PDA

View Full Version : If the WTA decides to have a 5th Grand Slam tournament...


ZeroSOFInfinity
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:43 AM
... which country would it be held? What surface would it be played on? When would it be held? And what tournament would it be called?

polishprodigy
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:44 AM
Canada. Hard.

But knowin the WTA, they would put it in either Doha, Dubai or Abu Dhabi.

Uranium
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:45 AM
Year Ending Championships-changes places,but stays to indoor hard
or Miami

Bruno71
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:52 AM
Moscow or Berlin in March/April...indoor.

heytennis
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:52 AM
I would never want a 5th Grand Slam. But if the WTA was stupid enough to make one, they would probably put it in new "emerging" markets like China or the Middle East. I don't really know where I would like it to go though, maybe South America? In Buenos Aires or Rio or something? In South America, clay is the most common obviously but I would want it to be outdoor hard. Could be called the Amazon Cup or something equally cheesy. On second thought, another place it could go is Russia. Indoor hard in St. Petersburg sounds cool.

edit: It could be held a few weeks after the USO like how Wimbledon is a few weeks after RG.

Corswandt
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:55 AM
The Cajˇ's Spit and Scratch Kegger's Open

Held in my backyard.

Surface: shit.

Contestants: Nadal and Hingis.

GrandSlam05
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:07 AM
Indoors. I love the fast indoor courts! It would be nice to see since the grass and outdoor hard seem to get slower and slower every year. :( And they should put it in California.

Prizeidiot
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:10 AM
The Grand Slams are separate from the tours aren't they? So it would be the ITF making a new slam.

I doubt it would ever happen, but if it were, I'd imagine it would be in Asia somewhere, probably China.

Andrew Laeddis
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:13 AM
Russia
surface:some surface made of sand or wood

Brooklyn90
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:16 AM
Russia
Indoor/Hard
Russian Open :lol:

Bruno71
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:22 AM
How about Russia in January on clay? They'll douse it with vodka to keep it wet.

SoSo_SRB
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:33 AM
Place:Serbia
indoors, swimming pool, ceramic tiles
name: Kosovo open

goldenslam888
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:33 AM
the 5th slam is the yearend championships.

clonesheep
Jul 6th, 2007, 05:36 AM
The Olympics can be considered the 5th slam. An olympic gold medal in tennis has become quite prestigeous these days. Many players care a lot about it. The Russians, Chinese (and all Asians), most Europeans and South American all care about the Olympics. That's about everyone except for a few holdouts in America.

Judging by who won the gold (and silver) in the past, the Olympic tennis games already have a lot of credibility:

1988: Graf def. Sabatini
1992: Capriati def. Graf
1996: Davenport def. Sanchez-Vicario
2000: Venus def. Dementieva
2004: Henin def. Mauresmo

All winners and runner-ups are present and future hall of famers, except Dementieva. All except Dementieva are slam winners and all except Dementieva and Sabatini are world No. 1.

-SheLL-
Jul 6th, 2007, 06:56 AM
how about..
Place:Antarctica
Surface:Ice
Dress Code:A pair of iceskates
Rules:Normal tennis....but on iceskates
Ladies and gents i present the 5th grandslam, The Antarctic Open :lol:
yeh im a :weirdo:

ElusiveChanteuse
Jul 6th, 2007, 07:43 AM
how about..
Place:Antarctica
Surface:Ice
Dress Code:A pair of iceskates
Rules:Normal tennis....but on iceskates
Ladies and gents i present the 5th grandslam, The Antarctic Open :lol:
yeh im a :weirdo:

:lol: nice one!:yeah:

How about Egypt Open then?
We need one in Africa at least since AO is for Ocenia and Asia.
Let the players play on sand.:tape: :p

Brett.
Jul 6th, 2007, 08:10 AM
They should have a GS in Mongolia! :D

Brett.
Jul 6th, 2007, 08:13 AM
Or they should have The Safari Open
Surface: Sand
Rules: To win a match, when you get caught in quicksand and drown!

PamShriverRockz
Jul 6th, 2007, 08:24 AM
:lol:

Wimbledon this year has been played on water practically ;)

Sexysova
Jul 6th, 2007, 08:58 AM
CZECH REPUBLIC!!! HARD SURFACE!!! :) :hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

Dexter
Jul 6th, 2007, 09:11 AM
Place:Serbia
indoors, swimming pool, ceramic tiles
name: Kosovo open
:rolls: :yeah:

LucasArg
Jul 6th, 2007, 09:11 AM
In Buenos Aires, Argentina. South America needs more attenion when it comes to tournaments.

It would be on clay.

-SheLL-
Jul 6th, 2007, 09:39 AM
oh!! i have another one...
Place: the moon
Surface: the moon
Rules: normal tennis...but with the mj "moon" walk
this'll give a new meaning to "moon" balling :lol:
:rolleyes: omgihavenolife

tennisbear7
Jul 6th, 2007, 10:09 AM
how about..
Place:Antarctica
Surface:Ice
Dress Code:A pair of iceskates
Rules:Normal tennis....but on iceskates
Ladies and gents i present the 5th grandslam, The Antarctic Open :lol:
yeh im a :weirdo:

If Sharapova feels like a "cow on ice" on clay, then... :help::help:

Anyway, there won't be a "fifth grand slam" because the FO, Wimbledon, USO and AusO have so much history attach to them. The "fifth" grand slams are at the YEC and Miami, but they will never account for the prestige of the four slams.

If there was, though, it will be held in Tokyo, or Doha, or Dubai, or some other ridiculously rich area of the world, in indoor hard or carpet courts.

Vlad Tepes
Jul 6th, 2007, 10:19 AM
Or they should have The Safari Open
Surface: Sand
Rules: To win a match, when you get caught in quicksand and drown!

To win a match before you get caught in quicksand and drown would be cool, sort of like a race against time.

CORIA01
Jul 6th, 2007, 10:30 AM
In Indoors
In An Exotic Country (doha)or In Central America (buenos Aires...)

Andy T
Jul 6th, 2007, 10:53 AM
The Olympics can be considered the 5th slam. An olympic gold medal in tennis has become quite prestigeous these days. Many players care a lot about it. The Russians, Chinese (and all Asians), most Europeans and South American all care about the Olympics. That's about everyone except for a few holdouts in America.

Judging by who won the gold (and silver) in the past, the Olympic tennis games already have a lot of credibility:

1988: Graf def. Sabatini
1992: Capriati def. Graf
1996: Davenport def. Sanchez-Vicario
2000: Venus def. Dementieva
2004: Henin def. Mauresmo

All winners and runner-ups are present and future hall of famers, except Dementieva. All except Dementieva are slam winners and all except Dementieva and Sabatini are world No. 1.

I'd disagree. The Olympics is not comparable with the slams because:
1) it's not an annual event
2) it has no established "home"
3) it doesn't have the accumulated history which the four majors possess. Even though venues have changed for the US & Aussie Opens, there is still a continuity from the "pioneer" days linking the likes of Lenglen, Wills and Connolly through Court & King, Evert & Navratilova, Graf & Seles to modern times.
4) Entry/eligibilty is restricted by a variety of considerations rather than being open and based on pure merit.

That's not to say thaty it doesn't have a special and unique place, mind you ( though personally I feel it would be more appropriate to hold it as a mixed team event.

I agree with the poster who said that there should never be a 5th slam. Adding a new one would be like deforming a beautiful old castle by building an ugly glass structure onto it.

Stavie
Jul 6th, 2007, 10:55 AM
Greece, hardcourt.

its sunny here!!Helooooo!! :p

Nemesis
Jul 6th, 2007, 11:11 AM
It should definately be on a continent where there are no GS yet ...
so Asia, Latin America or Africa.
and because Asia has most promising players & the best market, I think it should be in Asia.
countries that come in mind are India, China & Japan. China already has the forced Tier I in 2009, so maybe turn that one in a GS ...
surface: OR indoor carpet or hard OR indoor grass (to comensate the short grass season).
time of the year: between AO & RG or between USO & YEC

supergrunt
Jul 6th, 2007, 12:01 PM
Serbia,Russia,or China (this one would be outdoors) in an indoor carpet court :bounce: !

supergrunt
Jul 6th, 2007, 12:05 PM
I'd disagree. The Olympics is not comparable with the slams because:
1) it's not an annual event
2) it has no established "home"
3) it doesn't have the accumulated history which the four majors possess. Even though venues have changed for the US & Aussie Opens, there is still a continuity from the "pioneer" days linking the likes of Lenglen, Wills and Connolly through Court & King, Evert & Navratilova, Graf & Seles to modern times.
4) Entry/eligibilty is restricted by a variety of considerations rather than being open and based on pure merit.

That's not to say thaty it doesn't have a special and unique place, mind you ( though personally I feel it would be more appropriate to hold it as a mixed team event.

I agree with the poster who said that there should never be a 5th slam. Adding a new one would be like deforming a beautiful old castle by building an ugly glass structure onto it.

What are the criteria for qualifying for the Olympics?

Serval
Jul 6th, 2007, 12:21 PM
It should be held in Brazil! :banana:

Andy T
Jul 6th, 2007, 02:43 PM
What are the criteria for qualifying for the Olympics?

Eligibility is limited in three ways:
You have to have represented your country in Fed Cup (or Davis Cup) in two of the four (I think) previous years (one must be in the year of the Olympics or the one before) to be able to represent your country at the Olympics. This explains why certain top players suddenly become availbale for Fed Cup play after years of not participating. You could be #1 in the world but if you haven't played fed Cup for the last two years, you're not eligible for the Olympics.

There is a fixed number of nominations per country and per event. You can be ranked top 15 in the world but if you're only the 4th ranked Russian/American/etc, you may not get selected if the number of singles players from your country is set at 3. For example, in the 2002 Olympics, Serena, Venus, Lindsay, JCap and Monica were all top 10 players but only three could play singles at the Olympics. In 2008, several Russians from the following group Maria Sharapova, Sveta K, Nadia Petrova, Dinara Safina, Elena Dementieva and Anna Chakvetadze, all of whom would be seeded in a major, will not be able to play singles at the Olympics. This doesn't just affect the big countries. If your country only has the right to send one player and you are #2, tough, even if you're in the world's top 40.

If you are a "stateless" person ( i;e. an exile from your home country but not a naturalised citizen of another), you are ineligible to compete in the Olympics. No refugee or asylum seeker who has no citizenship has the right to play... For example, Martina Navratilova would not have been able to play the Olympics in 76 or 80 if tennis had been part of the games then.

Also, if you are not in good standing with your federation (e;g. Reza´ in France), there's a strong chance that you will not be selected.

rockstar
Jul 6th, 2007, 02:46 PM
in moscow or china probably.

indoors carpet/hard

.:sk:.
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:37 PM
Berlin

Indoors in the O2 Arena on hardcourt
http://www.worldstadiums.com/stadium_menu/past_future/pictures/future_stadiums/berlin_o2_arena1.jpg
http://www.worldstadiums.com/stadium_menu/past_future/pictures/future_stadiums/berlin_o2_arena2.jpg

SV_Fan
Jul 6th, 2007, 03:48 PM
I think the YEC is like a Grand Slam.

Also what about the olympics that's like a grand slam.

So we have 6 slams in my opinion.

AnnaK_4ever
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:21 PM
Eligibility is limited in three ways:
You have to have represented your country in Fed Cup (or Davis Cup) in two of the four (I think) previous years (one must be in the year of the Olympics or the one before) to be able to represent your country at the Olympics. This explains why certain top players suddenly become availbale for Fed Cup play after years of not participating. You could be #1 in the world but if you haven't played fed Cup for the last two years, you're not eligible for the Olympics.
You don't have to PLAY Fed Cup but only "make youself available for choice".

For example, in the 2002 Olympics, Serena, Venus, Lindsay, JCap and Monica were all top 10 players but only three could play singles at the Olympics.
Indeed, it would be hard to imagine all of them playing at Salt Lake City Olympics. :lol:

We have Graf, Capriati, Davenport, Venus and Henin as Olympic champions. All of them are top class players. No flukes, no "one hit wonders". So far only the very best players have been winning Olympics gold.
Also the quality of Olympics tournament has been improving. In 2004 we had No.1 Henin, No.2 Mauresmo, No.3 Myskina in the semifinals and both SF matches were very tense battles.

Mark Spruce
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:45 PM
Antartica and ice !!!

#1SteffiGraf#1
Jul 6th, 2007, 04:56 PM
place: United States, Los Angeles

surface: Indoor or Hardcourt

time: December...move Ausy to March

supergrunt
Jul 6th, 2007, 05:07 PM
Eligibility is limited in three ways:
You have to have represented your country in Fed Cup (or Davis Cup) in two of the four (I think) previous years (one must be in the year of the Olympics or the one before) to be able to represent your country at the Olympics. This explains why certain top players suddenly become availbale for Fed Cup play after years of not participating. You could be #1 in the world but if you haven't played fed Cup for the last two years, you're not eligible for the Olympics.

There is a fixed number of nominations per country and per event. You can be ranked top 15 in the world but if you're only the 4th ranked Russian/American/etc, you may not get selected if the number of singles players from your country is set at 3. For example, in the 2002 Olympics, Serena, Venus, Lindsay, JCap and Monica were all top 10 players but only three could play singles at the Olympics. In 2008, several Russians from the following group Maria Sharapova, Sveta K, Nadia Petrova, Dinara Safina, Elena Dementieva and Anna Chakvetadze, all of whom would be seeded in a major, will not be able to play singles at the Olympics. This doesn't just affect the big countries. If your country only has the right to send one player and you are #2, tough, even if you're in the world's top 40.

If you are a "stateless" person ( i;e. an exile from your home country but not a naturalised citizen of another), you are ineligible to compete in the Olympics. No refugee or asylum seeker who has no citizenship has the right to play... For example, Martina Navratilova would not have been able to play the Olympics in 76 or 80 if tennis had been part of the games then.

Also, if you are not in good standing with your federation (e;g. Reza´ in France), there's a strong chance that you will not be selected.

Thanks :) !

ASP0315
Jul 6th, 2007, 05:10 PM
madrid, st-petersburg, vienna, or china.

Serenita
Jul 6th, 2007, 05:13 PM
What about South Africa? Johannesburg!