Cam'ron Giles
Sep 13th, 2007, 07:05 PM
The "white tree"

At Jena High School (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_High_School), students of different races customarily seldom sat together. Black students traditionally sat on bleachers near the auditorium, while white students sat under a large shade tree, referred to as the "white tree," in the center of the school courtyard.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR)
During a school assembly on August 31 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_31), 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006), a black male freshman student asked permission from the principal to sit in the shade of the "white tree."[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-stealth) According to the recounting of events given by U.S. Attorney Donald Washington, the question was posed in a "jocular (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jocular) fashion."[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup) The principal told the students they could "sit wherever they wanted."[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-stealth)
The following morning, three nooses were discovered hanging from the tree. Anthony Jackson, one of two black teachers at the high school, recalled, "I jokingly said to another teacher, 'One's for you, one's for me. Who's the other one for?'" Jena's principal learned that three white students were responsible and recommended expulsion (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expulsion_%28academia%29). The board of education (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Board_of_education) overruled his recommendation, to which Superintendent Roy Breithaupt agreed. The punishment was reduced to three days of in-school suspension.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR)[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-wapo) The school superintendent was quoted as saying, "Adolescents play pranks. I don't think it was a threat against anybody."[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-0) Black residents of Jena claim that this decision stoked racial tensions that led to subsequent events.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-wapo) The school district and parents who were aware of the incident did not report it to the police or any legal authority, though such incidents may be prosecuted as federal hate crimes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hate_crime) by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Bureau_of_Investigation).[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup)

District Attorney Reed Walters and the "pen statement"

Accounts differ as to what happened afterward. According to some accounts, on September 5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_5), 2006, a number of black students organized a peaceful sit-in under the white tree in response to the commuted punishment of the perpetrators. The protest was then dispersed by police.[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-1)[7] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-2) U.S. Attorney Washington, speaking in July 2007, stated he could find no confirmation of this protest occurring. He could confirm that police were called to the school several times in the days after the noose incident in response to a rash of interracial fights between students.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup)
The principal called an impromptu assembly on September 6 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_6), in which students segregated themselves into white and black sections. The Jena Police Department asked LaSalle Parish District Attorney Reed Walters to attend and speak at the assembly. Walters was unhappy with the request because he was busy preparing for a case and, upon arrival, felt that the students were not paying proper attention to him.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup) Walters is alleged to have threatened the protesters if they didn't stop fussing over an "innocent prank" and to have stated, "See this pen? I can end your lives with the stroke of a pen." Black students state that Walters looked specifically at members of the black audience as he said this. Walters and school board member Billy Fowler, also present, deny that the comments were specifically directed at black students.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR) Nevertheless, police began patrolling the halls of Jena High on September 7, and the school was declared to be in total lockdown the day after.[8] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-3)
On September 10 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_10), several dozen black students attempted to address the school board concerning the recent events but were refused because the board was of the opinion that "the noose issue" had been adequately resolved.[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-4) Racial tensions and fights continued through the fall but were held in check by the ongoing football season. The high school team was doing unusually well, in large part due to efforts of several star black players, and students were unwilling to do anything to upset the season.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR)

Events prior to the Jena Six assault

On November 30 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_30), 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006), the main building of the high school was set on fire. The building was gutted and had to be later demolished. Blacks and whites accused each other of the arson.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR)[10] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-5)
On Friday, December 1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_1), there was a private party, attended mostly by whites, at the Fair Barn. Five black youths, including 16-year-old Robert Bailey, attempted to enter the party at about 11pm. According to U.S. Attorney Washington, they were told by a woman that they were not allowed inside without an invitation. The five youths persisted, stating that some friends were already in attendance at the party. A white man, who was not a student,[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup) then jumped in front of the woman and instigated a fight. After the fight was broken up, the woman told both the white man and five black youths to leave the party. Once outside, the black students were involved in another fight with a group of white men, who also were not students.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup) Police were then called to investigate. Several months later, Justin Sloan, a white male, was charged with simple battery (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Simple_battery&action=edit) for his role in the fight and was put on probation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Probation). Bailey later stated that one of the white men had broken a beer bottle over his head,[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-wapo) but there are no records of medical treatment being given.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup)
The following day, an incident apparently stemming from this fight occurred at a local convenience store. A student who had attended the party encountered Bailey and several friends. An argument ensued, after which the white student ran to his pickup truck (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickup_truck) and produced a pistol-grip shotgun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shotgun). Bailey ran after the white student and wrestled him for control of the gun. Bailey's friends intervened in the scuffle and took the gun away. Bailey refused to return it and ultimately took it home with him. Local police reported that the accounts of the white student and black students contradicted each other and formed a report based on testimony taken from eyewitnesses. This resulted in Bailey being charged with three counts: theft of a firearm, second-degree robbery and disturbing the peace. The white student who had produced the weapon was not charged.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR)[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup)

Jena Six assault

The following Monday, December 4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_4), a white student named Justin Barker, aged 17, loudly discussed - "bragged," as characterized by National Public Radio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Public_Radio) - how Bailey had been beaten up by a white man that Friday night.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR) When Barker walked out of the school gymnasium into the courtyard later that day, he was assaulted by Bailey and five other black students, and was temporarily knocked unconscious. The concussion he suffered has been described in the media as resulting either from a punch to the face or from hitting his head on concrete when thrown to the ground. While on the ground, Barker was kicked repeatedly. Barker was examined by a doctor at the local hospital.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-stealth)[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-NPR) After two hours of treatment and observation for his concussion and an eye that had swollen shut, Barker was discharged in time to go to the school Ring Ceremony that evening.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-wapo) In the meantime the six black students, eventually dubbed the "Jena Six"[11] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-6), were arrested.

Trial, prosecution, and legal proceedings

The six students - Robert Bailey Jr., Mychal Bell, Carwin Jones, Bryant Purvis, Theo Shaw, and an unidentified minor[12] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-7) - were initially charged with aggravated assault (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assault). However, District Attorney Walters increased the charges to attempted second-degree murder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attempted_murder), provoking protests from black residents that the charges, which could result in the defendants being imprisoned past age 50, were disproportional to the crime.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-wapo)
On June 26 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_26), 2007 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007), the first day of trial for defendant Mychal Bell (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mychal_Bell&action=edit), Walters agreed to reduce the charges for Bell to aggravated second-degree battery and conspiracy to commit aggravated second-degree battery.[13] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-8) A charge of aggravated battery requires the use of a "deadly weapon". Walters thus argued that the tennis shoes that Bell was wearing and used to kick Barker were deadly weapons, an argument with which the all-white jury agreed. Despite conflicting witness accounts on whether he was even involved in the attack[14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-tribune), Bell was found guilty and will face the possibility of up to 22 years in prison when he is sentenced on September 20 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_20), 2007 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007).
In late July, U.S. Attorney Donald Washington (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Donald_Washington&action=edit) noted the lack of connection between the noose incident and the beating at Jena High school, noting that the more than 40 statements all failed to mention the noose incident.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-clearup)
The case is currently in dispute as the court-appointed public defender (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_defender) did not call a single witness in his attempt to defend Bell.[14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-tribune) Bell's new defense attorneys, Louis Scott and Carol Powell-Lexing, requested that a new trial be held on the grounds that Bell should not have been tried as an adult and that the trial should have been held in another parish.[15] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-9) On September 4, 2007, a judge dismissed the conspiracy charge but let the battery conviction stand, though he agreed that Bell should have been tried as a juvenile.[16] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-10)
On September 4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_4), 2007, Carwin Jones and Theo Shaw also had their charges reduced to aggravated second-degree battery and conspiracy,[17] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-11) as did Robert Bailey Jr. on September 10.[18] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-12)

