PDA

View Full Version : Germany & Obesity...?


RVD
May 13th, 2007, 08:49 PM
I just watched a report on DW-TV news that stated Germany has a severe obesity problem. It was reported that 75% of the men and 50% of the children are obese. They also said that the problem is so severe that the health minister is initiating an [emergency..?'] action plan.
Then I did a bit of surfing and discovered this report:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/6639227.stm
Germany launches obesity campaign

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/42903000/jpg/_42903079_obesity_cred203.jpg
Obesity is increasing throughout the
developed world


The German government is launching
an action plan to cut obesity rates
sharply by 2020.

The initiative follows a study which revealed that Germany has the highest number of overweight people in Europe.

The plan, called "Fit instead of Fat", includes improving the quality of foods in schools and hospitals, and boosting exercise levels in children.

Health problems related to obesity are already estimated to cost Germany more than $90 million a year.

The package is being presented to cabinet meeting on Wednesday by health minister Ulla Schmidt and consumer affairs minister Horst Seehofer.

Germany is a nation that prides itself on its love of sport and outdoor activities.

So many Germans were shocked when figures compiled by the International Association for the Study of Obesity found more than 75% of men in the country, and 59% of women were classified as overweight.

Germany has a strong beer-drinking culture and some experts have pointed to a clear link between beer consumption and obesity.

Ms Schmidt warned that the government had to act now to minimise the risk of an huge increase in obesity-related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.

She expressed particular concern about the number of children who were overweight due to poor diet and lack of exercise.
______________________________________

So here's my question:
I can understand the probable link between beer consumption and obesity, but what about the children? They couldn't possibly link beer to the children's obesity problem, could they? :scratch:

Also, in general, I was surprised to read that Germany has the most overweight people in Europe.

tennislover
May 13th, 2007, 09:01 PM
not surprising: consider all those rivers of beer that Germans drink :D

In the so called "developed world" people eat too much and badly.....

Monica_Rules
May 13th, 2007, 09:02 PM
I thought Britain was the worst for fat people in europe?

Well we are supposed to be catching the USA up anyway.

RVD
May 13th, 2007, 09:08 PM
not surprising: consider all those rivers of beer that Germans drink :D

In the so called "developed world" people eat too much and badly.....Yeah, 'developed' world is becoming synonymous with 'obese' world. :lol:

Still, they didn't explain why the children are so obese. :scratch:

RVD
May 13th, 2007, 09:10 PM
I thought Britain was the worst for fat people in europe?

Well we are supposed to be catching the USA up anyway.Actually, so did I. But I didn't want to be the first to say it. :tape:
I'd imagine that Britain can't be too far behind Germany. :lol:

Josh
May 13th, 2007, 09:12 PM
Obese and overweight are not the same, are they? I thought overweight = weighing more than normal; obese = very overweight?

RVD
May 13th, 2007, 09:44 PM
Obese and overweight are not the same, are they? I thought overweight = weighing more than normal; obese = very overweight?Good question. Think of it this way...

Overweight = is an excess amount of body weight, including fat, muscle, bone and water.


Obesity = is an excess amount of body fat.

However, there are exceptions to the rule. For example, for my weight and height, depending on what physician I speak to, I'm considered obese. Yet I'm extremely lean or some would say "solid" because my hobby is resistence training.

Another good example would be the comparison of bodybuilders, football players, wrestlers, or similar body types with a lot of muscle. They can also be considered overweight [according to the definition], but yet not obese. :wavey:

RJWCapriati
May 13th, 2007, 09:50 PM
I thought Britain was the worst for fat people in europe?

Well we are supposed to be catching the USA up anyway.

lol - I don't think anyone is close to USA in the obesity category!!!!

RVD
May 13th, 2007, 09:55 PM
lol - I don't didn't think anyone exceeded the USA in the obesity category!!!!Just thought I'd correct that for ya. No need to thank me, though. :wavey: ;)

Nervenbuendel
May 14th, 2007, 08:25 AM
I do admit that there are plenty of people in Germany struggling with overweight, to name some of them: the female Chancellor (overweigt: 10-15 kg) the Minister of Environment (overweight: 20-30 kg) nickname: "the whale", the Minister Of Finance (overweight: 10-20 kg), and so on. One can easily see: politicans have to deal with this issue - the best way to solve this problem is to raise new taxes so the average citizen will furthermore not be in the position to spend money for truffles, caviar, and all the other stuff that harms health.

"Sluggy"
May 14th, 2007, 08:30 AM
I'm so surprised about this, I thought Germans were relatively thin. When i was living there, it seemd Germans were in general, pretty fit.

Kart
May 14th, 2007, 08:46 AM
Germans :hearts:, well some of them anyway.

Highlandman
May 14th, 2007, 11:31 AM
I also read this some days ago. We have much more people with overwight than in former times, but not THAT much...

But what a call for us :help: - but I really don't believe that 75 % of the men are overweight. The most ones are "normal" ....

If there are really 75 % overweight, I'm glad to be in the other 25 % :lol:

Johno_uk
May 14th, 2007, 01:03 PM
I thought Britain was the worst for fat people in europe?

Well we are supposed to be catching the USA up anyway.

Well Britain is fat, yes. But we aren't catching the USA very quickly at all, because they are still getting fatter, they haven't reached a plateau yet. :) oh my some of them are BIIIIIG. Saw a group of American tourists in Bath the other day, WADLING along the street. OH MY! I have never seen 10 people this fat in one place ever before!!

Both the Germans and Danes are generally known for being pretty fat, and are about the same as the Brits. German/ Danish fat is more due to beer, where as British fat is more due to chips and crisps imo.

According to my obesity lecture, the European fat categories for males are like this (2000-2005 data). Obese= BMI over 30

Category 1 over 25% obese: Greece and Croatia (suprising!!)
Category 2 20-24.9% UK, Germany, Czech Republic, Hungary, Finland
Category 3 15-19.9% France, Lithuania, Estonia, Denmark

And the skinnies= Bosnia, Serbia, Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine

Wigglytuff
May 14th, 2007, 01:21 PM
Good question. Think of it this way...

Overweight = is an excess amount of body weight, including fat, muscle, bone and water.


Obesity = is an excess amount of body fat.

However, there are exceptions to the rule. For example, for my weight and height, depending on what physician I speak to, I'm considered obese. Yet I'm extremely lean or some would say "solid" because my hobby is resistence training.

Another good example would be the comparison of bodybuilders, football players, wrestlers, or similar body types with a lot of muscle. They can also be considered overweight [according to the definition], but yet not obese. :wavey:

thats not what i was told

i was told its the body mass index

Interpretation of BMI for adults
For adults 20 years old and older, BMI is interpreted using standard weight status categories that are the same for all ages and for both men and women. For children and teens, on the other hand, the interpretation of BMI is both age- and sex-specific. For more information about interpretation for children and teens, visit Child and Teen BMI Calculator.

The standard weight status categories associated with BMI ranges for adults are shown in the following table.
BMI Weight Status
Below 18.5 Underweight
18.5 – 24.9 Normal
25.0 – 29.9 Overweight
30.0 and Above Obese


For example, here are the weight ranges, the corresponding BMI ranges, and the weight status categories for a sample height.
Height Weight Range BMI Weight Status
5’ 9” 124 lbs or less Below 18.5 Underweight
125 lbs to 168 lbs 18.5 to 24.9 Normal
169 lbs to 202 lbs 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight
203 lbs or more 30 or higher Obese

How reliable is BMI as an indicator of body fatness?

The correlation between the BMI number and body fatness is fairly strong; however the correlation varies by sex, race, and age. These variations include the following examples: 3, 4

* At the same BMI, women tend to have more body fat than men.
* At the same BMI, older people, on average, tend to have more body fat than younger adults.
* Highly trained athletes may have a high BMI because of increased muscularity rather than increased body fatness.

It is also important to remember that BMI is only one factor related to risk for disease. For assessing someone’s likelihood of developing overweight- or obesity-related diseases, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines recommend looking at two other predictors:

* The individual’s waist circumference (because abdominal fat is a predictor of risk for obesity-related diseases).
* Other risk factors the individual has for diseases and conditions associated with obesity (for example, high blood pressure or physical inactivity).

For more information about the assessment of health risk for developing overweight- and obesity-related diseases, visit the following Web pages from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute:

* Assessing Your Risk
* Body Mass Index Table
* Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults


If an athlete or other person with a lot of muscle has a BMI over 25, is that person still considered to be overweight?

According to the BMI weight status categories, anyone with a BMI over 25 would be classified as overweight and anyone with a BMI over 30 would be classified as obese.

It is important to remember, however, that BMI is not a direct measure of body fatness and that BMI is calculated from an individual’s weight which includes both muscle and fat. As a result, some individuals may have a high BMI but not have a high percentage of body fat. For example, highly trained athletes may have a high BMI because of increased muscularity rather than increased body fatness. Although some people with a BMI in the overweight range (from 25.0 to 29.9) may not have excess body fatness, most people with a BMI in the obese range (equal to or greater than 30) will have increased levels of body fatness.

It is also important to remember that weight is only one factor related to risk for disease. If you have questions or concerns about the appropriateness of your weight, you should discuss them with your healthcare provider.

What are the health consequences of overweight and obesity for adults?

The BMI ranges are based on the relationship between body weight and disease and death.5 Overweight and obese individuals are at increased risk for many diseases and health conditions, including the following: 6

* Hypertension
* Dyslipidemia (for example, high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, or high levels of triglycerides)
* Type 2 diabetes
* Coronary heart disease
* Stroke
* Gallbladder disease
* Osteoarthritis
* Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
* Some cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon)

For more information about these and other health problems associated with overweight and obesity, visit Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults.

Is BMI interpreted the same way for children and teens as it is for adults?

Although the BMI number is calculated the same way for children and adults, the criteria used to interpret the meaning of the BMI number for children and teens are different from those used for adults. For children and teens, BMI age- and sex-specific percentiles are used for two reasons:

* The amount of body fat changes with age.
* The amount of body fat differs between girls and boys.

Because of these factors, the interpretation of BMI is both age- and sex-specific for children and teens. The CDC BMI-for-age growth charts take into account these differences and allow translation of a BMI number into a percentile for a child’s sex and age.

For adults, on the other hand, BMI is interpreted through categories that are not dependent on sex or age.

Wigglytuff
May 14th, 2007, 01:28 PM
i am going to my first trade only wine tasting today!!! :bounce: and we will be tasting wines from.... UND GERMANY!!!! (i think und means and not "the" but the point is the same") and FINE GERMAN WINES ARE MY FAVORITE!!! its all about the soils and the wine making!

oh yeah the topic. yeah ever since i started this job 5 months ago i have been gaining weight. However now that the summer is hear i can start my thing which is super long distance speed walking.

i think really based on the wines and the other foods i have been trying for und germany i can see how very EASY it is to get fat on that if one is not VERY VERY careful. thats why i am glad that already love walking and biking because if i was not used to it and had to learn now, well i would like my avatar.

Wannabeknowitall
May 14th, 2007, 01:47 PM
The initiative follows a study which revealed that Germany has the highest number of overweight people in Europe.

The plan, called "Fit instead of Fat", includes improving the quality of foods in schools and hospitals, and boosting exercise levels in children.

Health problems related to obesity are already estimated to cost Germany more than $90 million a year.

The package is being presented to cabinet meeting on Wednesday by health minister Ulla Schmidt and consumer affairs minister Horst Seehofer.

Germany is a nation that prides itself on its love of sport and outdoor activities.

So many Germans were shocked when figures compiled by the International Association for the Study of Obesity found more than 75% of men in the country, and 59% of women were classified as overweight.

Germany has a strong beer-drinking culture and some experts have pointed to a clear link between beer consumption and obesity.

Ms Schmidt warned that the government had to act now to minimise the risk of an huge increase in obesity-related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.

She expressed particular concern about the number of children who were overweight due to poor diet and lack of exercise.


Sadly that's the kind of numbers I like. :tape:
I'm one of those people who don't feel that overweight is a bad thing.
The CDC one year decides it's fine and then the next decides it's not so I'm going with my gut when it comes to overweight.
Now obesity I do feel is a serious issue and people do need to exercise more but now with these studies of skinny people having too much fat in areas they shouldn't, I guess that means everyone really should exercise more. :lol:
The problem with that is, if people exercise more, some people are going to do it wrong.
Since this study is looking at how obesity is costing Germany a year, I wonder how much money would injuries caused from increases in exercise cost Germany.

To me with these studies these days, there never seems to be a just right, there seems to be something wrong with everyone which means investing in something we might not actualy go about doing without the study.
So really it's about what would you rather invest in your one life to live.
Would you rather it be something like Nike apparel, diet pills, or McDonalds?

gentenaire
May 14th, 2007, 06:37 PM
For once I agree with Jiggly.
The article says 75% is overweight, not obese, like RVD says in the first post! There's still a big difference between overweight and obese.

RVD
May 14th, 2007, 09:49 PM
Well Britain is fat, yes. But we aren't catching the USA very quickly at all, because they are still getting fatter, they haven't reached a plateau yet. :) oh my some of them are BIIIIIG. Saw a group of American tourists in Bath the other day, WADLING along the street. OH MY! I have never seen 10 people this fat in one place ever before!!

Both the Germans and Danes are generally known for being pretty fat, and are about the same as the Brits. German/ Danish fat is more due to beer, where as British fat is more due to chips and crisps imo.

According to my obesity lecture, the European fat categories for males are like this (2000-2005 data). Obese= BMI over 30

Category 1 over 25% obese: Greece and Croatia (suprising!!)
Category 2 20-24.9% UK, Germany, Czech Republic, Hungary, Finland
Category 3 15-19.9% France, Lithuania, Estonia, Denmark

And the skinnies= Bosnia, Serbia, Belarus, Moldova and UkraineO.K. now, that's just cold-blooded....but funny! :haha: :haha:

Helen Lawson
May 14th, 2007, 09:51 PM
Everything I've read, Europeans, at least Western Europeans, are becoming fat slobs like so many Americans. Sadly, Asians are next. You can't eat like a hog and not exercise.

Sally Struthers
May 14th, 2007, 09:52 PM
Everything I've read, Europeans, at least Western Europeans, are becoming fat slobs like so many Americans. Sadly, Asians are next. You can't eat like a hog and not exercise.

not everyone can do 11 like you on the stepping machine :lol:

Drinking beer and eating lots of sausages makes you fat? Who'd have thunk? :shrug:

RVD
May 14th, 2007, 09:54 PM
thats not what i was told

i was told its the body mass index

Interpretation of BMI for adults
For adults 20 years old and older, BMI is interpreted using standard weight status categories that are the same for all ages and for both men and women. For children and teens, on the other hand, the interpretation of BMI is both age- and sex-specific. For more information about interpretation for children and teens, visit Child and Teen BMI Calculator.

The standard weight status categories associated with BMI ranges for adults are shown in the following table.
BMI Weight Status
Below 18.5 Underweight
18.5 – 24.9 Normal
25.0 – 29.9 Overweight
30.0 and Above Obese


For example, here are the weight ranges, the corresponding BMI ranges, and the weight status categories for a sample height.
Height Weight Range BMI Weight Status
5’ 9” 124 lbs or less Below 18.5 Underweight
125 lbs to 168 lbs 18.5 to 24.9 Normal
169 lbs to 202 lbs 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight
203 lbs or more 30 or higher Obese

How reliable is BMI as an indicator of body fatness?

The correlation between the BMI number and body fatness is fairly strong; however the correlation varies by sex, race, and age. These variations include the following examples: 3, 4

* At the same BMI, women tend to have more body fat than men.
* At the same BMI, older people, on average, tend to have more body fat than younger adults.
* Highly trained athletes may have a high BMI because of increased muscularity rather than increased body fatness.

It is also important to remember that BMI is only one factor related to risk for disease. For assessing someone’s likelihood of developing overweight- or obesity-related diseases, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines recommend looking at two other predictors:

* The individual’s waist circumference (because abdominal fat is a predictor of risk for obesity-related diseases).
* Other risk factors the individual has for diseases and conditions associated with obesity (for example, high blood pressure or physical inactivity).

For more information about the assessment of health risk for developing overweight- and obesity-related diseases, visit the following Web pages from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute:

* Assessing Your Risk
* Body Mass Index Table
* Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults


If an athlete or other person with a lot of muscle has a BMI over 25, is that person still considered to be overweight?

According to the BMI weight status categories, anyone with a BMI over 25 would be classified as overweight and anyone with a BMI over 30 would be classified as obese.

It is important to remember, however, that BMI is not a direct measure of body fatness and that BMI is calculated from an individual’s weight which includes both muscle and fat. As a result, some individuals may have a high BMI but not have a high percentage of body fat. For example, highly trained athletes may have a high BMI because of increased muscularity rather than increased body fatness. Although some people with a BMI in the overweight range (from 25.0 to 29.9) may not have excess body fatness, most people with a BMI in the obese range (equal to or greater than 30) will have increased levels of body fatness.

It is also important to remember that weight is only one factor related to risk for disease. If you have questions or concerns about the appropriateness of your weight, you should discuss them with your healthcare provider.

What are the health consequences of overweight and obesity for adults?

The BMI ranges are based on the relationship between body weight and disease and death.5 Overweight and obese individuals are at increased risk for many diseases and health conditions, including the following: 6

* Hypertension
* Dyslipidemia (for example, high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, or high levels of triglycerides)
* Type 2 diabetes
* Coronary heart disease
* Stroke
* Gallbladder disease
* Osteoarthritis
* Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
* Some cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon)

For more information about these and other health problems associated with overweight and obesity, visit Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults.

Is BMI interpreted the same way for children and teens as it is for adults?

Although the BMI number is calculated the same way for children and adults, the criteria used to interpret the meaning of the BMI number for children and teens are different from those used for adults. For children and teens, BMI age- and sex-specific percentiles are used for two reasons:

* The amount of body fat changes with age.
* The amount of body fat differs between girls and boys.

Because of these factors, the interpretation of BMI is both age- and sex-specific for children and teens. The CDC BMI-for-age growth charts take into account these differences and allow translation of a BMI number into a percentile for a child’s sex and age.

For adults, on the other hand, BMI is interpreted through categories that are not dependent on sex or age.:lol: Now Wiggly...
You know that this being WtaWorld, folks aren't going to read all that? :tape:
I just went for the hyper-simplified description. But we aren't saying two different things here. :wavey:

Helen Lawson
May 14th, 2007, 09:55 PM
not everyone can do 11 like you on the stepping machine :lol:

Drinking beer and eating lots of sausages makes you fat? Who'd have thunk? :shrug:

I can do like a 14 now, but only for 30 minutes! :D

The last time I was in Paris, not a fatty in sight! And everyone smoked, God, it was like I was in heaven, and booze everywhere. Anyway, say what you will about the French, but they are slim and hot. Well, at least in Paris.

RVD
May 14th, 2007, 10:01 PM
For once I agree with Jiggly.
The article says 75% is overweight, not obese, like RVD says in the first post! There's still a big difference between overweight and obese.It's possible that in this case it's a matter of semanics. The DW-TV report was based upon an Obesity study, whereas the article uses the term 'overweight' with 'obesity' thrown in. :shrug:
But hey, I didn't write the article. ;)

gentenaire
May 15th, 2007, 02:43 AM
It's possible that in this case it's a matter of semanics. The DW-TV report was based upon an Obesity study, whereas the article uses the term 'overweight' with 'obesity' thrown in. :shrug:
But hey, I didn't write the article. ;)

I don't think it's a matter of semantics. Obese is not the same as overweight, obese is an extreme version of overweight. Most articles about obesity will say something along the lines of 60% are overweight and 20% are classified as obese. They left the obesity figures out in this article and only mentioned the number of people who're overweight. What is classified as obese is very clearly defined, like Wiggly said and there's no way 75% of Germans is obese. Overweight, yes, obese, no.

Wigglytuff
May 15th, 2007, 03:20 AM
For once I agree with Jiggly.
The article says 75% is overweight, not obese, like RVD says in the first post! There's still a big difference between overweight and obese.

i did NOT say that. and besides, i dont know if the obese are included in the that number (they may well be).

Wigglytuff
May 15th, 2007, 03:24 AM
:lol: Now Wiggly...
You know that this being WtaWorld, folks aren't going to read all that? :tape:
I just went for the hyper-simplified description. But we aren't saying two different things here. :wavey:

:lol: :lol: :lol: well i know most of these people arent into reading, and like erika_retard, many dont even read the articles they are replying to. :tape: :tape:

still we are not saying different things, i just wanted to add that technically, obese and overweight have nothing to do with muscle but rather bother are about body mass.

RVD
May 15th, 2007, 03:24 AM
I don't think it's a matter of semantics. Obese is not the same as overweight, obese is an extreme version of overweight. Most articles about obesity will say something along the lines of 60% are overweight and 20% are classified as obese. They left the obesity figures out in this article and only mentioned the number of people who're overweight. What is classified as obese is very clearly defined, like Wiggly said and there's no way 75% of Germans is obese. Overweight, yes, obese, no.You don't seem to get the picture that I agree about obesity and overweight being misconstrued in the article. I even pointed out that Jiggly and I were basically saying the same thing. Her post just happened to be more specific and technical.

Oh well, I'm going to go work out now so that I can continue to avoid being overweight and obese. :lol: :wavey:

P.S.
When I mentioned semantics, I meant the article misconstruing it this way, not the posters here.

RVD
May 15th, 2007, 03:32 AM
:lol: :lol: :lol: well i know most of these people arent into reading, and like erika_retard, many dont even read the articles they are replying to. :tape: :tape:

still we are not saying different things, i just wanted to add that technically, obese and overweight have nothing to do with muscle but rather bother are about body mass.:lol: I guess there aren't reading because how could they possibly think we're saying two different things? :lol:

Wigglytuff
May 15th, 2007, 03:38 AM
:lol: I guess there aren't reading because how could they possibly think we're saying two different things? :lol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: who knows.

rrfnpump
May 15th, 2007, 05:24 AM
75% :bolt: :o
well, I can say I am not overweight and I dont think 3/4 of all men are

Still a very long way to catch up with the US :lol:

Nervenbuendel
May 15th, 2007, 06:01 AM
Declaration:

I herewith declare that not even one poster of german citizenship that is present on wta-world suffers from obesity or even is overweight.

P.S.: Never thought that Wiggy has such an excellent taste regarding german wine. This information delights me.

gentenaire
May 15th, 2007, 06:03 AM
You don't seem to get the picture that I agree about obesity and overweight being misconstrued in the article. I even pointed out that Jiggly and I were basically saying the same thing. Her post just happened to be more specific and technical.
.

You don't seem to get that it's not the article that is misconstruing things, but you. The article got it right. The article said 75% is overweight. It is you who said 75% is obese even though that is not what the article says. Your initial post is wrong. You claim to know that it's wrong, then why haven't you edited it?

And your definition of overweight is not correct. They simply use the BMI, whether you weigh a lot because of high muscle mass of because you have too much fat. Bodybuilders would most likely fall into the obese category, even though they hardly have any fat. It's why the BMI shouldn't be used as the only tool because some people are wrongfully classified as being overweight or obese.

A Magicman
May 15th, 2007, 07:37 AM
I found the result of this study quite funny as a lot of my fellow countrymen and -women still have a good laugh about the "fat Americans" not realizing they are fat themselves.

75% seems to be an extremely high figure. They counted everyone as overweight whose weight was 1 kg above what is considered "Normalgewicht" here - height in meters minus 100.

So if I'm 1,75m and weigh 76kg - I was counted as overweight. Not really scientific - but hey.

Still, it's really alerting to see that an entire people is fattening. Our government is starting to take hectical actions and wants to rise the VAT on candy and chips from 7% to 19%. As if that would help. :rolleyes:

People just need to change their habits on eating. Eating here is not the same as in France or Italy - eating for many Germans means (in many cases) stuffing food (or "food") into one's mouth.

RVD
May 15th, 2007, 07:38 AM
You don't seem to get that it's not the article that is misconstruing things, but you. The article got it right. The article said 75% is overweight. It is you who said 75% is obese even though that is not what the article says. Your initial post is wrong. You claim to know that it's wrong, then why haven't you edited it?

And your definition of overweight is not correct. They simply use the BMI, whether you weigh a lot because of high muscle mass of because you have too much fat. Bodybuilders would most likely fall into the obese category, even though they hardly have any fat. It's why the BMI shouldn't be used as the only tool because some people are wrongfully classified as being overweight or obese.*sigh*
Okay, sure. You are right and I am wrong.
The DW-TV news report I watched was also wrong.
Wigglytuff's extended definition of overweight and obesity is wrong.

But YOU are a genius, and you alone are correct on all counts.

Happy now? :rolleyes:

[another one with a *@#! reading comprehension problem, and who clearly didn't read my posts].

RVD
May 15th, 2007, 07:45 AM
I found the result of this study quite funny as a lot of my fellow countrymen and -women still have a good laugh about the "fat Americans" not realizing they are fat themselves.

75% seems to be an extremely high figure. They counted everyone as overweight whose weight was 1 kg above what is considered "Normalgewicht" here - height in meters minus 100.

So if I'm 1,75m and weigh 76kg - I was counted as overweight. Not really scientific - but hey.

Still, it's really alerting to see that an entire people is fattening. Our government is starting to take hectical actions and wants to rise the VAT on candy and chips from 7% to 19%. As if that would help. :rolleyes:

People just need to change their habits on eating. Eating here is not the same as in France or Italy - eating for many Germans means (in many cases) stuffing food (or "food") into one's mouth.I agree, and thought the numbers were a bit inflated as well. I still do.
I'm inclined to believe that the numbers don't tell the real story either. When it comes to human physicality, numbers aren't always a realistic determining factor.

matthias
May 15th, 2007, 08:54 AM
i´m german and not overweight :)

gentenaire
May 15th, 2007, 10:57 AM
*sigh*
Okay, sure. You are right and I am wrong.
The DW-TV news report I watched was also wrong.
Wigglytuff's extended definition of overweight and obesity is wrong.

But YOU are a genius, and you alone are correct on all counts.

Happy now? :rolleyes:

[another one with a *@#! reading comprehension problem, and who clearly didn't read my posts].

*bangs head against desk*

I've said numerous times I agree with Wiggly's definitions of obese en overweight.
Overweight= BMI over 25
Obese = BMI over 30

The article uses the word OVERWEIGHT, not the word OBESE when they speak of 75%. Got that?

So the article says that 75% of Germans have a BMI over 25.

You claim to have heard that 75% of Germans are obese, i.e. BMI over 30 and I don't see anything to support that view. You claim to have heard it. Where? Do you have a link? Because the article you posted contradicts your saying that 75% is obese.

Wigglytuff
May 15th, 2007, 02:08 PM
I agree, and thought the numbers were a bit inflated as well. I still do.
I'm inclined to believe that the numbers don't tell the real story either. When it comes to human physicality, numbers aren't always a realistic determining factor.

:worship: :worship: i completely agree.

RVD
May 15th, 2007, 08:50 PM
*bangs head against desk*

I've said numerous times I agree with Wiggly's definitions of obese en overweight.
Overweight= BMI over 25
Obese = BMI over 30

The article uses the word OVERWEIGHT, not the word OBESE when they speak of 75%. Got that?

So the article says that 75% of Germans have a BMI over 25.

You claim to have heard that 75% of Germans are obese, i.e. BMI over 30 and I don't see anything to support that view. You claim to have heard it. Where? Do you have a link? Because the article you posted contradicts your saying that 75% is obese.Again, REREAD ALL MY POSTS!
You may be surprised at what I've actually stated.


Anyway, why are you still arguing?
I said that you were right and I was wrong.
Do you want me to mail my obese balls to you now?
Would that satisfy your misdirected anger and pride? :tape:

Wigglytuff
May 16th, 2007, 04:08 AM
Again, REREAD ALL MY POSTS!
You may be surprised at what I've actually stated.


Anyway, why are you still arguing?
I said that you were right and I was wrong.
Do you want me to mail my obese balls to you now?
Would that satisfy your misdirected anger and pride? :tape:

:worship: :worship: :worship:

you rock my world!!!

gentenaire
May 16th, 2007, 06:35 AM
I never thought there would be someone else whose reading comprehension is as bad as Wiggly's. I was wrong, apparently.

RVD
May 16th, 2007, 06:52 AM
I never thought there would be someone else whose reading comprehension is as bad as Wiggly's. I was wrong, apparently.I made two specific promises to myself before I changed my moniker from ReeVeeDynasty to RVD.
1) Never again will I argue the obvious on this message board to those who refuse to take the time to read for comprehension's sake.
2) Neither again will I ever engage in senseless prideful one-upmanship.

...which is what you are attempting to force me into.

Sorry, I don't have the time or inclination. :wavey:

Lastly, why is it you're the only one who doesn't get it? :confused:
And while you're at it, ask yourself why you're so pissed off? :hehehe:

This was my last post in reply to you, so don't bother responding please.

hablo
May 16th, 2007, 11:01 AM
Oh I didn't know that you were ReeVeeDynasty. :o

But you're title is then very misleading.

You should change it to overweight. :p

I just watched a report on DW-TV news that stated Germany has a severe obesity problem. It was reported that 75% of the men and 50% of the children are obese. They also said that the problem is so severe that the health minister is initiating an [emergency..?'] action plan.

That part if definitely wrong and not what I read in an article on a Canadian news website.
It said overweight not obese.

gentenaire
May 16th, 2007, 10:55 PM
That part if definitely wrong and not what I read in an article on a Canadian news website.
It said overweight not obese.

Exactly.
But alas, it's no use saying this. RVD still thinks he didn't write that but that it's us reading it the wrong way. Or that the article is misconstruing things.

Wigglytuff
May 17th, 2007, 02:48 AM
I never thought there would be someone else whose reading comprehension is as bad as Wiggly's. I was wrong, apparently.

dude you are so beneath me its not even funny. :wavey: