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GoDominique
May 22nd, 2007, 06:06 PM
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/breakingnews/feedstory/0,,-6651766,00.html

Former Telekom rider tells of systematic EPO

By Erik Kirschbaum
BERLIN, May 22 (Reuters) - Former Telekom cyclist Bert Dietz has told a German television station that the team carried out a systematic doping regime for its riders between 1994 and 1998.
In an interview broadcast on the ARD public television network on Monday, the 38-year-old said team doctors from the University of Freiburg, who were recently suspended, were fully involved in the process and sometimes administered injections.
"The doctors did the injections themselves when they were on site," said Dietz, a member of one of the top teams of the 1990s along with Tour de France winners Bjarne Riis and Jan Ullrich.
"When they weren't there, team masseur Jef d'Hont handled it."
D'Hont wrote in a recent book that Telekom had encouraged riders to use banned blood booster EPO.
He said Telekom Tour de France winners Riis (1996) and Ullrich (1997) used erythropoietin (EPO) and the medical team encouraged Ullrich to use the substance in 1996.
D'Hont also accused two team doctors, Lothar Heinrich and Andreas Schmid, of administering EPO injections in 1996.
The T-Mobile cycling team, the successor to Team Telekom, suspended Schmid and Heinrich earlier this month after state prosecutors launched an investigation into d'Hont's allegations.
On Tuesday, the two doctors were suspended from their jobs by the University of Freiburg, which also recalled three other doctors who now work with T-Mobile.
Dietz's confession prompted another former Telekom rider, Christian Henn, to come forward on Tuesday and admit he took part in the EPO doping system from 1995 to 1999. Henn has been sporting director at Gerolsteiner since 2001.
"I can only say that I used EPO," he told the Frankfurter Rundschau newspaper in an article to appear on Wednesday.
T-Mobile spokesman Christiam Frommert told German television that they planned to continue their investigation. T-Mobile has said it has a "zero-tolerance" attitude to doping.

RISKS EXPLAINED
Dietz, whose most notable success was winning a stage of the Tour of Spain in 1995 and 1996, said the doctors gave him detailed instructions on the use of blood doping that year. He was Germany's amateur cycling champion before joining Telekom.
"And if we wanted to be riding up with the leaders we would probably have to try this stuff out," Dietz quoted the doctors telling him. "The potential side effects and risks were explained. Then in principle it was a decision left to us."
When asked by talk show host Reinhold Beckmann if the doctors "ordered" or "offered" EPO, Dietz said: "They offered it, but in a way that everyone knew 'if I don't take that now I'll likely have poor results and my contract won't be extended'."
Dietz said the doctors were integrated in training plans.
"It was Telekom's wish. In these individual conversations that we all took part in the general cycling situation was first discussed," he added.
"Then, the Telekom situation was discussed and it was explained that we would be under pressure in the spring.
"And if we wanted to be up at the front, we'd probably have to try out this new means."
Dietz said he got regular injections until leaving the team in 1998. He said there was "practically no risk" of failing doping tests because there was no method to test for EPO until 2001. He also explained why he was coming clean now.
"I spent months wrestling with this but my wife and I agreed that I had to take this step, to put an end to that chapter and help others find the courage. I can talk openly now because I'm not part of the system anymore," said Dietz, who retired in 2000.
T-Mobile went through a major restructuring process last season after a scandal-filled year, which included the dismissal of Ullrich shortly before the Tour de France.
Former Telekom team boss Walter Godefront has rejected d'Hont's charges while there has been no comment from either Ullrich and Riis.
Germany's Ullrich retired from racing last month. Dane Riis is team manager with the CSC outfit.

August
Jun 22nd, 2013, 02:58 PM
Now Jan Ullrich has admitted blood doping.

http://espn.go.com/sports/endurance/story/_/id/9412545/jan-ullrich-1997-tour-de-france-winner-admits-blood-doping

He was a client of Dr. Fuentes.

Crazy Canuck
Jun 22nd, 2013, 05:13 PM
What happens to the doctors in these cases?

Crazy Canuck
Jun 22nd, 2013, 05:15 PM
From the article on espn:

"He would have done himself and cycling a favor years ago with such a confession," Rudolf Scharping told German news agency dpa. "But this no longer has anything to do with cycling today."

I know next to nothing about pro cycling, but please :rolleyes:

Sylvester
Jun 22nd, 2013, 09:35 PM
Doping in cycling? No way! :speakles:

Gagsquet
Jun 23rd, 2013, 12:52 AM
The almighty Jan Ulrich won't be forgotten !

King Halep
Jun 23rd, 2013, 02:02 AM
From the article on espn:



I know next to nothing about pro cycling, but please :rolleyes:


Cycling has been clean since they brought in the passport :secret:

Williamsser
Jun 23rd, 2013, 06:56 AM
Lance Armstrong was made to be a scapegoat. But, the fact is that every cyclist dopes.

King Halep
Jun 23rd, 2013, 06:57 AM
^Thats the truth that is staring the sport in the face but noone will admit it

Remix13
Jun 23rd, 2013, 08:13 AM
Leave the cyclists alone and bring controls to tennis. Even curling has more controls than tennis :facepalm:

Crazy Canuck
Jun 23rd, 2013, 11:12 AM
^Thats the truth that is staring the sport in the face but noone will admit it
The first item that comes up on Google when I type "Lance Armstrong scapegoat" is an article from the BBC with that exact title. There seemed to be more of the same below that, though I didn't open those ones. So, I don't really know why you would said this. There are obviously LOTS of people who think he's been made a scapegoat.

Gagsquet
Jun 23rd, 2013, 11:27 AM
A scapegoat :lol: this fucker would deserve jail. Many others fell before him, he is no scapegoat

King Halep
Jun 23rd, 2013, 06:16 PM
The first item that comes up on Google when I type "Lance Armstrong scapegoat" is an article from the BBC with that exact title. There seemed to be more of the same below that, though I didn't open those ones. So, I don't really know why you would said this. There are obviously LOTS of people who think he's been made a scapegoat.

Maybe there is some reflection now but there is not enough of it and I have not seen of them. When the scandal came out, there were a lot of cycling journalists who suddenly changed sides after pretending there was nothing wrong, some of them of course have been involved in business deals with him. From what I have seen of the general opinion in the sport, its a case of get rid of him but leave the other big name cheats. Cycling journalism is in the toilet as far as I am concerned.

hablo
Jun 23rd, 2013, 11:19 PM
The first item that comes up on Google when I type "Lance Armstrong scapegoat" is an article from the BBC with that exact title. There seemed to be more of the same below that, though I didn't open those ones. So, I don't really know why you would said this. There are obviously LOTS of people who think he's been made a scapegoat.

Hate to break it to you but hockey (NHL) is just as bad but no one is seriously testing the athletes. No independent body that is... :tape:

edificio
Jun 24th, 2013, 01:05 AM
A scapegoat :lol: this fucker would deserve jail. Many others fell before him, he is no scapegoat

I don't think he deserves jail, but I agree, he is no scapegoat. Not by a long shot.