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Sam L
May 27th, 2007, 12:19 PM
Just wondering does French have a noun case system other than nominative? Like how German has 4 cases and English has 2 cases.

As far as I'm aware in my French studies, it doesn't. It seems to be a very analytical language which relies purely on word order.

Also, what's the oblique case?

I find it funny that all these romance languages have lost the noun case systems when Latin had 7 cases!

XaDavK_Kapri
May 27th, 2007, 01:45 PM
I'm pretty sure you're right. Unfortunately, I'm not familiar enough with noun cases to assure you that French only kept one, but if I base myself on what I learned when I had German for a few semesters, French does not have those.

I'll look into it though. Same for the oblique case, I have no idea what it is. YET. :lol: I'll be studying Linguistics next year. So I'll check what the oblique case is defined as and I'll try to see if we have it in French. I don't have time now, I'm off to work but I'll definitely check this when I come back home.

If you have any more questions about French or anything relating to, I'd be happy to at least try and answer ;) I adore la langue française :)

Sam L
May 27th, 2007, 02:52 PM
I'm pretty sure you're right. Unfortunately, I'm not familiar enough with noun cases to assure you that French only kept one, but if I base myself on what I learned when I had German for a few semesters, French does not have those.

I'll look into it though. Same for the oblique case, I have no idea what it is. YET. :lol: I'll be studying Linguistics next year. So I'll check what the oblique case is defined as and I'll try to see if we have it in French. I don't have time now, I'm off to work but I'll definitely check this when I come back home.

If you have any more questions about French or anything relating to, I'd be happy to at least try and answer ;) I adore la langue française :)

Moi aussi! Linguistics is one of the most interesting subjects in the world. I've never formally studied it but because I know a few languages and am studying more, I've become very familiar with it. The best thing is that you cannot never know EVERYTHING. ;)

Yeah, I didn't think French had any other cases but I would like to make sure so I asked. English is the same but has kept 'genitive' in the form of the famous (or infamous) Saxon genitive. ;)

I don't really understand oblique case. In any case, this hasn't been taught in my french class.

Merci beaucoup!

Sam L
May 28th, 2007, 06:37 AM
D'autres?

Nicolas
May 28th, 2007, 07:08 AM
Excese me, wth is a noun case?

gentenaire
May 28th, 2007, 07:33 AM
I think French grammar is difficult enough without the noun cases.

Sam L
May 28th, 2007, 09:05 AM
Excese me, wth is a noun case?

It's like in German how nouns changes their ending according to the function they play in a sentence.

Sam L
May 28th, 2007, 09:42 AM
I think French grammar is difficult enough without the noun cases.

True. I wasn't wishing for it to have it but rather hoping my suspicions were true. ;)

<Sven>
May 28th, 2007, 09:51 AM
Your suspicions are true as far as my knowledge goes :p

égalité
May 28th, 2007, 03:00 PM
What other case does English have? :unsure:

Sam L
May 28th, 2007, 06:09 PM
What other case does English have? :unsure:

Genitive - but it's been questioned by linguists.

mirzalover
May 28th, 2007, 10:50 PM
Genitive - but it's been questioned by linguists.

I speak English and I dont even know what that is

égalité
May 29th, 2007, 09:35 PM
Genitive - but it's been questioned by linguists.

You mean "apostrophe + s?"

XaDavK_Kapri
May 30th, 2007, 05:03 PM
Moi aussi! Linguistics is one of the most interesting subjects in the world. I've never formally studied it but because I know a few languages and am studying more, I've become very familiar with it. The best thing is that you cannot never know EVERYTHING. ;)

Yeah, I didn't think French had any other cases but I would like to make sure so I asked. English is the same but has kept 'genitive' in the form of the famous (or infamous) Saxon genitive. ;)

I don't really understand oblique case. In any case, this hasn't been taught in my french class.

Merci beaucoup!
Ok from what I read and understood here, an oblique case is pretty simple. It's apparently any other case OTHER than the nominative. So accusative, dative, genitive, etc. would all be oblique cases.

And for the record, I haven't been working until today. :lol: Sorry it took me so long to reply ;)

Never knowing everything about a certain subject is one of the most amazing feelings ever. I'm always searching for more, always trying to find out answers to my many questions and I know I'll never get tired. Keeps the passion going.

XaDavK_Kapri
May 30th, 2007, 05:05 PM
You mean "apostrophe + s?"
There's that, but there's also a more complex aspect to it. I found this on Wikipedia, it's pretty interesting.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genitive_case#The_English_-.27s_ending
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxon_genitive

Yasmine
May 30th, 2007, 06:06 PM
If I'm right noun cases is what you'ld call déclinaisons in french. They exist in german and latin as you said, but thankfully not in french...

XaDavK_Kapri
May 30th, 2007, 09:22 PM
If I'm right noun cases is what you'ld call déclinaisons in french. They exist in german and latin as you said, but thankfully not in french...
Heureusement oui ;) C'est déjà assez compliqué comme ça :lol: Mais bon ;) On se plaint on se plaint, mais dans l'fond on l'adore notre jolie langue :p