Bell's criminal history

Mychal Bell's juvenile record was recently released, revealing that he had been previously convicted of four other crimes. Bell was put on probation for a battery that occurred December 25, 2005, and he was later convicted of yet another battery charge and two charges of criminal damage to property.[19] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-13)

Public outcry

In the wake of these events, numerous groups in support of the "Jena Six" and against the way the cases were and are being handled have appeared on social networking site Facebook (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook),[20] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-14) as well as an online petition circulating boasting over 243,254 signatures as of September 13, 2007.[21] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-15)
A rally is scheduled for September 20, 2007, the day of Mychal Bell's sentencing.[22] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-16) Rapper Mos Def (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mos_Def) plans to attend.[23] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jena_Six#_note-17)

samsung101
Sep 13th, 2007, 07:22 PM
Am I missing something?

I don't see where there is a mountain of evidence these young people did not do
what they were found guilty of?

Isn't that attempted murder if you kick a person in the head - especially if they
are already on the ground in a semi-alert state from a previous attack?

I think it is.

I applaud the groups bringing the situation at the school to the national attention.
They need changes there. By law they need to change. Shame on the school for not doing
enough. Seems like they did try though, little bit.

But, that doesn't change the fact these people seemingly did violently attack, and
could have killed, one person - a white guy.

HOWEVER, the incidents prior to this attack are troubling for the school, district,
and state. Sadly, it sounds like the junk going on in LA schools between the black
and hispanic students. Who are beaten up for walking on the wrong side of the street,
or in the hallway, or talking to a girl of another color - daily. Lockdowns are common
in downtown LA. In the suburbs too. It isn't just the deep south.

But, those issues are addressed on tv and in the papers and in the school board meetings
regularly in LA.

Sadly, in this school in Louisiana, the issues were ignored beforehand. That's just lazy
and sloppy and irresponsible administrators and teachers and cops. All part of the problem
there.

BUT, it does not excuse what happened to the white guy.
That is a hate crime too.

It may have been provoked, but, it's still a crime.
6 on 1 is not a fair fight. That's not a fight really.
It's an assault with potential deadly consequences.
Hate crime?
It does go both ways.
Where are the feds in this case?
They won't touch it.

Pureracket
Sep 13th, 2007, 07:24 PM
Am I missing something?

I don't see where there is a mountain of evidence these young people did not do
what they were found guilty of?

Isn't that attempted murder if you kick a person in the head - especially if they
are already on the ground in a semi-alert state from a previous attack?

I think it is.

I applaud the groups bringing the situation at the school to the national attention.
They need changes there. By law they need to change. Shame on the school for not doing
enough. Seems like they did try though, little bit.

But, that doesn't change the fact these people seemingly did violently attack, and
could have killed, one person - a white guy.

HOWEVER, the incidents prior to this attack are troubling for the school, district,
and state. Sadly, it sounds like the junk going on in LA schools between the black
and hispanic students. Who are beaten up for walking on the wrong side of the street,
or in the hallway, or talking to a girl of another color - daily. Lockdowns are common
in downtown LA. In the suburbs too. It isn't just the deep south.

But, those issues are addressed on tv and in the papers and in the school board meetings
regularly in LA.

Sadly, in this school in Louisiana, the issues were ignored beforehand. That's just lazy
and sloppy and irresponsible administrators and teachers and cops. All part of the problem
there.

BUT, it does not excuse what happened to the white guy.
That is a hate crime too.

It may have been provoked, but, it's still a crime.
6 on 1 is not a fair fight. That's not a fight really.
It's an assault with potential deadly consequences.
Hate crime?
It does go both ways.
Where are the feds in this case?
They won't touch it.I know I've missed a bit of this case, but I didn't know somebody got killed.

Cam'ron Giles
Sep 13th, 2007, 07:24 PM
So they should go to jail for 100 years? Does the punishment fit the crime? Did the school distirict not excuse the nooses hanging from the tree as teenage prank? Why am I not suprised that you would take that position?

Rtael
Sep 13th, 2007, 07:55 PM
Samsung...always irrelevant. :shrug:


This whole thing is pretty disgusting to me. First and foremost that DA should be fired and probably imprisoned.

Cam'ron Giles
Sep 13th, 2007, 08:03 PM
Samsung...always irrelevant. :shrug:


This whole thing is pretty disgusting to me. First and foremost that DA should be fired and probably imprisoned.

We agree on something...I knew you were a rational person...;)

Rtael
Sep 13th, 2007, 08:19 PM
I knew you were a rational person...;)


Only once in a blue moon.

meyerpl
Sep 14th, 2007, 04:15 AM
So they should go to jail for 100 years? Does the punishment fit the crime? Did the school distirict not excuse the nooses hanging from the tree as teenage prank? Why am I not suprised that you would take that position?
Who was sentenced to 100 years?

Wigglytuff
Sep 14th, 2007, 04:52 AM
for white kids its just a prank for black kids its 100 years in jail without parole for a SCHOOL YARD FIGHT??? and one that was provoked. to be sure the six were stupid for thinking their punishment for this would not be harsh, but there is a line between harsh and a miscarriage and if they get closer to 100 that would be a crime of its own.

Cam'ron Giles
Sep 14th, 2007, 02:13 PM
Who was sentenced to 100 years?

Who said someone was sentenced to 100 years? :rolleyes:

mykarma
Sep 14th, 2007, 03:16 PM
Am I missing something?

I don't see where there is a mountain of evidence these young people did not do
what they were found guilty of?

Isn't that attempted murder if you kick a person in the head - especially if they
are already on the ground in a semi-alert state from a previous attack?

I think it is.

I applaud the groups bringing the situation at the school to the national attention.
They need changes there. By law they need to change. Shame on the school for not doing
enough. Seems like they did try though, little bit.

But, that doesn't change the fact these people seemingly did violently attack, and
could have killed, one person - a white guy.

HOWEVER, the incidents prior to this attack are troubling for the school, district,
and state. Sadly, it sounds like the junk going on in LA schools between the black
and hispanic students. Who are beaten up for walking on the wrong side of the street,
or in the hallway, or talking to a girl of another color - daily. Lockdowns are common
in downtown LA. In the suburbs too. It isn't just the deep south.

But, those issues are addressed on tv and in the papers and in the school board meetings
regularly in LA.

Sadly, in this school in Louisiana, the issues were ignored beforehand. That's just lazy
and sloppy and irresponsible administrators and teachers and cops. All part of the problem
there.

BUT, it does not excuse what happened to the white guy.
That is a hate crime too.

It may have been provoked, but, it's still a crime.
6 on 1 is not a fair fight. That's not a fight really.
It's an assault with potential deadly consequences.
Hate crime?
It does go both ways.
Where are the feds in this case?
They won't touch it.
Why do you continue to bring up blacks and Hispanics in LA? Don't you have any white white kids you can talk about? Oh I forgot, only blacks and Hispanic kids fight. Anyhow, it has nothing to do with Jena La. where institutional racism is the norm. Yes, fighting is a crime but being charged as an adult by a racist DA is sick and for you to agree with him makes you ...

You sound like the lady that says that there are no race problems in Jena, and that the noose is just a prank. It's appalling that in 2007, black kids could cause such as uproar for sitting under a "white" tree. I find it difficult to believe that such a thing even exist, that a black child has to ask permission to sit under a tree. That because they sat under the tree, the DA and armed police were brought to the school to threaten the black kids about getting out of line. This DA told them that he could take their lives away with the stroke of a pen and that is what he did. IMO, he was using these kids as a warning to the black people in Jena to stay in their place or else.

The white kids were able to beat them up, point rifles at them and may have shot them if they hadn't taken the gun away. Then they were charged for taking the gun. These white kids hang nooses which certainly is a threat, and the black kids lives are being taken away.

Any fool should be able to tell that there is something terribly wrong in that place. This is the same type of things that was happening in this country before the civil rights law was passed. We have a black man running for president but in Jena black kids can't sit under a "white" tree and you agree with the DA. Go figure.

I blame the DA for this as he is trying to ruin these kids lives for a high school fight that wouldn't have ever happened if the school board had done their job. No one is saying that nothing should have happened to these kids for fighting. All we want is equal justice under the law. Yes, this kid was beat up but was at a social event that evening. I want the same thing to happen to these kids that happened to the white kids in Jena La.

woosey
Sep 14th, 2007, 04:42 PM
I know I've missed a bit of this case, but I didn't know somebody got killed.

you actually pay attention to him?:lol:

Cam'ron Giles
Sep 14th, 2007, 06:36 PM
you actually pay attention to him?:lol:

It's a she....(or gay cause she mentioned something about what her husband is geting shim for christmas...)

woosey
Sep 14th, 2007, 07:16 PM
It's a she....(or gay cause she mentioned something about what her husband is geting shim for christmas...)

ok. shim. that's actually a good one. when i startly working at this one place, someone told me that they didn't know how to refer to someone - very androgynenous. now i know - shim. :lol:

ptkten
Sep 14th, 2007, 09:41 PM
One of the six just had their last remaining conviction overturned by a Louisiana appeals court :D .

Mychal Bell had his aggravated battery conviction thrown out, looks like one of them is clear now at least.

Pureracket
Sep 14th, 2007, 09:42 PM
One of the six just had their last remaining conviction overturned by a Louisiana appeals court :D .

Mychal Bell had his aggravated battery conviction thrown out, looks like one of them is clear now at least.Link?

ptkten
Sep 14th, 2007, 09:43 PM
They broke in on CNN to announce it, sorry no link

Pureracket
Sep 14th, 2007, 09:44 PM
They broke in on CNN to announce it, sorry no linkOh, ok....thanks. *checks CNN*

ptkten
Sep 14th, 2007, 09:44 PM
ok, I found one

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/sns-ap-school-fight,1,1714722.story

Pureracket
Sep 14th, 2007, 09:47 PM
Thanks. Maybe this saves me a trip to Louisiana.

ico4498
Sep 14th, 2007, 10:01 PM
Thanks. Maybe this saves me a trip to Louisiana.

were they all legal juveniles?

mykarma
Sep 14th, 2007, 10:02 PM
One of the six just had their last remaining conviction overturned by a Louisiana appeals court :D .

Mychal Bell had his aggravated battery conviction thrown out, looks like one of them is clear now at least.


JENA, La. (AP) -- A state appeals court on Friday threw out the only remaining conviction against a black teenager accused in the beating of a white schoolmate that raised racial tensions in his town.

Mychal Bell, 17, should not have been tried as an adult, the court said in tossing his conviction on aggravated battery, for which he was to have been sentenced Thursday. His conspiracy conviction was already thrown out by another court.

Bell, who was 16 at the time of the beating, and four others were originally charged with attempted second-degree murder. Those charges brought widespread criticism that blacks were being treated more harshly than whites following racial altercations involving Jena High.

ico4498
Sep 14th, 2007, 10:06 PM
The Jena Six, as they have come to be known, range in age from 15 to 17 years old. is this their current age or at the time of the alleged attack?

mykarma
Sep 14th, 2007, 10:30 PM
is this their current age or at the time of the alleged attack?
I think there age was at the time of the attack.

If the community had not protested so strongly these guys lives would have been ruined and possibility would have lost 22 years of his life. Instead of having an opportunity of going to college they would have been convicted felons. Perhaps Mychal can now get those football scholarships he was offered and continue his education that he desired. One things for sure, if any of the six was my kid, they'd have to leave Jena La. I'd be very afraid for their lives.

Thank goodness for the Rev. Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, Michael Baisden, and other leaders that kept us informed since the national media reacted as they normally do with minority issues. If it had been the other way around it would have been in the news every day.

I can't wait to see pictures of Mychal and his family when they show him getting out of jail. :bounce::bounce::bounce: