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Tech1
Mar 21st, 2007, 06:44 AM
She figures big
By Charles Elmore
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, March 21, 2007

A head-snapping comeback from No. 140 in the world last July to win the Australian Open in January has, well, rekindled communications between Serena Williams and corporate America.

Advertisers had not exactly gone away, but neither were they rushing money to her as fast as they were to rivals such as Maria Sharapova. A two-year drought of tournament victories will do that. Forbes magazine estimated last year that Williams makes $10 million in endorsement and prize money annually compared to Sharapova's $19 million.

Talks are ongoing between Williams and half a dozen companies that sell automobiles, timepieces, technology and fragrances. In a few weeks, Camp Serena is expected to announce a deal for a skin-care product.

Williams, who takes the court this week for the first time since Australia at the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, is no stranger to a business meeting, certainly. But this is a new era in the Serena saga.

At 25, her image is no longer that of the cat-suited superheroine who dominated her sport with the "Serena Slam" of four straight majors four years ago.

This is a woman frequently criticized for her weight, chided for her socializing and fledgling careers in entertainment and fashion and questioned for her commitment to tennis. She was politely but firmly called out in an open letter by one of the legends of her sport, Chris Evert, to get in shape and make the most of her abilities.

She is now a different kind of heroine in the eyes of Robyn McGee, the Los Angeles-based author of Hungry for More: A Keeping-it-Real Guide for Black Women on Weight and Body Image.

"She's a huge role model for not just African-American women but all people who have been told you don't have the right dimensions," McGee said Tuesday. "She's not 15 anymore. She has a lot in common with a broad cross section of America. Six out of 10 Americans are considered overweight.

"She's still marketed as her own brand of sex symbol, not as a full-figured clothing spokeswoman. She's not Queen Latifah, but she's one of a kind."

Williams is doing it her way. Her efforts to get back in condition after a 2003 knee surgery haven't produced any dramatic skinny-Oprah moment as she emerges from the player's tunnel. When she's on, her serve and her forehand do the talking.

"I know I am larger than some women players," Williams said in Melbourne's afterglow. But the size of her will seems to matter most.

She admitted she was stung by a loss to Sybille Bammer in a warm-up event, her only loss in 10 matches this year. "I was really angry. I just felt like I should have won."

The world is starting to see Serena through a new lens, her agent Jill Smoller believes.

"She is somebody who has struggles in her life that people can go through," Smoller said. "She's approachable in a different way now. She has become a real person to many fans in a way they may not feel with other tennis players."

It wasn't that Williams bought into tabloid headlines that called her "overweight" and "overpaid" and openly asked whether her tennis career was finished. But she acknowledged that the thought has crossed her mind, in quiet moments at home in Palm Beach Gardens, that maybe she was not going to win a major tournament again.

"There's always times out there where you think, you know, 'Am I ever going to be looking at another trophy?' " Williams said. "Especially since I hadn't won a tournament - let alone a Grand Slam - I hadn't won a tournament in a long time. You know, you're thinking about, 'Wow, will there be another time?''

Her family picked her up, she said.

"Since Day One, my parents, my mom and my dad, have always been so positive," Williams said. "They never stopped believing in me. That helps me believe in me. Venus, as well. I live with her, so I'm with her every day. We always, like, believe in ourselves. You know, it works."

What haunts her, though, are the comparisons to her earlier self. Dominating women's tennis as long as Roger Federer has ruled the men's game would be "the ultimate experience," Williams said this year, prodded by a question. "He's definitely like a role model to me."

Williams did hold the sport in a Federer-like vise for 57 weeks at No. 1, through Aug. 11, 2003. That's about one-third the record 164 weeks Federer has held the men's top spot.

Could it happen again? Probably not, said Mary Joe Fernandez, who will analyze the Sony Ericsson Open for ESPN2.

"I don't think we're ever going to see her play a ton of tournaments, mainly because of her knee," Fernandez said. "That might be tough for her fans to accept, but she's going to pick and choose. But to me, when she's on her game, she's the best one out there."

Williams has pulled out of or skipped every event since Australia, citing a sudden flu in one instance. Her ranking has slipped slightly since February to 18th in the world. That is high enough to place her among seeded players, but in Key Biscayne she will not be able to coast to the quarterfinals. She could meet the winner of a match between top seed Sharapova and sister Venus in the fourth round.

Regardless of Serena's ranking, people tend to watch, said Leif Shiras, commentator for the Tennis Channel, which will carry 64 hours of coverage from Key Biscayne.

"No doubt when Serena is playing you have more viewers," Shiras said. "The fact she's built and made the way she is, I think people can relate to her in a way - perhaps more so than someone like Maria Sharapova. Serena brings to the table a remarkable dimension."

That dimension has never been more evident since Australia.

"I think what happened in Australia was her saying you don't know until you walk in someone's shoes," Smoller said. "She was saying, in effect, 'Here's how I am built. Deal with it. I'm not going to weigh 110 pounds. I'm comfortable with it.' It's how most of the world is. I think people related to her and identified with her."

dreamgoddess099
Mar 21st, 2007, 06:54 AM
Good for Serena, she's upping her endorsement game too.

Talula
Mar 21st, 2007, 07:02 AM
That's a nice, balanced article. Nice to see Serena has quite moments of doubt like everyone else! Also great to see that the hunger to win is still there big time. She's only 25, if she wants she could get to no 1 again quite esaily I think.

MrSerenaWilliams
Mar 21st, 2007, 07:10 AM
:yeah: good article!

VeeReeDavJCap81
Mar 21st, 2007, 07:15 AM
One of the best articles in recent times

Kunal
Mar 21st, 2007, 08:17 AM
word!

Mina Vagante
Mar 21st, 2007, 08:27 AM
thanks for posting :wavey:

PLP
Mar 21st, 2007, 09:32 AM
Serena is worth every penny that she makes, I wonder what her skin care product will be like?! :)

Good article!

CORIA01
Mar 21st, 2007, 09:33 AM
Thanks For Sharing!

bandabou
Mar 21st, 2007, 09:47 AM
nice article..

vettipooh
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:17 AM
Great positive and insightful article! :yeah: You go, Rena, with your PHAT (Plenty Hips And Thighs) self. :hearts:

Shuji Shuriken
Mar 21st, 2007, 11:27 AM
Serena :hearts: :sobbing:. Let's go girls in Miami :hearts: :bounce:. Too bad she might have to run into a roadblock named Venus. If it's Sharapova, then i know who i'll be pulling for :devil:. But go Venus :hearts: :bounce: :kiss:

Marcell
Mar 21st, 2007, 12:09 PM
Posted on Tue, Mar. 20, 2007

Serena not to be taken lightly
BY MICHELLE KAUFMAN
mkaufman@MiamiHerald.com


Many of the world's top tennis players were sweating it out at a tournament in Indian Wells, Calif., last week, all their attention focused between the baselines.

Not Serena Williams.

She spent last Monday in a fire suit, strapped into a NASCAR race car, sweating bullets as she sped 130 mph around Lowe's Motor Speedway in Charlotte, N.C., with actor William Shatner and singer Jewel for an upcoming reality TV show called Fast Cars andSuperstars.

Williams, always craving challenges, admitted this one was a bit more than she had bargained for.

''Scariest experience of my life,'' said Williams, reached by phone Saturday as she prepared for the Sony Ericsson Open, which begins today on Key Biscayne. 'All of a sudden, as I was racing around the turns, I was thinking, `This could kill me. I'm insane. What am I doing?' ''

Many tennis observers might be asking the same question of the former world No. 1. Why on earth would a woman coming off a stirring Australian Open title run divert her attention from tennis? Why wouldn't she devote every waking minute to the sport that made her famous, the sport she and her sister, Venus, so thoroughly dominated from 1999 to 2003?

Why would she choose not to play any tournaments between the Australian Open and this week?

Williams has her reasons, and she makes no apologies for dabbling in the entertainment and fashion worlds.

''I've been playing tennis since I was 4 years old, I'm a darned good player and I've always had outside interests,'' Williams said. ``If all I did was play tennis, I'd be burnt out by now and out of the game. I really believe that. It's not to say I don't work hard at tennis. It's a big misconception when people think I just show up out of shape and win. I work very, very hard, and I'm in better shape than people think I am.''

Williams said she was amused by TV coverage of her run at the Australian Open. She came in at No. 84, having played only four tournaments last year and dropped to No. 140, but she quieted the critics, brushing aside four top-20 players and obliterating then-No. 1 Maria Sharapova in the final 6-1, 6-2.

STUDENT OF THE GAME

Williams was so determined to win in Australia that she watched and dissected every match involving men's finalists Roger Federer and Fernando Gonzalez.

''I enjoyed how Fernando was playing, so aggressive with so few errors, and of course, I loved what Federer was doing, so I tried to pick up some pointers,'' she said. ``Can't say what they are, because my opponents might be reading this story.''

Williams has climbed to No. 18 heading into the Sony Ericsson Open, and firmly believes she will continue to rise in the rankings and strike fear into her opponents.

''Nobody thought I was in shape, and that worked in my favor,'' she said. 'I was watching an early match of mine on replay and the commentator was saying, `If this goes to three sets, Serena will be in trouble,' and I was actually feeling fine. I had trained hard, practiced a lot, and I knew I was ready, even though everyone underestimated me. But I don't care what the media or anyone else thinks.''

She said she no longer gets upset when people make remarks about her physique.

''I always wanted to look like Venus growing up, that tall, thin body that looks so good in all the clothes,'' Williams said. ``Sometimes I felt like I hated her because I wanted my body to look like hers, and I knew it couldn't because I'm built different. I have a big butt and big chest. As females, a lot of us go through that, to the point where people get eating disorders, but we have to learn to love who we are. Other people would tell me they love my body, but I didn't love it. I finally realized not everybody's Mary-Kate [Olsen], and I've been happier with myself.''

Williams is eager to keep her comeback going with a victory at the Crandon Park Tennis Center, where she has won three titles but hasn't played since 2005. If she doesn't win, then she will be rooting for Venus, who also is surging back up the rankings after an injury-filled 2006. Venus, now No. 39 in the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour rankings, is coming off a title at Memphis. The sisters are in the same quarter of the draw.

''We're trying to bring the title back home,'' Williams said. ``Venus and I have both had a lot of success there, and we're going in with a lot of potential. We're back, and we can't be counted out.''

And tennis certainly is more interesting when the Williams sisters are around.

''When Venus and Serena were around and playing each other in the finals, people complained it was boring, but the sport needs them right now,'' TV analyst Mary Carillo said. ``It was astonishing what Serena did in Australia. It was such a one-woman show. I don't know that I've ever seen such a dominating performance in a final. The ferocity in Serena's eyes, you just knew nobody was beating her that day. If she played like that all the time, she'd be Roger Federer.''

BATTLE TO BE WON

Said coach Nick Bolletieri, who has worked with Williams in the past year: ``Serena might have been a little out of shape, but she's a fighter, and that can make up for a lot of deficiencies. She played with a vengeance, with an inner spirit that was a joy to watch. I remember when Richard Williams first introduced me to his daughters. They were 9 and 10. He told me they would rewrite the books.''

And they still might.

''The hallmark of a champion is high quality consistently, fill the pail year after year,'' Carillo said. ``If Serena and Venus decided that's what they want to do, they will put marks on this sport. It's up to them.''

Tennisaddict
Mar 21st, 2007, 01:05 PM
Very positive article. Nice to see they´re finally acknowledging the fact that Serena´s built is normal and that she is not fat.

roarke
Mar 21st, 2007, 01:08 PM
Great positive and insightful article! :yeah: You go, Rena, with your PHAT (Plenty Hips And Thighs) self. :hearts:

Should have said Plenty Hips Ass & Thighs

MrSerenaWilliams
Mar 21st, 2007, 01:14 PM
another :worship::hearts: Great article! :yeah: Can't WAIT to see Ree in her sexy Lilac combos :yeah:

hacberto
Mar 21st, 2007, 01:30 PM
I loved it:hearts:

Go Venus and Serena!!! Take the this title!!!

RenaSlam.
Mar 21st, 2007, 01:34 PM
:worship:

A great read, finally these articles are praising Serena instead of knocking her down. :)

John.
Mar 21st, 2007, 01:35 PM
Great article.

Take the Miami title Serena

mykarma
Mar 21st, 2007, 01:41 PM
She figures big
By Charles Elmore
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, March 21, 2007

A head-snapping comeback from No. 140 in the world last July to win the Australian Open in January has, well, rekindled communications between Serena Williams and corporate America.

Advertisers had not exactly gone away, but neither were they rushing money to her as fast as they were to rivals such as Maria Sharapova. A two-year drought of tournament victories will do that. Forbes magazine estimated last year that Williams makes $10 million in endorsement and prize money annually compared to Sharapova's $19 million.

Talks are ongoing between Williams and half a dozen companies that sell automobiles, timepieces, technology and fragrances. In a few weeks, Camp Serena is expected to announce a deal for a skin-care product.

Williams, who takes the court this week for the first time since Australia at the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, is no stranger to a business meeting, certainly. But this is a new era in the Serena saga.

At 25, her image is no longer that of the cat-suited superheroine who dominated her sport with the "Serena Slam" of four straight majors four years ago.

This is a woman frequently criticized for her weight, chided for her socializing and fledgling careers in entertainment and fashion and questioned for her commitment to tennis. She was politely but firmly called out in an open letter by one of the legends of her sport, Chris Evert, to get in shape and make the most of her abilities.

She is now a different kind of heroine in the eyes of Robyn McGee, the Los Angeles-based author of Hungry for More: A Keeping-it-Real Guide for Black Women on Weight and Body Image.

"She's a huge role model for not just African-American women but all people who have been told you don't have the right dimensions," McGee said Tuesday. "She's not 15 anymore. She has a lot in common with a broad cross section of America. Six out of 10 Americans are considered overweight.

"She's still marketed as her own brand of sex symbol, not as a full-figured clothing spokeswoman. She's not Queen Latifah, but she's one of a kind."

Williams is doing it her way. Her efforts to get back in condition after a 2003 knee surgery haven't produced any dramatic skinny-Oprah moment as she emerges from the player's tunnel. When she's on, her serve and her forehand do the talking.

"I know I am larger than some women players," Williams said in Melbourne's afterglow. But the size of her will seems to matter most.

She admitted she was stung by a loss to Sybille Bammer in a warm-up event, her only loss in 10 matches this year. "I was really angry. I just felt like I should have won."

The world is starting to see Serena through a new lens, her agent Jill Smoller believes.

"She is somebody who has struggles in her life that people can go through," Smoller said. "She's approachable in a different way now. She has become a real person to many fans in a way they may not feel with other tennis players."

It wasn't that Williams bought into tabloid headlines that called her "overweight" and "overpaid" and openly asked whether her tennis career was finished. But she acknowledged that the thought has crossed her mind, in quiet moments at home in Palm Beach Gardens, that maybe she was not going to win a major tournament again.

"There's always times out there where you think, you know, 'Am I ever going to be looking at another trophy?' " Williams said. "Especially since I hadn't won a tournament - let alone a Grand Slam - I hadn't won a tournament in a long time. You know, you're thinking about, 'Wow, will there be another time?''

Her family picked her up, she said.

"Since Day One, my parents, my mom and my dad, have always been so positive," Williams said. "They never stopped believing in me. That helps me believe in me. Venus, as well. I live with her, so I'm with her every day. We always, like, believe in ourselves. You know, it works."

What haunts her, though, are the comparisons to her earlier self. Dominating women's tennis as long as Roger Federer has ruled the men's game would be "the ultimate experience," Williams said this year, prodded by a question. "He's definitely like a role model to me."

Williams did hold the sport in a Federer-like vise for 57 weeks at No. 1, through Aug. 11, 2003. That's about one-third the record 164 weeks Federer has held the men's top spot.

Could it happen again? Probably not, said Mary Joe Fernandez, who will analyze the Sony Ericsson Open for ESPN2.

"I don't think we're ever going to see her play a ton of tournaments, mainly because of her knee," Fernandez said. "That might be tough for her fans to accept, but she's going to pick and choose. But to me, when she's on her game, she's the best one out there."

Williams has pulled out of or skipped every event since Australia, citing a sudden flu in one instance. Her ranking has slipped slightly since February to 18th in the world. That is high enough to place her among seeded players, but in Key Biscayne she will not be able to coast to the quarterfinals. She could meet the winner of a match between top seed Sharapova and sister Venus in the fourth round.

Regardless of Serena's ranking, people tend to watch, said Leif Shiras, commentator for the Tennis Channel, which will carry 64 hours of coverage from Key Biscayne.

"No doubt when Serena is playing you have more viewers," Shiras said. "The fact she's built and made the way she is, I think people can relate to her in a way - perhaps more so than someone like Maria Sharapova. Serena brings to the table a remarkable dimension."

That dimension has never been more evident since Australia.

"I think what happened in Australia was her saying you don't know until you walk in someone's shoes," Smoller said. "She was saying, in effect, 'Here's how I am built. Deal with it. I'm not going to weigh 110 pounds. I'm comfortable with it.' It's how most of the world is. I think people related to her and identified with her."
Great find.

Bijoux0021
Mar 21st, 2007, 02:14 PM
Quote from article:

''When Venus and Serena were around and playing each other in the finals, people complained it was boring, but the sport needs them right now,'' TV analyst Mary Carillo said. ``It was astonishing what Serena did in Australia. It was such a one-woman show. I don't know that I've ever seen such a dominating performance in a final. The ferocity in Serena's eyes, you just knew nobody was beating her that day. If she played like that all the
time, she'd be Roger Federer.''
------
No matter how many times Mary Carillo shows her phony ways, I can't help but be amazed by her hypocritical nature every single time. She was the first to complain that the sisters' matches were boring. She put that comment out there and before we knew it, the other commentators, Williams haters/critics and many people in the media jumped on the bandwagon saying "Venus and Serena were bad for tennis."

Carillo really needs to go back and watch those tapes of the sisters she commented on and see for herself how much she bashed them throughout those matches. I have no doubt that if the sisters dominate tennis again she would say they are bad for the sport all over again. That's the type of hater she is....A typical two-faced, jealous, hypocrite who will never learn.

dangerjenny
Mar 21st, 2007, 03:14 PM
Great Article

OrdinaryfoolisNJ
Mar 21st, 2007, 03:50 PM
That's a nice article, but the fact is Robyn's comment about "people who don't have the right dimensions" does not describe what Chris and others have been talkiing about. I saw Serena play Carson last August (06) in person, and she was huffing, puffing, and sweating up a storm and was clearly "not fit" and overweight FOR A PROFESSIONAL ATHLETE! She's not your "average" person, she's a pro athlete!

That's a fact. Its time for people to stop blaming everyone but Serena. The fact is, that Serena's weight gain was understandable. My hubbie knows her Ortho doc, and she had knee surgery and is probably prone to weight. After her knee physical therapy, Serena still needed to do some body work.

She did not win Australia easily either. There were several matches where her pure grit as a champion pulled her through to victory (not to mention her opponent choking -- can we say Nadia Petrova).

I'm a Serena fan, but lets be honest here! I hope that Serena has been running as much as she can on her knee, and watching her diet, and lifting weights, and hitting the practice courts (as much as she can on her bum knee) so that she can prove that Australia was not a fluke, and that she is CONSISTENTLY back in the mix!

Nancy J/Serena and Venus fan - but my eyes only see the facts please.

StarDuvallGrant
Mar 21st, 2007, 09:15 PM
Should have said Plenty Hips Ass & Thighs

:lol:

PatrickRyan
Mar 21st, 2007, 09:20 PM
:yeah: get that money girl

Lulu.
Mar 21st, 2007, 09:41 PM
Great articles :)

Serena!
Mar 21st, 2007, 09:51 PM
good article

Stamp Paid
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:04 PM
I appreciate the message of the article, and I'm glad Serena is satisfied with her body type, but I hope she is not satisfied with her shape. I believe she can still get into much better shape, she's not like Seles, who couldn't get in better shape.

Rocketta
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:11 PM
That's a nice article, but the fact is Robyn's comment about "people who don't have the right dimensions" does not describe what Chris and others have been talkiing about. I saw Serena play Carson last August (06) in person, and she was huffing, puffing, and sweating up a storm and was clearly "not fit" and overweight FOR A PROFESSIONAL ATHLETE! She's not your "average" person, she's a pro athlete!

But that's not when the media was on Serena the most. It was in January this year at the AO and no one has said she was in the best physical condition she could be in. The point was she wasn't in bad physical condition either but if you believed the media she showed up obese. Considering some of the guts that other women players sport it was quite hypocritical.


That's a fact. Its time for people to stop blaming everyone but Serena. The fact is, that Serena's weight gain was understandable. My hubbie knows her Ortho doc, and she had knee surgery and is probably prone to weight. After her knee physical therapy, Serena still needed to do some body work.

She did not win Australia easily either. There were several matches where her pure grit as a champion pulled her through to victory (not to mention her opponent choking -- can we say Nadia Petrova).

That's not a fact, it's your opinion. Why exactly should people blame Serena for the actions of the media? She was not fat, she is not fat, She did not show up to the AO without doing some work before hand. She was not in the best shape of her life either but she was in better shape then the last time she played. The media acted like she showed up after having chilled in bed eating doughnuts all winter. If you ask me those are the facts and if someone is too busy writing the same old shit over and over again to take the time to notice that some things had changed well then yeah they deserve the blame and the scorn too.


I'm a Serena fan, but lets be honest here! I hope that Serena has been running as much as she can on her knee, and watching her diet, and lifting weights, and hitting the practice courts (as much as she can on her bum knee) so that she can prove that Australia was not a fluke, and that she is CONSISTENTLY back in the mix!

Nancy J/Serena and Venus fan - but my eyes only see the facts please.

We are all Serena fans. Let's really be honest. Serena has some problematic genes she's working with and she's getting older. Any interruption in her training will cause her to gain more weight than the average athlete. Those are the facts and that's what Serena means by being normal. She's not willing to make the type of sacrifices she would have to for her 2002-2003 shape to come back but why should she? How well is that working for Meghan Shaughnessy? It's her life and it's her body and I didn't hear Serena complaining about it so why should anyone else? :shrug:

Oh and also Sharapova was struggling like nobody's business but somehow her committment and fitness were never questioned (not saying that it should've)? Exactly how many slams does Serena need to win to shake the fluke title? How exactly do you prove that your 8th slam wasn't a fluke? :scratch: Well I earned the first 7 but that 8th total Fluke! :tape: :lol: :shrug:

Rocketta
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:15 PM
I appreciate the message of the article, and I'm glad Serena is satisfied with her body type, but I hope she is not satisfied with her shape. I believe she can still get into much better shape, she's not like Seles, who couldn't get in better shape.

I have no doubts that Serena knows she still needs to work on her fitness. I just wonder why is it so black or white for people.....she's either in horrible shape or she should be in the best shape of her life? She may never reach that goal again but even if she did there would still be people who would call her fat, too big, etc. and that's what I think Serena's point is about being ok with yourself.

Volcana
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:27 PM
But that's not when the media was on Serena the most. It was in January this year at the AO and no one has said she was in the best physical condition she could be in. The point was she wasn't in bad physical condition either but if you believed the media she showed up obese.I have to agree with this. Some of the radio people in New York were dismissing her saying she weighed, and I quote '500 pounds'.

You've got to measure people against their own best perfomances. Maybe Serena WOULD be 25% better if she lost 20 lbs. But she was good enough to use the world #1 for target practice in the last slam.

SAEKeithSerena
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:36 PM
she's winning Miami. 'nuff said.

supergrunt
Mar 21st, 2007, 10:46 PM
I can't believe that she was listening to the commentary :eek:

tennisbum79
Mar 21st, 2007, 11:03 PM
Quote from article:

''When Venus and Serena were around and playing each other in the finals, people complained it was boring, but the sport needs them right now,'' TV analyst Mary Carillo said. ``It was astonishing what Serena did in Australia. It was such a one-woman show. I don't know that I've ever seen such a dominating performance in a final. The ferocity in Serena's eyes, you just knew nobody was beating her that day. If she played like that all the
time, she'd be Roger Federer.''
------
No matter how many times Mary Carillo shows her phony ways, I can't help but be amazed by her hypocritical nature every single time. She was the first to complain that the sisters' matches were boring. She put that comment out there and before we knew it, the other commentators, Williams haters/critics and many people in the media jumped on the bandwagon saying "Venus and Serena were bad for tennis."

Carillo really needs to go back and watch those tapes of the sisters she commented on and see for herself how much she bashed them throughout those matches. I have no doubt that if the sisters dominate tennis again she would say they are bad for the sport all over again. That's the type of hater she is....A typical two-faced, jealous, hypocrite who will never learn.

Mary Carillo was leading the chorus of TV announcers, that included Pam Shriver, Chris Evert, Martina Nav that accused the sisters and Richard Williams of staging boring matches.

Not to forget boring players like Mauresmo and Justine, whose complains were more lamentations for not being abel to win because of the sisters:
They said " it is boring because the same players (Venus and Serena) win all the time, and that the fans would like to see other people (meaning they) win too"

supergrunt
Mar 21st, 2007, 11:14 PM
I don't understand how any one could dislike Serena. She is very human.

spokenword73
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:11 AM
But that's not when the media was on Serena the most. It was in January this year at the AO and no one has said she was in the best physical condition she could be in. The point was she wasn't in bad physical condition either but if you believed the media she showed up obese. Considering some of the guts that other women players sport it was quite hypocritical.



That's not a fact, it's your opinion. Why exactly should people blame Serena for the actions of the media? She was not fat, she is not fat, She did not show up to the AO without doing some work before hand. She was not in the best shape of her life either but she was in better shape then the last time she played. The media acted like she showed up after having chilled in bed eating doughnuts all winter. If you ask me those are the facts and if someone is too busy writing the same old shit over and over again to take the time to notice that some things had changed well then yeah they deserve the blame and the scorn too.



We are all Serena fans. Let's really be honest. Serena has some problematic genes she's working with and she's getting older. Any interruption in her training will cause her to gain more weight than the average athlete. Those are the facts and that's what Serena means by being normal. She's not willing to make the type of sacrifices she would have to for her 2002-2003 shape to come back but why should she? How well is that working for Meghan Shaughnessy? It's her life and it's her body and I didn't hear Serena complaining about it so why should anyone else? :shrug:

Oh and also Sharapova was struggling like nobody's business but somehow her committment and fitness were never questioned (not saying that it should've)? Exactly how many slams does Serena need to win to shake the fluke title? How exactly do you prove that your 8th slam wasn't a fluke? :scratch: Well I earned the first 7 but that 8th total Fluke! :tape: :lol: :shrug:

^^^Yeah, what Rocketta said. :bigclap:

dreamgoddess099
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:18 AM
I don't understand how any one could dislike Serena. She is very human.
They hate her because she doesn't make any apologies. She's good and she knows it, that's too much bravado for some peoples test. Believe it or not, some feel she should be more self depreciating, you know, play down her gifts as to not make others feel bad about being less gifted. In other words, it's ok to totally embarrass an opponent on court by beating them like a redheaded stepchild, just make sure you don't acknowledge that you meant or liked it. Serena will always be viewed as the "bad girl" because she refuses to be fake and pretend it doesn't give her pleasure to totally demolish her opponents. Serena's only crime is that she's a female, if she were a male sports star she'd be seen as some sort of sporting God for having such fire.

Sir Stefwhit
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:19 AM
Keep the articles coming! I'm not used to all this positivity in the media- what's going on?

serenafan08
Mar 22nd, 2007, 12:41 AM
THAT'S good journalism. Great article and a nice read! I'm looking forward to seeing Serena in Miami! :yeah:

RVD
Mar 22nd, 2007, 01:28 AM
What wonderful articles!!
It's GREAT to be a Williams fan. :bounce: :bounce:
Can't wait till play begins. I can barely contain myself. :scared: :lol:

VS Fan
Mar 22nd, 2007, 01:54 AM
Serena is SMOKIN' HOT!! I don't give a damn what the media says.

She may weigh 160 lbs but it is in ALL the right places.

She is welcome at my place ANYTIME!!

stevos
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:51 AM
"The world is starting to see Serena through a new lens, her agent Jill Smoller believes.

"She is somebody who has struggles in her life that people can go through," Smoller said. "She's approachable in a different way now. She has become a real person to many fans in a way they may not feel with other tennis players.""

So true, this year I feel like some tournaments she's missed and stuff, I used to feel that she would miss them because of personal things and she was just lazy. Especially when she wouldn't tell us what exactly was going on.

But now I realize she is just a class act who won't make lame excuses for missing a tournament. I feel like she actually did have a lot of struggles and was training really hard, even though I didnt believe it at the time.

Good for Serena :D