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goldenlox
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:42 PM
Clijsters Savoring Last Year on Tour


By STEVEN WINE
KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. - Kim Clijsters has eased up on her tournament routine, making more time for shopping and nice meals in each city she visits. It's a sort of phased retirement.

The 23-year-old former U.S. Open champion plans to call it quits and focus on family after playing an abbreviated schedule this year. The latest stop on her farewell tour is Key Biscayne for the Sony Ericsson Open, which began Wednesday.

Seeded players received a first-round bye, and the No. 4-seeded Clijsters will likely play her opening match Friday. She's among the favorites and optimistic she'll do well, but she plans to have fun regardless.

"The relaxing time is not so much focused on my tennis anymore, she said. "My sister and best friend are here, and I'm doing a lot more things. When I was younger I would always just stay in my hotel room and rest. I didn't want to spend energy to go shopping or something. But that has changed."

Plagued by injuries in recent years, Clijsters plans to marry American basketball player Brian Lynch on July 14 in her hometown of Bree, Belgium. She'll skip the French Open to prepare for the wedding, and she said this week she may miss the U.S. Open because of the honeymoon.
That could make Key Biscayne her biggest remaining U.S. event. She won the title in 2005 and has a favorable draw, with top-seeded Maria Sharapova, three-time champion Serena Williams, three-time champion Venus Williams and defending champion Svetlana Kuznetsova in the opposite half.

"I'm definitely not playing these tournaments just to say goodbye," said Clijsters, who won the Sydney title in January. "Winning in Sydney was a great feeling. Obviously when you can play a tournament for the last time and be there until the last day, that's the perfect scenario.

"I know it's not going to be like that every week. But so far things have been going really well for me this year. I'm not playing that much, but I feel good."

Winners on the first day of play included 14-year-old Michelle Larcher de Brito of Portugal, who beat American Meghann Shaughnessy 3-6, 6-2, 7-6 (3). The teen will next face No. 16-seeded Daniela Hantuchova, who won Indian Wells last week.

The Key Biscayne tournament has a new name _ it was formerly the Nasdaq-100 Open. It also has a new look, with purple courts for a more vibrant appearance.

"I think it's good," said third-seeded Andy Roddick, who plays his opening match Friday. "I think it is easier to watch on television, at least."

In men's first-round play, Gael Monfils lost to Simone Bolelli 6-4, 6-2. On the women's side, Akiko Morigami beat Aleksandra Wozniak 6-1, 7-5 and will play Clijsters in the second round.

This is only Clijsters' fourth tournament this year. She won Sydney, lost to Sharapova in the semifinals at the Australian Open and, in her last match in Belgium, lost an emotional final a month ago to Amelie Mauresmo at Antwerp.

"I cried every fluid out of my body," said Clijsters, who nonetheless remembers the experience fondly. "I couldn't have wished for a better farewell. It was a great experience."

Clijsters has always been a good loser, the flip side being she's accused of lacking a killer instinct. She climbed to the No. 1 ranking in 2003 but lost four Grand Slam finals before her breakthrough at the 2005 U.S. Open, where she beat Mary Pierce for the championship.

Clijsters said tournament titles are nice _ she has won 34 _ but now she's more interested in starting a family. She's the oldest of 13 cousins on her mother's side and has always enjoyed baby-sitting.

"I think at the U.S. Open, the nursery is the most relaxing place to be," she said. "It's so relaxing just to hang out with the children. ... I feel very comfortable with this decision."

That's why she can walk away from a career that allowed her to earn nearly $15 million in prize money. She understands that her many fans might find the decision difficult to accept.

"I know what I want," she said. "But it's funny _ people are already asking me if I'm thinking about a comeback. I haven't even retired yet."

http://www.cumberlink.com/articles/2007/03/21/ap/sports/tennis/d8o0q0k00.txt

cellophane
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:45 PM
Kill me now.

Rocketta
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:49 PM
:haha:

auntie janie
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:51 PM
Kill me now.

:lol:

njnetswill
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:54 PM
Savoring?! More like throwing in a shithole. :o

Wannabeknowitall
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:57 PM
Savoring?! More like throwing in a shithole. :o

Hey!!! That's not a nice thing to say to your new neighbor. :p

The Daviator
Mar 21st, 2007, 11:08 PM
"I think at the U.S. Open, the nursery is the most relaxing place to be," she said. "It's so relaxing just to hang out with the children. ... I feel very comfortable with this decision."

That's why she can walk away from a career that allowed her to earn nearly $15 million in prize money. She understands that her many fans might find the decision difficult to accept.

"I know what I want," she said. "But it's funny _ people are already asking me if I'm thinking about a comeback. I haven't even retired yet."

http://www.cumberlink.com/articles/2007/03/21/ap/sports/tennis/d8o0q0k00.txt

Oh Kim, why do you set yourself up so much? :tape: :o

égalité
Mar 21st, 2007, 11:10 PM
Well, maybe Meg Ryan can take her place on tour when she retires! I'd say they have pretty even chances of getting past the SF of a major.

Nicolás89
Mar 21st, 2007, 11:11 PM
no comment about the article but.....



"I know what I want," she said. "But it's funny _ people are already asking me if I'm thinking about a comeback. I haven't even retired yet."



:spit:

champGS1452
Mar 21st, 2007, 11:29 PM
Savoring? You mean phoning it in from a long distance payphone. :o Please play the U.S. Open. :p

esquímaux
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:12 AM
Savoring? You mean phoning it in from a long distance payphone. :o Please play the U.S. Open. :p*DEATHNESS* You know, I'm really going to miss Kim.... :sad:

John.
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:17 AM
:o Savouring

I dread to think what she'd be like if she wasn't giving a fuck :help:

goldenlox
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:17 AM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/3/global/photogallery/miami/f_25.jpg ©Action Images/Reuters
Miami, FL, USA (March 20): Kim Clijsters, the 2005 Miami champion and preparing for her final Sony Ericsson Open before retiring, goes for a test drive in an Indy Car.


http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/3/global/photogallery/miami/f_24.jpg ©Action Images/Reuters
Miami, FL, USA (March 20): Indy Car star Helio Castroneves shows Kim Clijsters how to attach a steering wheel to one of the speed machines.


http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/3/global/photogallery/miami/f_16.jpg ©Action Images
Miami, FL, USA (March 21): Kim Clijsters drew much media interest as she prepared for her final appearance in Miami.

Goai
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:26 AM
Well she's having fun. :D That's what they mean by savouring.

spinpup
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:31 AM
:o Savouring

I dread to think what she'd be like if she wasn't giving a fuck :help:

:lol: :lol:
Maybe she should go hang out in the daycare room and give her spot to a player who will give her all.

RenaSlam.
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:44 AM
Savoring by not playing jack shit :lol:

LindsayRulz
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:46 AM
:lol:

Mileen
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:48 AM
[QUOTE=goldenlox;10337285] I haven't even retired yet."

QUOTE]

You could have fouled me!

ico4498
Mar 22nd, 2007, 01:50 AM
Kim Clijsters is where its at!

Go Kimmy, your dues are paid up, shop, cook, clean, babysit! makes yah happy, i'm happy.

i'm disappoined in the so called "fans" of the WTA. yah give up your youth, jeopordize your health, for years yah played a schedule so heavy these self same critics bitched at yah ...

now they begrudge yah 15 minutes. gimme some football hooligans, they know how to appreciate a player!

Kimmy rocks!

thrust
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:12 AM
Kim will give her all, on court! I, an avid Justine fan, almost hopes Kim wins this just to shut up all the negative nasty remarks about her.

njnetswill
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:13 AM
Hey!!! That's not a nice thing to say to your new neighbor. :p

Well at least she's coming to New Jersey. Maybe I'll see her at the local Babies R Us. :hearts:

(Or did all those stores close already :unsure:)

égalité
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:15 AM
Well at least she's coming to New Jersey. Maybe I'll see her at the local Babies R Us. :hearts:

(Or did all those stores close already :unsure:)

They had to close down. Kim put them out of business buying all the ballboys presents. :help:

John.
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:17 AM
They had to close down. Kim put them out of business buying all the ballboys presents. :help:

:haha:

njnetswill
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:18 AM
They had to close down. Kim put them out of business buying all the ballboys presents. :help:

Awww.

Well maybe I'll see her at the local mall shopping for maternity wear? :o

go hingis
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:40 AM
Way too many harsh posters. Give Kim the respect she deserves and the respect she would give any human. To be upset she's not playing is understandable but it seems no matter what she does some people are just not going to be happy and are being as mean as can be. At first I wasn't happy to hear she wasn't playing the FO and now USO but life goes on. Well it does for Kim and the pro players but I don't know about us posters. lol

This year Kim's played three tournaments. Same as Justine, Maria etc and more then Venus, Serena etc. Shje's playing so enjoy it while you can.

timafi
Mar 22nd, 2007, 01:15 PM
:o Savouring

I dread to think what she'd be like if she wasn't giving a fuck :help:

:lol: :lol: :lol:
really it's hard to accept that she's retiring so young:sad: so :hug: Kim

fifiricci
Mar 22nd, 2007, 01:34 PM
Given the proliferation of these threads, I just wish that poor Kim had looked to Tony Blair as an example of how NOT to manage your retirement, rather than copy him, and HAD taken the advice of the gorgeous and wise David Tennant (aka Dr Who), who told the BBC yesterday that you should never announce your retirement until it's imminent :lol:

Talula
Mar 22nd, 2007, 04:18 PM
Given the proliferation of these threads, I just wish that poor Kim had looked to Tony Blair as an example of how NOT to manage your retirement, rather than copy him, and HAD taken the advice of the gorgeous and wise David Tennant (aka Dr Who), who told the BBC yesterday that you should never announce your retirement until it's imminent :lol:

:lol: Precisley! A strung out retirement NEVER works - people know you're on the way out and just want you to go in the end. A short, sharp shock is SO much more effective - leaves people shocked and wanting more! It's the same when people resign from jobs.

Now, Graf's retirement was spot on. Cool as can be. With a lovely big 'do' in New York. Lindsay's has been pretty well played too.

But Kim? I actually now think she's just not very bright!

But good luck to her. I hope she'll be happy - though I don't think she'll be as missed by the public as some people think.

cellophane
Mar 22nd, 2007, 04:22 PM
Kim should just answer "no comment" to those retirement questions. She is giving people the ammuniton to make fun of her (which I think is kind of ludicrous to the extent it happens here at least)... but then I'm not sure if she cares.

harloo
Mar 22nd, 2007, 04:23 PM
Kill me now.



:rolls::rolls:

Reuchlin
Mar 22nd, 2007, 04:30 PM
"The relaxing time is not so much focused on my tennis anymore, she said. "My sister and best friend are here, and I'm doing a lot more things. When I was younger I would always just stay in my hotel room and rest. I didn't want to spend energy to go shopping or something. But that has changed."
Like oh my gosh, she can finally go shopping instead of, like, you know, playing tennis, like.

fufuqifuqishahah
Mar 22nd, 2007, 04:34 PM
i really hope she plays the us open. it only makes sense to me.... but i guess i can't judge :/

harloo
Mar 22nd, 2007, 04:40 PM
Way too many harsh posters. Give Kim the respect she deserves and the respect she would give any human. To be upset she's not playing is understandable but it seems no matter what she does some people are just not going to be happy and are being as mean as can be. At first I wasn't happy to hear she wasn't playing the FO and now USO but life goes on. Well it does for Kim and the pro players but I don't know about us posters. lol

This year Kim's played three tournaments. Same as Justine, Maria etc and more then Venus, Serena etc. Shje's playing so enjoy it while you can.

I have much respect for Kim and everything she's accomplished but this non-chalant fairwell tour is tired. Instead of focusing and making her last competitive year on tour one of her best she's constantly griping about how she's ready to leave.

Personally I think she doesn't want to play the rest of the year and that's fine. I don't think anyone would have a problem if she called it quits and left right now. The subtle references in her interviews these days basically say, "I'm sick of playing tennis, and really don't care anymore" so why should she keep supressing her feelings? It's time to leave, JUST LEAVE and move on with your life.:)

tennisjunky
Mar 22nd, 2007, 05:02 PM
wish her all the best. the good news is that now her fans could find a player with real heart now that she's leaving. she just should have retired right after winning the us open. her legacy is stained now because of what she's doing her last year on tour.

she'll always be known as Super-nice, MEEK AND WEAK Clijsters.

LoveFifteen
Mar 22nd, 2007, 05:29 PM
The best thing that Clijsters could have done for her career and legacy would have been to call it quits the day after she won the US Open, a record $2.2 million, and the right to call herself a Slam champion.

Sara81
Mar 22nd, 2007, 06:11 PM
A different look at Clijsters' farewell tour - By Bonnie DeSimone, Special to ESPN.com

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. -- There's always been something slightly retro about Kim Clijsters.

She would have fit right in on "Happy Days," as a friend of Richie Cunningham's little sister Joanie, giggling over malts at Arnold's and making eyes at Potsie. If she'd grown up in the United States in the 1950s, Clijsters surely would have been on the pep squad, with a picture in the yearbook next to Best School Spirit.
Yet Clijsters' recent announcements might lead people to believe she's coming up a little short in the spirit department. When she said 2007 would be her last season of professional tennis, many fans expected her to do a full-blown farewell tour. Instead, Clijsters has booked more of a victory lap lite.

She's skipping the entire clay court season, including the French Open. She's taking a pass on Belgium's first-round Fed Cup tie against the U.S. (featuring the Williams sisters) next month. Clijsters has committed to just a handful of other events this season, including Wimbledon.

The Sony Ericsson Open could be her last appearance in North America. The 23-year-old Clijsters recently said she might not play the U.S. Open, where she broke through to win her one and only Grand Slam title in 2005. She's not sure the timing is right on the heels of her July 14 wedding to former Villanova basketball player Brian Lynch and their subsequent honeymoon. Lynch now plays for the professional team in Clijsters' hometown of Bree, Belgium.

This may be as selective a parting kiss as tennis has seen in a while, but Clijsters, sitting calmly in the center of a scrum of reporters, is obviously comfortable with it.

"So far, things have been going really well for me this year," said the fifth-ranked Clijsters, who won in Sydney earlier this season and reached the semifinals of the Australian Open. "I feel really good at the tournaments I'm playing. I don't want to go to a tournament anymore knowing I'm not physically 100 percent or mentally fresh."

But she's not waving from a parade float.


"I'm playing in these tournaments because I want to do well," she said. "I'm definitely not playing in these tournaments just to say goodbye."

A reporter asked why she was eschewing the Fed Cup.

"I don't feel like it this year," she said softly.

Her thinking may be puzzling, even maddening, to her fans and followers of the game in general. To which a devil's advocate could respond:

Get off her back!

Women's tennis players can't catch a break. When young teenagers compete under the sway of overbearing fathers or Svengali coaches, we bemoan their lost childhoods. When they play past their primes and tell us they carry on because they love it, we grumble that they should hang it up and leave us our untainted memories.

Now comes a smart, personable woman, a five-time Grand Slam finalist, winner of 34 titles and nearly $15 million in prize money, a former world No. 1, a veteran of injury and surgery and rehab that would make most of us curl our toes with dread. She's eager to have children after all that, yet some people want to label her an underachiever.

Clijsters openly lusts for domestic life when deferring it has almost become the norm for bright young women in sports and elsewhere. She's at ease with being a player's wife and cheering for her husband's team from the stands. Maybe people would cut her more slack if she wanted to pursue an advanced degree.

It's not as if Clijsters is blithely sauntering through her limited schedule. In fact, she may feel things a little too deeply. She talked about saying goodbye to staff people who work the tournament desks, exchanging phone numbers and e-mail addresses with volunteers she'd gotten to know over the years.

She admitted it would be hard to top the emotion of her last match in Belgium. Clijsters lost to Amelie Mauresmo in the final at Antwerp a month ago. When she walked out on the court to address the crowd, her lower lip began to tremble uncontrollably. She tried to still it with a finger, then had a practical thought: "I'm not gonna stand here for half an hour trying to hold my lip." That's when she broke down.

"I didn't know it was going to have that much of an impact on me," she said, her voice still a little shaky in the retelling. "I don't know if you guys saw any of it, but I cried every fluid out of my body, I think. Afterwards just going home and to the supermarket, people were coming up to me and hugging me."

As for her seemingly odd and abbreviated farewell tour, athletes wreck the grand finales we script for them all the time. Everyone doesn't get -- or want -- the Andre Agassi lovefest.

Not so long ago, Pete Sampras wrote himself a Hollywood ending against Agassi at the U.S. Open, yet couldn't pull the trigger on retirement until months later. Boris Becker thought he had picked the perfect moment, confiding in Sampras across the net at Wimbledon before he told the world, but then couldn't resist returning to play on Centre Court.

Sportswriters' clip files are full of carefully crafted tributes made obsolete by changes of heart. Clijsters knows folks think her resolve might waver, talk fueled by Martina Hingis' renaissance.


"People are already asking me if I'm thinking about a comeback while I haven't even retired yet," she said. "I'm very happy that she's back, but I doubt that I would be in that position someday."

So what if Clijsters is taking the express train instead of the local this year. That's her business. If it's the worst decision she ever makes in her life, she'll do pretty well.

Clijsters isn't stringing anyone along. What else does she owe the game besides an honest effort when she's on the court, and honest comments off it?

Perhaps the people who have enjoyed watching her over the years owe her the courtesy of being disappointed about her imminent departure, but not judgmental.

It's natural for fans -- and writers -- to root for tennis players to have long and interesting careers. But the gains made by female athletes in the last few decades mean little if they don't include the right to put their personal lives ahead of their professional ones when they see fit, retro as it may seem.

Many years ago, that would have been expected of them. How nice now that it's their choice.

Mileen
Mar 22nd, 2007, 06:35 PM
A different look at Clijsters' farewell tour - By Bonnie DeSimone, Special to ESPN.com

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. -- There's always been something slightly retro about Kim Clijsters.

She would have fit right in on "Happy Days," as a friend of Richie Cunningham's little sister Joanie, giggling over malts at Arnold's and making eyes at Potsie. If she'd grown up in the United States in the 1950s, Clijsters surely would have been on the pep squad, with a picture in the yearbook next to Best School Spirit.
Yet Clijsters' recent announcements might lead people to believe she's coming up a little short in the spirit department. When she said 2007 would be her last season of professional tennis, many fans expected her to do a full-blown farewell tour. Instead, Clijsters has booked more of a victory lap lite.

She's skipping the entire clay court season, including the French Open. She's taking a pass on Belgium's first-round Fed Cup tie against the U.S. (featuring the Williams sisters) next month. Clijsters has committed to just a handful of other events this season, including Wimbledon.

The Sony Ericsson Open could be her last appearance in North America. The 23-year-old Clijsters recently said she might not play the U.S. Open, where she broke through to win her one and only Grand Slam title in 2005. She's not sure the timing is right on the heels of her July 14 wedding to former Villanova basketball player Brian Lynch and their subsequent honeymoon. Lynch now plays for the professional team in Clijsters' hometown of Bree, Belgium.

This may be as selective a parting kiss as tennis has seen in a while, but Clijsters, sitting calmly in the center of a scrum of reporters, is obviously comfortable with it.

"So far, things have been going really well for me this year," said the fifth-ranked Clijsters, who won in Sydney earlier this season and reached the semifinals of the Australian Open. "I feel really good at the tournaments I'm playing. I don't want to go to a tournament anymore knowing I'm not physically 100 percent or mentally fresh."

But she's not waving from a parade float.


"I'm playing in these tournaments because I want to do well," she said. "I'm definitely not playing in these tournaments just to say goodbye."

A reporter asked why she was eschewing the Fed Cup.

"I don't feel like it this year," she said softly.

Her thinking may be puzzling, even maddening, to her fans and followers of the game in general. To which a devil's advocate could respond:

Get off her back!

Women's tennis players can't catch a break. When young teenagers compete under the sway of overbearing fathers or Svengali coaches, we bemoan their lost childhoods. When they play past their primes and tell us they carry on because they love it, we grumble that they should hang it up and leave us our untainted memories.

Now comes a smart, personable woman, a five-time Grand Slam finalist, winner of 34 titles and nearly $15 million in prize money, a former world No. 1, a veteran of injury and surgery and rehab that would make most of us curl our toes with dread. She's eager to have children after all that, yet some people want to label her an underachiever.

Clijsters openly lusts for domestic life when deferring it has almost become the norm for bright young women in sports and elsewhere. She's at ease with being a player's wife and cheering for her husband's team from the stands. Maybe people would cut her more slack if she wanted to pursue an advanced degree.

It's not as if Clijsters is blithely sauntering through her limited schedule. In fact, she may feel things a little too deeply. She talked about saying goodbye to staff people who work the tournament desks, exchanging phone numbers and e-mail addresses with volunteers she'd gotten to know over the years.

She admitted it would be hard to top the emotion of her last match in Belgium. Clijsters lost to Amelie Mauresmo in the final at Antwerp a month ago. When she walked out on the court to address the crowd, her lower lip began to tremble uncontrollably. She tried to still it with a finger, then had a practical thought: "I'm not gonna stand here for half an hour trying to hold my lip." That's when she broke down.

"I didn't know it was going to have that much of an impact on me," she said, her voice still a little shaky in the retelling. "I don't know if you guys saw any of it, but I cried every fluid out of my body, I think. Afterwards just going home and to the supermarket, people were coming up to me and hugging me."

As for her seemingly odd and abbreviated farewell tour, athletes wreck the grand finales we script for them all the time. Everyone doesn't get -- or want -- the Andre Agassi lovefest.

Not so long ago, Pete Sampras wrote himself a Hollywood ending against Agassi at the U.S. Open, yet couldn't pull the trigger on retirement until months later. Boris Becker thought he had picked the perfect moment, confiding in Sampras across the net at Wimbledon before he told the world, but then couldn't resist returning to play on Centre Court.

Sportswriters' clip files are full of carefully crafted tributes made obsolete by changes of heart. Clijsters knows folks think her resolve might waver, talk fueled by Martina Hingis' renaissance.


"People are already asking me if I'm thinking about a comeback while I haven't even retired yet," she said. "I'm very happy that she's back, but I doubt that I would be in that position someday."

So what if Clijsters is taking the express train instead of the local this year. That's her business. If it's the worst decision she ever makes in her life, she'll do pretty well.

Clijsters isn't stringing anyone along. What else does she owe the game besides an honest effort when she's on the court, and honest comments off it?

Perhaps the people who have enjoyed watching her over the years owe her the courtesy of being disappointed about her imminent departure, but not judgmental.

It's natural for fans -- and writers -- to root for tennis players to have long and interesting careers. But the gains made by female athletes in the last few decades mean little if they don't include the right to put their personal lives ahead of their professional ones when they see fit, retro as it may seem.

Many years ago, that would have been expected of them. How nice now that it's their choice.

Thanks!

tennisjunky
Mar 22nd, 2007, 06:35 PM
A different look at Clijsters' farewell tour - By Bonnie DeSimone, Special to ESPN.com

So what if Clijsters is taking the express train instead of the local this year. That's her business. If it's the worst decision she ever makes in her life, she'll do pretty well.

Clijsters isn't stringing anyone along. What else does she owe the game besides an honest effort when she's on the court, and honest comments off it?

Perhaps the people who have enjoyed watching her over the years owe her the courtesy of being disappointed about her imminent departure, but not judgmental.

It's natural for fans -- and writers -- to root for tennis players to have long and interesting careers. But the gains made by female athletes in the last few decades mean little if they don't include the right to put their personal lives ahead of their professional ones when they see fit, retro as it may seem.

Many years ago, that would have been expected of them. How nice now that it's their choice.just cant get over how different the media reacts to clijsters than it does to serena. serena get crucified for "not caring" and not making tennis number one in her life. all day long they go on and on about what a waste of talent she is. then there is kim and all the suden it's ok to have a life outside of tennis. it's ok not make tennis number one. it's ok, because tennis is just a sport.

dont get me wrong most people shouldn't criticise, it's their lives and they can do what they want. i defend serena when she wants to do other things so it's only fair that clijsters can do the same. except clijsters is more extreeme. she's more extreeme but gets less criticism, doesn't make sense and doesnt seem fair.

never want to hear another person in the media ever talk bad about serena unless they've given it equal to kim.

cellophane
Mar 22nd, 2007, 07:17 PM
just cant get over how different the media reacts to clijsters than it does to serena. serena get crucified for "not caring" and not making tennis number one in her life. all day long they go on and on about what a waste of talent she is. then there is kim and all the suden it's ok to have a life outside of tennis. it's ok not make tennis number one. it's ok, because tennis is just a sport.

You missed the negative article(s) posted on Kim's retirement in GM then. Because there has been at least one major one posted here. I don't know why you need to bring Serena into this... but she is more in the spotlight, so she will obviously get more articles written about ther than Kim. Actually a positive article about Serena by the same columnist who wrote this one was also posted here a little while ago.

dont get me wrong most people shouldn't criticise, it's their lives and they can do what they want. i defend serena when she wants to do other things so it's only fair that clijsters can do the same. except clijsters is more extreeme. she's more extreeme but gets less criticism, doesn't make sense and doesnt seem fair.

I think Serena can do what she wants personally... in my opinion the articles about her not playing were so negative, because the people writing them assumed were skeptical of Serena's show business career and assumed she was lazy and cared only about partying.

never want to hear another person in the media ever talk bad about serena unless they've given it equal to kim.

So because negative articles were written about Serena, there should be negative articles on Kim? Great logic. :scratch: