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goldenlox
Jan 22nd, 2007, 11:15 AM
The New Hingis: Chakvetadze is Martina With a Twist

http://www.****** **************/chakvetadze_aussie_012107.html

Anna on Potential Sharapova Match: 'If I use my game plan right, then I can win'


FROM THE AUSTRALIAN OPEN –There are just two Russians who have lost just one match since October – Maria Sharapova and guess who, Anna Chakvetadze, who after whipping eighth seed Patty Schnyder 6-4, 6-1 on Monday, has won out of her 15 out of her last 16 matches. Tracy Austin calls the creative and clean ball stroker the new Martina Hingis. Not a bad call, although the thin blonde thinks that she packs a little more punch than the once great Swiss.
“Martina is a great player, a former No. 1 and it’s a compliment that they say that, but I think I hit the ball little harder than Martina,” Chakvetadze told TR.net

The label might stick if the 19-year-old continues to display the same intelligence that she’s showed during the past few months. She’s very hard to read, especially when she’s hitting out of an open stance, because she seems to wait until the last second to decide which direction she's going. She plays the angles adeptly, but more importantly, she’s secure in both her crosscourt and down the line game off both wings. Her serve is mediocre and her net game is still a work in progress, but there aren’t many gaping holes in her technique.

“ My groundstroke are okay and when I feel my return, I’m really okay.”

More than okay, apparently.

Not every player can play with such assurance and given that Chakvetadze is quick and is rarely off balance, she has a lot of options at her disposal. Knowing when to use which shot and when will come with more experience.

“I’m trying to play smart but I don’t always do it,” she said.

Seeded No. 12, the Russian has had a bang-up past four months, winning Guangzhou, and then stunning Russia by talking it’s highly coveted national championships, other wise known as Moscow, a Tier I. There, she bested Dinara Safina, Francesca Schiavone, Elena Dementieva and Nadia Petrova. Before the AO, she won Hobart. Here at the Aussie Open, she played one lousy set, against Laura Granville in the second round, but when she’s had to step up and close, she has.

“After I beat Petrova in San Diego, I started to believe I can beat top players,” said Chakvetadze. “Then I started player better and better at every tournament. I didn’t play well against Golovin at the US Open, but she played great. But I already believed by then that when I got on court, that I could win. It’s all confidence.”

The 5-foot 7, 128-pound Chakvetadze can tire out and says that when she’s not training or playing, that she naturally loses weight. When she first came on tour she was a substantial head case and is very hard on herself when she loses. She simply seethed if she made an unforced error.

“I’m concentrating more now, not losing easy points,” she said.

She’s very hard on herself, so much so that she offered that an easy draw was part o the reason for her progress here. She doesn’t smile nearly enough and is more than a bit of a perfectionist.

[I am pretty hard on myself],” she said. “That's how I'm thinking. I don't want to talk, like some of the players, they like to say, ‘I will win a Grand Slam.’ All the players want to win a Grand Slam. I just play.”

Like Kim Clijsters and Roger Federer, Chakvetadze is coach-less. Those two are veterans, but she’s not. She’s at the Aussie Open with her father, Djambuli, and her hitting partner, Australian Andre Roberts. She's not giving her dad lot of props for designing strategies.

“He’s not like my coach, he just my dad,” she said. “He helps a little, but I’m trying to think by myself about my game.”

Chakvetadze will play either Maria Sharapova or Vera Zvonareva in the next round, two players she’s familiar with. She lost to Sharapova at ’05 Roland Garros and then fell to her 7-5 in the third set at ’05 Los Angeles. After that loss, she shed tears. The two are less than a month apart in age and not as far apart as one would think in overall ability. Sharapova has proven herself to be mentally tougher, now it’s up to Chakvetadze to show that her eyes won’t get wet when the going gets tough on the big stage.

“I’m happy to play in second week," she said. “ It's different, because the pressure is on. I’m just trying to stay calm because when I don’t, I can’t play tennis. I’m still working on that. I start to think more about the next point, how to beat my opponent and not get frustrated after the point I lost. Now I have more confidence and I know how should I play. If I use my game plan right, then I can win.”

goldenlox
Jan 22nd, 2007, 03:55 PM
ANNA Chakvetadze is not like some of the others. Not for her the modern way of talking herself up, laying bare her grand slam dreams and forecasting the spoils that will one day be hers. "I just play. We will see what's happen."
Latterly, she has been just playing very well, with yesterday's 6-4, 6-1 domination of the veteran Swiss Patty Schnyder taking the 19-year-old to 21 wins from her past 22 matches, a deep purple patch that has brought titles at three of her past four tournaments.
Eighteen Russian women began this Australian Open, eight of them seeded. Chakvetadze, the 12th seed, has progressed to the last eight, where she will play the winner of last night's meeting of compatriots Maria Sharapova and Vera Zvonareva. She may not want to talk about it, but her status as a rising force is beyond dispute.
So prevalent is the "Rus" abbreviation in contemporary grand slam draws that it is easy to lump Russia's women together, with Sharapova out in front and a gaggle of wannabes straining at the hem of her corsetted dress. It is too early to pluck Chakvetadze as the one to emerge from the pack, but her game is moving in the right direction.
Barbara Schett, the popular Austrian who played here 11 times, was her first significant victim, falling to the then 17-year-old in the first round at the 2004 US Open. She knew nothing of her at the time, but has taken notice since.
"She's a little bit in the shadow of the others — Sharapova, Petrova, Myskina, Kuznetsova — and that probably suits her. The attention is not that big on her, and she can just quietly slip through the draw," Schett said yesterday.
"When I played against her, her serve was not good, but now it's a lot better. She's a pretty consistent player out there now."
Aggression is a word Chakvetadze uses often, and Schett agrees it is her dominant feature. "That's the Russian game." But yesterday's triumph illustrated there is more to this particular Russian Anna than meets the eye.
She plays a patient game for a teenager with limited guidance from above; Chakvetadze has not officially had a coach for six months, although Schett supports the theory that her father Djambuli, who travels with her, essentially fills the role.
She also reads the game beautifully, as if she's already watched it on TV and knows every line in the script.
Schnyder jumped out to a 4-1 lead, at which point Chakvetadze said she found some rhythm against the Swiss' heavily spun balls.
Schnyder had been to the last eight here in each of the previous three years, but her body language soon smacked of resignation, and the realisation that she was up against a player who was already her equal, perhaps better.
She won just one more game for the match, becoming visibly distressed by the precision of Chakvetadze's anticipation, as if she were tapping into her thoughts. Schnyder turning to her entourage, arms outstretched and asking, "What can I do?" was a telling snapshot.
So now to the quarter-finals, a first for Chakvetadze at this level. Meeting one of her fellows is no cause for concern; most of them are very nice, she said, although noting that you can't be friends with everyone.
"Of course, it's mentally a little bit different because we know each other better. But I'm not thinking like, 'OK, she's Russian, I have to beat her'."
No, being on the other side of the net is reason enough.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/tennis/chakvetadze-emerges-from-russian-wannabes/2007/01/22/1169330831807.html

goldenlox
Jan 22nd, 2007, 04:01 PM
CHAKVETADZE/P. Schnyder
6‑4, 6‑1

Q. Not so good early on, but then it all changed very quickly. Anything you can put your finger on that turned it around for you?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, I started very slow today. But you have to get used to Patty's game because she play with so much spin. Ball is bouncing so high here. Vodafone is a little bit different court because I played outside courts all my matches.
I just had to get used to it, then I found my rhythm and played better.

Q. Did you step more inside the court? Is that what you did?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, I just started play more aggressive.

Q. So you were pretty composed out there the whole time. How does it feel to be in the quarterfinals?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I'm happy to be in quarterfinals, for sure. I didn't expect that when I came here because usually I play very bad in Australia (smiling). I'm happy to be in quarterfinals.

Q. Mentally were you nervous at all going into the match knowing you were playing a veteran player?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I just try go to the court, just to win. I'm not thinking about who is my opponent.
Before the match, of course, I'm thinking. But during the match, I just thinking about how to beat her, and which level.

Q. You might have Sharapova in the next round. You played her twice. Didn't get the chance to play her in Moscow. You almost beat her in 2005.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, almost. But I lost. She have to beat Zvonareva first. I think it will be very difficult match today. Zvonareva is playing pretty good here. I mean, they both are tough, so we'll see how it goes.

Q. Can you talk about if you have to play either one, what you have to do against each other.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: They both play pretty similar. They hit very flat, good serve. Better backhand, I think. Well, I played against Vera on grass and I lost very close match. I don't know. They both very tough opponents. I have to be ready.

Q. Do you feel you're a much better player now than you were when you lost to Maria the last time you played her?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, I think so because now I have more confidence and I know how should I play. I mean, if I will play ‑‑ if I use my game plan, you know, right, then I can win I think.

Q. Your anticipation seems to be a strength. Is this a natural gift, something you're conscious of that you work on?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, I'm trying to work than it. Sometimes it really happen, but sometimes I have bad days and I just can't play.

Q. Bad days, you mean you guess the wrong way to go?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: What?

Q. You guess the wrong way. You seemed today to guess the right way every time.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I'm just trying to watch her racquet, where she want to hit.

Q. I think there are 27 Russian women and girls here competing. It's easy for the media to think of them as a group. Do you look upon the other Russian girls as friends or rivals?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Of course friends because we spend so much time on the tour. You can't be friends with everyone because it's different personalities, all the players. But most of them are very nice. I'm friends with them.

Q. Is it important for you to beat them as rivals and to sort of work your way up, get a profile for yourself?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I'm not thinking to beat them. I just want to, you know, play one more match and get one more match. I'm not thinking about that she's from my home country.
Of course, it's mentally a little bit different because we know each other better. But I'm not thinking like, Okay, she's Russian, I have to beat her.

Q. Patty didn't fight very much today. Have you been surprised by her behavior?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, I actually was surprised. But I was trying to play concentrate second set because I knew that she's a fighter.
If she win like two easy points, she can start to fight. I think I served pretty well. That helped me a lot, especially in the second set.

Q. You're on a real winning streak at the moment. Can you ever remember being as confident going into matches as you are now?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: No.

Q. That's a real noticeable thing to you, very important?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Uh‑huh. I won like 20 matches I think, 19 or something. So, yes, I get more confidence of course. But it's also depends against who are you playing. I mean, I think here I have pretty good draw, especially first two rounds. It can be tricky when you play like first round.
Maybe she's like Mirza or Chinese, maybe she's not seeded, but she's good player. And here I think draw was good for me.

Q. So you're not giving yourself a lot of credit?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: No, not really (smiling).

Q. Are you pretty hard on yourself?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, I am.

Q. Is that good or is that bad?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I don't know. You tell me if it's good or bad. I don't know. I mean, that's how I'm thinking. I don't know.
I don't want to talk, like some of the players, they like to say, I will win a Grand Slam. I mean, all the players want to win a Grand Slam. All the players, they want to win their match.
I don't know. I just play. We will see what's happen.

goldenlox
Jan 22nd, 2007, 04:03 PM
For a shot at the semi-finals, top-seeded Sharapova will meet another hard-hitting Russian, 19-year-old Anna Chakvetadze.
They have met three times before but Sharapova had trouble recalling that when interviewed after last night's match.
"I've never played her before. Yes, I have. What am I saying?" Sharapova said. :lol: :tape:
"She's had some great results in the last couple of months. Another great Russian coming up so I'm looking forward to that."
Chakvetadze, the 12th seed who won at Hobart in a warm-up to this event, has a walkover against Sharapova in last October's Kremlin Cup in Moscow as her only victory.
The last time the pair actually played was in Los Angeles in 2005, when Sharapova won in three sets.
Chakvetadze said she was an improved player.
"Yes, I think so because now I have more confidence and I know how should I play," she said.
"I mean, if I use my game plan, you know, correctly, then I can win I think."

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,21102374-2722,00.html

lilimi
Jan 22nd, 2007, 04:17 PM
For a shot at the semi-finals, top-seeded Sharapova will meet another hard-hitting Russian, 19-year-old Anna Chakvetadze.
They have met three times before but Sharapova had trouble recalling that when interviewed after last night's match.
"I've never played her before. Yes, I have. What am I saying?" Sharapova said. :lol: :tape:
"She's had some great results in the last couple of months. Another great Russian coming up so I'm looking forward to that."
Chakvetadze, the 12th seed who won at Hobart in a warm-up to this event, has a walkover against Sharapova in last October's Kremlin Cup in Moscow as her only victory.
The last time the pair actually played was in Los Angeles in 2005, when Sharapova won in three sets.
Chakvetadze said she was an improved player.
"Yes, I think so because now I have more confidence and I know how should I play," she said.
"I mean, if I use my game plan, you know, correctly, then I can win I think."

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,21102374-2722,00.html

:rolleyes: this girl is killing me:help: :haha:. her words are so cant that she doesn't listen to questions...
thank you for the articles, goldenlox!

goldenlox
Jan 23rd, 2007, 11:51 AM
Latest Russian To Emerge Draws Her Country's Best
Tennis

BY TOM PERROTTA
January 23, 2007


http://www.nysun.com/pf.php?id=47174

MELBOURNE, Australia — Russia has produced yet another fine talent in the world of tennis, and on Wednesday she'll take her chances against her country's reigning queen, Maria Sharapova, in the Australian Open quarterfinals.
The 19-year-old Anna Chakvetadze may be a month older than Sharapova, but she's a novice in terms of Grand Slam success, having reached her first major quarterfinal at this event. She'd prefer her run did not end there.
"If I use my game plan, you know, right, then I can win I think," she said after dumping no. 8 seed Patty Schnyder in the fourth round, 6–4, 6–1.
Unlike many of her Russian counterparts — such as Svetlana Kuznetsova, Elena Dementieva, and Vera Zvonareva, who gave Sharapova a fair challenge on Monday — Chakvetadze is more of a thinker than thumper. She's not too tall (5-foot-7) and her frame is slight. While she hits impressive groundstrokes, she wins because of her speed, anticipation, court positioning, and, on good days, her ability to wait patiently for openings. Tracy Austin, the former world no. 1 who is a commentator for Australian television, said in an interview on Monday that Chakvetadze has much in common with the tour's best tactician, Martina Hingis, minus the volleying expertise.
"It's the way that she uses the court, the way she is always balanced," Austin said. "She doesn't really look rushed."
Chakvetadze was flattered by the comparison but suggested there were some differences between her and Hingis.
"I think I hit the ball a little harder than Martina does," she said. "I'm trying to play smart. It's not all the time I can do that."
Chakvetadze is perhaps quicker around the court, too, and with less effort.
"Some people seem to put a lot of effort into everything they do," Austin said. "Someone like [Jelena] Jankovic, you feel like she is working so hard every point, digging and grinding. Chakvetadze, she just seems to kind of be there."
Since last October, Chakvetadze has won 16 matches (including a walkover against Sharapova in Moscow) and three titles while losing once. In that time, she's beaten Elena Dementieva, Nadia Petrova, Dinara Safina, and Jankovic. But she said her victories over Petrova and Ana Ivanovic, in San Diego last year, convinced her that she could compete against the game's top players. At the moment, she's traveling without a coach, accompanied only by her father, Djambuli.
"He's not like my coach, he's just my dad," she said. "He's helping a little bit. I'm just trying to think by myself."
An injured Sharapova forfeited her match against Chakvetadze in Moscow, but the last time they met before that, in Los Angeles in 2005, Chakvetadze came to tears after letting a winning opportunity slip away in three sets. So far at this year's Australian Open, Sharapova has not overwhelmed her challengers. She nearly lost in the first round to Camille Pin, a pesky scrambler who used 100-degree heat to her advantage. Against Zvonareva, Sharapova almost blew a two-break lead in the second set, but charged back from 0–40 to serve out the match, 7–5, 6–4. If Chakvetadze can stay with Sharapova early, she'll have her chance.
"I'm just trying to stay calm because when I am excited I can't play tennis," she said.
The winner of Sharapova and Chakvetadze will meet the winner of Kim Clijsters and Martina Hingis, a rematch of last year's quarterfinal. Clijsters won that one in three sets and then had to retire in the semifinals against Amelie Mauresmo. The 24-year-old Belgian is playing her last Australian Open, and seems in form to win her second major title.
***

goldenlox
Jan 24th, 2007, 11:35 AM
After AO QF

THE MODERATOR: Question.

Q. Was it a matter of survival of the fittest at the end, who was the stronger at the end?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, definitely Maria was today. She is stronger. I guess she played very well. She's a great fighter. I think she deserve this win. I can just wish her good luck in semis.


Q. Was she a little more aggressive than you?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes. I think I need to improve to be more aggressive on important points especially because, yes, she was a little bit more aggressive than me.


Q. You seemed quite nervous at the start. Did it take you a while to settle down?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: No, I wasn't nervous at all, not at all. Maybe on the tiebreak because I was up like 5‑3 and I had so many opportunities. I just didn't use it. That's, you know, a little bit strange because on the tiebreak, so many points are lost so easy balls.

I don't think it's because nerves. I just need to be more aggressive on the important points. That's what I think.


Q. What do you do about that? Will that be something you'll pick up on the next tournament, being more aggressive?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, definitely I will work on it. But, you know, it's tough to be aggressive because Maria, she's hitting the ball so hard. Especially in the warmup, I thought she will kill me (laughter). I couldn't put one ball on court because she played one ball on me, and the other ball like somewhere. I couldn't, you know, get where is the ball going, she was hitting so hard.

It's also tough to play aggressive against these kind of players because they play aggressive and you should mix your game a little bit more. But important balls, of course, you should be more aggressive.


Q. On speed and placement, you were staying with her.

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, but I think she won all the important balls. I didn't use my opportunities in the first as well as second set because it was like two or three games Love‑30 on her serve. I just didn't use them. That's why I lost.

It was close match, but Maria won. I think she played better today than me and she deserve it, definitely.


Q. Your shoulder, what happened?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: It was tight in the morning. I had some treatment on it. During the match I felt pain, strain from the backside. I definitely should call the trainer earlier, not after first set. I think I should call it before I'm serve on that game at 5‑4. Maybe it would help me.

I got some antiinflammatories and pain gone in second set after few games.


Q. What is the problem?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Strain, right shoulder strain.


Q. You hurt it before the match?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: No, it was really tight before. As I said, I had a treatment on it. I felt it okay. But maybe Maria's hitting so hard, my shoulder was getting tighter.


Q. Was it bothering you in previous matches or only this one?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, you know, that's amazing because something is happen when I'm playing important matches. Like against Hingis in Montréal I had injury, again, my right hand. Here, as well. I should do something to myself. Should stay healthy, you know, to beat these kind of players.

I mean, it was my tenth match in a row. I felt tired. I just need to stay healthy and maybe not play tournament before a Grand Slam.


Q. You seemed to be having her running more than you were running a lot of that match. You had her moving a lot. Is that a good sign for your future?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, that was my game plan, you know, to move her. If I would play all balls to her, it will be very difficult. Yes, you know, I was running I think well today. But my hands and my arms was little bit sore and stiff. You know, especially those easy shots, I couldn't put it where I wanted. That was the problem, especially important points.


Q. You're the same age as Maria. When did you first know her or meet her?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Good question actually. I think I saw her on TV when I played juniors and she played main draw of US Open or something. It was on TV. I think she beat someone the first round. I just remember her dress, that's it (smiling).


Q. Why is that?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: It was pink dress. I just remember the color actually. Sorry.


Q. Do you remember what year that was?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Year?


Q. 2002?

ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I don't really remember. Sorry

andrewbroad
Jan 24th, 2007, 01:12 PM
Excellent appreciation of Anna's game in these articles. Except this:

Her serve is mediocre.

Anna has a great serve, especially for a girl of 5'7"! It's consistently deep, although she can also hit short-angled serves to the sidelines, which are very effective as they push her opponent way beyond the sideline to hit the return. Anna hits a lot of aces, both out wide and down the middle.

And Anna has a great one-two punch: most of the time, her serve doesn't win the point directly, but sets up a groundstroke-winner on the third stroke of the rally.

[from my Anna Chakvetadze Biography (http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/chakv/biography.html)]

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/ (http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/)
http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/ (http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/)
http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/chakv/ (http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/chakv/)

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Anna_Chakvetadze/ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Anna_Chakvetadze/)
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jeldani/ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jeldani/)

Wintermute
Jan 24th, 2007, 06:23 PM
Anna has a great serve, especially for a girl of 5'7"! (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jeldani/)

I don't think Anna served especially well against Maria, at least not compared to the way she served in Moscow last year. Her serve certainly is more effective on a faster surface.

She hit 12 aces in this tournament which puts her 11th overall on the leaderboard. However, she also hit 12 double faults.

goldenlox
Feb 8th, 2007, 07:21 PM
http://www.sport365.fr/medias/sporever/sport365_300x135/tennis/femmes/52017_CHAKVETADZE_080207.jpg

Relive the chat session with Anna Chakvetadze

Here are the highlights of Thursday afternoon’s chat session with Anna Chakvetadze. (Photo: DR)

Tom: People often compare you to Martina Hingis because of your game analysis, what do you think about this comparison?
Martina is an incredible player but I don’t like being compared to others. Each player is unique. We all have different personalities and styles.

titi: What are your goals this season?
To make it in the top 10, then we’ll see…

henry: Who is your best friend on the WTA tour?
I get along well with all Russian players, but my best friend is probably Elena Vesnina, my former doubles partner.

Olivier: Given the number of excellent Russian players, maybe throughout your career you won’t have the opportunity to make it to the Olympic Games or the Fed Cup… Don’t you feel like taking on Norwegian of Bahamian citizenship?
It’s true that several of us have the opportunity to play in Russian teams. For the Fed Cup, you have to keep in mind that the coach decides. As for the Olympics, I still have enough time to improve my ranking.

anna: Who is the player you dread most on the circuit?
Nobody. The top 10 players are obviously very hard to play, but I’m not scared.

mymycoucou: Even if you play against a Frenchwoman, either Amélie or Nathalie, I hope that you will have a good match and that the public won’t be too much against you, because you’re a sweet player.
Thanks, it’s true that it’s going to be very difficult for me in these conditions, but I also think it will be a very interesting game.

vic: Who were your idols when you were younger?
Steffi Graf, I admired her a lot, and also Mary Pierce.

rafa: Apart from Federer, who do you enjoy watching on the men’s circuit?
I really like to watch Marat Safin, but only when he wins because when he looses, he gets angry and sometimes it’s not pretty to watch…

Tennis: Why do so many Russians play so well at the moment? Do you have a secret?
Of course we have a secret, but I won’t tell you! (laughs)

jearmy: If you have to pick a tournament, which one would you like to win?
One of the Grand Slams, any one…

Coach: If you could steal a shot from your opponents, whose serve would you take? Whose forehand? Whose Backhand? Whose volley?
I’d like to take Roddick’s serve, Gonzales’s forehand… As well as Federer’s backhand and mental. Then I’d be world number 1, easy! No one could beat me. (laughs)

go anna: How do you deal with the stress before a crucial match?
I listen to music, I isolate myself, I think about my game plan and the way I have to play.

momo: What is your favourite city in the world?
My native town, Moscow.

MariaKirilenko: Anna, do you have a boyfriend?
No I don’t but if you would like to introduce me to someone… No problem! (laughs)

Tony K: What are your hobbies?
Unfortunately I don’t have much time for a hobby. I know it sounds boring, but really, it’s not…

Lator: According to you, who is the sexiest player?
Errr… Fernando Gonzalez!

paulo: Apart from tennis, who are your favourite athletes or who is your favourite team?
I love football, especially Chelsea and Milan AC. I also like wrestling because a lot of my friends practise this sport.

Dudu: Who is your favourite actor?
I have no favourite actress, but among the actors, it’s Johnny Depp.

bob: What kind of music do you like?
Depends on my mood but when I go out I like R&B better… Before a match I like to listen to Prodigy to wake up!!!

goldenlox
Feb 17th, 2007, 06:00 PM
Russia's newest wonder girl; Chakvetadze breaks Top 10

To face Mauresmo; Clijsters v. Golovin

FROM THE PROXIMUS DIAMOND GAMES IN ANTWERP – Anna Chakvetadze keeps on churning and after her 6-3, 6-4 win over Nadia Petrova in the quarterfinals, cracked the Top 10 for the first time.
Amazingly, the 19-year-old is 4-0 against her elder Russian, who has been a solid Top-10 player for two years.

"I don't know if her game suits me, I think she made a lot of unforced errors today," Chakvetadze told TRnet. "But she played a lot of matches lately so she could be tired. I didn't know I could reach the Top 10 today. It's nice, but I won't play in Dubai and Doha the next weeks so I will drop out again. I don't really care that much about my ranking anyway. I just want to improve my game, win matches and then my ranking will take care of itself."

Petrova came off a title run in Paris last week, where she beat red-hot Czech Lucie Safarova in the final. Chakvetadze lost in the French capital against Amelie Mauresmo in the quarters, but will have a chance to get her revenge on Saturday, when the two square off for a final berth.
Mauresmo convincingly brushed aside Dinara Safina, 6-3, 6-1.

The '07 Hobart champion looks forward to face Mauresmo in a neutral ambiance. "In Paris, the atmosphere was not nice," Chakvetadze said. "You know that the crowd will support Amelie, but they were not fair to both players. Here in Antwerp everyone is supporting Kim, but they show respect for the others as well."

Chakvetadze is not your average up-and-comer. Where most talented youngsters bring a flat-out power game to the court, Anna C. plays a little more with her head.

"First of all, I'm not as tall as [Nicole] Vaidisova or [Ana] Ivanovic," she says. "I can't hit as hard, so I need to find other ways to win. I try to look for weaknesses in my opponent's game and play accordingly."

The inventive and quick Russian, so reminiscent of Martina Hingis, had her breakthrough year in 2006, starting the season just inside the Top 40, but finishing strong with a career first title at the Tier III in Guangzhou and a Tier I win in Moscow. Her impressive year end run put the 19-year-old among the world's best 15 players.

"I never thought I would win a Tier I last year. When I won my first tournament in Guangzhou, that gave me a lot of confidence. This helped me to do well in Moscow."

In her early days on tour, Chakvetadze frequently lost control of her emotions on court, breaking into tears when a match didn't go her way. She starts laughing and says, "You haven't seen me play in the Under -14s."

On the Sony Ericsson Tour website, Chakvetadze has said she wants to break the Top 5 within three years. "No, no, that's not true," she said. "The WTA wanted to know my goals so I just said 'Top 5 would be nice,' but it's not something I'm really aiming for."

In order to settle in amongst the elite, Chakvetadze knows she still has work to do. She's 14-2 in 2007, and has won 24 out of her last 27 matches. "I need to further improve my confidence so I can play well on the important moments. And my serve and fitness need to get better, too."

At the Australian Open, Chakvetadze faced top-seeded compatriot Maria Sharapova in her first ever Grand Slam quarterfinal. She served for the first set at 5-4, but eventually went down in straight sets. She moved the ball around nicely, but couldn't hit her spots when it counted.

"People said I played well that match, but I didn't win the important points. Maria played better than I did that day, but it was good I made the quarters."

One might think that Chakvetadze would have Parisian dreams, but likes the bright big Apple better.
"I would love to win the US Open. It was the first Grand Slam I played in 2004 and I beat [the then No. 3 Anastasia] Myskina when I was just coming up. I just love the whole atmosphere in New York. I also have a lot of friends there."

http://www.tennis reporters.net/chakvetadze_antwerp_021607_c.html (http://www.********************/chakvetadze_antwerp_021607_c.html)

goldenlox
Feb 19th, 2007, 04:06 PM
Russia's Chakvetadze realises 2007 ambition
By Emma Davis

ANTWERP, Belgium, Feb 19 (Reuters) - Russia's Anna Chakvetadze has realised her 2007 ambition of breaking into the women's top 10 rankings for the first time after a strong showing at the Diamond Games.

The 19 year-old, who went out in the semi-finals of the tournament in Antwerp to eventual winner Amelie Mauresmo, moved up two places on Monday to number 10 in the world.

Having achieved that ambition, she said she wanted to gain more confidence in matches against top-flight players.

"Before, I had said I wanted to be in the top 10," the Moscow-born player told Reuters. "For me, it's more important now to improve my game and to win some matches and tournaments.

"The first thing is my fitness. I'm working on it. I have some parts of my game which I know I have to work on too. My serve and a couple of things I don't want to tell you about. We will see," added Chakvetadze, who has won three tour titles.

In Antwerp, she gave world number three Mauresmo a tough game in parts, breaking her serve and holding off two break points to take the second set. But the Frenchwoman took advantage of a string of unforced errors from Chakvetadze.

"I lost concentration for three or four games in the third set and that's why I lost the match. I just have to gain more confidence when I play more important players," said Chakvetadze.

"To win, you have to play all important balls with a bit more aggression," added the wrestling fan, who prepares for matches by listening to tunes by The Prodigy.

Chakvetadze's breakthrough means five of the women's top 10 are now Russian, led by world number one Maria Sharapova.

But while Chakvetadze has previously stated she wanted to be in the world's top five within three years, the Australian Open quarter-finalist declined to put a time limit on winning a grand slam title.

"A lot of players will talk about it. It's a dream for everyone. Of course I would like to win a grand slam but I don't know when and I don't want to talk about it," the Chelsea and AC Milan soccer fan said.

She was wary of playing too many tournaments and the problems with injury that can bring.

"For me, I'm getting tired if I play too many matches. I need some rest afterwards so I think I will play three tournaments on clay this year," said the Russian, who plans to compete on the surface in Warsaw, Berlin and Rome
"Hopefully I will be ready for three in a row," she said.

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/breaking...426163,00.html (http://sport.guardian.co.uk/breakingnews/feedstory/0,,-6426163,00.html)

Wintermute
May 14th, 2007, 06:03 PM
There is a feature interview with Anna in the new Ace Tennis magazine. A lot of it seems to be a retread of stuff I've read before but if you're in the UK it might be worth picking up a copy.

Spiritof42
May 15th, 2007, 08:36 AM
There is a feature interview with Anna in the new Ace Tennis magazine. A lot of it seems to be a retread of stuff I've read before but if you're in the UK it might be worth picking up a copy.
Someone will hopefully scan it and post it here (hint, hint ;))

Wintermute
May 16th, 2007, 06:07 PM
Someone will hopefully scan it and post it here (hint, hint ;))

I might be able to scan it but not until the end of next week at the earliest.

Spiritof42
May 17th, 2007, 11:13 AM
I might be able to scan it but not until the end of next week at the earliest.
OK, thanks! :wavey:

goldenlox
Jun 25th, 2007, 11:35 AM
Chakvetadze claims Ordina Open title over Jankovic


FROM THE ORDINA OPEN IN ROSMALEN – Anna Chakvetadze and Ivan Ljubicic will be heading to Wimbledon high on confidence, after both Eastern European players claimed career first grass titles in The Netherlands on Saturday. Anna C. bested Jelena Jankovic 7-6(2), 3-6, 6-3, while Ljubicic outlasted No.488 Peter Wessels 7-6(5) 4-6, 7-6(4).
Chakvetadze had a false start in her first-round match against Belarussian up-and-comer Victoria Azarenka, when the 20-year-old Russian dropped the opening set, but she has been playing solid tennis for the rest of the week. She convincingly dispatched Daniela Hantuchova in straight sets for a final berth, after the 13th-ranked Slovakian had thrashed Roland Garros finalist Ana Ivanovic 6-3, 6-1, in the quarterfinals.
In the final, she faced red-hot Serb Jankovic, who had won the tournament of Birmingham last week, beating Maria Sharapova in three sets in the final. Jankovic had a pass to the quarterfinals in Rosmalen, with a bye and a walkover win over American Meilen Tu.
Amidst two rain delays early on in the match, Chakvetadze raced out to a 5-0 lead, but faltered when she had the set for the taking. Jankovic almost closed the gap, when more rain stopped play with the No. 3 serving at 4-5, advantage Jankovic.
The covers went on and off for the next three hours, and the players were called up twice during some of the dry spells, but not a single point was played over the entire second half of the afternoon. The clock had struck six when the skies finally cleared and play could be resumed.
Jankovic held for 5-5, but she had another cold start coming out of the rain delay, spraying numerous unforced errors, that helped Chakvetadze take the opening set in a tiebreak.
In the second set, Jankovic stepped it up a notch and she dominated most of the points. Chakvetadze was playing well herself, but Jankovic displayed the ability to up the pace and take control of the rally with a single shot. The Serb served out the set at 5-3, after having missed four set points in the previous game.
Jankovic was looking for the early break in the third set, but Chakvetadze hit some excellent serves from 1-1, 15-30 down to go up 2-1 and she pumped her fist in celebration.
With Jankovic serving at 2-3, deuce, Chakvetadze hit two cracking backhands to force the break, but she lost her next service game by sending a backhand wide on break point.
Where her emotions have let her down in big matches in the past, most recently against Sharapova in the quarterfinals of Roland Garros, Chakvetadze displayed the fighting spirit of a champion on Saturday, when the Russian rebounded directly after dropping the break. She aggressively pounced on Jankovic’ next service game to again take the advantage.
Serving for the match at 5-3, Chakvetadze faced three break opportunities, but she dominated each point with her backhand to hang in the game. With a forehand winner the Russian got her first match point, and she immediately claimed the win with a strong first serve.
“I was nervous in the last game,” Chakvetadze said, “because in the first set I was 5-0 up, and if I didn’t take my serve at 5-3, I know Jelena would fight for every point.”
Despite the nerves near the end of the match, Chakvetadze confirmed that she felt strong out there. “I didn’t have pressure. I like the tournament here, it’s nice and quiet and it almost feels like I’m playing exhibition.”
She said she feels no added pressure for Wimbledon, having beaten one of the hottest players on tour “It doesn’t put extra pressure on me, it just gives me more confidence.”
Chakvetadze also thinks having gone through the tough weather conditions on Saturday will help her in London.“It was the first time I stepped on court six times [for one match], so now I have experience,” she said with a smile.
It was the fourth career title for Chakvetadze, and her second in 2007. In January, she won the Tier IV tournament in Hobart. Her biggest win came in Moscow last year, where she won the Tier I Kremlin Cup. She is now 4-0 in finals.

goldenlox
Jun 25th, 2007, 11:37 AM
Four Finals, Four Titles for Chakvetadze


's-HERTOGENBOSCH, The Netherlands - Jelena Jankovic has been one of the hottest players on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour this season, but coming into her championship match-up with Russia's Anna Chakvetadze in 's-Hertogenbosch, she knew there would be problems; Chakvetadze had won four of their six previous encounters, and was unbeaten in her career in finals. And on Saturday all of those problems became a reality as the Russian won the $175,000 Ordina Open.
Chakvetadze, the No.3 seed at the Tier III grass court event, came out on fire, reeling off the first five games of the match; and although the top-seeded Jankovic managed to even it up at 5-all and force a tie-break, it was just too late, and Chakvetadze grabbed a one set lead. Jankovic retaliated by claiming the second set but the gas seemed to run out late in the third, and the Russian emerged with her fourth career title, 76(2) 36 63.
"When I was up 5-3 in the third set I was just thinking about how I lost my 5-0 lead in the first set, so I knew I had to hold serve," Chakvetadze stated. "I knew Jelena would fight until the end, so it was important I won it right there at 5-3."
The final was played predominantly in pieces, as intermittent rain fell upon the Autotron Rosmalen throughout the day. Both players were bothered by the starts and stops, but in retrospect they realized neither gained an advantage from it.
"This was the first time in my life I went on court six times, so I have experience now," Chakvetadze said. "Later in the day the Sun came out and it was nice."
"It's always difficult to go on and off court but we all had to deal with it," Jankovic said. "In the end she was better. She took her chances and deserved to win."
By virtue of her quarterfinal win over the Ukraine's Alona Bondarenko, Jankovic was the first player since Chris Evert in 1974 to win 50 matches in a year this quickly. But next in line on the leaderboard so far this year is Chakvetadze, who notched the equal-best victory of her career over the No.3-ranked Serb.
The Russian also improved to 4-0 lifetime in finals.
"I'm just trying to play match by match; I don't really think about being in the final," Chakvetadze said. "Of course I want to win, but it's already good that I make finals. No pressure. I just like going out and playing... without rain!"

Foot's Fingers
Jul 3rd, 2007, 10:27 AM
http://www.sport-express.ru/art.shtml?141729 in Russian

cosmoose
Jul 3rd, 2007, 04:41 PM
http://www.sport-express.ru/art.shtml?141729 in Russian

I think this is the english summary of that interview.
http://english.sport-express.ru/news/13_781/

penkku
Jul 19th, 2007, 11:58 AM
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070719/SPT/707190348/1062

Top-seeded Russian working her way up
Chakvetadze still building on 2006 breakout season
BY JASON WILLIAMS | ENQUIRER CONTRIBUTOR
E-mail | Print | digg us! | del.icio.us!


MASON - Top-seeded Anna Chakvetadze is the headliner of the Western & Southern Financial Group Women's Open.

W&S TENNIS COVERAGE
Rodionova disputes DQ
Top-seeded Russian working her way up
Emerging favorites in W&S
W&S Tennis notebook
Inside the W&S Tournament


Don't feel bad, Cincinnati, if you've never heard of the 20-year-old Russian.

Despite currently being ranked eighth in the world after finishing last year 13th, Chakvetadze says the general tennis world still doesn't know her because she hasn't accomplished anything significant yet.

"I think you should play better in the Grand Slams," Chakvetadze said. "After that, people will know you much more. That's my goal: to play better in the big tournaments."

But first, Chakvetadze is focused on making a good impression in her first career appearance in the W&S Women's Open. She has overcome sluggish starts in each of her first two matches to cruise to victory, including defeating unseeded Anda Perianu of Romania 6-4, 6-3 in the second round Wednesday night at the Lindner Family Tennis Center.

Chakvetadze, who made her professional debut in 2001, is building on a breakout 2006 season. Two of her four career tournament victories have been this year, and she was a quarterfinalist in both the Australian and French opens.

In both Grand Slam events, Chakvetadze lost to Russian megastar Maria Sharapova. Some fans have suggested that Chakvetadze plays in the shadow of Sharapova, who is popular for both her play (currently ranked No. 2) and cover-girl beauty.

Chakvetadze is 0-4 in her career against Sharapova. But Chakvetadze said she doesn't believe it will take a victory over Sharapova to be recognized as being an equal player.

"I don't think that I'm in her shadow, said Chakvetadze, who is a month older than Sharapova. "Every player is different. I just started to play better at the end of last year. Maria won Wimbledon when she was 17. She started to play well early. But for me, it's another story."

In the W&S Women's Open, it's been the same storyline for Chakvetadze. After being down 0-4 in the first set of Tuesday's match, she fell behind 0-3 to Perianu.

Chakvetadze cited fatigue for her sluggish play Tuesday, after having helped Russia beat the United Stated in the semifinals of the Fed Cup last weekend.

She said she was well-rested for Wednesday's match, but got off to a slow start partly because she was unfamiliar with Perianu. It was their first match together.

Chakvetadze also is considered a grass-court player, so she's making the adjustment to the hardcourt at the Lindner Family Tennis Center. She said the humidity is bothering her, too.

"It's tough to play," Chakvetadze said. "But I still think I can play better."

goldenlox
Jul 23rd, 2007, 12:15 PM
Thoughtful Play Makes Chakvetadze A Cerebral Champ
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/ChakvetadzeGETTYCincytrophy.jpg
Photo By Getty Images By Joshua Rey
07/22/2007

Anna Chakvetadze’s star has risen quite high in 2007. The 20-year-old Russian reached her first Grand Slam quarterfinal at the Australian Open, then ascended into the top 10 for the first time in her career in February.
By the time she entered the Western & Southern Financial Group Women’s Open in Cincinnati, Chakvetadze had tied a career best with 37 wins on the season.
Facing 61st-ranked Akiko Morigami in the Cincinnati championship, Chakvetadze seemed to be the odds on favorite. But Morigami had beaten her all three times they’d played — on three different surfaces.
That wasn't enough to stop Chakvetadze from shining on Sunday. The Russian ran Morigami ragged with sharply-angled strokes en route to a 6-1, 6-3 victory and her third WTA Tour title of the season.
"Those three matches, I think we were both playing pretty good," said Morigami, 27. "But Anna is definitely a different player, even from last year. She's improved a lot. The difficult thing about Anna is she changes direction with every other ball so I had to run side-to-side all the time."
Chakvetadze is a rarity in professional tennis: a top-10 player and a college student at the same time. She'll do her tennis training with renowned coach Robert Lansdorp during the U.S. Open Series. All the while, she’ll travel with textbooks and take online exams, hoping to graduate with a psychology degree from the University of Moscow in 2008.
Learning psychology played a part in Chakvetadze forgetting about her three previous losses to Morigami.
"I needed to improve for the final," said Chakvetadze, the No. 8 player in the world. "I didn’t think about the fact that I lost to her three times because it was a long time ago — more than one year since the last match. I just wanted to play my best."
Playing in her seventh match in nine days, Chakvetadze jumped to a 40-15 lead in the opening game before double faulting twice to deuce. It was a sign of things to come as the Russian double-faulted 10 times throughout the match. She was only broken twice.
"I hit a lot of double faults," said Chakvetadze, who hit 34 doubles in five matches this week. "All week, I didn't serve well but I won the tournament with this kind of serve and hopefully I will improve it for the next week."
Chakvetadze’s serve may have been a bigger liability in Cincinnati had two-time Wimbledon champion Serena Williams and 2007 Wimbledon finalist Marion Bartoli not withdrawn prior to the event.
Still, Morigami seemed to be a formidable opponent. In May, she beat Bartoli in the Prague final to win her first career title. Then, the 10-year Japanese veteran reached the third round at Wimbledon, serving for the match at 5-3 in the third set against Venus Williams before the elder Williams’ sister made a comeback and won the tournament.
On Sunday, Morigami was unable to reprise her recent good form. After failing to break Chakvetadze in the opening game, Morigami dropped her serve when Chakvetadze blasted an inside-out forehand to draw an error. Morigami, who hits with two hands on both sides, was forced to stretch for a one-handed backhand, which she couldn't muster over the net.
At 2-0, Chakvetadze double-faulted twice to fall behind Love-30, but again dug herself out of trouble.
"I had so many opportunities in return games because she hit a couple double faults here and there," said Morigami. "But I was hitting unforced errors on my returns, or there was nothing on my balls, and she was attacking on the next shot. Basically, I was on the defense right away."
Chakvetadze won the first set 6-1 after Morigami hit a backhand long. On the first point of the second set, Morigami tried to change speeds by hitting a moon-ball to Chakvetadze’s backhand. But Chakvetadze responded with a short-angled backhand that dragged Morigami out wide, opening up the court for a backhand winner on the Russian's next shot.
"She’s a very smart player," said Morigami. "When you try to get the rhythm going, she never gives you the time to do that. She never really gives you any free points. Sometimes, you want to win two points in a row but you can never do that. You can win one point, and then all of a sudden she is aggressive on the next point."
Morigami managed to hold serve to open the second set following a down-the-line forehand winner, a cross court forehand winner and a service winner. Then she broke Chakvetadze for a 2-0 second set lead when the Russian double faulted at 15-40. But Morigami gave the break right back when she hit a forehand long.
"Even when I was up 2-0, I didn’t really feel like I was up 2-0," said Morigami. "Just because she was making a few unforced errors, I got the game. I tried to play my game but that never happened."
The psychology student/tennis player sliced a backhand down-the-line to set up an open court winner and reach Love-40 on Morigami's serve at 2-2. Chakvetadze broke serve, held, then broke again to take a 5-2 lead in the second set.
Just 18 hours earlier, she was struggling in the semifinals against Sania Mirza, her second straight three-set match. Against Morigami, Chakvetadze never looked threatened in baseline rallies.
"I was trying to play every point very concentrated because yesterday was really up and down and I thought, if it was like this today, it would be really tough because Akiko usually doesn’t make easy mistakes and she runs very fast," said Chakvetadze. "My gameplan was to make her run and to play more aggressive."
Chakvetadze was broken when she was serving for the match, but again, Morigami failed to consolidate. On her first match point, Chakvetadze pounded a forehand return that drew an error into the net by Morigami, sealing the championship in just under an hour.
Despite holding a 3-0 head-to-head record against Chakvetadze, Morigami was unable to break through for her second title of the year.
"I really didn’t know what I wanted to do on the court," said Morigami. "She likes the pace obviously, so I tried to mix it up, but my ball wasn’t going anywhere. Then she was hitting all over the place. I felt like I was missing so many balls. I just didn’t play well today."
One player’s loss is another player’s gain. Chakvetadze will leapfrog Serena Williams in Monday’s WTA rankings and match her career-high rank of No. 7. She improved to 5-0 lifetime in finals on the WTA Tour with her win Sunday, and she did it her way.
"I wish I had great shots like Venus or Maria (Sharapova) because they are really tall girls and have great serves," said Chakvetadze, the No. 3 Russian behind Sharapova and Svetlana Kuznetsova. "They hit the ball so hard and I wish I could hit as hard as they can. But I have to run more than they do and play smart because I don’t have the killer shots. I have to do other things."
If Chakvetadze’s star is to rise even higher, she'll need to join Sharapova and Kuznetsova as a Grand Slam champion. That may seem unlikely since she didn’t win a set against Sharapova in the quarters of both the Australian Open and Roland Garros this year.
But don’t tell a psychology student what she can and cannot do.
"A lot of things should come together in a grand slam," said Chakvetadze. "You should have a good draw. You should be healthy. You should be in good shape. I made the quarterfinals two times and I think I can do better. That's my goal: to do better and win a Grand Slam."
"I think I can because I think I can."

goldenlox
Jul 23rd, 2007, 03:16 PM
A non-emotional win
Chakvetadze remains cool
By Josh Katzowitz
Post staff reporter

http://cmsimg.kypost.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=AE&Date=20070723&Category=SPT09&ArtNo=707230338&Ref=AR&Profile=1035&MaxW=300&MaxH=280&border=0 (http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/misc?url=/misc/zoom.pbs&Site=AE&Date=20070723&Category=SPT09&ArtNo=707230338&Ref=AR&Profile=1035)http://news.cincypost.com/graphics/spacers/spacer_1x1.gifhttp://news.cincypost.com/graphics/buttons/zoomtab.gif (http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/misc?url=/misc/zoom.pbs&Site=AE&Date=20070723&Category=SPT09&ArtNo=707230338&Ref=AR&Profile=1035)AL BEHRMAN/

http://cmsimg.kypost.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=AE&Date=20070723&Category=SPT09&ArtNo=707230338&Ref=V2&Profile=1035&MaxW=300&MaxH=280&border=0 (http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/misc?url=/misc/zoom.pbs&Site=AE&Date=20070723&Category=SPT09&ArtNo=707230338&Ref=V2&Profile=1035)http://news.cincypost.com/graphics/spacers/spacer_1x1.gifhttp://news.cincypost.com/graphics/buttons/zoomtab.gif (http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/misc?url=/misc/zoom.pbs&Site=AE&Date=20070723&Category=SPT09&ArtNo=707230338&Ref=V2&Profile=1035)AL BEHRMAN/Associated Press

Anna Chakvetadze has a 5-0 record in championship finals after defeating Akiko Morigami on Sunday.

MASON, Ohio - When she played under-14 or under-16 tennis tournaments, Anna Chakvetadze could get quite emotional. She might cry during a match, she might yell at herself, she might laugh.
Sania Mirza knows. The two played doubles together on the junior circuit, and Mirza saw first-hand how short-tempered Chakvetadze could be, how much anger she could pour out.
But as she matures and gets more experienced, Chakvetadze is trying to hard to rectify that behavior.
When Chakvetadze disagrees with the judgment of the chair umpire - a regular occurrence during her Western & Southern Women's Open semifinal match against Mirza on Saturday - she'd cover her mouth in disbelief. That was it.
When seventh-seeded Akiko Morigami's two-handed forehand hit the net Sunday, giving the top-seeded Chakvetadze the 6-3, 6-1 victory in the final, Chakvetadze gave a little fist pump and walked nonchalantly to the net to shake hands. That was it.
For the 20-year-old Russian who admits she has struggled with outbursts before, she presented a perfectly calm disposition for most of the tournament.
So, it makes sense that when you ask Chakvetadze what she studies at Moscow University in her free time, the answer is perfectly simple.
Psychology, of course.
"I use that," said Chakvetadze after the 59-minute match improved her career record to 5-0 in tournament finals. "That's why I said I'm improving. I read so many books. In everything, psychology is really important in life. You can pick some stuff from everything that can help you in life and on the court."
She's been studying the subject for the past three years and has one more year of classes before she earns her degree. It's not easy, though. She doesn't spend much time on campus. Last year, she played 22 tournaments, and this year, she's competed in 13 so far and for her country's Fed Cup team.
She takes correspondence courses, but still, it's not the life of your typical college student.
"I'm away from home so much, and I take books and I do some tests on the Internet," said Chakvetadze, who was ranked eighth in the world before the W&S and will move to No. 7 in next week's rankings. "But of course, compared to other students, it's really tough, because I'm never there. They go there every day and they spend so much time there.
"It's very important to me. Not all of the teachers can understand that you are away from home for so many months. I started it because of my parents. I wanted to try it to see if I could study. The first year it was very tough for me. Then, I got used to it."
Morigami, also a W&S finalist in 2005, could see the results Sunday. Morigami could point to Chakvetadze's footwork on the court or her groundstrokes, but the No. 61 player in the world pointed to Chakvetadze's tennis intelligence as one her best attributes.
"She's definitely a very smart player," Morigami said. "When you try to get the rhythm going, she never gives you the time to do it. It's just difficult. She never gives you any free points. With something you want to get going, like two points in a row, she never does that."
It's born out of necessity. Chakvetadze knows she's not the most physically gifted player on the court, so she has to use a more cerebral approach.
"I wish I had great shots on the court like Venus (Williams) or Maria (Sharapova), because they're really tall girls and they hit the ball so fast," Chakvetadze said. "I wish I could hit as hard, but I just can't. I have to run more than they do, and I have to play smart, because I don't have such killer shots like they do. I have to use something else."
Keeping calm also helps.
"I've definitely been getting better," Chakvetadze said. "When people are telling me that I'm pretty emotional on the court, I am telling them that they didn't see my matches when I played under-14 and under-16. Then, I was really emotional. I'm improving every match with the way I play and with the way I act on the court. That's one of the parts on my game that I want to improve."
At times, though, her swing of emotions still is evident.
During the French Open, according to an account by the (London) Sunday Times, she was so happy with one of her shots against Agnes Szavay that she couldn't contain her laughter as she walked to the baseline. Later in the match, after Szavay won the second set, Chakvetadze began crying.
But she's getting better. Mirza notices the difference.
"She was very, very emotional," Mirza said. "When she used to play, she used to be very short-tempered, even when we played doubles. Just getting angry with herself. She's very calm now on the court, even when she's losing. She's very composed. That has a lot to do with the matches she's played and the confidence and the experience she gets playing. You look and you learn. That just comes with maturity. She's really matured as a player."

goldenlox
Jul 25th, 2007, 11:27 AM
Tourney lacks big names, but Chakvetadze a rising star
Russian is ranked 7th in world, believes her game will only improve
By David Kiefer
Mercury News
Article Launched: 07/25/2007 01:36:58 AM PDT


There is no Serena Williams at the Bank of the West Classic, or perhaps any other player recognizable to the mainstream public. But for truly hardy tennis fans, Anna Chakvetadze may be enough.
The 20-year-old Russian is a rising star on the women's circuit and opens the 37th annual tournament against Greece's Eleni Daniilidou at Stanford's Taube Family Tennis Stadium on Thursday (7 p.m.) as the top seed.
Ranked No. 7 in the world, Chakvetadze is coming off her third Women's Tennis Association tournament title of the season, Sunday in Cincinnati, and was a quarterfinalist at the Australian and French opens.
"I still feel like my best tennis is ahead of me," she said. "I'm working hard, but I feel I can get better."
Chakvetadze is unique in that she has no official coach and never has since she joined the tour. She travels with her family, usually her father Walter, who gave up his medical practice to oversee her career, though her mother and 9-year-old brother are accompanying her on their first visit to the United States.
But she also has sought the council of Robert Lansdorp, a Southern California-based coach who has mentored Pete Sampras, Tracy Austin, Lindsay Davenport and Maria Sharapova.
Chakvetadze will work with Lansdorp after competing in the WTA's San Diego tour stop next week. "He wants me to hit harder, to make my shots and serves more powerful," she said. "He's a great guy. We could practice three hours and I wouldn't get tired mentally at all."

Still, Chakvetadze prefers to pick and choose the advice she receives from any of several people she has sought guidance from. "All the coaches have something good to offer, but maybe another coach knows something better," she said. "Maybe, for you, it's good to try all of them and do what's good for your game. You're the one playing on the court, not the coach."

Spiritof42
Jul 30th, 2007, 08:22 AM
Tourney lacks big names, but Chakvetadze a rising star
Russian is ranked 7th in world, believes her game will only improve
By David Kiefer
Mercury News
Article Launched: 07/25/2007 01:36:58 AM PDT

[...]

Chakvetadze is unique in that she has no official coach and never has since she joined the tour. She travels with her family, usually her father Walter, who gave up his medical practice to oversee her career, though her mother and 9-year-old brother are accompanying her on their first visit to the United States.
LOL! I think he got her confused with Bartoli! :help: :rolleyes:

cosmoose
Aug 1st, 2007, 06:02 AM
If Anna Chakvetadze sits in bed all day today and eats nothing but ice cream, no one could blame her. The 20-year-old Russian played nine sets in less than 24 hours to win the Bank of the West Classic singles title and reach the final in doubles at Stanford's Taube Family Tennis Stadium.

With Justine Henin and the Williams sisters resting, Chakvetadze is the hottest player in tennis after taking her second straight tournament to vault her into the sixth overall world ranking. She switched rankings with Amelie Mauresmo with her latest wins.

Chakvetadze took the court at noon Sunday, after getting to sleep at 1 a.m. following her late-night doubles win. She then made surprisingly quick work of India's Sania Mirza, beating her 6-3, 6-2 in the final to win the $88,265 first prize.

She did it by tuning out an Indian contingent that chanted between games for Mirza.

Composed throughout the week, Chakvetadze was emotional Sunday, pumping her fist and yelling to inspire herself.

"She plays much better when people are against her," Mirza said. "Today, she played some pretty unbelievable tennis. She was very pumped today."

Chakvetadze said she felt as if she was playing in India in front of the capacity crowd of 3,733. According to tournament officials, it was the largest crowd since 2005, when Kim Clijsters met Venus Williams in the final.

At the end of the match, Chakvetadze disarmed the audience by saying over the public-address system, "Sania has a very nice crowd. I want to thank my crowd; it's a little bit smaller."

With that, she drew applause from everyone.

The comment summarized Chakvetadze's demeanor throughout the week. Her classic strokes and unrelenting consistency - coupled with her charm - made her an ideal winner.

She has won 46 of 57 matches this year and is riding a nine-match, hardcourt winning streak.

Asked what she likes best about the United States, she said the hard tennis courts, the grapes, pineapples and oranges.

The question remains if she has enough game to be a factor in a major tournament. If this tournament is an indication, she is developing the mental approach needed to succeed.

She was undeterred early in Sunday's match, despite having her racket nearly lassoed out of her hand by her long ponytail. She only could watch as a Mirza backhand whistled by her while she tried to get her racket untangled.

Later in the match, Chakvetadze won the tight points. Up 4-3 in the first set with Mirza serving, she went down an ad, before cracking a forehand winner, then she won the game a point later with an overhead.

On crucial points throughout the week, Chakvetadze was tough, something she didn't used to be.

"Sometimes it's a mood thing," Chakvetadze said. "Whenever you have a bad mood - especially a woman - ah, watch out."

The question is does Chakvetadze have enough game mentally and physically to challenge at an event such as the U.S. Open in August?

"A lot of things have come together when you are playing a Grand Slam," Chakvetadze said. "You have to be healthy, you have to be in good shape, you have to have a good draw, and just be lucky."

And, of course, make sure your ponytail is out of the way.

Briefly: The tournament announced a new five-year deal with Bank of the West. ... Mirza and Shahar Peer defeated Chakvetadze and Victoria Azarenka 6-4, 7-6 (5) to win the doubles title.

E-mail Kevin Lynch at klynch@sfchronicle.com.

Spiritof42
Aug 1st, 2007, 07:00 AM
If Anna Chakvetadze sits in bed all day today and eats nothing but ice cream, no one could blame her. The 20-year-old Russian played nine sets in less than 24 hours to win the Bank of the West Classic singles title and reach the final in doubles at Stanford's Taube Family Tennis Stadium.

With Justine Henin and the Williams sisters resting, Chakvetadze is the hottest player in tennis after taking her second straight tournament to vault her into the sixth overall world ranking. She switched rankings with Amelie Mauresmo with her latest wins.

Chakvetadze took the court at noon Sunday, after getting to sleep at 1 a.m. following her late-night doubles win. She then made surprisingly quick work of India's Sania Mirza, beating her 6-3, 6-2 in the final to win the $88,265 first prize.

She did it by tuning out an Indian contingent that chanted between games for Mirza.

Composed throughout the week, Chakvetadze was emotional Sunday, pumping her fist and yelling to inspire herself.

"She plays much better when people are against her," Mirza said. "Today, she played some pretty unbelievable tennis. She was very pumped today."

Chakvetadze said she felt as if she was playing in India in front of the capacity crowd of 3,733. According to tournament officials, it was the largest crowd since 2005, when Kim Clijsters met Venus Williams in the final.

At the end of the match, Chakvetadze disarmed the audience by saying over the public-address system, "Sania has a very nice crowd. I want to thank my crowd; it's a little bit smaller."

With that, she drew applause from everyone.

The comment summarized Chakvetadze's demeanor throughout the week. Her classic strokes and unrelenting consistency - coupled with her charm - made her an ideal winner.

:worship: But I'm sure Anna made many new fans during the last couple of weeks.

She has won 46 of 57 matches this year and is riding a nine-match, hardcourt winning streak.

Asked what she likes best about the United States, she said the hard tennis courts, the grapes, pineapples and oranges.

The question remains if she has enough game to be a factor in a major tournament. If this tournament is an indication, she is developing the mental approach needed to succeed.

She was undeterred early in Sunday's match, despite having her racket nearly lassoed out of her hand by her long ponytail. She only could watch as a Mirza backhand whistled by her while she tried to get her racket untangled.

Later in the match, Chakvetadze won the tight points. Up 4-3 in the first set with Mirza serving, she went down an ad, before cracking a forehand winner, then she won the game a point later with an overhead.

On crucial points throughout the week, Chakvetadze was tough, something she didn't used to be.

"Sometimes it's a mood thing," Chakvetadze said. "Whenever you have a bad mood - especially a woman - ah, watch out."

:lol:

The question is does Chakvetadze have enough game mentally and physically to challenge at an event such as the U.S. Open in August?

"A lot of things have come together when you are playing a Grand Slam," Chakvetadze said. "You have to be healthy, you have to be in good shape, you have to have a good draw, and just be lucky."

And, of course, make sure your ponytail is out of the way.

Briefly: The tournament announced a new five-year deal with Bank of the West. ... Mirza and Shahar Peer defeated Chakvetadze and Victoria Azarenka 6-4, 7-6 (5) to win the doubles title.

E-mail Kevin Lynch at klynch@sfchronicle.com.

goldenlox
Sep 5th, 2007, 12:52 AM
Matt Cronin -

Chakvetadze will face the familiar No. 18 Shahar Peer of Israel, who ended Agnieszka Radwanska's run 6-4, 6-1.
Chakvetadze has had the best summer of all the four, winning Cincy and Stanford and taking out Venus Williams in San Diego. She's still a little unsure of herself, but is as smooth as silk in conducting points and owns the corners with her quick hands.
"I was so confident today because I knew that she is a junior – she will be nervous – and I just have more experience than her. But anyway, I think she's a good player and she will improve a lot," the Russian said.
Chakvetadze said her biggest challenge will be keeping her emotions in check and knows she might have to go the wall against Peer, who upset her at Indian Wells. She still gets frustrated when she's not playing perfectly and she often rushes too much. Few players get up to the service line as quick as she does. Are you listening Novak "26 bounces" Djokovic?
" I had problems when I was playing under 14," she said. "I never bounce the ball. I serve straightaway. Opponents were not really ready to take my serve so I won a couple matches like that. Then the chair umpire said, 'You have to take your time a little bit.' "
There are times when you watch the 20-year-old where you think she's over thinking and that she play more by instinct. Her intelligence certainly is a crucial part of her success, but it can also lead to indecisiveness. But take it from the mouth of Little Ms. Perfect: When she stops thinking, reason goes out the window and she's left wrestling with her volatile emotions.
"It's better when I'm thinking, but sometimes when I'm too much [emotional], I can't think and that's why I losing. That's why I lost this year in Wimbledon match [to Michaella Krajicek]. I was so nervous that I couldn't control the game. I couldn't think where should I put the ball. For me much easier to play when I'm thinking... I'm trying to stay more calm on court because it's not all the time I can do that because sometimes it's too much emotion."
Chakvetadze spent four days with coach Robert Lansdorp in early August and he was also here during the first week. He just returned to LA, but she's talking to him every day and he may return if she reaches the semis. Lansdorp, who taught Tracy Austin, Lindsay Davenport and Maria Sharapova, teaches straight-ahead play where flat, powerful ground strokes make their way to the corners, which is why his relationship with Chakvetadze is odd, as she never hits a shot the same way.
But she's enjoying their relationship nonetheless.
"He wants me to hit every ball like Maria and I'm just different," she said. "I just take some little things what he teaches, because I will never play like Maria. I will never have such a powerful shots like Maria, because I'm just smaller and thinner I don't have so much power to hit so I have to play smart. And because I'm shorter I'm moving better, so I have to use that."

goldenlox
Sep 6th, 2007, 12:27 PM
Chakvetadze Grounds Peer To Reach Open Semifinals
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/ChakvetadzeGETTYOpenquarters.jpg
Photo By Getty Images By Richard Pagliaro
09/06/2007

Hands on her hips, Anna Chakvetadze stared up at the video screen awaiting the verdict on the forehand she fired down the line on match point. The sixth-seeded Russian spent much of this U.S. Open quarterfinal against Shahar Peer calling the shots and when the Hawk-Eye line calling system confirmed her final shot had indeed hugged a sliver of the sideline, Chakvetadze saw the video view of the line suddenly supplanted by her own smiling face staring down at her.

That screen play was a fitting match-ending image: Chakvetadze's court sense and anticipation were so sharp she sometimes simultaneously seemed to be peering over Peer's shoulder as well as facing her across the net.
Continuing her tear through the U.S. Open draw with a shrewd ball-control attack, Chakvetadze pulled Peer around the court like a puppet in winning 10 of the last 11 games to advance to her first career Grand Slam semifinal with a 6-4, 6-1 decision.
"I'm so happy I got through," Chakvetadze said upon entering her post-match press conference and pulling back her pony tail back with her hand. "I don't have powerful groundstrokes. I just fight to the end and try to play smart. I'm trying to change the pace a lot."
A quarterfinalist at both the Australian Open and French Open this year, Chakvetadze was one of the most consistent performers throughout the U.S. Open Series in collecting her third and fourth tournaments titles of the season at Cincinnati and Stanford. She has elevated her level of play during the Open in surging to the semifinals without dropping a set.
Facing a top 20 opponent for the first time in the tournament, Chakvetadze rebounded from a slow start that saw her drop four of the first six games, by putting more spin and air under her shots and pressing Peer into defensive positions throughout the latter half of the match.
"I was in a rush a little bit from the beginning," Chakvetadze said. "I wanted to hit very hard. [I] wanted to blow Shahar from the court, but that's not the way how I'm playing. So I just had to play smart and not easy and not rush myself. Then I just started to do less mistakes. And on the other side also I was aggressive especially in the second set. That's why I think I won it so easy."
Svetlana Kuznetsova followed Chakvetadze on the stadium and ended the inspired U.S. Open debut of Agnes Szavay. Surrendering only six points on her first serve, Kuznetsova cruised to a 6-1, 6-4 victory to set up an all-Russian semifinal with Chakvetadze, ensuring a Russian women will contest the U.S. Open final for the third time in the past four years.
Chakvetadze has the court craft and accurate groundstrokes to trouble Kuznetsova. Seven of Chakvetdaze's 10 top 10 victories have come against Russian women, including a 7-6(3), 6-3, upset of then World No. 3 and reigning Roland Garros champ Anastasia Myskina including a 7-6(3), 6-3 upset of then World No. 3 and reigning Roland Garros champ Anastasia Myskina (http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=11399)in the second round of the 2004 U.S. Open.
That match was a coming of age for Chakvetadze, but breaking through to her first major final against Kuznetsova will be problematic for several reasons: Kuznetsova is 2-0 lifetime against Chakvetadze, the 2004 U.S. Open champion is a more experienced big-match player and if she can withstand the pressure of performing as the favorite, Kuznetsova has bigger weapons than Chakvetadze and can determine the the direction of the rallies.
For many players, acknowledging pressure prior to the start of a major match can be like accepting te bill at a group dinner for top 10 players: no one really wants to pick up the tab. Though Chakvetadze is one win removed from her first career major final, she played the pressure and level of expectation squarely on Kuznetsova's broad shoulders.
"She's a favorite in this match so I have nothing to lose and no pressure," Chakvetadze said. "For me, it's much easier to play with no pressure, so I will try to do my best."
In this era of might makes right tennis, Chakvetadze is a different breed from the pack of power merchants who prowl the top 20 with one primary purpose: hit hard with a fall-back plan equally profound: hit harder. Top-ranked Justine Henin has shown the ability to diffuse bigger, stronger players with her quick court coverage and tremendous technique. Chakvetadze does not own all the options the multi-talented Henin possesses, but she is adept at taking the ball early, absorbing and altering the pace and changing direction with down the line drives.
It wasn't always that way. Chakvetadze recalls as recently as four years ago she played fast, flat groundstrokes until her results flat-lined prompting her to rethink her approach and re-design her game.
"A lot of people compare me to Martina [Hingis]," Chakvetadze said. "I never played like this when I was a junior. I was hitting really flat balls and after that I couldn't just win a match. That's why I change it. I knew that I needed to do something else."
Taking appropriate action, Chakvetadze transformed herself into a tennis thief.
Her long blond braid bouncing behind her back as if keeping time on her latest competitive caper, Chakvetadze is a tennis pick-pocket who pilfers power from opponents by stepping on top of the baseline to rob players' of their reaction time. The result is that oddly unsettling feeling Peer had coming off court: she believed she was in every point yet found herself shutout of winning games for long stretches of the second set.
A tenacious defensive specialist, Peer will compete her mandatory two-year service in the Israeli Army next month, but could not earn her semifinal stripes against an opponent who discharged her from the draw. A half hour after the match, Peer, who beat Chakvetadze, 6-4, 7-6(2), in their most recent meeting in the Indian Wells quarterfinals, could not precisely put her finger on how Chakvetadze controlled the match.
"I don't know. I think I'm also a tough player," said Peer, who has lost three of four meetings to the 20-year-old from Moscow. "I don't know what to tell you. She's a good player. She moves well and she put a lot of balls in the court. One day you win, and one day you lose. I just beat her in Indian Wells a few months ago so it's not that huge different. She's a good player like I was saying, but [in] tennis every day is a new day." Chakvetadze credits stroke surgeon Robert Lansdorp, who has worked with Tracy Austin, Lindsay Davenport and most recently Maria Sharapova, with helping her refine her serve, which was once pretty pedestrian but now serves as a solid set-up shot for her groundstrokes. The second set today was arguably Chakvetadze's best set of the tournament, but she believes she must pick it up even more if she is to reach the final. "I'm playing well, but still you know I'm not feeling I'm playing my best," Chakvetadze said. "Because even in Stanford I played better. But because these two weeks I'm feeling better the ball with each day, so hopefully I will do well on Friday and play even better than today."

goldenlox
Sep 6th, 2007, 04:10 PM
It's an all-Russian semifinal

Fast-rising Anna Chakvetadze will face former Open champion Svetlana Kuznetsova.

NEW YORK -- With the evening-match showdown between Jelena Jankovic and Venus Williams still to come, the semifinal bracket on the other side of the U.S. Open tennis tournament's women's draw was filled today with two Russians.

Fast-rising Anna Chakvetadze, 20, stopped New York favorite Shahar Peer of Israel, 6-4, 6-1, in the first quarterfinal of the day, on the Ashe Stadium court. A little more than an hour later, former champion Svetlana Kuznetsova, 22, reversed Chakvetadze's score and took out Agnes Szavay of Hungary, 6-1, 6-4.

http://www.latimes.com/media/thumbnails/photo/2007-09/32344637.jpg (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-chakvetadze1_jnwxdskn,1,4599348.photo?coll=la-headlines-sports) Anna Chakvetadze (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-chakvetadze1_jnwxdskn,1,4599348.photo?coll=la-headlines-sports)
http://www.latimes.com/images/standard/clicktoenlarge.gif click to enlarge (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-chakvetadze1_jnwxdskn,1,4599348.photo?coll=la-headlines-sports)


http://www.latimes.com/media/thumbnails/photo/2007-09/32344896.jpg (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-kuznetsova1_jnwyg1kn,1,5837577.photo?coll=la-headlines-sports) Svetlana Kuznetsova (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-kuznetsova1_jnwyg1kn,1,5837577.photo?coll=la-headlines-sports)
http://www.latimes.com/images/standard/clicktoenlarge.gif click to enlarge (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-kuznetsova1_jnwyg1kn,1,5837577.photo?coll=la-headlines-sports)



The winner of the Jankovic-Venus Williams match will play top-seeded Justine Henin, who beat Serena Williams on Tuesday night in straight sets.

Chakvetadze, who is ranked and seeded sixth and who won this year's tournament at Stanford, had statistics similar to Peer's, but always seemed to produce on the big points.

"I don't have powerful ground strokes," she said, "and I just, you know, fight until the end and try and play smart."

Chakvetadze, always bubbly and upbeat, said she knew that she would be facing a stadium full of people rooting for Peer, who has captured the fancy of many New Yorkers as a player who serves in the Israeli army when she is at home.

"I was a little nervous today because all the crowd was against me," Chakvetadze said. "But I thought to myself, I will die on this court, but I will not lose."

She occasionally works with Robert Lansdorf, the Los Angeles tennis coach who has helped develop so many stars, most recently Maria Sharapova, the defending champion here until she was upset a few days ago. Chakvetadze said she wasn't sure whether Lansdorf would be here for her semifinal Friday, but she spoke highly of him.

"He gives me confidence," she said, "and he's a great guy."

Peer, who entered the tournament ranked No. 18, said she would return to Israel and serve a few more weeks of military service. She is allowed to come and go, and her two-year commitment will be filled out in short spurts away from tennis. She said her service was mostly clerical work, and that everybody in Israel had to serve, so she felt quite normal doing it when she was home.

She said she even had fond memories of her basic training three years ago.

"We were staying 17 girls in a tent and it was a lot different," she said. "But I was like a normal person."

Kuznetsova, the winner here in 2004, won the recent tournament at New Haven and has lost just one set in her five matches here so far.

"I just had so much energy out there today," she said.

The 18-year-old Szavay, playing in the main draw of the U.S. Open for the first time while making a quick rise in the rankings to No. 31, summed up her match with a bit of awe.

"She has everything, like serve, big forehand," she said. "Big, big forehand and backhand also good too. She's tough mentally, so I think she has good chances on this tournament."

goldenlox
Sep 6th, 2007, 11:31 PM
A throwback worth watching


by: Stephen Tignor, TENNIS.com
posted: Thursday, September 6, 2007 | Feedback (http://*****.espn.go.com/chat/mailbagESPN?event_id=13566) | Print Entry (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/print?id=3007920&type=blogEntry)
filed under: Tennis (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?name=tennis&catID=Sport~850~850&catDesc=Tennis)

NEW YORK -- The bottom half of the women's draw at this year's U.S. Open has been the most maligned in recent Grand Slam memory. And with good reason: There was just one marquee name among its 64 players, Maria Sharapova, and one other player you could call a serious threat for the title as the tournament began, 2004 Open champ Svetlana Kuznetsova.

Buried in between, though, were a few intriguing up-and-comers, most prominently Shahar Peer, Agnes Szavay and the latest in a long line of accomplished young Russian women, 20-year-old Anna Chakvetadze.

After the fall of Sharapova, it's Chakvetadze who has been left standing. That's hardly a surprise; she came into the tournament ranked No. 6 in the world and spent the summer beating Venus Williams and winning two tournaments. But that doesn't mean many U.S. viewers are too excited about Friday's first women's semifinal, between Chakvetadze and Kuznetsova. This is one of the Open's showcase afternoons, a day that has produced some of the event's signature matches, including the 1991 career-changing throwdown between Moncia Seles and Jennifer Capriati; the 1997 "bump" by Irina Spirlea and Venus Williams; and the 2003 midnight tragedy enacted between Capriati and Justine Henin.

This year we start with two Russians, neither of whom are likely to grace any billboards near you in the immediate future. This is a mistake. First, Kuznestsova is one of the sport's all-time great athletes. She moves and hits with more force than anyone this side of Serena Williams. Second, the world will get a good first look at Chakvetadze, who has never reached a Slam semifinal before.

Women's tennis fans have long lamented the demise of Martina Hingis in the face of the sport's big hitters. She was supposedly the last of the naturals: players who won with touch and court sense rather than raw power. Well, those fans have a chance to see a new natural in the form of Chakvetadze.

She's just 5-foot-7 and 128 pounds, but her remarkable timing, all-court guile and surprising feistiness -- she looks more like a figure skater but she's a jock at heart -- allow her to compete with anyone. You can see quiet confidence in her face as she serenely rocks back and forth while waiting to return serve. That self-control extends to her ground strokes, which she rarely aims close to the lines. Instead, she changes directions with the ball relentlessly off both wings and even with her return of serve. It's another echo of Hingis, and the kind of thing you really can't teach. But it is the kind of thing that tennis fans, the ones who profess to love the old ways of the sport, should want to watch.

Chakvetadze is 0-2 against Kuznetsova and will struggle to handle the bigger woman's power. There's no one else out there who has a chance to make that struggle as entertaining as Chakvetadze.

peanuts
Sep 7th, 2007, 09:34 AM
Since for reasons unknown to me, usopen.org had not posted any transcript of Anna's post-match interviews, I'm posting one here from her 4th round match against Paszek. I got this from FastScripts. - LINK (http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=45317)

U.S. OPEN

September 3, 2007

Anna Chakvetadze

NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You are not in good preparation for this tournament, but you are in quarterfinal. Can you explain how you are playing.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I think I could start better, you know, because first two matches, I mean, I didn't have a tough opponent, but I didn't actually play well. And than I just felt better when I played against Mirza, and also today I think I played good quality test, but a little bit I lost concentration because she called the trainer, and I actually thought she was retired because she didn't move that well in the first set. So I was like 90% sure that she will stop the match, that's why I lost my concentration totally.
She started to play better. She had nothing to lose. Good that I came through that.

Q. So you served for it at 5-4 in the second set and played a little bit sloppy, and got right back and broke her.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I was so confident today because I knew that she is a junior, she will be nervous, you know, and I just have more experience than her.
But anyway, I think she's a good player and she will improve a lot.

Q. So now you're in the quarterfinals for the third time this year in a Grand Slam. It's not Maria Sharapova this time, it's Peer. You said on court she played you tough in practice, but an opponent you should be able to do well against. You think you will be able to play your game?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, I actually lost against her this year at Indian Wells. I think she improved her game, and she's very tough opponent.
Actually I was in the same quarter as Maria Sharapova but she didn't get through. Shahar is very tough opponent, also, and I think we both deserve to be in the quarterfinal.

Q. What do you have to do this final to breakthrough?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I just have to stay focused during all points because Shahar is a great fighter, she is running so fast, screaming "come on" so loud. She's tough. So I have to serve really well. I just to have stay aggressive.

Q. Do you know why young players are playing very well in this tournament?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, you know, it's a lot of year, I don't know why it was here in this tournament, but yeah that's amazing. Like they all took their opportunities, you know. Well, just new generation is a coming, like all the time. It happens.

Q. Some people described you as kind of a Martina Hingis-type player with more power. Do you agree with that opinion?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I think all players are different, and I respect Martina a lot like a player, but I still think we're different.

Q. You were fan of Milan football club. Are you still a fan of Milan?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, sure I am. I will never change it. Until Kaladze is playing there, another Georgian.

Q. You still play football?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, a little bit. In front of my house I have a small garden for soccer and my brother does play soccer a little bit, my younger brother. I play together with him. I love to play soccer. The little boy, like nine years old.

Q. What's more important to you, to be thinking while you're playing or to play with instinct and play from your gut?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, you know, it's better when I'm thinking, but sometimes, you know, when I'm too much, I can't think and that's why I losing. That's why I lost, for example, this year in Wimbledon match. I was so nervous that I couldn't control the game. I couldn't think where should I put the ball. For me much easier to play when I'm thinking and that's I think the way how I should play?

Q. You still play pretty fast though. Some players like Djokovic take ten minutes to serve. You get right up there, right? A couple bounces and boom, right into it.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah. You know, I had problems when I was playing under 14. I never bounce the ball. I serve straightaway. Opponents were not really ready to take my serve so I won a couple matches like that. Then the chair umpire said, You have to take your time a little bit.

Q. Can you describe your team, your small team around you?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, here right now I'm just my dad and because Robert Lansdorp, he left to L.A. because he has some stuff to do there. But he probably will come if I will win the quarterfinal. If, you know. But because he has some stuff to do there.
So it's just my dad, and I have a lot of friends in here and my hitting partner from adidas and coach, Sven Groeneveld also. They help me a lot. That's it.

Q. Can you talk about what type of opportunity this is for you with the bottom half of the draw being so open with Maria losing, and then also what it was like for to you play at night here.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I never played a night match on the court, so I was pretty excited. About the draw, yeah, I think, you know, I think Shahar is a very tough opponent for me. I'm not looking -- you know, I'm not looking farther away, like if I will be in the semis, because it will believe really difficult match for me.

Q. Can you talk about the kind of work you've been doing with Lansdorp. Has he been telling you anything different?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, definitely. When he's not here he's calling me all -- you know, every day like twice. He's asking me how I'm practicing and telling me the game plan, what he thinks about the opponent, and how he thinks she's playing.
So he helps me a lot. Even when he's not here he helps me with some instruction.

Q. He's known for having more repetition, and you play with a little more variety. You play a lot different than Maria or Lindsay.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, he wants me to hit every ball like Maria and I'm just different. I just take some little things what he teach, you know, because I will never play like Maria. I will never have such a powerful shots like Maria, you know, because I'm just smaller and thinner -- or, I mean, I don't have like so many power to hit so I have to play smart. And because I'm shorter I'm moving better, so I have to use that.

Q. Do you work a lot physically and what about mentally?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah. I'm working physically and mentally definitely, and I think I improve this year a lot compared to last year.

Q. Just some details.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, physically I just got a new fitness trainer back in Moscow, and my dad is helping me a lot because he's an exsoccer player and he does know what's, you know, about the fitness a lot of things.
And the mentally part I just, you know, trying to stay more calm on court because -- but not all the time I can do that because sometimes it's too much emotion. But I'm trying to be more calm.

Q. Alone? You are by yourself?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes.

Q. How did you come to be working with Robert Lansdorp?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I was trying to find a coach and my agents from SFX, they told me that he's free and if I want to try to work with him. I said yes. I had some time before Indian Wells this year, so I came one week earlier and we start. That's how we started.

Q. Did you find an instant connection and that he was really helping you?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, I think he helps me a lot. He's just a great guy. We have fun on the court. I enjoy to practice with him and enjoy to spend time with him and I like it.

Q. I heard that you used to be a kind of player that's really emotional, but now you look very calm and you stay calm and you're really concentrate on the game. How did you make the transition?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, as I said, that's one of the thing which I working on. You know, and I'm not staying so calm as I wanted to be during all the matches or during all the points. Sometime I go the emotion, you know.
So I just try to stay more calm, as I said, and I'm working on it. And as I said, I improved on this part compared to last year a lot.

End of FastScripts

peanuts
Sep 7th, 2007, 09:56 AM
Another one from her quarterfinal match against Peer. - LINK (http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=45365)

U.S. OPEN

September 5, 2007

Anna Chakvetadze

NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. We asked your opponent, Peer, what's so good about you. She said, oh, you'd have to ask Anna, but she couldn't figure it out. All you do is you win matches. How are you doing it?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I'm doing good. I'm doing good. I'm so happy that I got through. The question is how am I playing or what?

Q. Yes. How are you doing it? You're not serve and volleying and you're not explosive, but you keep winning you're and No. 5 in the world.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: No 6.

Q. Excuse me. You'll be 5.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, just, you know, I don't have this like powerful groundstrokes and I just, you know, fight until the end and trying to play smart.

Q. You seem to know though where the ball is. You anticipate well I would say, because you're there. When the ball is there you're there.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes. And I'm trying to change the pace a lot.

Q. You were talking going into the match that Shahar had given you a very tough match in March. What did you do to change it around? Did you change your tactics?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Actually, I need to say that that match in Indian Wells I played really -- I didn't play well. Today when I was in the rush a little bit from the beginning. I was -- I wanted to hit very hard. Wanted to blow Shahar from the court, but that's not the way how I'm playing.
So I just had to play smart and not easy and not rush myself. So, yeah, then I just started to do less mistakes, easy mistakes, you know. And on the other side also I was aggressive especially on the second set. That's why I think I won it so easy.

Q. How do you learn to play this way? It's almost like Martina Hingis-type tennis.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Again. Yeah, a lot people compare me with Martina. I don't know. You know, I change it because I never played like this when I was a junior. I was hitting really flat balls, and after that I couldn't just win a match. That's why I change it. I knew that needed to do something else, you know.

Q. Had you watched lost the Martina Hingis when you were a junior?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, I did, but not more than all other players.

Q. You've had two matches with Svetlana Kuznetsova. Is there a common theme in both of those matches? Did the matches progress in the same way?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I think the last time I played her I won -- no, I mean I lost really easy, like 6-2, 61. It was on a clay court in Warsaw. I believe it was one year ago. So, yeah, you know she's a favorites in this game, in this match, so I have nothing to lose and no pressure.
For me it's much easier to play with no pressure, so I will try to do my best.

Q. Is that the way you felt all season, that you have no pressure?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes.

Q. Can you talk about that a bit, because you've made such a great rise. There must be more expectations?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I mean, I played top 10 players and I mean, I played maybe top 20 players. Still, you know, it's much easier to play when you have no pressure and you're not thinking about, oh, if I going to win this how will -- which ranking will I have and all this stuff.
Just be more relaxed and think about next point and that's it, and next match.

Q. You also always seem to be in a good mood.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, today I was a little nervous because all crowd was against me, but I thought to myself, I will die on this court but I wouldn't lose, because the crowd was against me so I have to win. I have to prove that I can win that.

Q. But is there anything this really gets you down? You seem so bubbly and happy.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, it depends on the mood, you know. Depends when you woke up how you feel. I woke up today with a good mood, very good mood. That's why I won maybe so easy, straight sets.

Q. You were saying no pressure on yourself depending on how the players you play are, but you're also the type of player if you don't play well you get upset with yourself. You have high expectations of your own level, correct?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah, that's true, but you can't play good and well during all matches. For example, here I didn't start that well first and second match I didn't play well. But then I just felt better and better with every day.
Today I'm happy with the way I played. I think it was a good quality and good level.

Q. Why did you think the crowd -- or feel -- that the crowd was against you?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I guess it's so many people from Israel came to New York.

Q. How old were you when you decide that you needed to stop hitting the ball so flat and change tactics a little bit?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I think I was 15, 16 years.

Q. It a was coach that sat down and talked to you about that?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yeah. Actually, I change my coach after that and I just began to work with coach from Sweden with Aspelin. Yeah, I just want to win some matches. You know, I didn't want to lose all the first round, so that's why I change my game.

Q. How long did it take to you get comfortable with this new style?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: A while, of course. You know, it doesn't change really quickly and really fast. But I was working on it and I'm happy that I improved in that.

Q. You're going into your first Grand Slam semifinal. What does that mean to you? This is as if far as you've got in a Slam before.
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: You know, I should be so excited but it, but I think just pretty normal like always. Of course it's a big match, it's a big win, and I'm so the happy to be in the semifinal. But I just thinking about the next match.

Q. To go out and play under the circumstances you did today with the crowd so in favor of her and you're twenty years of age, to be able to go out in that environment and to play the way that you did and prevail, how do you feel about that in terms of your own development as a player mentally?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I knew that I have to stay concentrate and confident and I have to stay calm. I knew that Shahar going scream after I losing easy point, like, Come on, like this. The crowd will be like, Oh, come on.
But I knew it will be like this so I was prepared for that. I knew in my mind it was most of the crowd will be against me.

Q. Your probably answered the question, but why do you think the girls from Eastern Europe are so successful?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: First time this question actually. From Eastern Europe, I never thought about that. I never thinking where is my opponent coming from actually. You know, I never thought about that before.

Q. Are you upset that there are so many players in this tournament in the quarterfinal? There are six players in the fourth round from Eastern Europe. Are you upset about this fact?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: You know, I never thought about that. Never thought about that.

Q. Here's something else you probably never thought about. Everybody said there's nobody good in the bottom. Nobody any good down there after Sharapova lost. What do you think of that, to be among the bottom feeders?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Of course she was second seed and she was -- I mean, for sure everyone thought she would be in the quarterfinal, but it just didn't happen. I guess just Radwanska played better that day than her. This girl deserved to be in the fourth round as well because she beat Maria and she can beat top players and win these kind of players. I just took advantage of the draw.

Q. Do you think since Wimbledon you maybe have been playing the best tennis on hard courts all summer long, and if you play to your level you should get to the final?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Yes, I'm thinking that, you know, I'm playing well, but still, you know, I'm not feeling that I'm playing my best.
Because even I think in Stanford I played better. But because these two weeks I'm getting like I'm feeling better the ball with each day, so hopefully I will do well on Friday and I will play even better than today.

Q. Do you think that you will feel no pressure as well on Friday and maybe even Saturday?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, I hope I will have no pressure. But, I mean, all players I think have a little pressure before the match. But when they go on court it doesn't really matter if they still have that pressure. It's just gone and they concentrate on the match.

Q. If there were just a few Russian girls doing well it might be easier for everyone to be close and social. But there are so many good Russian women on the tour right now. Does that maybe make in more difficult to get close to people from your own country because you're competing against them all the time?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, you know, me I'm such a friendly person and I'm in good relations with everyone. I mean, we are seeing each other every week. We practice together. I don't think that -- I ht ink on court you're fighting against each other, but when you go off court we're in a good relations.

Q. Is Lansdorp coming now?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I don't know. I didn't speak with him yet. I'll call him and ask if he comes.

Q. How much has he been helping you?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: He help me a lot. He change my serve a little bit before Toronto. It was -- we had just few practices with him and he did change my serve, and I think on this tournament I'm serving much better.
So he helps me a lot. He gives me confidence, you know, and he's a great guy.

Q. Did you visit him or...
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I visit him in L.A.

End of FastScripts

goldenlox
Sep 7th, 2007, 01:17 PM
Russians, ex-champs spice semis
20-year-old Chakvetadze faces first big test of her rising stardom
By Douglas Robson Special for
USA TODAY
NEW YORK — Anna Chakvetadze is the dark horse entering the final stages of the U.S. Open, but there is nothing dim about the Russian's prospects.
"I think she has potential to be No. 1," says famed California coach Robert Lansdorp, who began working with Chakvetadze in March and has helped hone the strokes of top-ranked women ranging from Tracy Austin to Lindsay Davenport to Maria Sharapova.
That might be another year or two away, Lansdorp says. But Chakvetadze — whose cagey style and court sense have earned her comparisons to Martina Hingis — has served notice with a strong summer and an even stronger U.S. Open that Lansdorp's prognostication might not be far off.
Her first big test is today against 2004 U.S. Open winner Svetlana Kuznetsova in the first all-Russian semifinal in New York. Former champions Justine Henin and Venus Williams clash in the other.
"The media like to compare my tennis style with Hingis," says No. 6 Chakvetadze, smiling, "and how I look with Mary Pierce. But I don't think it's even close, eh?"
How then does she explain her disruptive change-of-pace tactics and aptitude for staying one step ahead of the ball?
"Because I am trying to run really fast," she laughs. "Maybe it looks easy, but it's never easy."
What looks easy is her march through the draw. Chakvetadze, 20, hasn't dropped a set, logging an average of 1 hour, 6 minutes a match, fewer minutes than any of her fellow semifinalists.
"I feel every day I am playing better," she says. "That quarterfinal (vs. Shahar Peer) was pretty solid, but I still don't think I'm playing my best level."
What Chakvetadze might have conserved in energy she will lack in experience. Between them, Henin, Williams and Kuznetsova own 13 majors and have appeared in 35 Grand Slam semifinals.
Chakvetadze is an undaunted debutante. "I never walk on court and think I may lose," she says.
Something has to give in the high-octane contest between Henin and Williams.
"That's very delicious," Austin, a USA Network analyst, says of the two six-time major winners.
Henin derailed an all-Williams showdown by dismissing Serena in the quarterfinals for the third consecutive time at a Grand Slam.
In the 6-1 Venus, who won Wimbledon in July, the 5-6 Henin faces a different set of challenges. With a larger wingspan, better foot speed and plenty of muscle, Venus can hang in points longer from the baseline and blunt the Belgian's offense.
"Serena and I, we play different, even though we're both very powerful," Williams said after her win vs. No. 3 Jelena Jankovic on Wednesday night. "So I think she'll definitely obviously have to play well. Quite obviously I'll have to play well, too."
Henin and Williams have not met since 2003, before Henin won the first of her six majors.
"I didn't play Venus for a long time, so that will be interesting," Henin says.
Saturday night's champion will likely emerge from the survivor of that stacked upper half of the draw, according to Jankovic.
"Whoever wins from that top will win the whole tournament, from my opinion," Jankovic says.
Like Chakvetadze, Kuznetsova, 22, has been working through the draw efficiently, dropping just one set. After struggling to cope with winning her first major in 2004, fourth-seed Kuznetsova has consistently gone deep in majors, including a runner-up finish at the 2006 French Open.
"I know (I've) grown as a person and as a player," says the hard-hitting but streaky Kuznetsova. "I can see it in the matches."
Chakvetadze, too, has come a long way in a short time. She calls herself a "weak" junior player, who only showed success when she started to add variety to her game, and she credits Lansdorp.
Lansdorp says he's helped her drive the ball with more pace, a la Davenport, and use her change-of-pace strategy more judiciously.
"It looks like it's starting to work," Lansdorp says.

goldenlox
Sep 7th, 2007, 01:29 PM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/09/07/sports/womensopen190.jpg
Elise Amendola/Associated Press
Sixth-seeded Anna Chakvetadze will be the only semifinalist who does not have a U.S. Open title.


By LIZ ROBBINS (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/liz_robbins/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: September 7, 2007
In a women’s foursome boasting three former United States Open champions, two of whom make up a semifinal worthy of a championship final, one player has quietly slipped into the conversation.

Even her first name and the blond ponytail cascading down her back evoke a more famous tennis player from Russia. But sixth-seeded Anna Chakvetadze, a 20-year-old from Moscow, knows exactly who she is and where she wants to go.
“I should be pretty excited about that, but I’m thinking about the next match already,” she said matter-of-factly. “That’s how I am.”
As the undercard for today’s late afternoon United States Open semifinal — No. 1 Justine Henin (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/h/justine_heninhardenne/index.html?inline=nyt-per) versus No. 12 Venus Williams (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/w/venus_williams/index.html?inline=nyt-per) — Chakvetadze will play No. 4 Svetlana Kuznetsova, her friend, Fed Cup teammate from Russia and the 2004 Open champion.
In 2004 at the Open, Chakvetadze was a qualifier who advanced to the third round by upsetting her fellow Russian Anastasia Myskina. She remembered then sitting in the stands to see Kuznetsova crush her second-round opponent. “It was so easy, I was like, Wow, she’s going to do really well this year,” Chakvetadze said yesterday.
Chakvetadze was less prescient about her own career. Her mother, Natalia, started her playing at 8 years old in Moscow. “When I was 10, I was a weak tennis player; I was worst in my group,” she said. “No one really wanted to teach me. My parents always believed in me. I never felt I would be a top-10 player.”
She said she wanted to stay in Moscow to train, comfortable with her coach and her club conditions. A decade later, Chakvetadze ascended to a career-high No. 6 rating and reached the semifinals in the Australian Open and the French Open before losing to Maria Sharapova (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/s/maria_sharapova/index.html?inline=nyt-per).
Sharapova, the No. 2 seed, was on track to be Chakvetadze’s quarterfinal opponent this tournament, too. But Agnieszka Radwanska upset her in the fourth round.
It is clear that Chakvetadze and Sharapova, who left Russia at 9 to train in Florida, operate in different worlds.
“No, actually I don’t speak with her, I never speak with her,” Chakvetadze said, adding that Sharapova is very private. Chakvetadze held a relaxed interview yesterday in the garden outside the players’ lounge while her father, Djambuli, was lying happily on a nearby bench, cellphone to his ear.
Chakvetadze, who has spent time in the Russian neighborhood of Brighton Beach this tournament, carries a similar exuberance and innocence after a strong summer on the hardcourts.
She won a tournament at Stanford and then defeated Williams in three sets at San Diego. In California, she connected with Robert Lansdorp, who has coached Sharapova and Lindsay Davenport (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/d/lindsay_davenport/index.html?inline=nyt-per), and the two worked to improve her serve.
Chakvetadze does not possess a booming serve or powerful ground strokes, relying instead on her slice backhand, and quick feet and mind that draw comparisons to Martina Hingis (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/h/martina_hingis/index.html?inline=nyt-per). As much as she is tired of that comparison, Chakvetadze acknowledges that studying psychology at Moscow University has helped her break down her opponents. Like Henin, she has not dropped a set in this tournament.
But hardly anyone is talking about Chakvetadze. “Of course if I improve my game, people know me,” she said.
Kuznetsova, 22, comes in with the edge of experience, having made three semifinals in Grand Slam tournaments.

BUBI
Sep 8th, 2007, 08:18 AM
Transcribed Interview

S. KUZNETSOVA/A. Chakvetadze

3-6, 6-1, 6-1

THE MODERATOR: Questions.

Q. Where do you think the match got away from you?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: I just played horrible. I mean, I didn't expect it will be such a turnaround after this first set. You know, just couldn't put the ball in the court. It's very disappointing match for me. I mean, I didn't know what did I do, you know. It was very tough condition because it was very windy. I just couldn't handle with that wind. But I'm very disappointed the way I played today. I mean, I didn't want to, you know, just win in straight sets or something like that, but at least play at least maybe more than 50% that I can. But that didn't happen.

Q. Can you point to any reason why that didn't happen?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: Well, if I would know why it happened, I would just play better. But it didn't happen, so I don't know why.

Q. When you took that ten minute break between the second and third set, where you able to regroup a little bit?
ANNA CHAKVETADZE: It didn't help, as you saw.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

lilimi
Sep 8th, 2007, 11:00 AM
OMG i've just seen the video interview, Anna is so disappointed she couldn't play her best. :sad::hug: anna you still have many matches to win ths year :)

goldenlox
Sep 8th, 2007, 01:54 PM
That's why they say experience is important. Anna didn't handle the wind and Sveta, like she would in a smaller event.

Sharapower8
Sep 8th, 2007, 02:36 PM
She seems so sad on the video...:sad:
Anna :hug:

goldenlox
Nov 13th, 2007, 02:10 AM
Sony Ericsson All-Access Hour
Date: 5th November 2007

Q. You will probably be the most improved player of the year. How pleasing is that for you to be here?
A. I’m very excited to be here. I worked a lot this year to be here. Being here is a pleasure the best eight players in the world. This season was the best for me, I think, as you said as well, because I had my highest ranking and I won four titles. So, I’m pleased but of course I want to work more, to improve more as well.

Q. Remember that in Moscow nobody expected you to win in a shell, because so many Russian players... but you did it. Is your life a surprise? Perhaps you can make it here or you come as a newcomer? What is your mentality?
A. I think it’s a little bit different story here because the tournament is much tougher. As you said, nobody expected me to win. Maybe some of the players didn’t really think that I was going to beat them. That’s why maybe they were a little bit relaxed on court. That’s why I won. But here all players know how I’m playing and I know how they are playing as well. So, we know each other very well already. I’ve been on tour for 2/3 years so we know all the players and I know all the players very well. So, it’s a different story. The tournament is much tougher but I’ll try to do my best.

Q. Ana Ivanovic just said that she’s been working in the mental part, the control of emotions because she got to the final in Paris and she was so nervous. Do you have this problem? Are you working on that?
A. You know, when I was playing under 14 I was very nervous and people who might not have seen me play at that time may think that I’m still not at control, but compared to that time I’m much more in control. Of course, I’m working on it. I want to improve on this part of my game as well.

Q. Does the indoor court suit you? Can you play any surface? Because you’ve won on several surfaces?
A. I don’t think that clay is my favourite surface but here I like the surface. It’s not that fast, is little slow. So, I like it and I hope that I’ll do well here.

Q. Justine talked a little bit about you. She said that you distribute your game very well, that you’re very intelligent on the court. Do you agree with that?
A. I cannot disagree with Justine. Yeah, I’m playing my first match with her and I think is a very tough first round for me. I think I have a very tough group but what can we do. I have to play and show my best tennis here in the last tournament. I wish I will even improve here compared to the last 3 weeks which I played indoor season.

Q. What will you have to do to beat her? What’s the main thing you do?
A. It’s very tough to say because twice I was very easily defeated. Hopefully, this time I will play better than the last time I played against her. I just need to stay more concentrated, to keep playing aggressive because if you’re not playing aggressive against Justine I think is very tough to win.

Q. You used to play doubles with Elena Vesnina but now you separated your career so are you still in touch?
A. Yes, of course we are still in touch. I will see her in one week. We are going to have some meetings in Moscow. We are still good friends but we are not playing doubles together because she wanted to play with Likhovtseva this year and I decided to concentrate more on my singles. I’ve played just a few tournaments with Azarenka and I think next year I’ll play with Isvenoyava (phonetic transcription) for the Olympics. We´ll see how it goes and if it goes well maybe we’ll go to the Olympics as well.

Q. You play Justine in the 1st match. Maybe that’s an advantage because for both of you is the 1st match of the tournament? Maybe is better for you to play immediately against her?
A. You never know with these things. It also depends on how it goes. For me it’s better to play Justine in the 1st round because as you said she didn’t play any matches but, on the other hand, I also didn’t play matches. So, we will see how it goes and I think it will be a very interesting match.

Q. Do you follow any ritual before a match or do you have any superstition?
A. I’m not really a superstition person but before very match I’m always listening to my Ipod, my music and just trying to prepare myself. I don’t really like to talk too much before I go to play. I just like to sit somewhere in the corner and stay concentrated for my match, just keep the energy for the court.

Q. What kind of music do you prefer?
A. It depends on the mood. Sometimes fast, like... maybe R&B but it depends. It’s the mood thing I think.

Q. What do you do in your spare time during a tournament?
A. During the tournaments I usually go home because I always want to be with my family and friends of course it is always nice to have some time off. My hobby, I think is shopping, I have said it a lot of time in my interviews.

Q. Do you like any sport apart from tennis
A. Yeah football

Q. Do you practice it?
A. A little bit. My brother actually is a little soccer player. He is just 9 years old, he has just started to play so he wants to improve. My dad is an ex-soccer player as well so I do like to watch it and I play a little bit because we have a little garden in our house.

Q. How is your relationship with the other eight?
A. Its good. We see each other every week and we keep in touch sometimes. Friendly relations because it’s our work to be on the tournaments every week and we see the same faces all the time. I am not saying that I keep in touch with all the eight players but with Svetlana and with most of the Russian girls we keep in touch a lot.

Q. You have the reputation on the tour as being the player with the most interest in fashion. Is it only for shopping or are you interested in designing or something?
A. I do like to design stuff but usually for models and for people .. I better like shopping because I like to buy everything for myself. That’s how I am.

Q. How did you prepare for this tournament because the last indoor tournaments were not so good for you so did you have time to regroup and refocus on this tournament?
A. I have ten days to practice and I did practiced in Moscow with my hitting partner and with my fitness coach so as I said, hopefully I will play better than I played in those few tournaments because as you said the indoor season wasn’t that great for me but I hope I will get through and we will play better here.

Q. Your results at the indoor season were not as good. Were you a little bit tired or a little bit relaxed after winning the Fed Cup?
A. Yes, It’s actually started after the Fed Cup win but I think you can’t play all the year at 100%, its very tough. Even Federer losing now there two tournaments so for me of course it’s tough and I felt a little bit tired but for this tournament I hope that I will get some extra energy because this is the last tournament and very important one.

Q. You are also trained father Djambuli, how do you develop the relationship? Is it difficult?
A. He’s not really my coach, he just helps me outside the court a little bit and he is not all them time telling me sometimes I tell with my mom as well so all my family is here with my little brother but I cannot say that my father is coaching me he is just helping me a bit. It’s more of a psychology thing because when we have bad days it’s very important that we have someone for the team and I think parents are the best people who can help and I am in great relations with my parents. Because of them I am playing tennis and I am playing so well like I am now and it will be very tough without their help.

Q. Do you find it uncomfortable to play with such a long hair?
A. Once when I played in Stanford it got stuck on the racket but it was just one time. I played my back and it just got stuck in the racket. I think I am going to cut it a little bit after Madrid because I cut it every year but before the last tournament I didn’t want to cut it – its a little superstition. But just a little bit, I don’t want to have short hair because I am used to having long hair since I was 8 or 9. It used to be even longer but I get used to it and for me it is comfortable.

Q. Are you still playing the piano?
A. No, not anymore. It’s still in my house. For 10 years I didn’t touch it because I didn’t like it when I was growing up and its very boring and I think when a kid doesn’t like something the after he grows up he still doesn’t like it. I wish I will play; I like to listen to classic music but not playing.

Q. You used to play classical music?
A. Yes.

Q. Did the Martina Hingis case surprise you or do you think these are things that can happen in tennis?
A. It’s a tough question but I think nothing has been proved for 100%. I support the anti-doping programme as well but Martina is a great champion and I hope she will get through that and as I said it’s still not proven 100%.


Chakvetadze takes the psychological approach

Tue Nov 13, 2007 1:17am GMT

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By Simon Baskett
MADRID (Reuters) - Anna Chakvetadze, the latest woman to emerge from the Russian tennis production line, says her time as a psychology student has helped her to break into the top 10 this year.
"I studied psychology at university, although I've not yet finished. At first I thought it was boring but it got more and more interesting when I started to read the books and it definitely helps me when I'm playing," she told Reuters at a promotional event.
"It helps you prepare properly for the match and when I'm playing I try to think about the next point and not the last one. I also make a point of fighting all the time as it puts pressure on your opponent when they see you don't want to give them any free points.
"For me it is important not just in sport but in life in general."
Chakvetadze started the year outside the top 10, but four tour titles and a debut grand slam semi-final appearance at the U.S. Open have helped the 20-year-old to rise to number six.
BEST SEASON
Her performances earned her a place in the season-ending WTA Championships in Madrid for the first time. She fell at the semi-final stage to compatriot Maria Sharapova but showed plenty of evidence of the talent that is likely to make her a fixture in the top 10.
"It is definitely my best season but I've still got plenty of room to improve my tennis and my ranking," she said.
The Moscow-born player, who is one of six Russians in the world's top 15 and a member of the country's victorious Fed Cup team, admits she took up tennis only because she was desperate to find an excuse to give up piano lessons.
"I started with piano and I didn't like it and when I started with tennis I really liked it," she said. "One day I said to my parents I wanted to stop piano and just play tennis. I was just eight years old and I had to stop one of the two.
"My parents were playing a little bit and my mum was watching tennis on TV and she really liked it and she said 'Why don't you try tennis and if you like it you can continue it'.
"My parents never pushed me and that's good because if kids don't want to do something like that they shouldn't have to do it. My mum pushed me for piano and because I didn't like it I'm not playing right now.
"Maybe if I had started a little later I would be a good piano player but it didn't happen and I'm pleased I'm a good tennis player."
SWITCH OFF
Her determination and strength of character were evident in her victory over world number three Jelena Jankovic in her final round-robin match in Madrid.
She won the first set 6-4, then lost seven games in a row to trail 1-0 in the third but hung on to clinch the decider 6-3 and book her place in the semi-finals.
One thing she believes helps her to keep her focus is the fact that she can switch off from the sport when she is not on the circuit.
"My friends who I grew up with have nothing to do with tennis," she said. "They don't know the sport and that makes things easier when I go home. We just go out and because they don't really follow the sport we can talk about anything except tennis.
"During the summer I relax and stay fit by playing soccer in the garden with my friends and my little brother who is nine. You need that sort of freedom."

goldenlox
Nov 17th, 2007, 02:33 PM
Queen of the cortex
(http://www.smh.com.au/news/tennis/queen-of-the-cortex/2007/11/17/1194767017474.html#)
http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2007/11/17/annachakvetadze_wideweb__470x357,0.jpg From Russia, with a lovely bit of topspin ... Anna Chakvetadze, tennis star and psychology student, returns during the WTA Championships in Madrid this month.
Photo: Reuters

Simon Baskett
November 18, 2007


ANNA Chakvetadze, the latest woman to emerge from the Russian tennis production line, says her time as a psychology student has helped her break into the top 10 this year.
"I studied psychology at university, although I've not yet finished," she said. "At first I thought it was boring but it got more and more interesting when I started to read the books and it definitely helps me when I'm playing.
"It helps you prepare properly for the match and when I'm playing I try to think about the next point and not the last one. I also make a point of fighting all the time as it puts pressure on your opponent when they see you don't want to give them any free points.
"For me it is important not just in sport but in life in general."
Chakvetadze started the year outside the top 10, but four tour titles and a debut grand slam semi-final appearance at the US Open have helped the 20-year-old to rise to number six.
Her performances earned her a place in the season-ending WTA Championships in Madrid for the first time. She fell at the semi-final stage to compatriot Maria Sharapova but showed plenty of evidence of the talent that is likely to make her a fixture in the top 10.
"It is definitely my best season but I've still got plenty of room to improve my tennis and my ranking," said Chakvetadze.
The Moscow-born player, who is one of six Russians in the world's top 15 and a member of the country's victorious Fed Cup team, admits she took up tennis only because she was desperate to find an excuse to give up piano lessons.
"I started with piano and I didn't like it and when I started with tennis I really liked it," she said. "One day I said to my parents I wanted to stop piano and just play tennis. I was just eight years old and I had to stop one of the two.
"My parents were playing a little bit and my mum was watching tennis on TV and she really liked it and she said, 'Why don't you try tennis and if you like it you can continue it'.
"My parents never pushed me and that's good because if kids don't want to do something like that they shouldn't have to do it. My mum pushed me for piano and because I didn't like it I'm not playing right now.
"Maybe if I had started a little later I would be a good piano player but it didn't happen and I'm pleased I'm a good tennis player."
Her determination and strength of character were evident in her victory over world No.3 Jelena Jankovic in her final round-robin match in Madrid.
She won the first set 6-4, then lost seven games in a row to trail 1-0 in the third but hung on to clinch the decider 6-3 and book her place in the semi-finals.
One thing she believes helps her to keep her focus is the fact that she can switch off from the sport when she is not on the circuit.
"My friends who I grew up with have nothing to do with tennis," she said. "They don't know the sport and that makes things easier when I go home. We just go out and because they don't really follow the sport we can talk about anything except tennis.
"During the summer I relax and stay fit by playing soccer in the garden with my friends and my little brother who is nine. You need that sort of freedom."

itzhak
Nov 17th, 2007, 09:04 PM
Anna awarded tonight Player of the year in Russia.

http://www.allsport.ru/index.php?id=9906

goldenlox
Nov 17th, 2007, 11:34 PM
Anyone got pictures?

goldenlox
Jan 12th, 2008, 03:58 PM
Chakvetadze's lost time



http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,23043904-5012689,00.html
THE pain is still raw for world No.6 Anna Chakvetadze, the Russian tennis queen held up at gunpoint by masked bandits and robbed of $250,000 during a home invasion last month.
By comparison, the Australian sun beating down on Melbourne's centre court is a welcome distraction.
With snow covering the outskirts of Moscow on December 18 last year, Chakvetadze's preparations for the opening grand slam of this year were rocked by a chilling reality.
Masked men burst into her mansion. Her father Dzhamal was pistol-whipped. The Russian tennis star was tied-up.
"We actually didn't want anyone to know about that but the same day it was everywhere on the internet and in the newspapers,'' Chakvetadze said.
"Everywhere was information about what happened.
"I'm so happy we have a lot of friends and people who helped us because it was a tough time for me and my family, what we went through.''
By the time the bandits had finished the Chakvetadze family were missing $250,000 worth of cash, jewellery and other assets.
The Russian tennis queen's lead-in to the Australian Open was in tatters, having been scheduled to fly to Hong Kong the day of the ordeal to begin preparing for a hot summer.
Instead she sought refuge with family friends. Now Chakvetadze must start tomorrow's Open on a limited and disrupted preparation.
"It's tough to say how I will perform because my preparation was disrupted because I had some troubles with me and my family before my flight, said Chakvetadze in understatement.
"So the preparation was not that good. It's very hot in Australia, I have to get used to it, in Russia at the moment it's minus 15.
"In Australia the first time is tough because of the heat but once you get used to it it starts to get good.
"All the top 10 players are dangerous but it's very difficult to say because you don't know what shape each player is going to be in.''
On the court, 2007 was a watershed year for the latest female Russian tennis star.
Chakvetadze won four singles titles on the Women's Tennis Association tour, amassed $1.6 million in prizemoney and made the semi-finals of the US Open.
Now she's aiming even higher.
"The new generation is always coming, every year there is someone new so you have to be ready for that,'' she said.
"I want to get better all the time, challenge the best players, beat some of the others in the top 10.''
Knocked out of the Sydney International in the opening round last week, Chakvetadze has been honing her game in on the new plexicushion courts in Melbourne.
"It's much slower than it used to be last year but if you practice on it then you get used to it.
"I like it, it's all right.''
Meanwhile compatriot Vera Zvonareva's Australian Open campaign is now in doubt after a warm-up mishap forced her to withdraw from the Hobart International final, handing the title to Greece's Eleni Daniilidou.
Daniilidou won her fifth WTA tour event with the walkover after second seed Zvonareva badly rolled her left ankle in practise.
The Russian world No.23 had an MRI scan in Melbourne yesterday to determine the extent of the damage, but concedes her grand slam hopes are in danger.

goldenlox
Jan 12th, 2008, 04:12 PM
What's strange is that Anna said "We actually didn't want anyone to know about that but the same day it was everywhere on the internet and in the newspapers,''

But her dad was on tv a few hours afterwards taking off his hat and showing the marks on his forehead.

BUBI
Jan 12th, 2008, 04:42 PM
Maybe she is tired of answering questions about it :shrug:

Sharapower8
Jan 12th, 2008, 08:46 PM
What's strange is that Anna said "We actually didn't want anyone to know about that but the same day it was everywhere on the internet and in the newspapers,''

But her dad was on tv a few hours afterwards taking off his hat and showing the marks on his forehead.

I understand her reaction... She's getting tired of that :sad:

goldenlox
Jan 13th, 2008, 08:38 PM
A humiliating lesson in speed






World No.6 Anna Chakvetadze gave Rohit Brijnath a fleeting taste of how fast modern tennis is



— Photo: AFP
http://www.hindu.com/2008/01/14/images/2008011451862101.jpg
POWER GAME: Russian Anna Chakvetadze, though not one of the bigger hitters, gave glimpses of what hard hitting is all about.
Sometimes the only way to knowledge is through the road of humiliation. Or so I recently discovered when briefly facing off against a 128-pound girl who fired shots that looked to me as if they should be declared illegal under the arms act. In other words, I played a couple of points against world No.6 Anna Chakvetadze, just to get a fleeting taste of one thing: what does fast mean in professional sport.
Everything in sport, as the Australian Open will demonstrate again, is incredibly fast, but mostly we can’t tell. To say Andy Roddick produced a first serve at 246 kmh is meaningless, for it is a number impossible to relate to.
Only if you put your face to the netting, about 15 feet behind the batsman, do you have even a vague idea of how quick Brett Lee is. Only if you strap on layers of armour and stand in the goalmouth can you tell the velocity of a hockey penalty corner. Otherwise, we have to rely on television, except this brilliant box fails to translate speed for us. Which is why, I hesitantly asked the sporting and lightweight Chakvetadze to play a few shots with me. And it is telling. The sound of the ball coming off her racket is pure, almost musical in a way, not that ugly “kerplunk” that comes off mine, and her strokes, polished for hours, are effortless and clean.
Then she is asked, do you mind just beating the %$#@ out of my serve. Just smack your return, Miss, burn the fuzz off the ball. So twice she swats back serves and only this much the mind remembers: The ball was a hissing blur. It passed the net and like some guided missile dipped towards my ankles. It was upon me before my body had arranged itself for a response, or my mind had contemplated a reply. It was frighteningly fast.
Apparently, not really. Because Chakvetadze explains she was hitting at only “60 per cent” of her capacity. Then she adds, grinning: “And I’m not even a big hitter.”
Biggest hitter


Who is the biggest hitter brings a somewhat surprising response from her.
The answer is a Williams, but not the Williams you think. “Venus,” she says. But adds, “Serena is close behind.”
Men hit even harder, like Fernando Gonzales who arrives from a different planet of speed than Chakvetadze, and it is incredible that athletes can move this fast, think this fast, create this fast, respond with millimetre-perfect replies this fast. Federer is the most astonishing for what he does is akin to doing embroidery on skates. More and more the divide between the professional athlete and the amateur sportsperson is growing: the equipment is similar but they play a sport we are unfamiliar with.
The speed of the game plays hell with linespeople, for where a skidding ball lands is hard to tell. Marat Safin defended the quality of officials this week, saying: “The game is too fast for the people to see, so you can’t say the people are getting worse and worse — it’s just the game is getting faster and faster. It’s impossible to see some of the balls.”
Yet, in this blurry world, Chakvetadze believes there is room for players like her, who do not exist purely on speed. When the Williams’ ruled tennis, she says, the game was all “just power.” Now, she points to the Top 10 list as evidence of change, for she rests besides competitors who are powerful but not purely power players, such as Jelena Jankovic (No. 3) and Marion Bartoli (No. 10). Even Justine Henin (No.1), whose shots have surprising sting and heft, is aided greatly by her versatility.
Still, Chakvetadze must compensate for a lack of voltage by playing what she calls “smart” tennis. It means tinkering with pace, adjusting spin, staying consistent, displaying variety, counter-punching. Her repertoire is fine enough to reach the top 10, but some might say it will be difficult to triumph at a slam with a game so unmuscular.
Perhaps, but for one writer whose serve she dismissed with a yawn, the Russian remains the biggest hitter on the planet.

goldenlox
Jan 13th, 2008, 10:43 PM
Anna and the kingmaker When tennis stars Maria Sharapova and Anna Chakvetadze came to our shores for an exhibition match, former Singapore bodybuilder Rano Izhar and his brothers provided security for them. He has now forged an alliance with Chakvetadze, as he tells ARUN RAJBy Arun RajJanuary 14, 2008http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/mnt/static/image/images/printicon.gif (http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/printfriendly/0,4139,153391,00.html?) http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/mnt/static/image/images/emailicon.gif (javascript:window.open() http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/mnt/static/image/images/5.gifTHE government has always urged Singaporeans to be effectively bilingual.
http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/mnt/media/image/launched/2008-01-13/NP_SPORTS_1_CURRENT_ARRANO13_8t.jpg (javascript:window.open() One man took it a step further and reaped the rewards.
When Rano Izhar Rahmat spoke in Russian to Djambuli Chakvetadze to remind him of his hotel room number, he may have drawn surprised laughter and shock from the father of tennis superstar Anna Chakvetadze.
But, there is little doubt that he made an impact with them.
The women's world No. 6 has asked former national bodybuilder Rano to train her in the gymnasium during winter this year.
Rano, 43, represented Singapore as a national bodybuilder and was runner-up at the 2004 Musclemania World - a bodybuilding competition held annually in the United States.
He and his brothers were recently employed to provide security coverage for Chakvetadze and Maria Sharapova when the duo were in town for an exhibition match.
Rano says he found himself attached to looking after the former rather than the latter.
'Maria had her own boundaries and did not really talk to any of us,' said Rano.
'Even when I helped with her luggage, only her coach acknowldged me with thanks.
'Anna is really nice and her father was always forgetting his room number.
'So I told him what his room number was in Russian and he had a good laugh, probably humoured by this brown-skinned man speaking his language,' said Rano, laughing.
Mr Chakvetadze needn't have been surprised. Rano's wife, Anya Kulish, is a Russian.
Rano explained that he picked up the language when he went to Russia last year to visit his in-laws. Kulish's mother does not speak a word of English.
'When you are there, everyone speaks Russian and I started with the basic stuff like 'hello' and 'how are you' and went on from there,' Rano said.
Coming from a family of 11 brothers and three sisters, Rano and his siblings have been trained in the traditional Malay martial art of silat by their father, Rahmat Mohd Shah.
'From strength training for silat, we did bicep workouts with barbells, dumbells and push-ups.
'We knew little about muscle and body building then, but that's how it all started,' said Rano.
He has a doctorate in exercise and sports science from Honolulu University, and he uses his knowledge - coupled with his experience in traditional massage that he learnt from his father - to help alleviate muscle aches and strains.
MASSAGE
'Once, I saw Djambuli struggling to lift his arm, and I asked him if he wouldn't mind me massaging it,' said Rano.
'He agreed, and I went to work on it. And after three days of massaging him, he had managed to lift it up straight, vertically.
'He was so thankful.'
Rano also accompanied Chakvetadze when she decided to pop down Orchard Road for shopping.
Although she could speak English, having Rano, with whom she could converse in Russian, around seemed to put her at ease.
They chatted about Chakvetadze's game and Rano recommended that she hit the gym to strengthen her muscles.
'She has great technique and skill, but if she could add power to her game, she could better challenge for a Grand Slam,' reasoned Rano.
The closest Chakvetadze had come to winning a Grand Slam title was when she reached the semi-finals of last year's US Open, before losing to Svetlana Kuznetsova.
It was no surprise then that Chakvetadze took Rano's recommendations seriously.
And he could turn out to be the kingmaker who helped Chakvetadze achieve her Grand Slam dreams.
Chakvetadze has invited him to personally train her during the Russian winter season.
'I usually head up to Russia in the summer with my wife to see her family, but Anna and her father asked if I could come in winter this time,' said Rano.
'I'm trying to arrange my schedule to allow for that as I really like them,' said Rano.
'It is my passion and forte to help someone achieve his or her objectives and goals.'
And if Chakvetadze stars in her first Grand Slam final this season, you know who she'll have to thank.

goldenlox
Jan 15th, 2008, 06:57 PM
http://msn.foxsports.com/id/7677756_36_2.jpgAnna Chakvetadze is playing through many emotions. ( / Associated Press)

Sixth-seed Chakvetadze has better reason to be glum, but because from the looks of her long and tried face while reflecting on her family's mugging at the hands of a group of robbers in the their Moscow home last December, she's a long way away from a full emotional recovery.

"Because I'm not at home, I'm trying to think about tennis and trying to forget it because if I think about it more I wouldn't be mentally ready to play," said Chakvetadze after she advanced to the second round when her opponent, Andrea Petkovic, retired with a right knee injury in the first game of their contest. "I feel better now. I'm OK and I'm trying not to think about what happened with me and my family."
What happened was that five-to-six unknown people wearing masks burst into their suburban Moscow home, tied up the Chakvetadze family, robbed them of some $250,000 worth of valuables and cash, and left Anna with a left finger injury and her father Djambuli bruised and beaten. Her mother, Natalia, and her 9-year-old brother, Roman, weren't harmed
"It was [a] good thing we were all together because my father and I just came back from an exhibition that morning, otherwise my mother and little brother would have been at home alone and it could have been worse," Chakvetadze, who couldn't practice for a week because her hand was too sore to grip the racket when she tried to hit backhands.
Four of the thieves were caught a couple of weeks later, but not until after the Chavetadze's had to hire around-the-clock security and install a new alarm system. Anna says they are considering moving out of crime-ridden Moscow to somewhere else in Russia.
"You can't control these things," Chakvetadze said. "It can happen to everyone. But it happened to me and before I felt safe in my house and I found out I wasn't."
The 20-year-old Chakvetadze entered last year's Australian Open without such a high ranking, but as an attractive darkhorse, as she had a standout end to 2006. Had the robbery not have occurred, she may have been an obvious semifinal pick, because December should have afforded her an opportunity to right her ship and gets the kinks out of her game after a less than mediocre fall season.
But she's lacking play and isn't speaking with much conviction. Like many of the multitude of Russian players, Chakvetadze sports a tough exterior. She didn't grow wealthy, or have gobs of money thrown at her at some well-branded U.S. academy, and had to work extremely hard under trying circumstances to earn her place in the game.
But while it's possible that she could harden her shell and turn things around during the first week of the tournament, but she wasn't too convincing, saying she was lacking confidence. "I didn't really have any preparation for the season," she said. "I need matches."

Gdog
Jan 22nd, 2008, 10:11 PM
Thank you for posting the stories. Anna has had a turbulent last couple of months. :( With her results at the AO it is clear that it is still affecting her. Hopefully, she will be able to overcome it soon though or she is going to take a severe ratings hit. :(

saniapower
Jan 23rd, 2008, 12:30 AM
Anna come back strongly :yeah:

goldenlox
Feb 10th, 2008, 10:54 PM
http://picsrv.fashionweekdaily.com/?fif=/tennisweek/img_696_173656_6908.jpg&obj=iip,1.0&hei=268&wid=422
Anna Chakvetadze's wins Paris title to raise her record in finals to 7-0. http://www.tennisweek.com/pix/see-other-images.gif 1 of 2http://www.tennisweek.com/pix/icons/arrow_right.gif (http://javascript<b></b>:loadMediaItem(1);)


http://s7.addthis.com/button1-bm.gif (http://www.addthis.com/bookmark.php?v=12&winname=addthis&pub=img&s=&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tennisweek.com%2Fnews%2Ffulls tory.sps%3Finewsid%3D531495&title=Tennis%20Week%20-%20News%20-%20Femme%20Finale)
Anna Chakvetadze spends some of her spare time with her nose stuck in detective novels, but when it comes constructing the plot lines of tournament finals the Russian baseliner has little interest in Whodunnits. Chakvetadze crafts consistent climaxes: when she reaches finals, she wins.
Deleting the drama from the decisive set with a key service break, the top-seeded Chakvetadze created closure again today with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-2 victory over seventh-seeded Agnes Szavay in the Open Gaz de France final in Paris.
Chakvetadze, who will rise to No. 6 in the world when the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour rankings are released on Monday, owns a 7-0 record in finals.
The pivotal point of the match came with Chakvetadze clinging to a 3-2 lead in the final set. Serving to level the set, Szavay fell victim to Chakvetadze's unerring ground strokes. She broke for a 4-2 lead and never looked back in winning three straight games to collect her third Tour title at the Tier II level or higher. Chakvetadze previously won the Tier I Moscow title in 2006 and took the Tier II title with a victory over Sania Mirza in last summer's final.
"The 3-2 game in the third set was really important, because I was able to break her for 4-2 - I knew that wasn't the end and she would keep fighting, but I felt I was playing well also and knew I needed to keep concentrating and I could win," Chakvetadze said. "I had a good first set as well, but I made so many errors and had so many problems in the second set. The crowds were great though - I think they helped both of us play well today."
The 20th-ranked Szavay started the season with successive losses to players ranked outside the top 100 in the opening round of the Gold Coast and Australian Open, but she rebounded with a solid week in Paris that saw her beat second-seeded Daniela Hantuchova, 7-6(4), 6-1 in the quarters and then fight off fourth-seeded Elena Dementieva, 6-3, 1-6, 7-5 to reach the final.
In their lone prior match at the 2007 French Open, Chakvetadze played the pressure points better to earn a 6-4, 6-7(1), 6-4.
Cleaning up her game considerably in the third set, Chakvetadze minimized her errors and gave Szavay little to work with in the baseline rallies.
"The third set was a really great set; I think we were both playing really well," Szavay said. "She just wasn't giving me any unforced errors and she was playing better in the middle of the set, especially when she broke for 4-2. The 3-2 game was the most important game of the match, I think."

goldenlox
Feb 26th, 2008, 09:19 PM
Chakvetadze still haunted by robbery

Tue 26 Feb, 03:31 PM

DUBAI (Reuters) - Russian Anna Chakvetadze is still haunted by the robbery at her Moscow house late last year during which she was tied up with her parents and injured.

"I never thought something like that would happen to me," she told reporters on Tuesday, her voice still trembling at the memory. "It was like something I had seen in the movies."

Her father, Djambuli, a wealthy businessman, was targeted, and the world number six was so shaken by the experience that she cancelled the pre-season training she had arranged.

The family now have bodyguards living in the house.

Chakvetadze's form suffered afterwards and she lost her opening match at the Sydney International before going out in the third round at the Australian Open but she got back on track this month by winning the Paris indoor event (http://www.wtaworld.com/showthread.php?t=334152#).

"I just couldn't sleep the first three nights in my room," said Chakvetadze, who beat Pole Agnieszka Radwanska 6-2 2-6 6-4 to reach the second round of the Dubai Championships (http://www.wtaworld.com/showthread.php?t=334152#) on Tuesday.

"Then it was okay but I wanted to live in another place in Moscow, to change location, but my parents didn't really want to. So now we have bodyguards in the house and alarms, everything you can do.

"I don't think it's strange to live with bodyguards, because sometimes you live in the house and you think that you are safe, but you are not so you have to do something."

Although she was not in the right mental state in January to play, Chakvetadze insists she did the right thing by travelling to Australia.

"It was difficult because I didn't have any preparation for the season because I was supposed to go to Asia to practise outdoors with my hitting partner and my fitness coach," she said.

"But I was happy I was in Australia playing the tournaments because I wanted to play very badly. I like it there and I also think a Grand Slam tournament is very important."

Sixth-seeded Chakvetadze faces compatriot Dinara Safina in the second round in Dubai.

Sharapower8
Feb 28th, 2008, 01:06 PM
"I just couldn't sleep the first three nights in my room,"

:sad::hug:

PMRD44
Mar 9th, 2008, 12:39 AM
Good news! Local authorities have confirmed that they have apprehended seven men involved with the home invasion and robbery of Anna's home. The men are also suspected in dozens of other robberies in the Moscow area.

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2008/03/07/013.html

Sharapower8
Mar 9th, 2008, 07:26 PM
Good news! Local authorities have confirmed that they have apprehended seven men involved with the home invasion and robbery of Anna's home. The men are also suspected in dozens of other robberies in the Moscow area.

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2008/03/07/013.html

Finally !! Great :)

Petkorazzi
Mar 9th, 2008, 10:37 PM
:banana: :)

RsaibotD
Mar 10th, 2008, 02:23 AM
great news:)

03 RuleTheCourt
Mar 11th, 2008, 08:07 PM
Sure is nice to hear indeed ;)

GeorgianFan
May 29th, 2009, 03:42 PM
http://www.teenvogue.com/beauty/ (http://www.teenvogue.com/beauty/blogs/beauty/2009/05/20-questions-with-tennis-pro-anna-chakvetadze.html)

20 Questions with Tennis Pro Anna Chakvetadze!
by Laurel Pantin May 20, 2009
http://mtblog.teenvogue.com/beauty/blogs/beauty/FILA-anna-chakvetadze-thumb-233x310.jpg

At 22, tennis player Anna Chakvetadze has already placed in the top-five worldwide players, played in the US Open, and won the Kremlin Cup in her hometown, Moscow. This girl is seriously talented! Now, she's sponsored by Fila (which means LOTS of super cute tennis dresses) and she's fighting her way back to a spot at the top. We caught up with Anna to chat about her goals, training schedule and her signature long hair!

1) When did you know you wanted to be a tennis player?
I knew I wanted to be a tennis player when I was about 14-15 years old. I didn't start taking tennis seriously as a possible profession until then, as I was playing other sports and going to school full time. Tennis was just an after school activity until I was around 14 years old!

2) What's the best part of your job?
I love being with Fila! I was so excited when my agent told me they were interested in having me endorse the brand. Fila is a classic tennis brand that has a rich history in tennis. It's fun to be the face of a big company like Fila! My former clothing company was too big and I was just one of many girls all wearing the same product. At Fila, I get to be more of an individual.

3) What's your on the court style?
I love all the Fila on-court tennis dresses. Not only are they comfortable to wear, but they are also really nice-looking! I feel confident that not only can I win matches but will also look attractive. Probably on-court my style staple is my ponytail. I haven't cut my hair in 5 years and it's pretty long. The ponytail flies around when I'm playing and once even got caught in my racquet.

4) What about off the court?
Off-court I like to be comfortable and usually just wear jeans.

5) What are your favorite wins?
My favorite championship is the US Open, because I have played well in New York and I love the city. However, my favorite tournament is the Kremlin Cup in my home, Moscow. I never felt better than when I won the Kremlin Cup in 2007 in front of my friends and family.
6) Which tennis legend would you most love to play?
I would love to see how I would have matched up against Steffi Graf. She is a legend and probably the all time best player. I think it would have been a good match.

7) What are some of your goals for the future?
My # 1 goal right now is just to get my confidence back and get back into the top 10-15 in the world by the end of 2009. I finished 2007 at # 5 in the world and I believe it is just a matter of time before I'm back in the top 10. 2008 was a tough year for me but I'm pretty happy with how I'm playing now and feel that my game is back to where it was in 2007. Now the key is just to win some matches and get the confidence back.

8) What has been the most exciting moment of your career?
Again, by far the most exciting moment was winning the Kremlin Cup in 2007.

9) What's the hardest part of what you do?
The hardest challenge for me is competing on a weekly basis against some of the best athletes in the world. Most of the girls on tour are much bigger physically than I am, so it can be very difficult and demanding on my body. I've got to manage my schedule better and make sure that I'm 100% physically in shape for the bigger tournaments.

10) What are you studying in school?
I have not declared a major yet.

11) If you weren't a tennis player, what do you think you would like to do?
I always wanted to be involved in a business of some sort. My father was a successful businessman and I have always looked up to him. I'm not sure exactly what kind of business but probably something in women's fashion.

12) What's your beauty must have item?
I love lipstick and have about 100 different kinds!

13) What's your beauty regimen?
My daily regimen is just to wash my face about 3-4 times per day. I use normal face wash soap that is not too hard on the skin and I always try to keep my face clean between practice and matches.

14) Do you wear makeup when you compete?
I don't wear make up on the court but a lot of girls do. I prefer to wear a lot of sunscreen so I don't get burnt, get wrinkles, and look too old...

15) What's your best fitness advice?
The best fitness advice is to do something that you enjoy. Find a few workouts/activities that you love doing and focus on those. Working out can be fun and does not have to seem like a chore.

15) What is your biggest beauty or fashion indulgence?
My biggest splurge was a Louis Vuitton handbag!

16) Is there a treat or snack that you can't resist?
Food! I love Russian food, of course, and sushi. I try to eat a lot of fish and stay away from fatty meats.

17) What has it been like traveling so much between Russia and the US?
I love both Russia and the US. Russia is dear to my heart as that is my home and probably where I love to be most when I'm not traveling on tour. I would say the Russian people are a bit more reserved and quiet where the Americans seem very loud and confident.

18) How do you stay motivated?
Motivation is difficult when you play for a living just about every single week. Sometimes it's hard get pumped up for a match. Often, if I've lost to the player before, I remember that bad feeling and want revenge! Sometimes, I get into some music on my iPod and that gets me going. Usually every tournament I find something different as motivation.

19) How do you stay in touch when you're traveling?
The Internet makes it so easy to stay in touch with my friends and family. We talk all the time and I don't really feel like we are that far apart.

20) Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
In ten years I hope to be retired with a husband and family. I see myself living in Moscow, traveling a lot and doing some work on the side in tennis or charity.

Bilbo123
May 30th, 2009, 11:08 PM
thanks GeorgianFan :wavey:

great answers from Anna :)

charlieluvtennis
Jun 3rd, 2009, 11:43 AM
Thanks for this GeorgianFan :yeah:

http://www.teenvogue.com/beauty/ (http://www.teenvogue.com/beauty/blogs/beauty/2009/05/20-questions-with-tennis-pro-anna-chakvetadze.html)

7) What are some of your goals for the future?
My # 1 goal right now is just to get my confidence back and get back into the top 10-15 in the world by the end of 2009. I finished 2007 at # 5 in the world and I believe it is just a matter of time before I'm back in the top 10. 2008 was a tough year for me but I'm pretty happy with how I'm playing now and feel that my game is back to where it was in 2007. Now the key is just to win some matches and get the confidence back.

I hope she can do it sooner rather than later :(

Daszmarelli
Jun 10th, 2009, 08:43 PM
^^^^
me too
C'mon Anna

Albireo
Jun 10th, 2009, 09:37 PM
Thought she was majoring in psych.

Hope she changed it!

HowardH
Jul 29th, 2009, 02:31 PM
Blondes Trying to Have More Fun (and Success)
Struggling Kirilenko Downs Reeling Chakvetadze in Classic
Anna: ‘It’s easier to fall than to come back up’
By Matthew Cronin

Anna C. is still trying to find herself.FROM THE BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC AT STANFORD - It took 3 hours and 24 minutes and 257 points, but when a constantly hesitant Anna Chakvetadze was forced into a forehand error and fell to Maria Kirilenko 6-4 5-7 7-6(5), another chapter in the pony-tailed girl’s downward slide was added.

“At the end of last year I was thinking, Oh my God, I hope this was the worst year ever. And this year is even worse,” Chakvetadze told tr

The 2007 Bank of the West champion fought like hell, but for the most part, she was fighting against herself and could never come through when the most important points on her racket.
The one time world No. 5’s career has frankly become a sad story. She has as much touch as anyone on tour and may have the softest hands of anyone out there, but coming into her match against fellow 22-year-old Kirilenko, she was 9-12 on the year and hasn’t even reached a quarterfinal. Imagine that from the woman who just two years ago, was looking like a potential US Open champion.

But she apparently hasn’t completely recovered from being tied up and robbed in Moscow in December of 2007, nor from her choke to Svetlana Kuznetsova in the 2007 US Open semis.
At the early stages of sets, she’s still the same A-Chak: brilliantly misdirecting balls, flattening out forehands down the lines at the last moments, caressing drop shots, whipping crosscourt shots at severe angles, totally dictating play.
But then when she asked to do more than counterpunch – and against a fellow counterpuncher like Kirilenko that’s request on going to be in constant demand -- she freezes up, whether she over-hitting, under hitting, double faulting or pushing.

Just watching her try to close out the second set was tortuous. Playing on the No. 2 court, which is situated next to Stanford’s fabulous swimming stadium, she seemed to shrink every time there were loud and boisterous calls for the home team to respond in the pool next door.

She needed six set points to close out that set, as Kirilenko kept retrieving and she kept missing. Of those six set points, she made four errors, watched Kirilenko power a return winner off the softest serve possible and then won it when she finally forced her foe into return error.

“I’m playing better when I’m down than when I’m up,” Chakvetadze said. “I’m not concentrating enough on big points, or have enough confidence, and I’m not trusting my shots.”

She went down 0-3 in the third set, but then began to claw back as Kirilenko – who is by no means a consummate closer – was having trouble with her forehand and shot selection, but once Kirilenko saw balls coming into her sharp two-handed, she was doing major damage.
Luck came to A-Chak for a while at 5-4, when the quick Kirilenko felt she was robbed on three match points.

“Two were so bad and one was maybe 50-50 but it was unbelievable,” Kirilenko said. “The umpire came to me later and said he was sorry about one of them. If I would have lost like that, it would have been the worst, because I felt like I won and then it was taken from me.”

But Kirilenko, who has been working on improving her mental game, pressed on. She hustled her way into the third set breaker tiebreaker and appeared to be the more self-assured player.

Chakvetadze began to swoon. The first nine points featured just two winners – two off the Chakvetadze serve – and seven unforced errors, five from A-Chak off the ground. So at 5-4 Kirilenko, Chakvetadze ripped a forehand down the line winner to tie it up. A fleeting thought rippled through the crowd that maybe, just maybe, she could actually win the match. But the woman with the tour’s most distinctive, tighly-wound ponytail is nothing but unlucky these days.

Chakvetadze nailed another forehand down the line that would have been a clean winner, but it hit the top of the net, bounced on top of the let cord and it dribbled back over the net on to her side.
“I thought maybe God owed me that one,” Kirilenko said.

A-Chak’s chin dropped hard on the deep blue court. With her final match point in hand, Kirilenko smoked a forehand and forced Chakvetadze into an error.

“It was pity because losing 6-1, 6-1 and you have no chance, you don’t feel so bad, but the last two were points were tough,” Chakvetadze said. “I could have taken my chances. I was up at Roland Garros and Wimbledon and all the time I’m not winning. But I feel like I’m playing much better than the start of the year like in Australia when I had 17 double faults.”

Chakvetadze promises to keep pressing on and at least she hasn’t gone the way of another extremely promising player, Nicole Vaidisova, who was nearly double bageled in qualifying, but it’s quite possible that she’ll never re-enter the top 20, much less the top five.Now ranked No. 50, she began working with Tommy Robredo’s old coach, Jose Clavet, at Roland Garros. Maybe he can lift her out of her doldrums.
“I haven’t had any good results, but I’m practicing twice a day and working with a physio and I feel like I'm ready. I just have to bring my work to the matches and it hasn’t happened yet.”
Chakvetadze is only 22 and perhaps with further maturity will begin to play more freely again, without battling her demons when her eyes should be on the ball, not on the dark pits below. But she's still very hard on herself.

“I’m a hard worker and it just makes me really upset that I can’t play the same level as I practice. I hope to finish the year top 30 at least, but I have to win matches to get some points. It’s tough not to be hard on myself when I know how well I can play. I’m trying really hard, but it isn’t working. It’s easier to fall than to come back up.”

But is she optimistic?

“I was pretty optimistic about this tournament but I didn’t happen,” said Chakvetadze, who is playing every tournament through the US Open.


Maria K. is learning to relax.Kirilenko's Journey

Kirilenko hasn’t had an easy journey either. Even though she wanted to spend New Year's Eve in Moscow for the first time in eons, her former coach, Eric Van Harpen, demanded that she arrive in Australia earlier to prepare for Brisbane. The two had been arguing during practice during December (“he was always mad”), but she agreed nonetheless, and then had a miserable 24-hour flight to Australia on December 31 where she felt depressed and resentful.

“There were like three people on the plane and it was horrible,” she told TR.net .

Unhappy and exhausted, she immediately caught a flu and her January season was gone, as even when she attempted to play she felt like she was playing in another’s person’s body.

The task master Van Harpen was gone by the end of the Aussie Open, ending their year and a half relationship.
“I needed to end the relationship,” said Kirilenko.

Now she’s back with her father, Yuri, who coached her as a child and she says it’s going well. She’s not pleased with her No. 52 ranking, believing that she has top 20 stuff, but knows that in order to prove that she has to win matches like she did against Chakvetadze, staying relaxed during big moments continuing to go for her shots, not getting down on herself.
Seven years into her career, she calls herself a veteran and realizes the value of experience in winning matches, but she still thinks she very much a work in progress.

Despite the numerous photo shoots and the more than fair amount of media she’s done due to her good looks, she came on tour as a shy girl and now appears to be coming into her own as personality. She speaks with much more self confidence than she once did, and breaks down points like a wizened old teaching pro. She by no means wants to remain a lesser Russian player and someday, just might have her second week Slam break through.

Some might think that making a run at the top 20 this year is beyond her, but she doesn’t, feeling in control of her life and making more of her own decisions.

She’ll face a tough task going up against Elena Dementieva in the second round, but she’s willing to take her shot.

“I still have high goals,” Kirilenko said. said. “I understand a lot more now.”

lilimi
Jul 29th, 2009, 02:45 PM
“At the end of last year I was thinking, Oh my God, I hope this was the worst year ever. And this year is even worse,”


:sad::hug: keep fighting Anna, keep fighting

sammy01
Jul 29th, 2009, 05:15 PM
that article sums up chaks whole situation pefectly. she just cant play her 'normal' tennis when theres any sort of pressure on. the last point of the match against kirilenko is a pefect example, she could have drive volleyed a ball like 3rd shot in the rally and just didn't believe in herself to do it.

i have no answers as to how she gets the confidence to play the way she needs to at 5-5 as 2-2. the only thing i think is she needs to drop down to smaller wta tournaments. portroz last week was a very very weak draw on hard courts in europe, why the hell not play it to try and pick up wins?

rucolo
Jul 29th, 2009, 05:56 PM
Thanks for this good article, HowardH.:)
I really wanted to know what Anna herself has to say about her situation.
Difficult to win when there is no confidence.:sad:
Stay strong, Anna!:hug:

Sammy01, I agree. Perhaps it would be better to mix smaller tournaments with bigger ones.
(But somehow I have the feeling Anna doesn`t like to play smaller tournaments.)

The Anna I became a fan of was confident, fearless, consistent, mentally strong (in important moments of match), played smart and served well.
Unfortunately the Anna today is only a shadow of her former self.:sad:
Hopefully Anna will turn it around completely soon.:)

Daszmarelli
Jul 29th, 2009, 09:43 PM
Thanks for article :hearts:

Anna, please keep fighting!

Iggy
Jul 30th, 2009, 09:24 PM
Baby steps. This hole she's in took 2 seasons to dig. It will take her a while to rectify it.
Interesting that the article brought up Vaidisova. I hope Chak can be patient and build up her mental strength.

Pink Princess
Aug 4th, 2009, 02:03 AM
I hope to finish the year top 30 at least

I think she can reach the Top-30!!!

goldenlox
Dec 20th, 2009, 01:59 PM
Time of Change for Chakvetadze

http://static.stuff.co.nz/1261271226/651/3179651.jpg Reuters
CHANGE: Anna Chakvetadze's decision to play in Auckland next month is all about change.

Aside from the standard platitudes about really wanting to see New Zealand (although she at least doesn't throw in the usual lines about hobbits and our beautiful countryside), and getting an early start to the year because of the injury-disrupted nature of her 2009, what world No69 Anna Chakvetadze's decision to play in Auckland next month is really about is change.
As that perma-tanned motivational gibberer Anthony Robbins would have it: "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you always got."
Two years ago, the 22-year-old Russian was fifth in the world, having won four of seven career titles and had made the quarterfinals of the Australian and French Opens and the semifinal of the US Open. But her ranking began to plunge the day a gang of masked men broke into her Moscow mansion, pistol-whipped her father, tied and gagged the whole family and stole $US300,000 in cash and valuables.
"I think I am completely over it," she tells the Sunday Star-Times on the phone from her training base in the Russian resort city of Sochi, where she has spent the past month hitting indoors with world No23 Elena Vesnina.
"I don't think about it at all. After a week, I really did not think about it," she says.
This is a rather staunch version of events. As a result of the robbery, Chakvetadze needed acupuncture to correct a loss of feeling in her hands caused by the tightness of her bonds, didn't sleep for three nights, moved house and acquired bodyguards. She couldn't train, but in an effort to clear her mind, went to the Australian Open.
"Physically, I was not ready," she says. "Mentally, it was also very tough, and that's how it started.
"It was very tough for me."
Of her tormentors, she says: "They are not in prison, I don't know where they are."
The two years since have been a procession of injuries and early exits from tournaments, the result, she says, of not being physically ready for a full tour schedule.
"Sometimes I had a tough time, I didn't want to practise, I just wanted to throw down my racquet somewhere and I didn't want to see it again," she says.
"I didn't want to see the court. Now I like to practise, I like to compete. That's why I am doing this and it is important to enjoy it and that's what I am doing now."
She has changed coach and her hitting partner and acquired a physical trainer to toughen up, saying: "I felt I had to change something."

But the one constant remains her father, Djambuli, who travels everywhere with her. Her mother, Natalia, is also a regular on the road. "Sometimes they try to coach me, but they haven't been professional tennis players. They just help me with support, I need the support of my family and I like to have them stay around me.
"My dad, he keeps talking to me during matches but I can't hear him. My mum – she is quiet, just cheering and clapping."
After a stress fracture in her foot ended her 2009 season back in October, Chakvetadze spent two months in Moscow, her longest spell at home since she was 16. "I had a great time, of course, but you get used to the travel and already, during the second month, I was saying `OK, I want to go somewhere'. I was getting kind of bored ... but I couldn't go to the nightclubs because I was wearing this big ugly boot. It was pretty embarrassing."
Now she's ready to hit the road again. Having completed a psychology degree last year, Chakvetadze would be well placed to assess her own mental fragility, and agrees it has helped her game, saying: "I feel I am a completely different person."
Auckland may be her chance to prove it. She will be one of the earliest arrivals for the ASB Classic, which starts on January 4 – missing New Year celebrations in Russia – and says: "Next year, I think I can change some things. It will be good to change some things ... every year is different."

Daszmarelli
Dec 20th, 2009, 02:21 PM
Good luck.
I wish the best of luck to you on 2010! you deserve, princess.

GeorgianFan
Dec 20th, 2009, 02:50 PM
Anna, come back! :hearts:

Pink Princess
Dec 20th, 2009, 05:03 PM
An interesting article!!!

sammy01
Dec 21st, 2009, 03:31 AM
now that article gives me great hope. the fact that shes practicing regular with a world class player, has her new coach and a physical trainer (something i felt shes needed) are all good signs. another great thing is her going to australia early, that shows good commitment which i feel has been lacking last year (she openly admits training and practice haven't always been top of her list).

if shes putting in the hard work like seems to be protrayed in this article my hopes for 2010 are much higher, top 20 is something she could easily be back inside given her game.

rucolo
Jan 2nd, 2010, 04:40 PM
Time of Change for Chakvetadze

http://static.stuff.co.nz/1261271226/651/3179651.jpg Reuters
CHANGE: Anna Chakvetadze's decision to play in Auckland next month is all about change.

Aside from the standard platitudes about really wanting to see New Zealand (although she at least doesn't throw in the usual lines about hobbits and our beautiful countryside), and getting an early start to the year because of the injury-disrupted nature of her 2009, what world No69 Anna Chakvetadze's decision to play in Auckland next month is really about is change.
As that perma-tanned motivational gibberer Anthony Robbins would have it: "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you always got."
Two years ago, the 22-year-old Russian was fifth in the world, having won four of seven career titles and had made the quarterfinals of the Australian and French Opens and the semifinal of the US Open. But her ranking began to plunge the day a gang of masked men broke into her Moscow mansion, pistol-whipped her father, tied and gagged the whole family and stole $US300,000 in cash and valuables.
"I think I am completely over it," she tells the Sunday Star-Times on the phone from her training base in the Russian resort city of Sochi, where she has spent the past month hitting indoors with world No23 Elena Vesnina.
"I don't think about it at all. After a week, I really did not think about it," she says.
This is a rather staunch version of events. As a result of the robbery, Chakvetadze needed acupuncture to correct a loss of feeling in her hands caused by the tightness of her bonds, didn't sleep for three nights, moved house and acquired bodyguards. She couldn't train, but in an effort to clear her mind, went to the Australian Open.
"Physically, I was not ready," she says. "Mentally, it was also very tough, and that's how it started.
"It was very tough for me."
Of her tormentors, she says: "They are not in prison, I don't know where they are."
The two years since have been a procession of injuries and early exits from tournaments, the result, she says, of not being physically ready for a full tour schedule.
"Sometimes I had a tough time, I didn't want to practise, I just wanted to throw down my racquet somewhere and I didn't want to see it again," she says.
"I didn't want to see the court. Now I like to practise, I like to compete. That's why I am doing this and it is important to enjoy it and that's what I am doing now."
She has changed coach and her hitting partner and acquired a physical trainer to toughen up, saying: "I felt I had to change something."

But the one constant remains her father, Djambuli, who travels everywhere with her. Her mother, Natalia, is also a regular on the road. "Sometimes they try to coach me, but they haven't been professional tennis players. They just help me with support, I need the support of my family and I like to have them stay around me.
"My dad, he keeps talking to me during matches but I can't hear him. My mum – she is quiet, just cheering and clapping."
After a stress fracture in her foot ended her 2009 season back in October, Chakvetadze spent two months in Moscow, her longest spell at home since she was 16. "I had a great time, of course, but you get used to the travel and already, during the second month, I was saying `OK, I want to go somewhere'. I was getting kind of bored ... but I couldn't go to the nightclubs because I was wearing this big ugly boot. It was pretty embarrassing."
Now she's ready to hit the road again. Having completed a psychology degree last year, Chakvetadze would be well placed to assess her own mental fragility, and agrees it has helped her game, saying: "I feel I am a completely different person."
Auckland may be her chance to prove it. She will be one of the earliest arrivals for the ASB Classic, which starts on January 4 – missing New Year celebrations in Russia – and says: "Next year, I think I can change some things. It will be good to change some things ... every year is different."

Great article!:yeah:
This article makes me optimistic!:) I REALLY hope these are not just words and she will indeed improve in 2010! I want good results again!
One thing I really don`t get: How can somebody that has a psychology degree be mentally so fragile?! I don`t get it, I just don`t get it.:o:tape:

Tezuka.
Jan 2nd, 2010, 05:15 PM
Great article!:yeah:
This article makes me optimistic!:) I REALLY hope these are not just words and she will indeed improve in 2010! I want good results again!
One thing I really don`t get: How can somebody that has a psychology degree be mentally so fragile?! I don`t get it, I just don`t get it.:o:tape:

same question here !?:unsure:

GeorgianFan
Jan 9th, 2010, 10:51 PM
Tennis ace is back

ADAM SMITH
January 10, 2010 08:38am
http://www.themercury.com.au/article/2010/01/10/120741_sport-news.html

ANNA Chakvetadze's renewed passion for the game has put her back on track to claim a second Moorilla Hobart International title.

Three years ago the Russian claimed the Hobart crown the only No. 1 seed to do so in the tournament's 16-year history kick-starting a 2007 season in which she broke into the world top-10 for the first time.

Chakvetadze followed her Tasmanian success by reaching the quarter-finals at the Australian and French Opens and the semi-finals at the US Open, culminating with a career-high ranking of No. 5 in September 2007.

Since then she has gradually slipped down the rankings as injuries and form took their toll, and her motivation for the sport started to wane.

Now the 22-year-old is back and beginning to recapture her best form.

Competing in qualifying yesterday, the world No. 67 brushed aside countrywoman Elena Chalova 6-2, 6-2 in a little over an hour to move within one win of clinching a main-draw berth.

"It was pretty tough conditions today, lots of wind, but I knew what to expect and sometimes it's good to play qualifying to get some matches under your belt," Chakvetadze said.

"I'm here to get my confidence back and to also play a few matches. To be in the final again would be great.

"I had a few injuries last year and it was a pretty bad time but now I feel almost 100 per cent healthy; this year I feel much stronger physically and I think it will help me.

"Last year I was a bit tired of everything, I didn't really want to practice and it was tough, but now I feel like I want to be here, it's like my job and I enjoy my job.

"Especially the Australian Open, which is one of my favourite tournaments."

One of three former Hobart champions in qualifying, Chakvetadze will meet Elena Baltacha this morning, with the victor moving into the strong main-draw field.

rucolo
Jul 22nd, 2010, 10:37 PM
Bump :p

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100721/anna-on-the-rise-again_2256076_2098623


Anna On The Rise Again?

July 21, 2010
PORTOROZ, Slovenia - Sara Errani had been one of the best players at the Banka Koper Slovenia Open over the last few years, winning 10 of her last 11 matches at the event; but what happened Wednesday night was a far cry from that, as the No.4-seeded Italian crashed hard to Anna Chakvetadze.

Errani won here in 2008 and made the final in 2009, barely losing to Dinara Safina, then the No.1 player in the world, 7-5 in the third set. She won her first round match this year in straight sets but against Chakvetadze in the second round was totally outclassed, losing 61 62 in only 58 minutes.

"I was expecting more from her side, but I don't think she played her best at all," Chakvetadze told reporters after the match. "I just took my chances and I'm happy to be in the quarterfinals playing in my first year here."

Chakvetadze was ranked as high as No.5 a few years ago but in the spring fell out of the Top 100 after a disappointing last 12 months; she is showing improved form as of late, and now is in her second quarterfinal of the season.

"I want to get back to the top, but it's tough to say," the Russian added. "I haven't played the Top 10 players a lot recently. I played Serena a few weeks ago and lost pretty easily. I have to play more to get the feel again."

Tezuka.
Jul 23rd, 2010, 01:10 AM
She is realistic.thanks rucolo.

rucolo
Jul 25th, 2010, 12:32 PM
Article about Portoroz SF::p

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100724/anna-johanna-into-final_2256076_2101460


Anna & Johanna Into Final

July 24, 2010
PORTOROZ, Slovenia - In what has become the theme for her in Portoroz, Anna Chakvetadze overcame the odds to make the final, rallying from a 6-0 first set to beat Polona Hercog in front of her home crowd, 06 62 62.

Chakvetadze, who saved two match points to beat No.6 seed Vera Dushevina in the quarterfinals, lost the first seven games of her match against No.7 seed Hercog on Saturday before making her move, eventually grinding past the aggressive Slovenian in an hour and 48 minutes in their first career meeting.

Chakvetadze will be playing her first final since New Haven in August 2008, where she was runner-up to Caroline Wozniacki.

"I'm very excited. It has been almost two years with no final, now finally here," Chakvetadze said. "In the beginning I didn't know what to do. I didn't know her game too well. She was hitting the lines and making almost no mistakes, but in the second set I changed my tactics a bit and it worked."

Hercog was the only seed who made it to the final four but was aware Chakvetadze isn't a typical No.103 in the world: "She was a top player, Top 5, and much more experienced than I am," the Slovene teen said. "I should have played phenomenally but I'm missing these kinds of matches."

Awaiting Chakvetadze in the final will be Johanna Larsson, who reached her first career Sony Ericsson WTA Tour final when another Russian, Ksenia Pervak, retired with a right wrist injury from the second semifinal while trailing, 62 10.

"This place is like a fairytale. It's so pretty in Portoroz," Larsson said. "I'm always happy to win, but I feel sorry for Ksenia. It's a part of the game though, and I was feeling good out there. It's my first final - I'm going to go out there and enjoy the match. Tomorrow is a new day and we'll see what it brings."

Chakvetadze and Larsson will be playing each other for the first time.

In the doubles final, Maria Kondratieva and Vladimira Uhlirova upheld their No.2 seeding with a 64 26 107 win over Chakvetadze and Marina Erakovic. Kondratieva and Uhlirova were playing together for the seventh time but had a losing record together before this week - now they win their first title together (it was Kondratieva's first Tour doubles title and Uhlirova's fourth).

Chakvenus
Jul 25th, 2010, 05:01 PM
awww i like that article.
you can tell she's thrilled to be in a final after almost 2 years.
you deserve it Anna so go out there and takeee it!!

GeorgianFan
Jul 26th, 2010, 01:54 AM
Chakvetadze New Queen of Portoroz
http://www.sloveniaopen.si/en/chakvetadze-new-queen-portoroz

A shower that delayed the start of play for nearly two hours was just a prelude to the storm that Russia's Anna Chakvetadze created on court in blowing past Sweden's Johanna Larsson 6-1 and 6-2 to lift the Banka Koper Slovenia Open title on Sunday.

The 23-year-old Russian, who was ranked as high as No. 5 in 2007, showed much of the form that made her a top-ten player as she raced to her first WTA title in nearly two years and the eighth of her career in a mere hour.

“Of course I’m not at the same level that I used to be but I’m close,” :devil: :devil: the Russian said of her performance in Portoroz, where she beat three seeds en route to succeeding fellow Russian Dinara Safina as the champion.

Chakvetadze showed no symptoms of the slow start that hampered her previous two outings, when she rallied from a set down to win the quarter-final and semi-final. "Today I was very concentrated, I felt the rhythm of my strokes and I saw her weak spot - her backhand - and played the ball there.”

Breaking her opponent for the first time in the fourth game, the Russian then fought off a counter-attack and responded by stepping up her game another notch to wrap up the set in just 22 minutes.

The Swede, who entered the tournament ranked 19 places higher than the Russian in 84th, never truly threatened, as anything she produced was met with a swift and decisive response from Chakvetadze.

Larsson momentarily regained her composure to win her service game at the outset of the second set and pressured Chakvetadze's service in the next game, only to see that attempt quashed by the relentless Russian.

This would prove the turning point in the second set, as Chakvetadze used the momentum to break in the next game and then press ahead to 5-1.

The Swede summed up the state of affairs on the court after the match: "Anna played really well today. I thought I was fighting out there and I did everything I could, but she was just too good."

Fittingly for a tournament in which she dug her way out of a hole time and time again, the Russian closed out the match having saved three-break points to win her service game.

"I hope this will give me some confidence so that I can play better against the top players," she said of her efforts to get back to her former glory.

Her sights are now be set on the US Open, where she first broke into the top five three years ago. “If you do well at a grand slam, you kind of start to believe that you can do really well.”

And while Chakvetadze looks for the form to return to former glory, 21-year-old Larsson, for whom this was the first final, is ecstatic about her newfound success on the WTA Tour.

"I'm really happy, obviously, even though I might not look happy right now. I’ve started playing really well - the quarters last week [in Prague] and a final this week. If someone told me this a month ago, I would not believe that."

Daszmarelli
Jul 26th, 2010, 02:22 AM
:hearts: seems she is so confident about her level.

Chakvenus
Jul 26th, 2010, 04:24 AM
i love her remarks after this win!!
here's hoping for a good hard court swing!!

sammy01
Jul 26th, 2010, 09:32 AM
i want to know chaks schedule beyond the danish open?

Tezuka.
Jul 26th, 2010, 12:48 PM
love her post.:inlove:

rucolo
Jul 26th, 2010, 05:16 PM
"I'm not at the same level I used to be... but I'm close."


True. Anna played brilliant tennis.:yeah:

Anna back in Top 100 now!
Ranking jump from #103 to #74.:D

rucolo
Jul 26th, 2010, 05:22 PM
Article about Anna`s Portoroz title::hearts:

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100725/chakvetadzes-back_2256076_2101849


Chakvetadze's Back!

July 25, 2010
PORTOROZ, Slovenia - It had been a while since Anna Chakvetadze conjured up the magic that took her to No.5 in the world a few years ago, but there were flashes of that magic in Portoroz this week, as the Russian won her first title in almost two and a half years at the Banka Koper Slovenia Open.

Little by little, and despite being unseeded, the Chakvetadze momentum kept growing. She won her first two matches in straight sets, including a 61 62 thrashing of No.4 seed Sara Errani in the second round. Errani had been to the final here the last two years, winning in 2008 and finishing runner-up in 2009.

The quarters and semis were a struggle for Chakvetadze, but she really rose to the occasion, saving two match points to beat No.6 seed Vera Dushevina in the quarterfinals, 26 63 75, then rebounding after a first set blowout to defeat No.7 seed Polona Hercog, 06 62 62 - in front of her Slovenian home crowd.

"The quarterfinal and semifinal matches were the toughest of the week for me," Chakvetadze said. "Against Dushevina I didn't play well but still won - it's good when you don't play your best and win, because after that you play better."

Chakvetadze, who won her eighth career title, and first since Paris in February 2008, cruised past first-time finalist Johanna Larsson in 61 minutes, 61 62.

"This was my ninth final and Johanna's first, so I don't think she was as comfortable as me today," Chakvetadze said. "I was very concentrated and didn't give her many free points, so I'm very happy with my performance."

During 2006 and 2007, Chakvetadze put together a sparkling 96-40 record (71%), reaching a career-high No.5 in September 2007 after her first Grand Slam semifinal at the US Open. Between the start of 2008 and coming into this week she had a 55-55 record (50%); on May 17 this year, she was out of the Top 100 for the first time in almost six years (she broke the Top 100 in September 2004).

Five straight wins here may be a sign of a career rebound for the 23-year-old, No.103-ranked Chakvetadze, who returns to the Top 75 by virtue of this title.

"Right now I'm far away from No.5. I've struggled so much, but finally I have this win," Chakvetadze said. "Last year was really tough for me. I hope this year will be better. I'm not at the same level I used to be... but I'm close."

goldenlox
Jul 28th, 2010, 05:24 PM
Chakvetadze hoping dark days are behind (http://espn.go.com/sports/tennis/blog/_/name/tennis/id/5416303/chakvetadze-hoping-dark-days-behind)

July, 28, 2010 Jul 28
9:12
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Email (http://sendtofriend.espn.go.com/sendtofriend/SendToFriend?URL=http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=5416303&name=tennis&title=Chakvetadze%20hoping%20dark%20days%20are%20b ehind&id=5416303)
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By Sarah Unke


A few years ago, Anna Chakvetadze (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=380), her long braid whipping around behind her on court, was a teenager on the rise.


She made her first big splash at the 2004 U.S. Open. Playing in her third WTA Tour main draw and her first Grand Slam, she reached the third round and defeated No. 3 Anastasia Myskina (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=343) to tie her with Serena Williams (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=394) as the second-fastest woman to beat a top-10 opponent. In 2006, she reached the fourth round of the Open and cracked the top 20 after winning her first two titles, the second of which came in her hometown of Moscow. There she proved herself among the gaggle of other top Russian women by defeating Dinara Safina (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=246), Maria Sharapova (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=399), Elena Dementieva (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=377) and Nadia Petrova (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=371) for the title.


That year was big, but Chakvetadze's 2007 was even bigger. She won four tournaments and reached the Australian and French Open quarterfinals and the U.S. Open semis. With her grinding game and ability to unleash her powerful shot-making ability at any moment, she was like a 2007 version of Caroline Wozniacki (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=630). She even had a top-five ranking to match. Chakvetadze's mental stamina in matches was also reminiscent of the Dane's. But a year later, something had happened to her unflappability.


Until she won the Slovenia Open last week, Chakvetadze had suffered a serious title and confidence drought. She hasn't been past the second round at a Slam since Wimbledon two years ago, and her ranking fell to No. 118 earlier this year.


It's hard not to imagine that the experience she had at the end of her stellar 2007 season didn't have something to do with it. While Chakvetadze was home in Moscow for the offseason that December, armed burglars forced entry into her house, tied her wrists up so tightly that she temporarily lost feeling in her left hand, hit her father over the head with a pistol and robbed her family of more than $200,000 in cash and jewelry. Since that incident, Chakvetadze hasn't been the same player.


"Life has to go on -- you can't just dwell on the past," she said at Wimbledon in 2008. "After what happened, I wanted to move somewhere else in Moscow, but my parents didn't want to. I couldn't sleep in my room for the first three nights, but now it's OK."


But she didn't seem to move on the court. That was the last Slam in which she got past the second round, and her results just seemed to get worse and worse. Although her Russian contemporaries have also had their ups and downs, they were still a part of the conversation. Chakvetadze seemed to disappear.


It would have been easy to see her fade away altogether, but Chakvetadze never lost her passion for tennis. She constantly talked about trying to remain positive and working to come back. In 2008, the blonde with hair for miles even cut bangs as a way to try to get herself out of her funk. "Hopefully with this new fresher look comes with a new fierce attitude and confidence," she wrote on her website diary.


Now the 23-year-old is finally making inroads on a return to form. With her title last week, she improved her ranking 29 spots to No. 74. Although she only had to defeat one player in the top 50 for the title, the win should be a major confidence booster for her.


"Right now I'm far away from world No. 5. I've struggled so much, but finally I have this win," she said in Slovenia. "Last year was really tough for me, and I hope this year will be better. I'm not at the same level I used to be, but I'm close."


The haircut didn't work, but maybe this title will. Chakvetadze is now looking toward the U.S. Open, where she had so many breakthrough moments just a few years ago.


"I hope this will give me some confidence so that I can play better against the top players," she said. "If you do well at a Grand Slam, you kind of start to believe that you can do really well."

dornik
Aug 7th, 2010, 12:49 PM
It took Anna exactly an hour to advance to the semis of the E-Boks Sony Ericsson Open in Copenhagen, Denmark. Anna defeated #6 Polona Hercog of Slovenia 6-4 6-3. This is Anna's 10th straight singles win.

Afer the match, Anna said: "It looked easy, but it was not, and to be honest I'm actually not very happy with the way I played today. I made a lot of unforced errors and my movement wasn't as good as I want it to be. Still, it's a good result for me to be in the semis here and I'm excited. I think I'm still far away from my best, but on the upside I'm getting my confidence back and starting to play better. I need to play a Top 10 player to see how close I am. I've lost to Caroline twice and never beaten her; we haven't played for two years and I'm sure she's improved since then. I'll try to play my best and enjoy it."

rucolo
Aug 27th, 2010, 02:55 PM
^ Love these realistic comments from Anna.:hearts:

She knows she`s not at her best yet, but she surely is on her way.;)

Glad she is motivated and getting more and more confidence.
So nice to see her hungry for wins again!

Link to the Copenhagen article::p
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100806/top-seeds-on-track_2256076_2113953

Hope for more success in New York!

dornik
Sep 1st, 2010, 01:25 PM
Hi, everybody!

Below there are some quotes from Anna's interview to the Russian news agency she gave after the match.
(http://sport.rian.ru/sport/20100901/270929250.html)
"There was nothing good at all, I don't know what happened. I have not speak to my coaches about my play yet. We will watch the match with my coaches, analyse it and learn from mistakes."
"I can not even comment what happened. I thought I played on a level which was not bad, but I failed with a GS so far.
I've got new coaches but today their assist did not help"

Sergius
Sep 1st, 2010, 01:35 PM
Who are hew new coaches?:scratch:

HowardH
Sep 1st, 2010, 03:47 PM
Anna, you have been playing tennis for a long time now. Surely you should know what is happening during the match? If you do not know what is going wrong, then how can you fix it? If you have to wait till after the match to consult your coaches to figure out what is happening, that means you will have already lost... except I suppose on the wta most of the time you get to call the coach on. But not in the big ones, not in slams. Of course this is part of why she lost, she wasn't sure what to change.

Sergius
Sep 6th, 2010, 02:17 PM
Hi, everyone! Anna was interviewed by the sports.ru. I translated the interview. I skipped some parts of it where Anna talks about Caro and Serena, but if someone's really interested in these parts I can translate that too.
The source (in Russian) http://www.sports.ru/tennis/72864465.html

- You ended your US Open performance in first round by losing to Urszula Radwanska from Poland...
- Yeah, but to be honest I had a good draw. When at first I looked at it I had noticed that I would have faced Shvedova in the 2nd round. So the draw was good for me. But a week before I have won the Bronx tournament, and the conditions were really tough there, sometimes we had to play matches twice a day. That's way it was very difficult physically, I injured my arm and wasn't fully recovered for the Slam. The Bronx tournament was the preparatory one and I took part there to be ready for the US Open. But it didn't turn out the right way. I gave all my efforts and my health to Bronx 100k. So I couldn't succeed at the USO.
- After the match (against Radwanska) you said that you didn't understand why you had lost. What can you say now, was the main reason of your loss your physical weariness?
- Yeah, I talked to my coach and we decided that I just hadn't recovered and prepared enough. Next time we shall make our schedule more properly. Also I understood that not playing any tournaments a week before Slam would be better for me. I just should train at the courts of the tournament I decided to play. This time I just wasn't prepared enough to play 2 tournaments in a row at a high level.
- Have you ever played any tournaments a week before slam?
- Some years ago everything used to be different a little. My rankings were higher, I played a lot of tournaments and my results were good.This year the season's beginning was horrible. I got injured and I started recovering and winning matches recently, and of course I couldn't think the Bronx tournament to be so difficult. Every match was a three-setter, and once I had to play 2 matches in a day. And when a you are not able to sustain such physical loads you have a danger to got small injuries that can influence on your game.
- You decided not to perform at the USO Series. Why?
- Of course I should have made another schedule and I should have performed at the USO Series skipping a week before the USO. I couldn't get to main draw of that tournaments directly because of my ranking, so the plan was to play some WTA events in Europe, train for 10 days then, and to play Bronx and US Open after that. But the Bronx tournament turned out to be the wrong decision.
- So you prefer to play ITF not WTA because of your ranking...
- Well, yeah, but I don't plan to play ITF any more. Of course I prefer WTA to ITF tournies but I just had to play qualies to get into MD, that's why I decided to include Bronx in my schedule. But I instantly realised that that wasn't the decision I needed. And now I'll play big tournaments for sure despite the fact I have to play qualies.
- Is there a difference between ITF events and WTA ones so big?
- Sure. WTA tournaments have everything different.
- Have you got some benefits from your Bronx win?
- I don't think so. That was rather tough tournament for the 100k one. Safarova has been the top seed and she's world number 25 and I defeated her. On the other side defeating such a player at the 100k is not the same to defeat her at Slam. Players fight for every point at the Slam but they just can not play at their best at the small ones to save energy.
- In August you played against Danish Caroline Wozniacki and lost in three sets. What are strong and weak sides of her game?
- She plays very consistent, but I cannot say that the Danish hits the ball hard, she's very quick though. It is not so obvious while watching on TV that Caroline presses on her opponent incredibly. Wozniacki has good speed abilities and she just doesn't let the ball drop, she just come to it and hits immediately. Caroline moves well and she's a constant top-5 player. I think she deserved have such a ranking.
- What do you think will she be able to play at such high level in 5 years? Or her success is possible due to her young ages and good stamina, physical conditions?
- It's hard to say. If you look at other girls of her age you can say they don't move so fast and well. It's hard to predict what's gonna happen with her in 5 years. Actually I think she can play at such level for quite a long time.
- Can her level of game be compared to Serena's one?
- I have always said that there were not any players in top-10 who had not deserved to be there. All top-10 tennis players deserved that by their hard work and achievments. If we compare Serena and Caroline I can say that the American's level of play is higher than Wozniacki's. She has won many GS tournaments, and Caroline hasn't, but she's so young, you know. So it's hard to compare. But her world number 2 ranking is completely deserved.
- Does it matter for your what's your ranking?
- The only thing that matters for me is to get back my game. If I can do it my ranking will be higher. I don't think of my ranking too much. The main thing to worry me is to increase the level of my game.
- You have a new team, tell us about it.
- Cristian Cordasz is my new coach. He used to work with Alexandra Wozniak from Canada. We didn't do joint practising yet. The point is what I had another coach with me at the USO who cannot keep on working with me due to family circumstances. And I just asked Cordasz to help me. He helped me before that as well, at the Copenhagen tournament and in Slovenia. We didn't train there too much, I only did some exercises to get the ball feeling. And now the real work will begin.
- Where will you train further?
- The coach has flown to Moscow, so I'll work here, but then before the season starts I can fly to Argentina. Because the first tournaments will be held in Australia and I cannot be 100 per cent prepared here because of the Moscow weather, you know, cause I'll have to play indoors here. I think it would be good for my game to fly to Argentina and play were getting used to weather and court.
- What tournaments are you going to play before the season ends?
- I'll start preparing in a week for Asian tournaments. The series begins with Tashkent, I will fly to Japan and China then and after that I'll go back to home.
- And what about Kremlin Cup?
- I'll play the KC for sure, if I am healthy of course. I like the tournament very much. It is so nice to play in your native city. The crowd root for me, my friends and my family come to my matches
- Don't you think that the level of KC has dropped?
- Sure it has. It's no longer a Tier 1 tournament, and the level has dropped. That's because of the WTA calendar, the KC is held the weak before the YEC, and the top-8 players just cannot take part there.
- What do you think about WTA calendar's commitment?
- It's harder for top-10 players, because they have mandatory tournaments, which they are to play. It's hard for them to play full schedule, no one can play every week. So that's the reason of injuries, this influences on the game.WTA needs to do something.

Daszmarelli
Sep 6th, 2010, 02:40 PM
Wow thanks, I'ld love to see the rest of interview. Thanks a lot.

HowardH
Sep 6th, 2010, 03:17 PM
I hope her arm gets better. And it's a good decision to not play tournaments in the week before a slam but to just prepare for the slam.

GeorgianFan
Sep 6th, 2010, 05:51 PM
Anya will fly to Argentina with Cordasz :yeah:

sammy01
Sep 6th, 2010, 06:40 PM
best news i have heard that she will be full time with cordasz, good girl anna.

A-Chak
Sep 6th, 2010, 11:05 PM
Good :yeah:

Rafa_thebest
Sep 6th, 2010, 11:44 PM
"the real work will begin" HELL YES!! He is so good to Anna!! so cool that she might be traveling to Argentina to train!! South America LOVES Anna! :D

Daszmarelli
Sep 6th, 2010, 11:56 PM
Yeah, Brazil loves her.

Sergius
Sep 7th, 2010, 12:25 AM
Wow thanks, I'ld love to see the rest of interview. Thanks a lot.

well, I have no time to translate the rest of the text atm, but I shall do it soon

Jason A.
Sep 7th, 2010, 02:24 AM
Serezha, thanks a lot for posting her interview and the translation. :)

dornik
Sep 7th, 2010, 12:22 PM
The idea of going to the South America to get used to courts and climate there for the AO sounds very strange.

King Halep
Sep 7th, 2010, 03:51 PM
Thanks for the translation Serezha. Glad she cleared everything up. So it was too much warmup the week before and she is too committed to tank one of the matches. Maybe she is not at peak fitness yet. Dementieva also played too much the week before and ran out of gas in 4R. Very happy that Brad GilbertCordasz has been free to coach her fulltime. It really has been a hard time for her, now with not being in good shape for USO, but I think she will keep getting stronger.


http://www.sports.ru/images/object_44.1234136770.jpg

http://www.sports.ru/images/object_22.1209333584.jpg

King Halep
Sep 7th, 2010, 03:52 PM
best news i have heard that she will be full time with cordasz, good girl anna.

I think she reads this forum.

Sergius
Sep 7th, 2010, 05:54 PM
The idea of going to the South America to get used to courts and climate there for the AO sounds very strange.

I was kinda surprised by this logic too. :lol: But I hope she knows what she's gonna do

Edited the interview, added the missed parts

dornik
Sep 7th, 2010, 08:56 PM
I was kinda surprised by this logic too. :lol: But I hope she knows what she's gonna do

Edited the interview, added the missed parts

Hi! Have to remind you, Serezha, she was sure 'bout Bronx too.

Rafa_thebest
Sep 7th, 2010, 09:36 PM
The idea of going to the South America to get used to courts and climate there for the AO sounds very strange.

no! it's not! she's not coming to Venezuela or Brasil ! she's going to Argentina! a country that has similar weather to Australia!! Argentina and Australia are different from most countries! they have winter when it's summer time all over the world (june/july/august) and summer when it's winter in most countries (X-mas, january) That's why she's going there!! Russia, USA even other latino countries are too cold in that time while Austrialia is SO HOT! it makes sense!! Argentina is the perfect place for her to train in the off season!!

dornik
Sep 8th, 2010, 02:28 PM
In Buenos Aires it's about 82 degrees F in December, so it's fairly warm, but not tropical warm like Australia.

Daszmarelli
Sep 8th, 2010, 03:47 PM
In Buenos Aires it's about 82 degrees F in December, so it's fairly warm, but not tropical warm like Australia.

Some cities of Brazil has australian weather aswell

Sergius
Oct 17th, 2010, 10:01 PM
I know many of us are anxious about Anna's tough first round opponent. So, I thought it'd be nice to know what she thinks about the upcoming tournament.
http://sport.rian.ru/sport/20101017/286531477.html


So, this is what she said.
" Li Na is a good player, she got good results this year, she entered the top-10 for the first time of her career. But I have nothing to lose. The Kremlin Cup is gonna be the last tournament of my season. So I'll try to do my best and give her a surprise."
"I'm fine physically, I'm in a good mood - I play at my hometown tournament, you know. Despite my lately return from Linz, I've already practised in Olympiyski (the stadium where the KC will be held)"
"This year I like the courts more than last one. I was told it's the same and it was the colours that was changed, but I think the surface became slower. This fact would be an advantage for me in match against Na Li, because she plays better at faster courts."
She also mentioned that she has never won a match in Moscow, but once. "But that year I won the whole tournament. I don't want to predict this year's result. I was doing well when practicing,but that was practice, not a match, and I have a tough first round opponent."
" I've begun the year so bad, but after that I started playing better and won Portoroz. Also I've won Bronx, played well in Copenhagen. I thought 'finally I regain my form and there will be consistent results' And the moment I thought so my form vanished. And in Tashkent I was taken ill with an intestinal virus. I felt very upset over it, because I had a good draw there, and I'd have made a good run. Besides that, I was ill even playing Beijing, and didn't perform well there."


Well, I think it's very nice to know she's in a good mood and finally is healthy and feels good. I have some slight optimistic expectations about the match against Na Li. I hope she can win it.

Jason A.
Oct 20th, 2010, 02:31 AM
Thanks a lot for the article and its translation, Serezha! :cool:

King Halep
Oct 20th, 2010, 03:16 AM
Chakvetadze’s scores best win of the year

“It is my only win over a top-20 player so far this season. I played well, while Na Li was probably tired, as many top players are by the end of the year”, she said.

Anna also confirmed that she is changing her service technique with her new coach and lamented respective problems in her game.


”After several vain attempts with other specialists in recent past, we decided to find a new approach to my old game”, she told at her press-conference. “I believe I’m on the right path”, stressed the Russian who will play against Ukraine’s M.Koryttseva in the next round.



Changing her service technique again? Thought it was going well.

sammy01
Oct 20th, 2010, 03:49 AM
i missed the on court coaching she had at the end of the 1st set, was it cordasz that came on?

thanks for the articles, i still think the serve needs work, i watched her yesterday thinking if she had a solid 65/70% 1st serve she would be back to being a great player again.

King Halep
Oct 20th, 2010, 04:10 AM
i missed the on court coaching she had at the end of the 1st set, was it cordasz that came on?

thanks for the articles, i still think the serve needs work, i watched her yesterday thinking if she had a solid 65/70% 1st serve she would be back to being a great player again.


Never as simple as that

sammy01
Oct 20th, 2010, 07:09 AM
Never as simple as that

it was in 2006/7, she simply got a high 1st serve percentage in, went for placement on the serve and let her ground strokes back her up.

now she goes for bomb 1st serves, misses a large percentage and it results in her very short df prone 2nd serve being far to relied upon.

King Halep
Oct 20th, 2010, 10:38 AM
Maybe when her whole game is working together. This year she has been getting around 70% 1st serve and still losing. She was getting some nice velocity at Copenhagen, around 160km/h which was surprising to me.

King Halep
Oct 21st, 2010, 05:44 AM
Press-conference with Anna Chakvetadze 19.10.2010

Q: Can you call this victory the most important this year?
A: Can’t say that it is the most important, but it’s the best. I have not beat anybody top 20 this year.


Q: Was it an easy match for you? Don’t you think that Li burnt out?
A: Yes, I think she didn’t show her best tennis, and that really helped me.


Q: How can you comment why the beginning of the tournament was so unsuccessful?
A: It is tough to say. It’s the end of the year, players are tired. It is not so easy to maintain the high level of tennis .There is always the slump at the end of the year, even top players lose.


Q: Did it help you playing doubles yesterday? Did you get the chance to get used to the court?
A: I like to play doubles. 2years ago I stopped playing doubles and lost my position. I would like to start again. Unfortunately I can’t use my rankings to enter the main draw. So I have to choose the partner with higher ranking, not with those whom I prefer. I hope to improve my ranking.


Q: Kalevod mentioned that something new appeared in your technique. Is that true?
A: Yes, my new coach works on my serve. I had problems with my serve today. It is rather tough to change the serve technique and to implement it in the match. Serve is not my strong point. I agree with the coach that I have to change something. But I can’t always put it into practice during the match.


Q: Can you tell us about your new coach? What were you talking about today on the court?
A: Coach can’t teach you to play tennis, that is more of psychological support. He points out strategic thinks, it is not possible to get tips about tactic in half a minute. He can turn up and give advice. We started to work with my coach accidently . He is very positive. He does not make any dramatic change. I had many coaches before. But unfortunately they couldn’t find an approach to my game. And they started to change it a lot. But it wasn’t the way out. And we decided with my current coach my old game which I used to play and improve it a little bit. I think I’m on the right way.


Q: As concerns the doubles, who would you like to play with?
A: It’s tough to say. It’s better to play with who you are in good relations. If you have such strain relationship, it would be tough to play.

Sergius
Oct 21st, 2010, 07:04 AM
Thank you. Very nice interview

sammy01
Oct 21st, 2010, 09:40 AM
glad it seems she will play a fullish doubles schedule in 2011. her doubles ranking would be easily top 75 if she played more

King Halep
Oct 21st, 2010, 09:57 AM
Why is her volleying in doubles so good and in singles her net game is :silly: :sobbing:

King Halep
Oct 21st, 2010, 10:18 AM
i missed the on court coaching she had at the end of the 1st set, was it cordasz that came on?

thanks for the articles, i still think the serve needs work, i watched her yesterday thinking if she had a solid 65/70% 1st serve she would be back to being a great player again.

Didnt see anyone coming on court after the first set. She might have changed the angle that she stands at, apart from that cant see any change in her service.

sammy01
Oct 21st, 2010, 01:55 PM
for me i just wanna see her serve smoother, right now i feel it is very jerky and it is good when it all connects together, but far too often it doesn't.

though im glad shes using the shortened serve than the long service action she was using in pattaya and early in the year.

King Halep
Oct 22nd, 2010, 12:48 PM
Anna Chakvetadze: “I want to find my game”

In spite of the “easy” score Anna wasn’t satisfied with her game. “I had some problems with my serve. Besides I felt a little bit nervous at the beginning of the match and couldn’t concentrate and I’ve made a lot of double faults”, - said Anna after the match.
Speaking about Vera Dushevina, her opponent in the quarterfinals Chakvetadze said: “Vera has a higher ranking that’s why she is the favorite. We have known each other since our childhood – I really don’t know how many times we played. Last time I beat her in a very close match after saving two match points. Vera is in a very good shape now. It will be a tough match”.

According to Anna, she wants to “find her game and get a higher ranking” next season.


I like her saying she need to start the match better and identifying the problem. I think her next two opponents she knows their game very well and it will be a matter of her being in her best form and playing her own game. If she can play to her own style I think she has is favourite to make the final.

goldenlox
Jan 1st, 2011, 09:20 PM
Recent interview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmRDNzbMxB4&feature=share

Tezuka.
Jan 1st, 2011, 10:05 PM
love it.:hearts:

King Halep
Jan 1st, 2011, 10:22 PM
I am satisfied that she want to do better at GS events. Her hair looks :hearts: "Well...you need a lot of patient....to be calm" *flashes cute grin* :hearts:

rucolo
Jan 2nd, 2011, 06:13 PM
Recent interview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmRDNzbMxB4&feature=share

Anna wants to be more consistent in 2011!:drool:

Her attitude reminds me a bit of Anna Lapuschenkova.:scared: And that`s not a good thing!:sobbing:

Thank God, Anna thinks more positive.

dornik
Jan 8th, 2011, 01:53 PM
Chakvetadze to headline day one

Former champion Anna Chakvetadze (RUS) will headline day one of the 2011 Moorilla Hobart International when she meets world No.43 Sara Errani (ITA) in the first round tomorrow.

Chakvetadze won the tournament in 2007 before reaching the semifinals of the US Open and quarterfinals of the Australian Open and French Open in the same year, and will be hoping to reclaim the form which saw reach her highest singles ranking of No.5 in the world.

No.7 seed Errani will start 2011 in the top 50 for the third consecutive year, and will prove to be a tough first round opponent for Chakvetadze after reaching the semifinals of the tournament last year.

http://www.hobartinternational.com.au/2011/01/chakvetadze-to-headline-day-one

goldenlox
Jan 25th, 2011, 03:07 AM
She should write this herself.

Anya Chakvetadze (http://www.facebook.com/officialpageannachakvetadze)
Anna arrived Safely in Moscow late this afternoon ( New York Time) in another airport . Upon hearing the tragic event in the Domodedovo Airport Bombing, She sends her Thoughts and Prayers to the Victims and their Families . She would also like to Thank her Fans here and Australia for the Overwhelming Love and Support. She Plays Doha and Dubai Next

Daszmarelli
Jan 25th, 2011, 12:48 PM
:)

Rafa_thebest
Jan 25th, 2011, 05:09 PM
good to know she's fine, what happened in Moscow is just AWFUL AND SAD! i wish she'd play Paris Indoors! that's a cool tourney and she always does well in it! :D

goldenlox
Feb 15th, 2011, 06:33 PM
http://www.wtatour.com/javaImages/a9/cd/0,,12781~9424297,00.jpg
DUBAI, UAE - Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.wtatour.com/player/caroline-wozniacki_2257889_12631)'s path to regain No.1 will open with Anna Chakvetadze (http://www.wtatour.com/player/anna-chakvetadze_2257889_9939), after the Russian beat Daniela Hantuchova (http://www.wtatour.com/player/daniela-hantuchova_2257889_3589) in the first round.
Watch live tennis from Dubai all week on TennisTV.com! (http://www.tennistv.com/page/LiveIndex/0,,11444,00.html?WT.mc_id=SEWTA2)
In a battle between former Top 5 players, Chakvetadze was sharper on the day, completing a 61 63 win over Hantuchova, although the match was far tougher than the scoreline indicates - it lasted an hour and 31 minutes. Chakvetadze has now beaten Hantuchova four times in a row and was happy with her play.
"I guess Daniela just came from Asia and didn't have enough time to adapt to the jet lag and everything," Chakvetadze said. "I was trying my best today. I actually thought I wouldn't have a lot of chances to win, but it's a very big tournament and I really wanted to, so I was trying my best and it was working."
"I'm disappointed about today, but I'm still so happy about last week," said Hantuchova, who defeated Vera Zvonareva (http://www.wtatour.com/player/vera-zvonareva_2257889_9376) en route to the title in Pattaya. "Probably the positive emotions are much more important right now. I just need to rest a few days and try to get my energy back, and then get ready for Doha."
Wozniacki, ranked No.2 in the world and needing to reach the semifinals here to regain No.1, received a first round bye and will open her tournament against Chakvetadze. The Russian, who turns 24 next month, has been as high as No.5 in the world and although she is 0-3 against Wozniacki, she has pushed the Dane to three sets every time, two of them going to 6-4 in the third.
After reaching the Top 5 in 2007 Chakvetadze had a rough few years, but in the second half of 2010 showed glimpses of her former self, particularly during a summer stretch in which she won 10 straight matches on hardcourts (ending up losing to Wozniacki in three sets in the Copenhagen semifinals).
"I'm pretty confident," Chakvetadze said of her form. "I think I'm going in the right direction. At least now I feel I'm playing tennis. A year ago it was something different. I don't want to expect too much, I just want to enjoy practicing, then enjoy the matches and try to win. I don't want to put pressure on myself.
"It's the beginning of a new career for me. I don't think about three years ago. Of course it gave me some experience, but it will also put more pressure on me."

RS232
Feb 16th, 2011, 12:27 PM
interview transcripts


http://www.dubaidutyfreetennischampionships.com/News/Interview-Transcripts/Interview-Transcripts.aspx

VitorTA
Mar 23rd, 2011, 12:45 PM
Google translation looks very good!!
"Chakvetadze could resume training in two weeks" (Championat.ru)
Www.championat.ru/tennis/news-766326.html
Google translation (http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ru&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.championat.ru%2Ftennis%2Fnews-766326.html)


Edit: Looking at the source from that article,
"Health and career Chakvetadze is not in danger - says her father" (sport.rian.ru)
http://sport.rian.ru/sport/20110323/356993502.html
Google translation (http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=ru&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fsport.rian.ru%2Fsport%2F20110323%2F 356993502.html)
it says that she is planning to return in Stuttgart, April 18-24.

Hope its true!!!:bounce:

goldenlox
Mar 23rd, 2011, 02:42 PM
Thanks! Good news!

Daszmarelli
Mar 23rd, 2011, 03:23 PM
Wow thanks for sharing.

Go, Anna!

Sergius
Mar 23rd, 2011, 03:55 PM
Yeah, I've read the news too.
What a relief!

Tezuka.
Mar 23rd, 2011, 04:18 PM
Thak God nothing serious.

VitorTA
Mar 23rd, 2011, 05:06 PM
Funny how the news travel slowly, even with the internet...
Jessie Balan posted a message on Anna's FB page with the diagnosis 8 days ago. Most of the specialized press picked up on it imediately and wrote articles about it.
Now today, i wanted to see the standings in the Spanish Football League and came across an article on MARCA (spanish sports newspaper), dated as of yesterday, talking about her illness, and that she went back to Moscow to "think about her future" (:confused:), but clearly without any real news (and the most outrageous comments from readers).
Now it seems that the Brazilian press have read the Marca article, and are giving the 8-day-old news as breaking, appearing on various important websites, on the same day that it is revealed that the illness might not be that bad and she is a couple of weeks away from training.
When she shows up in Stuttgart they will probably be reporting that it was completely unexpected and a miraculous recovery :rolleyes:.

VitorTA
Mar 24th, 2011, 04:44 PM
Two new interviews with Anna this time, first one from @VladasLasitskas, on "Sport-Express" (http://www.sport-express.ru/):
Original (http://www.sport-express.ru/newspaper/2011-03-24/7_1/)
Google Translation (http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=ru&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sport-express.ru%2Fnewspaper%2F2011-03-24%2F7_1%2F&act=url)
(you can see how unlucky she's been when the reporter asks Anna if she feels that she's been jinxed :sad:)

Second one to "SovietSport" (http://www.sovsport.ru) reporter Alexander Nikolaev:
Original (http://www.sovsport.ru/news/text-item/447487)
Google Translation (http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=ru&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sovsport.ru%2Fnews%2Ftext-item%2F447487)

Dominika23
Mar 25th, 2011, 03:31 AM
is it true that Cristian Kordasz not her coach anymore

Sergius
Mar 25th, 2011, 11:47 AM
is it true that Cristian Kordasz not her coach anymore

Where did you read the information?

King Halep
Mar 25th, 2011, 11:08 PM
- Your coach Christian Kordas will arrive in Moscow in the near future?

- I do not see any reason to call it now, so while he was in Argentina. We'll see how my body responds to the first workout, and already from this we draw on.

Dominika23
Mar 26th, 2011, 02:33 AM
- Your coach Christian Kordas will arrive in Moscow in the near future?

- I do not see any reason to call it now, so while he was in Argentina. We'll see how my body responds to the first workout, and already from this we draw on.

that good to hear than that she still with christian i sorry about that i just heard crazy rumor

VitorTA
Apr 19th, 2011, 07:52 PM
Two pieces of news...

----------------------------------------
First one from AP:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110419/sp_wl_afp/tenniswtaruschakvetadze

Dizziness forces Chakvetadze out of tennis tournament

STUTTGART, Germany (AFP) – Russia's Anna Chakvetadze was forced to retire from her third straight WTA tournament on Tuesday when she collapsed during her first round match in Stuttgart due to a mystery illness.
The 24-year-old qualifier, ranked 50th in the world, was in the third set of her match against Slovakia's Zuzana Kucova when she dropped to the clay-court floor during a break in the third set of her first round match.
She needed medical attention before retiring from the match with the score at 1-6, 7-5, 4-4 to Kucova.
The 24-year-old also had to retire for a similar reason in February's tournament in Dubai and again at Indian Wells last month as doctors struggle to identify the problem.
"I started the match feeling fine, but I knew the dizziness was coming and started to feel worse in the second set," said the Russian.
"It was the same feeling as the two times before.
"I have seen a doctor and I don't really have anything more to update with at the moment."
The Russian said she had sought medical advice on whether to play in Stuttgart and her future plans remain unclear as she looks for the cause of the problem.
"I saw a doctor before the tournament and they told me everything would be ok, which is why I decided to play here," she said.
"But now it's the third tournament in a row I have had to retire with this dizziness problem.
"It seems the doctors don't have all the answers yet, so I have to rest.
"Hopefully we will find a solution."

----------------------------------------

Second one an interviwe with Anna's father to Sport-Express newspaper reporter Vladas Lasitskas:
http://tennis.sport-express.ru/reviews/13257/
Google translation:

Chakvetadze had lost consciousness on the third tournament in a row

On Tuesday in Stuttgart at a major tournament WTA Tour with a prize fund of 721,000 dollars to fifth former world number Russian woman Anna Chakvetadze for the third time in the past two months, lost consciousness during the competition.

It happened in the third set match 1 / 16 finals against Susan Kutsov from the Czech Republic with the score 6:1, 5:7, 4:4. By the time an opponent had on the court for nearly two hours. Similar cases have occurred with a 24-year-old Muscovite from the previous two tournaments - in Dubai (February 16) and Indian Wells (March 12).

It is worth noting that in the main draw of the tournament Porsche Tennis Grand Prix Chakvetadze, who is now in the world ranking of 50 th place, made its way through the qualification. In other words, has won three matches, including those held on Monday, the most persistent three-hour duel with a Ukrainian Mariya Koryttseva.

Two hours later, after being right on the tennis stadium was a medical examination, the correspondent "SE" rang in Stuttgart her father Jamal Chakvetadze.

- You still here with her daughter at a tennis center?

- Yes, there are going to a council of physicians, but I'm not sure that I will hear from them something new. All say the same thing: that everything is normal, you can take Anya home. Her heart was in the order a blood test - too. Yet she did a brain scan. According to the doctor who did the procedure, no abnormalities were found.

- In preparation for the tournament in Stuttgart, it was all right?

- We trained almost a week, and Anna felt fine. The first two qualification matches went well, she won them in two sets. The first bad signs I noticed after the final qualification. I look at Anna, but she was all pale. After three hours of stay on the court, any player, of course, experiencing fatigue, but this lethargy and pallor on her face usually does not happen. I ask: how do you feel? She answers: Yes like normal. But I can see - that something is not right. Now it is clear: a duel with Koryttseva she won only through faith.

- And what you now do you?

- Did not even know where and to whom to go. We have passed the examination in the U.S. and Russia, and now - in Germany. Everywhere say the same thing - everything is in order. But that does not happen! Why, then, my daughter fainted right on the court?

- A doctors' recommendations are the same everywhere?

- Judge for yourself. Recently, doctors put Anya special rubber leggings, which are adhesive qualities feet, and from that blood circulates better through the veins. She wore them here. And today, the doctor said do not need and sent her on a brain scan. In any case, you have to find the truth, to understand why these syncope occur. Can this somehow be treated or should finish his career?

Vladas LASICKAS

----------------------------------------

They sound a little depressed, and it seems they lost faith in the doctors...:help:
I don't think she will play until she gets a different diagnosis.
She might really retire :sad:

King Halep
Apr 22nd, 2011, 08:31 PM
http://www.sovsport.ru/news/text-item/453291


[Dzhamal] To [chakvetadze]: [Anya] can pass “[Rolan] Of [garros]”

To Anna [Chakvetdaze] it decided to make interruption in its career to the complete explanation of the reasons for faintings, which happened of the tennis player at three last tournaments contract.
Let us recall that the ex-fifth racket of peace lost consciousness directly on Kort in Dubai, Indiana- Wales and Stuttgart.

- Doctors say that everything in the order and by it can be played in [Ani] with the health. But what sense to be declared to the tournament, if sooner or later it does end for you by fainting? - explained the motives of this decision of sportswoman her father Of [dzhamal] To [chakvetadze] in the telephone conversation with the correspondent “Soviet sport” by Nikolai [MYSINYM]. - Therefore we decided to make a pause and to pass complete inspection. Although I, honestly speaking, even do not know, where it to make. In America, in Europe, and in Moscow doctors establish one and the same - heart, blood, liver in daughter within the standard. But they recognize that of 100 reasons for faintings accurately it is possible to establish only 4. remain 96 more. Themselves you understand, to risk by the health Of [ani] we do not can.

- When you do plan to renew appearances?

- I do not know answer to this question. If it is required, it is necessary to pass “[Rolan] Of [garros]”, which starts in the month. Again I will be repeated - what sense to leave on Kort, if not the first, then second- third match at the tournament does end by the loss of consciousness? Now we are situated in Moscow and examine the versions, where to pass sequential inspection. Thus far we have on the sign four leading clinics capitals.

dornik
Apr 22nd, 2011, 10:31 PM
http://www.sovsport.ru/news/text-item/453291


[Dzhamal] To [chakvetadze]: [Anya] can pass “[Rolan] Of [garros]”

To Anna [Chakvetdaze] it decided to make interruption in its career to the complete explanation of the reasons for faintings, which happened of the tennis player at three last tournaments contract.
Let us recall that the ex-fifth racket of peace lost consciousness directly on Kort in Dubai, Indiana- Wales and Stuttgart.

- Doctors say that everything in the order and by it can be played in [Ani] with the health. But what sense to be declared to the tournament, if sooner or later it does end for you by fainting? - explained the motives of this decision of sportswoman her father Of [dzhamal] To [chakvetadze] in the telephone conversation with the correspondent “Soviet sport” by Nikolai [MYSINYM]. - Therefore we decided to make a pause and to pass complete inspection. Although I, honestly speaking, even do not know, where it to make. In America, in Europe, and in Moscow doctors establish one and the same - heart, blood, liver in daughter within the standard. But they recognize that of 100 reasons for faintings accurately it is possible to establish only 4. remain 96 more. Themselves you understand, to risk by the health Of [ani] we do not can.

- When you do plan to renew appearances?

- I do not know answer to this question. If it is required, it is necessary to pass “[Rolan] Of [garros]”, which starts in the month. Again I will be repeated - what sense to leave on Kort, if not the first, then second- third match at the tournament does end by the loss of consciousness? Now we are situated in Moscow and examine the versions, where to pass sequential inspection. Thus far we have on the sign four leading clinics capitals.


Jamal Chakvetadze: Anya may fail to attend RG

Anna Chakvetadze decided to make a break in her career to clarify the reasons of syncopes which happened during the last three tournaments fully.
We should remind, that former #5 fainted on court in Dubai, Indian Wells and Stuttgart.

- the doctors say that everything is ok with Anna's health and she can play. But does it make any sense to participate in a tournament if sooner or later it will end with a faint? - explained the reason of the decision athlete's father Jamal Chakvetadze during a phone interview to the "Sovsport" reporter Nikolay Mysin.
- that's why we decide to make a break and undergo a complete checkup. To tell you the truth I even don't know where it should be conducted. In the US, Europe and in Moscow the doctors ascertain the same - my daughter's heart, her blood, liver are normal. And the same doctors admit that from 100 reasons of the faint one can determine only 4. There are 96 remain. We clearly can not risk Anna's health.

- when are you planning to resume participation in tournaments?
- I don't have an answer. We may not attend RG, which starts in a month if it's necessary. I should tell you once again - there's no sense in coming out on court in a tournament if the first, second or third match will end with faint. We're in Moscow now and check the variants of the next examination. We've got four best Moscow hospitals in view right now.

Wert.
Apr 23rd, 2011, 07:12 AM
I dont care about RG..Her health is the most important

Anya :hearts:

VitorTA
May 18th, 2011, 12:00 AM
And, as Vladas Lasitskas promised, here are some news:

http://news.sport-express.ru/2011-05-18/439089/

--------------------------
Google translation:

Discovered a possible cause of syncope Chakvetadze

Former world number-fifth Russian woman Anna Chakvetadze, who this season in three consecutive tournaments (Dubai, Indian Wells, Stuttgart) during the match lost consciousness, continues to undergo a rehabilitation course in Moscow. In an interview with the correspondent "SE" father of 24-year old tennis player Jamal Chakvetadze said that still does not know when his daughter will return to the court:

- Anya four weeks she lay in a metropolitan hospital, where he again took a full survey. It once again confirmed: the heart and blood daughter is all right. But doctors have found inflammation of the inner ear, which could affect the operation of vessels and cause fainting. We are going to treat. To answer the main question - why Anya was losing consciousness, we go by process of elimination. Say that the season is over for Annie, it is premature. Now the main task - to cure. And only then we will think about when to return to the WTA Tour. ( Vladas LASITSKAS)

----------------------------------------

Inner ear infection is the answer they found after a quite lenghty investigation...
Hope that they are right! It doesn't sound so serious :wavey:

Daszmarelli
May 18th, 2011, 12:31 AM
Well, at least they found something. Now she can have a treat it.

Get well soon, Anna!

GeorgianFan
May 18th, 2011, 01:34 AM
inner ear infection can really cause fainting :awww:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labyrinthitis

Tezuka.
May 18th, 2011, 10:35 AM
Good news. At least they found something.

Chakvenus
May 18th, 2011, 12:37 PM
Wow, if that's in fact the cause, then that's great! That sounds treatable.

VitorTA
May 31st, 2011, 02:32 PM
New News :p !!

http://sport.rian.ru/sport/20110531/382276353.html

------------------------------
Google translation:

MOSCOW, May 31 - RIA Novosti, Natalia Mescherikova.
Russian tennis player Anna Chakvetadze, was treated after a series of fainting spells, began training and plans to play in a tournament in June, the athlete's father Jamal Chakvetadze reported to the R-Sport agency.

In late April, Chakvetadze was forced to take a break in the performances because of the fact that the tennis player three times in two months, fainted during the game.

"Anna is at home in Moscow and has already started training - told the father of the tennis player on the phone. - It was only the third day training, and yet nothing is clear. But doctors say that the game is already possible. I think that we should try to declare at a some of those tournaments that are played on grass. "

According to Father of the tennis player, Chakvetadze had inflammation of middle ear. "She treat and has already passed the test. It seems, everything is normal. Now we must verify it hurt or something else" - he explained.

At present, 24-year-old Chakvetadze took 48 th place in the ranking of WTA. On account of eight titles in the tennis singles.

------------------------------

I think we can get what the article means, she is cured for the inner ear infection, has started practicing for 3 days now. If the original diagnosis was correct, and nothing happens, she might play a tournament in the grass season (Eastbourne?).
Good news all around, i think :bounce:

Wert.
May 31st, 2011, 07:02 PM
Great News!
Comeeeeee on Anna.
Rosmalen I think not Eastbourne

Rafa_thebest
May 31st, 2011, 07:26 PM
YES!! Anna + grass is :hearts:

Tezuka.
May 31st, 2011, 07:31 PM
OMG yesssssss :hearts:
Thank god she's finaly okey.

Tezuka.
May 31st, 2011, 07:31 PM
YES!! Anna + grass is :hearts:

Yup.:drool:

King Halep
Jun 2nd, 2011, 01:57 PM
Lets hope they are right. Cant say anything until she plays some matches
http://www.en.kolobok.us/smiles/mini/clapping_mini.gif

Sharapower8
Jun 2nd, 2011, 10:52 PM
Come back soon Anna :kiss:

VitorTA
Jun 17th, 2011, 05:54 PM
New good long interview, from russian paper Советский Спорт (Soviet Sport):

http://www.sovsport.ru/gazeta/article-item/463720

Translation is barely comprehensible, but there are some good parts:

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=ru&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sovsport.ru%2Fgazeta%2Farticle-item%2F463720&act=url

King Halep
Jun 17th, 2011, 08:35 PM
Anna on the court already warming up with his coach, Stefano Valenti.

:eek:

VitorTA
Jun 22nd, 2011, 10:08 PM
New interview, from Sport-Express, from Yevgeny Fedyakov (not Vladas Latiskas:worship: this time):

http://news.sport-express.ru/2011-06-22/446137/
Apparently this is just a preview, full text will be available tomorrow:

--------------------
Google Translation

Anna Chakvetadze:
"At Wimbledon, was going without much hope"

Yevgeny Fedyakov, in London

Anna Chakvetadze on Tuesday held its second match after a two-month break caused by a series of fainting fits at three different tournaments. In the first round of Wimbledon she in 1 hour 8 minutes lost to compatriot Maria Sharapova with a score of 1:6, 2:6. After the match the Russian tennis player, was interviewed by special correspondent of "SE".

Anna: - At this Wimbledon, I was going without much hope, the situation is adequately assessed, because perfectly knew my physical condition. Once you do nothing one and a half months, two weeks of training, of course, is not enough. But I miss Wimbledon did not want, to the same grass cover I love. The most important thing for me today was to play the match and finish it completely on my feet. (Smiles) - Chakvetadze said. - However, as the game appeared again some strange sensations, and it upset me.

YF: - Do not worry, please.

Anna: - In principle, I understand that completely cured. But the memories of what happened recently, still remain as to fall three times in public are not very nice. In short, today being a little disappoint.

YF: - A training on how to feel?

Anna: - Have a harder time, but it's there purely physical fatigue.

YF: - What are your immediate plans?

Anna: - Participated in the tournament in the coming weeks is not going as they are now once again be held on clay where with my form now, just do nothing. The next three weeks going to train, and then planning to go to America for a series of tournaments before the US Open. Check-same thing for me now - finally fix health.

Anna Chakvetadze full interview - in tomorrow's issue of "SE".

-------------------------------
So she's not going to those European Clay tournaments she signed up for, it seems. She really needs a new pre-season after the illness. :wavey:

Dominika23
Jun 22nd, 2011, 10:29 PM
Understandable really wish she would play GDF SUEZ Grand Prix the field so weak she the only big name :sad::sad::sad::sad::sad:

King Halep
Jun 25th, 2011, 03:19 AM
Anna [CHAKVETADZE]: “FOR ME MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL WAS TO FINISH MATCH ON THE FEET”


The chronicle item of last events in Anna [Chakvetadze]'s life is well known to the readers “[SE]”; therefore it would not be desirable to return to it now. I note only that on Tuesday in the evening our 52nd racket of peace conducted the second match after the two-month interruption in the appearances, connected with faintings at three different tournaments. Last week in Dutch [Khertogenboshe] it lost to the Spaniard Of [lourdes] of [Dominges]- Lina - 1:6, 4:6, and it at this time yielded to Maria by Sharapova. This game, the place of conducting by which organizers determined at the last moment, took place not somewhere, but on central Kort, they continued 68 minutes and was completed with the score 6:2, 6: 1. 6 [breykov] of Sharapova her 24- summer rival answered only by one, what it, it goes without saying, proved to be insufficiently for the victory.

From the side [Chakvetadze] by no means produces the impression of man, whom has something not in the order with the health. Moreover, in comparison with her associates, who already half a year without the respite travel throughout entire planet, Anna appears much fresher. Mood after defeat in it, of course, was not the better, nevertheless some questions [Chakvetadze] answered with the humor. But when young likable girl, who fell into not the simplest life situation, finds in herself forces to joke - this, you will agree, already good.
I began from a distance.

- Anna, for the beginning, if you please, you will share with your impressions from today's match.

- To this Wimbleton I went without the special hopes, situation was evaluated adequately, since perfectly well knew its physical state. After you nothing make one-and-a-half month, two weeks of trainings, of course, insufficiently. But to pass Wimbleton me greatly it was not desirable and furthermore I love grassy coating. Most important of all for me it was today to play match completely and finish him on the feet. (It smiles.) True, some incomprehensible sensations again appeared on the motion of game, and this upset me.

- Do not frighten, if you please.

- In principle I understand, that completely she cured herself. But recollection about that which was very recently, nevertheless they remain, since to fall three times on the people is not very pleasant. Briefly stated, health today a little pumped. And with this it is necessary to make something, since cannot be played. But defeat as such in no way astonished me.

- What was your state in [Khertogenboshe]?

- That game flew so rapidly that I simply understood nothing.

- A during the trainings as itself you do feel?

- It is felt heavily, but purely physical fatigue there is present.

- You are trained by the total force or in the unloading regime?

- Since in me in the reserve was only two weeks for the preparation, I tried to be trained very actively. I do not know, can, it was necessary to begin to work in another regime, while not on six hours during the day.

- On six hours?!

- I hoped to have time to pull immediately and physical form, and tennis components. But she rapidly understood that to make this is simply unreal in such short time, after four days of trainings i in the mornings began complicatedly to arise from the bed. (It smiles.)

- It is understandable. And are such your nearest plans?

- In the tournaments to participate in the next weeks I am not going, since they will pass on ground, where with my form now accurately it can't be helped. Three next weeks I will be trained, and then I plan to go into America to a series of the tournaments before US Of open. C[amoe] main thing for me now - health to finally repair.

- At the beginning of season you trained Argentinean Christian [Kordazh]…

- We parted with it even before the tournament in Indiana- Wells.

- On whose initiative?

- To the larger degree - on it.

- It did not remain offence for the fact that you they did throw in a similar situation?

- Of course not. I related to this with the understanding. The more stable work, with which I ensure to it could not, is nevertheless necessary to man.

- New trainer to itself search for you will be?

- Thus far I will work with Andrey [Olkhovskiy], who agreed to help before an American series. But it is further - let us look.

- It is interesting, before your return in [Khertogenboshe] the representatives female tennis association did ask to grant some evidence about the fact that they did cure themselves? Indeed for sure WTA Of tour is not interested in the continuation of a series of your faintings. This is the best advertisement for it.

- In [Khertogenboshe] before the output on Kort me looked doctor, formally measured on pressure. Also in me the copies of all discharges from the hospital, where I was treated, asked. With the serious problems with the health it is better to be turned not to the doctors of stage, but to other specialists. After fainting in Stuttgart generally incorrect diagnosis was placed to me.

- With the doctors from the clinic, in which was passed the treatment, you do contact constantly?

- Certainly. Now I will return to Moscow and I will be located under the observation.

- About the level of Maria's game to Sharapova today something can say?

- If it is concrete, then I hinder. Masha, as usual, powerful beats along the ball, but it is objective to me to judge complicatedly about her form after this match. I think only that here by it on the forces to play very well. Finally - why no?

Eugene [FEDYAKOV]

Sport- express


Some shocking revelations

Wert.
Jun 25th, 2011, 09:59 AM
http://www.askmen.com/sports/galleries/wimbledon-women.html


Love you Anna :)

lang26
Aug 16th, 2011, 08:39 PM
Russia's Anna Chakvetadze has pulled out of the U.S. Open due to an ankle injury, her father told RIA Novosti on Tuesday.
Chakvetadze, who has slumped from a career high ranking of 5th in 2007 to 125th this year, sustained the injury in training last week, Dzhamal Chakvetadze said.
"Maybe in a week Anya will be able to play. But there's no point whatsoever in going to the U.S. Open out of shape, as a tourist," he said.
The U.S. Open, the final grand slam of the year, begins August 29 in New York.
Chakvetadze had just recovered from bursitis, an inflammatory condition linked to repetitive stress that kept her out of a WTA Tour event in Baku, and was showing promising form in training, her father said.
Chakvetadze's compatriot Alisa Kleybanova will also miss this year's event following her announcement that she is receiving treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, and former world No. 1 Dinara Safina continues to recover from a back injury that saw her miss the French Open and Wimbledon.
World No. 3 Vera Zvonareva and No.5 Maria Sharapova, who knocked Chakevtadze out in the first round at Wimbledon, lead the Russian challenge in New York.

http://en.rian.ru/sports/20110816/165832441.html

smokovec
Sep 5th, 2011, 03:13 PM
A long interwiev with Anna on http://www.sports.ru/tennis/120658748.html (thank you krul for the link in the photos thread!).

I read the article using Google translator because it's all in Russian and so some parts of the interview are not so clear, but it seems that fainting problems are now resolved and Anna has other type of injuries on foot and she sais that she can play 2 Tournaments before the end of the Season because she needs some training weeks before, so I don't know if we can see Anna in Tashkent.

I'm happy if I see Anna playing Moscow and win 1-2 matches without phisical issues, so that can give to us some hope to a good start in 2012 Season!

Wert.
Sep 5th, 2011, 07:14 PM
2012 :cheer:

Thank God this disaster year is almost over :sad:

dornik
Sep 5th, 2011, 07:18 PM
And she says that it's ok having relations with a man at least 10 years older, no matter if he's got a belly but he's has to be...
not...the
She has influence of georgians when living, making decisions, etc. she says.
And the shit of this kind. She is spending her time now going to the parties with her friends.

Tezuka.
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:08 PM
And she says that it's ok having relations with a man at least 10 years older, no matter if he's got a belly but he's has to be...
not...the
She has influence of georgians when living, making decisions, etc. she says.
And the shit of this kind. She is spending her time now going to the parties with her friends.

Anna.:facepalm:

Tezuka.
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:09 PM
And i thought she was training hard.:facepalm:

lang26
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:33 PM
So Wait she Not coming back till 2012 & she not playing Tashkent & Guangzhou :sad::sad:

dornik
Sep 5th, 2011, 10:02 PM
Sorry if I failed to make it clear - my English is weak :(
She does not spend all the time partying. Not at all. The question is: what is she doing the rest of the time :)

smokovec
Sep 5th, 2011, 10:26 PM
So Wait she Not coming back till 2012 & she not playing Tashkent & Guangzhou :sad::sad:

The interview is from the last Monday and Anna says she need 2 weeks of full training before return on tour, the question is if she is already training right now or not and probably Tashkent is too early for a return.

But from the photos in the article I see a happy Anna and so probably the worst is gone.



And she says that it's ok having relations with a man at least 10 years older, no matter if he's got a belly but he's has to be...

So maybe I have a possibility with Anna, I'm just 10 Year older. :lol::yippee: and she also love italian food...

dornik
Sep 5th, 2011, 10:58 PM
The interview is from the last Monday and Anna says she need 2 weeks of full training before return on tour, the question is if she is already training right now or not and probably Tashkent is too early for a return.

But from the photos in the article I see a happy Anna and so probably the worst is gone.





So maybe I have a possibility with Anna, I'm just 10 Year older. :lol::yippee: and she also love italian food...

Where are you from? What do you think of Russians? It matters, ask jessy balan. He is the Guru. He def. teaches you. Sorry. He'll never do it. He's the owner. :(

dornik
Sep 5th, 2011, 11:01 PM
The only one owner who lets the toy to play by her own. Peace out

Tezuka.
Sep 5th, 2011, 11:03 PM
Sorry if I failed to make it clear - my English is weak :(
She does not spend all the time partying. Not at all. The question is: what is she doing the rest of the time :)

Nevermind.
Well, hopefully she is working on her fitness.

Rafa_thebest
Sep 6th, 2011, 03:10 AM
I hope she'll comeback this year, may be just playing the european indoor season (Linz, Moscow and Luxembourg) if she's not ready for Asia! :)

Jason A.
Sep 28th, 2011, 10:10 PM
Anna Chakvetadze, 2007 US Open semi-finalist, stands for Right Cause party in Russian parliamentary election

* From correspondents in Moscow, Russia
* AFP
* September 27, 2011 7:55AM

Anna Chakvetadze is to try her hand at politics, standing for Right Cause party in coming elections for Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma.

The 24-year-old, formerly ranked in the top five in the world, and winner of eight WTA Tour titles, has not played since Wimbledon because of poor health.

She had previously retired from five tournaments in April and May due to a mystery illness.

Chakvetadze, a semi-finalist at the 2007 US Open, said she wanted to "try something new" and focus on women's rights and children's sports.

"I joined the Right Cause party because it's a young party," she said.

"All of its members are young people, who have many fresh ideas.

"I believe I also can bring some fresh ideas into this project.

"I'd like to be involved in deciding the questions concerning the sports sphere in case we manage to enter the State Duma.

"I am especially interested in children's sports. I believe the state should support the children's sports activity, making it completely free of charge."

Right Cause, a pro-business party in the country, has little popular support, with political pundits saying they have the support of only about 2 per cent of the population.

And the party is in disarray after billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov was ousted as leader last week.

Maria Sharapova, meanwhile, said that Chakvetadze's decision to run for the Russian parliament would make it "tough" on her compatriot's tennis career.

"I think it obviously takes a lot of time, so it's tough to do two things, two pretty big things at the same time," Sharapova said.

"But if she feels strong about it, obviously it's a personal choice."

Sharapova said she was "not really sure" whether Chakvetadze, world No.5 in 2007, was still going to play or commit herself to politics.

http://www.foxsports.com.au/tennis/russian-tennis-star-anna-chakvetadze-2007-us-open-semi-finalist-stands-for-right-cause-party-in-parliamentary-elections/story-e6frf4mu-1226147466784

lang26
Sep 28th, 2011, 11:22 PM
Yeah I read this Gosh hope she don't retire any news on if she playing moscow

Daszmarelli
Oct 31st, 2011, 03:18 PM
What's the name of her political party? Does someone know?

Nena_xxx
Nov 1st, 2011, 12:56 AM
Hope that she will be back to tennis next season...

goldenlox
Nov 1st, 2011, 08:16 PM
Moscow (CNN) -- If a country's standing can be measured by its sporting ambitions, then Russia's status as a superpower is once again on the rise.
Its big-spending football league is attracting top international stars, and the next few years will see it host major sporting spectacles for the first time since the Soviet-era regime staged the 1980 Olympic Games that were notoriously boycotted by the United States.
And ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and the 2018 soccer World Cup, one of Russia's prominent athletes has put aside her sporting dreams to concentrate on contributing to the politics of the Kremlin.
Anna Chakvetadze was one of Russia's seemingly never ending line of top female tennis players when she burst onto the scene as a 17-year-old in 2004.
A junior finalist at Wimbledon the previous year, she stunned compatriot and world No. 3 Anastasia Myskina at the U.S. Open and went on to reach a career-high fifth in the rankings, winning eight tournaments and almost $4 million on the WTA Tour.



However, she has now turned to politics after sliding outside the top 150 following a combination of injuries and illness.
"I would like to develop youth sport. I was a sportsman myself so I know about problems in sport," the 24-year-old told CNN.
"I would like youth sport in our country to be affordable to people from all social classes. We have to give the same access to sport for kids from poor families. Ideally, my goal is to get the majority involved in sport activities ... sport should come to every family."
Chakvetadze has chosen the fringe "Right Cause Party" as she stands for Russia's lower parliament in the December 4 elections, with parties needing 7% of the total vote to earn seats. Former top-ranked men's tennis player Marat Safin will also be standing, seeking one of 450 places.
And they'll both be hoping to join fellow sports figures Svetlana Khorkina and Alina Kabaeva in the State Duma after the two former Olympic champion gymnasts won respective elections in 2007
Formed in 2008 from the ashes of three other parties, Right Cause has positioned itself as "anti-old guard" and dismissed the relevancy of former president Vladimir Putin and other longtime political stalwarts who have stood for decades.
"It's a challenge for me. I have joined Right Cause because it's a young party with fresh ideas," Chakvetadze said.
"I was invited to join it when (Mikhail) Prokhorov was in it. But even now all the basic ideas that the Right Cause stands for haven't changed and I share the program and idea of the party."
Billionaire businessman Prokhorov stepped down in September after a few months as party leader, dismissing Right Cause as a "puppet party" of the Kremlin.
It is an accusation Luke Harding -- a reporter for British newspaper The Guardian and the first Western journalist to be expelled from Russia since the end of the Cold War in 2011 -- supports.
Over the last decade-plus under Putin there has been a restoration of the classic authoritarian model
Journalist Luke Harding



"Russia was a quasi-democracy under Boris Yeltsin in the 1990s. But over the last decade-plus under Putin there has been a restoration of the classic authoritarian model, with the squashing of independent TV, proper elections, and opposition forces," Harding, the author of "Mafia State: How one reporter became the enemy of a brutal new Russia," (http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/01/sport/tennis/tennis-chakvetadze-russia-putin/www.guardian.co.uk/mafia-state-luke-harding) told CNN.
"Today's Russia does have political 'parties,' like Right Cause. But they are not parties in the real sense -- their role is simply decorative, to create the illusion of voter choice and to legitimize decisions taken behind closed doors in the Kremlin.
"There's a long tradition in Russia of getting sportsmen and women to stand for parties: they help to enthuse a weary and cynical electorate."
Prime Minister Putin has announced that next year he intends to again stand for president, a position he held for two consecutive terms -- the maximum allowed -- before endorsing the campaign of his 2008 successor Dmitry Medvedev.
While her fellow Right Cause candidate Andrei Bogdanov has listed Putin among the Russian establishment "we have had enough of," Chakvetadze said the 59-year-old -- who is a strong supporter of sport -- is popular with the people.
"The real opposition is a constructive one that has something to offer to authorities [other than] beautiful election campaign slogans. I guess the Right Cause is able to become a constructive opponent," she said.
This year was really a tough one for me. There were several traumas and I decided to take care and restore my health
Anna Chakvetadze



"As for the next president, Putin is really significantly supported by Russians. If he is elected he will take the real steps for further development of the state and improving lifestyle for citizens, which is a good thing. The main thing is to keep on moving."
Chakvetadze said sport is an important part of becoming a healthy nation, and acknowledged that improvements need to be made before the big events in 2014 and 2018.
"First we should develop the infrastructure -- build new stadiums, hotels, additional railway service and air travel," she said.
"We have to provide our guests and citizens with the highest level of security service. We must not lose face. Big sport forums like this will definitely increase interest in sport and will contribute to the promotion of healthy lifestyles.
"On the other hand it will make our authorities move and develop the infrastructure of territories where these competitions will take place, attract new investment into our country."
Chakvetadze has struggled to maintain the peak levels of 2007, when she reached the U.S. Open semifinals and was also part of Russia's successful Fed Cup team, but she has not closed the door on her tennis career.
"This year was really a tough one for me. There were several traumas and I decided to take care and restore my health," she said.
"It doesn't mean that I'm over with my sport career. I just took a pause for an unknown period of time. So all my goals now are related with this party project."


http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/01/sport/tennis/tennis-chakvetadze-russia-putin/index.html?iref=allsearch

King Halep
Nov 1st, 2011, 09:29 PM
Anna :oh:

lang26
Nov 2nd, 2011, 06:37 AM
Hope she come back next year

Wert.
Nov 2nd, 2011, 09:44 AM
It doesn't mean that I'm over with my sport career. I just took a pause for an unknown period of time. So all my goals now are related with this party project."

King Halep
Nov 2nd, 2011, 01:03 PM
Big sport forums like this will definitely increase interest in sport and will contribute to the promotion of healthy lifestyles.

Reiken
Nov 3rd, 2011, 05:12 PM
http://sport.ria.ru/interview_sport/20111103/479598417.html

Translated from Google:

Famous Russian tennis player Anna Chakvetadze in an interview with sports news agency "R-Sport" Alexander told about Vladimirova, who brought her into politics, why she decided to change the activity and whether the return to tennis.

- Anna, you announced that in the near future on the court will not go. What is the reason this decision?

This year in sports for me has been very difficult, primarily because of the large number of injuries. It is because of health problems, I decided to take a break for an indefinite period.

- Indefinite period of time may be delayed, say, a year?

In Women's Tennis Association (WTA) is a rule that you can freeze your rating for two years. I did it. For two years I can go back and use their ratings in eight tournaments. But when I get back and come back if at all, I hesitate to say so far.

- So, you already have thought about retirement?

I still only 24 years old, so I do not want to put an end to the career. But everything will depend on many factors, first of all, from my physical condition. And now I have changed the scope of activities, decided to enter politics. My ambitions and goals are related primarily to her.

- Why politics?

So there were certain set of circumstances. To be honest, politics is always interesting to me was, and wanted a taste not only in sport but in another field. Now I'm a new in politics, and I do not care what's happening in Russia. I travel a lot for other countries, I see how people live there. I would like to bring something new in our lives, to achieve some progress.

- Who brought you into politics?

As I said, it really turned out totally by accident. In the game "Just Cause" I was approved on the lists in July. We talked a lot about what is happening in the country, about life in Russia with my friend - Andrei Bogdanov. He is currently second in the federal lists. The proposal came just from him. Since I was interested, I thought about it and agreed.

- Do you think it will help if you are in a political career that you are famous tennis player?

Sport and politics, in my view, are closely related. Between them a lot in common. I think it would help me. I have experience, there is a character. I can fight.

- What tasks do you like to achieve in the political arena?

Since I am myself an athlete, then a party, I would like to engage in sporting matters, the development of children's sports. I would love to sport came in every family, by 2020 about 40 percent of our population engaged in sports. We painted a specific program for the development of sports and the development of this public-private partnership in building sports facilities. The positive experience already - it's "Gazprom", which revolutionized and brought about 600 objects.

We also plan to work to increase excise taxes and prices of tobacco and alcohol production. We do not encourage smokers to 20 years of experience to quit smoking, it's more designed for young people. Now a lot of young people, unfortunately, smoke and drink alcohol. If prices rise, the youth may finally will sport. We also want to increase the maternity capital to one hundred thousand rubles, and that this money has been spent on training the child in sports clubs. This will create additional competition between sports schools.

- If your political career will be developed successfully, it will remain there incentives to return back to the sport?

Hard to say. Sometimes it's hard to find motivation for any business. If I find the motivation, everything can happen.

Reiken
Nov 3rd, 2011, 05:14 PM
^^ It sounds like she's "about to" retire.

Wert.
Nov 3rd, 2011, 05:14 PM
I still only 24 years old, so I do not want to put an end to the career

Put a . after this please :tears:

Tezuka.
Nov 3rd, 2011, 05:58 PM
I registered in TF to support a tennis player not a politician.:facepalm:

lang26
Nov 3rd, 2011, 09:20 PM
It really make You think if she going come back next year. :sad:

lang26
Nov 3rd, 2011, 09:21 PM
She said two year break do that means she going wait all the way till 2013 to make a comeback

GeorgianFan
Nov 3rd, 2011, 09:46 PM
It just gets worse and worse :facepalm: :facepalm:

Potapovushina
Nov 3rd, 2011, 10:48 PM
Yeah :sad:

Rafa_thebest
Nov 4th, 2011, 12:24 AM
I REALLY REALLY hope she'll be back next year! :(

Dominika23
Nov 5th, 2011, 06:10 AM
didn't her dad say she be back for 2012, I don't know wat to say anymore really I hope she be back for AO This Right Cause Party Got out of Hand really, I read somewhere she only need seven percent of votes to be seated usually I won't go against A-Chak but this time she gotta lose for sure she don't need to be seated. Anybody know what her Percent now

goldenlox
Dec 27th, 2011, 02:39 PM
Anna Chakvetadze: Recovered & Ready

http://www.wtatennis.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2558479,00.html


http://www.wtatennis.com/javaImages/2d/a4/0,,12781~10331181,00.jpg
MOSCOW, Russia - It has been a difficult last couple of years for Anna Chakvetadze (http://www.wtatennis.com/player/anna-chakvetadze_2257889_9939), with several problems on and off the court being thrown at her - the latest being an inner ear inflammation that sidelined her for almost the entire 2011 season - but the talented Russian is over it all and feeling strong for 2012.
At the start of 2011, Chakvetadze seemed on her way to the upper echelon of the WTA. She had already been there, after all, making it as high as No.5 during a breakthrough 2007 season that saw her win four WTA titles and reach her first Grand Slam semifinal at the US Open (http://www.wtatennis.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781~840,00.html). But adversity struck in Dubai, as she was leading the No.1-ranked Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.wtatennis.com/player/caroline-wozniacki_2257889_12631) in the second set of their second round match when she collapsed and had to retire due to illness.
"When I got sick in Dubai I was in very good shape," Chakvetadze said. "I was finally enjoying the way I was playing. I was feeling the ball great. I had found my game again and was really ready to compete. But then I got sick."
The illness would soon be diagnosed as dizziness, and Chakvetadze would end up playing just three complete main draw matches the rest of the year, retiring from two matches and withdrawing from 11 other events due to the ailment.
Never one to back down from a fight however, Chakvetadze continued to look for the root of the problem, and was eventually able to put an end to it.
"Doctors found an inflammation in my ear and connected it with the dizziness. I had to take medication for it, for a while actually. I didn't expect that it would take so long to get over it, but I did it. When I felt ready to play again it was already almost the end of the season, so I just decided to wait until the new season to play again. It was disappointing, but my health is the most important thing, and I hope I'll be able to do some good things in the new season.
"I'm 100% healthy now. It doesn't bother me anymore. I'm completely over it."
With her ranking down at No.232 it could be a steep climb, but just like any player who misses an extended period of time, she will have some help.
"I can use my special ranking for eight tournaments, so I'll be doing that in the first part of the year. Then we'll see what happens," the Russian said. "Of course it's going to be physically tough to start playing tournaments again because I wasn't training at this level for a long time, and right now I can't do three practices a day like I used to, but I feel so motivated to be back. I miss playing, I miss hitting the ball, I miss competing. I've found my motivation again and if I didn't think I could do well again, I wouldn't be coming back.
"I will be leaving Moscow on January 2 to go to Australia. My first tournament will be in Hobart. I have good memories from there. Again, I understand it will be tough, but I have nothing to lose and will try my best."
There will be at least one thing different about Chakvetadze upon her return: she is now involved in politics. "While I was away from the game I wanted to try something else besides tennis. I was always interested in politics, but if you told me a few years ago I'd actually be involved with it, I would never believe it! I was working with the Right Cause Party in Russia. I met some new people and really enjoyed myself. It was great to try myself in a different world.
"While I will do something if my party asks me to, right now my priority is sport. I spend my days on the tennis court. Tennis comes first for me."

King Halep
Dec 27th, 2011, 10:22 PM
Her hair looks nice

Tezuka.
Dec 27th, 2011, 11:21 PM
Her hair looks nice

IIRC, that photoshot was taken in Rome 2008 with JJ. They were good friends even though Anna was owning her in most of their matches. :lol:

King Halep
Dec 27th, 2011, 11:30 PM
I was in very good shape," Chakvetadze said. "I was finally enjoying the way I was playing. I was finally enjoying the way I was playing. I was feeling the ball great. I had found my game again and was really ready to compete.

This was the best part. When I saw her matches there I thought she was looking really good, but maybe it was just my imagination and thrashing a sick Hantuchova is not that hard, but now she says she was suddenly hitting the ball really well. So if she had waited to get over the flu first who knows what she could have done.

King Halep
Dec 27th, 2011, 11:31 PM
IIRC, that photoshot was taken in Rome 2008 with JJ. They were good friends even though Anna was owning her in most of their matches. :lol:

never seen it, wta is so cheap they keep recycling old photos

sammy01
Dec 28th, 2011, 12:39 AM
yeah pic is from 2008, though to be fair i wouldn't have used a pic from last year or so as most haven't been that flattering (on the floor in dubai :sad:).

just want to have her back on court already!

HowardH
Dec 28th, 2011, 05:55 AM
IIRC, that photoshot was taken in Rome 2008 with JJ. They were good friends even though Anna was owning her in most of their matches. :lol:

Yeah, I remember, Anna always loved playing JJ. Good matchup for her. JJ loves to defend and draw errors out of players who try to hit through her, but Anna used to be so accurate with her shot placement. She hit the ball early and precisely so she could make JJ run all over the place without making the errors JJ was looking for. Anna's also quite quick so JJ's counterattack (e.g. her bh dtl) tended not to catch her out. Unlike some of the bigger hitting girls (e.g. Sharapova) JJ couldn't really take advantage of Anna's slight lack of heaviness in her shots.

I can't quite remember why they got on so well though. Maybe it's because they both like emotional stuff. And are both slightly crazy (in a good way).

_inocencia_
Dec 28th, 2011, 07:15 AM
Chakvetadze says she's completely healthy
Ticker - Tuesday, December 27, 2011
Former Top 5-player Anna Chakvetadze says she is completely over the inner ear infection that caused dizzy spells and nearly sidelined her for almost the entire 2011 season.

Chakvetadze is using her special ranking to enter 2012 tournaments and will open her year in Hobart. "I'm 100% healthy now. It doesn't bother me anymore. I'm completely over it," the No. 232- ranked Russian told the WTA. "Of course it's going to be physically tough to start playing tournaments again because I wasn't training at this level for a long time, and right now I can't do three practices a day like I used to, but I feel so motivated to be back. I miss playing, I miss hitting the ball, I miss competing. I've found my motivation again and if I didn't think I could do well again, I wouldn't be coming back."

In December, Chakvetadze ran for a seat in the Russian Duma with the Right Cause Party but was not elected.

Wintermute
Dec 30th, 2011, 02:36 PM
Anna Chakvetadze: Recovered & Ready

http://www.wtatennis.com/javaImages/2d/a4/0,,12781%7E10331181,00.jpg

MOSCOW, Russia - It has been a difficult last couple of years for Anna Chakvetadze (http://www.wtatennis.com/player/anna-chakvetadze_2257889_9939), with several problems on and off the court being thrown at her - the latest being an inner ear inflammation that sidelined her for almost the entire 2011 season - but the talented Russian is over it all and feeling strong for 2012.

At the start of 2011, Chakvetadze seemed on her way to the upper echelon of the WTA. She had already been there, after all, making it as high as No.5 during a breakthrough 2007 season that saw her win four WTA titles and reach her first Grand Slam semifinal at the US Open (http://www.wtatennis.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781%7E840,00.html). But adversity struck in Dubai, as she was leading the No.1-ranked Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.wtatennis.com/player/caroline-wozniacki_2257889_12631) in the second set of their second round match when she collapsed and had to retire due to illness.

"When I got sick in Dubai I was in very good shape," Chakvetadze said. "I was finally enjoying the way I was playing. I was feeling the ball great. I had found my game again and was really ready to compete. But then I got sick."

The illness would soon be diagnosed as dizziness, and Chakvetadze would end up playing just three complete main draw matches the rest of the year, retiring from two matches and withdrawing from 11 other events due to the ailment. Never one to back down from a fight however, Chakvetadze continued to look for the root of the problem, and was eventually able to put an end to it.

"Doctors found an inflammation in my ear and connected it with the dizziness. I had to take medication for it, for a while actually. I didn't expect that it would take so long to get over it, but I did it. When I felt ready to play again it was already almost the end of the season, so I just decided to wait until the new season to play again. It was disappointing, but my health is the most important thing, and I hope I'll be able to do some good things in the new season.

"I'm 100% healthy now. It doesn't bother me anymore. I'm completely over it."

With her ranking down at No.232 it could be a steep climb, but just like any player who misses an extended period of time, she will have some help.

"I can use my special ranking for eight tournaments, so I'll be doing that in the first part of the year. Then we'll see what happens," the Russian said. "Of course it's going to be physically tough to start playing tournaments again because I wasn't training at this level for a long time, and right now I can't do three practices a day like I used to, but I feel so motivated to be back. I miss playing, I miss hitting the ball, I miss competing. I've found my motivation again and if I didn't think I could do well again, I wouldn't be coming back.

"I will be leaving Moscow on January 2 to go to Australia. My first tournament will be in Hobart. I have good memories from there. Again, I understand it will be tough, but I have nothing to lose and will try my best."

There will be at least one thing different about Chakvetadze upon her return: she is now involved in politics. "While I was away from the game I wanted to try something else besides tennis. I was always interested in politics, but if you told me a few years ago I'd actually be involved with it, I would never believe it! I was working with the Right Cause Party in Russia. I met some new people and really enjoyed myself. It was great to try myself in a different world.

"While I will do something if my party asks me to, right now my priority is sport. I spend my days on the tennis court. Tennis comes first for me."

wtatennis.com (http://www.wtatennis.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781%7E2558479,00.html)

sammy01
Jan 7th, 2012, 07:49 AM
i found this, it is a short interview with anna from hobart after a practice session including picture of her hitting from a few days ago

http://www.themercury.com.au/article/2012/01/05/289851_sport-news.html

rucolo
Jan 7th, 2012, 08:24 PM
Russian hopes for lift in Hobart

January 05, 2012
MOTIVATION has not always been Anna Chakvetadze's strongest suit but the talented Russian has a renewed spring in her step as she embarks on her 2012 season.

The former world No.5 has battled injury and illness not to mention documented problems off court for the past two years, in which time her ranking has slipped to outside the top 200.

However, Chakvetadze has put the horrors behind her and is looking to again push her way back into the top echelon of players on the WTA Tour.

Last February the 24-year-old was serving for the second set against world No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki in their match at Dubai when she collapsed and had to retire.

Chakvetadze ended up completing just three main-draw matches for the rest of the season, was forced to retire from two and pulled out of 11 additional tournaments.

Doctors eventually found an inflammation in her ear, but by the time it had been treated the season was almost over.

"I never had so much time off in my career. I didn't play for five months, didn't do any physical exercise either," she said after a practice session in Hobart yesterday.

"So it was tough to find my rhythm again, to practise every day was hard for my body, but I got used to it.

"I liked it, which was the most important thing. I hope it will help me to compete."

She says she can definitely produce her best tennis, "otherwise I wouldn't be back".

"I have to say I missed competing, and I'm more motivated than a year ago actually. Maybe it's a good thing."

With the use of a protected ranking, Chakvetadze will start 2012 at No. 59 in the world.

She begins her Australian trek at the Hobart International, which provides familiarity and good memories.

It will be her fourth consecutive visit to the Apple Isle. Back in 2007 the Russian claimed the title the only No. 1 seed in the tournament's history to do so and used it as a springboard to a career-best 12 months.

By the end of 2007 Chakvetadze was No. 6 in the world and had reached the quarter-finals at the Australian and French Opens and the semi-finals at the US Open in the process.

"I was working pretty hard during the off-season. I have won here in Hobart but other times I have lost first round, so I hope I get past the first round this year," she said.

"There is no ranking in mind, I just want to test myself to see how I play at a different level.

"Practice and matches are always different. I don't want to look too far.

"I'm happy I'm back and happy I can play again."


All the best in 2012, Anna! :D;)

Noctis
Jan 10th, 2012, 04:06 AM
XnjZ_2fJYPM

sammy01
Jan 10th, 2012, 04:30 AM
wish the interview was longer and asked her what she thinks about her game ect, not silly questions about the tournament itself.

dornik
Jan 10th, 2012, 04:33 AM
Is it an interview after the 1st round match? Looks like that.

dornik
Jan 12th, 2012, 12:28 PM
http://wwos.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8402212

Tezuka.
Jan 12th, 2012, 01:08 PM
Chakvetadze forced to retire in Hobart

Gutsy former world No.5 Anna Chakvetadze was forced to retire from her quarter-final against sixth seed Shahar Peer at the Hobart International on Thursday night.

Chakvetadze called it quits early in the third set after suffering from what officials said was severe cramping.

The Russian had looked impressive in winning the first set 6-4, suffering the injury late in that set, but succumbed 6-4 to Israel's Peer in the second.

She lost her opening service game in the third set and signalled she couldn't continue after bravely playing for more than an hour and a half.

The 24-year-old had struggled through the match, barely able to run and stretching between points.

She received a time violation warning after stalling in an attempt to be able to complete her serve.

The 2007 champion called on the trainer three times and left the court after the second set for treatment.

Currently ranked No.234 in the world, Chakvetadze was playing her first tournament since Wimbledon in June last year after illness and injury setbacks.

Her comeback had appeared on track as she heads into next week's Australian Open, the last grand slam tournament she made the quarters at back in 2007.

Peer will play top seed Yanina Wickmayer in Friday night's semi-final.

Fourth seed Angelique Kerber meets German compatriot Mona Barthel in the daytime semi.

Chakvetadze was hopeful the cramping in her left leg would not jeopardise her Melbourne Park campaign.

"Hopefully not," she said.

"I will see the physio tomorrow in Melbourne.

"I think it will be fine."

But she was regretting playing the second set.

"With me, I always want to try until the end but it was not necessary to stay there," she said.

"I didn't really want to play through the pain anymore, that's why I decided to stop the match."

http://wwos.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8402212

Tezuka.
Jan 12th, 2012, 01:08 PM
She such a fighter. I'm really proud of her.:hug:

krul
Jan 17th, 2012, 06:42 AM
Anna Chakvetadze: "The very warm
feel it will all end "
01/17/2012
TENNIS

Anna Chakvetadze, conceded in the first round of Australian Open Elena Dokic (2:6, 1:6), admitted that she could finish the meeting early. In this case, according to Russian women, it is not going to make a break due to injury, reports from Melbourne correspondent "SE" Eugene FEDYAKOV.

"Unfortunately, last week in Hobart, I was injured - said Chakvetadze. - I have had seizures, but doctors decided that it was due to the fact that the displaced vertebra. I went to the bone setters, but could not recover. Yet But today, very much like to come here, and although I already felt warm, it will all end, decided to still finish the match to end. Of course I'm upset because I feel that I am in good shape. But no - the season is long. Now, after two week going to try to go through the qualification in Thailand. And here in Dubai, Indian Wells and Miami going to start in the main grid, using a secure rating rule (this rule helps players who missed some time due to injury and disease in some as to compensate for lost time. - Comm. EF). "

http://news.sport-express.ru/2012-01-17/487600/

King Halep
Jan 19th, 2012, 12:48 PM
UP ONE end of Margaret Court Arena stood a blonde veteran of many years and grand slams, a woman who has known heady rise and miserable fall. Who has inhabited the world's top five, battled personal and physical ills, spent time away from the game, drifted deep into triple-figure obscurity.

And up the other end stood Jelena Dokic. Calm, collected, healthy, happy Dokic, a beacon for all that Anna Chakvetadze must hold true to.

The Russian was so awful yesterday that John Fitzgerald - who in commentator guise doesn't usually tread an inflammatory path - questioned whether she was even trying. ''Should you fork out first-round prizemoney for this performance?'' Fitzy said on Channel Seven. ''I'm not sure.''

''Oh really?'' Chakvetadze responded, eyebrow cocked, after her 6-2, 6-1 capitulation in 48 minutes. ''Nice.''

She cited for her meek performance a back injury suffered in Hobart last week, which restricted her movement and made her contemplate a pre-match withdrawal. ''I could not turn, side to side.'' But she bristled at the notion she turned up to collect the $20,800 loser's cheque.

''I was trying to play with an injury … I wanted to try to play today, but unfortunately it didn't work out.'' Chakvetadze said.

Did the accusation hurt? ''No, it's very difficult to offend me.'' She has needed to develop a thick skin.

The plot details behind yesterday's combatants differ but there are thematic parallels. Dokic was a Wimbledon quarter-finalist at 16 and world No. 4 while still a teenager; Chakvetadze reached her points-driven pinnacle at 20, yet began this year aged 24 and ranked 240.

Dokic has recently reconciled with father Damir, but for much of her 28 years their relationship has been so strained that to conclude it damaged only her tennis is a gross trivialisation. She spoke warmly yesterday of the benefits working with coach Louise Pleming have brought - settling nerves, getting her physically fit, adding clearance and kick to her serve.

And crucially, greater evenness to her disposition.

''I think you have to, to be honest with you, just chill a little bit,'' she said, with a laugh that has too often been suppressed by burden. ''You know, things come a lot easier when you do that.''

This is a state Chakvetadze longs to revisit. In late 2007, when she was 20 and in the world's elite, her family's Moscow home was robbed in the middle of the night. Reports abound of hooded intruders, the daughter being bound, father Djambuli beaten, thousands of dollars taken. Her rankings slide began soon after.

Last year, she collapsed on court in three consecutive tournaments. A cynical audience formed an unflattering picture. Yesterday, Chakvetadze recalled an inner-ear inflammation, for a long time undiagnosed; she missed six months of tennis, did nothing at all for four of those.

''I actually miss it so much, I miss to compete,'' she said, insisting that her love for the game has never diminished. ''I like to play, you know. I really miss to play the tournaments.''

Of the struggles she and Dokic have known, Chakvetadze says you cannot compare people. ''Everyone has their own story.''

Dokic's is again being reworked for a new audience, although for the time being not so dramatically as when she stormed to the quarter-finals here three years ago (beating Chakvetadze in a third-round epic along the way) at a time when her grand slam resume in the previous four calendar years featured only a 2006 first-round Australian Open loss. Tomorrow, ninth-seeded Frenchwoman Marion Bartoli awaits.

Her goals are measured - to continue working on Pleming's plan, to accept the bad days and get out on the practice court the next morning ready to go again. And most of all, to stay healthy.

''Hopefully have a full year with no injuries … that's the most important thing,'' Dokic said. ''Yeah, if all goes well, hopefully top 20.''

There is a last word, in response to the observation that life hasn't always been easy.

''But what can we do, you know? Sometimes this happens. You have to stay positive.''

It is Chakvetadze who speaks, for both of them.

http://www.theage.com.au/sport/australian-open/dokic-on-rebound-as-chakvetadze-sinks-20120117-1q4nt.html


Dont you just like people who can look at a match and automatically see who is tanking

King Halep
Aug 14th, 2012, 06:10 PM
No.1 Oprandi Continues Winning Ways


Although she dropped her first set of the tournament in today’s final, Romina Oprandi scored a convincing victory over unseeded Anna Chakvetadze 5-7, 6-3, 6-3 to win her 22nd ITF title at the 20th annual EmblemHealth Bronx Open.

Oprandi is in excellent form heading into the US Open which begins in two weeks. This is her second title in 2012 coming less than a month after her win at the $100,000 Biarritz ITF Tournament.

When she reached her first final of 2012, Chakvetadze was bidding to become the first repeat winner of the EmblemHealth Bronx Open.

The three-set match showcased dueling forehands and strong first serves. Oprandi frustrated Chakvetadze with her well-executed drop shots, while Chakvetadze approached the net effectively thwarting Oprandi.

Oprandi took control of the match at the end of the second set winning seven games in a row taking a 3-0 lead in the third set before Chakvetadze mounted a final challenge.

EmblemHealth Manager of Events, Denise Shearer, presented Oprandi with the winner’s check in the amount of $7,315. This is the eighth year of EmblemHealth’s sponsorship of the tournament which has been played in the Bronx for 20 years.

The match will be broadcast by Cablevision on its neighborhood journal program. Cablevision sports anchor Charlie Cornacchio and World TeamTennis Commissioner Ilana Klass provided expert commentary.

King Halep
Jan 31st, 2013, 02:18 AM
"Just cause" loses eminent supporters: party left the famous tennis player Anna Chakvetadze

Moscow, 23 January. /ITAR-TASS/. Famous Russian tennis player Anna
Chakvetadze, which ranked fifth place earlier in the world ranking, withdrew from
"just cause". As the site is held by activists of the party, its withdrawal
She explained that after the failure of the elections to the State Duma and the
regional zaksobraniâ "right" fell short of its expectations.
After the scandal with the departure of Mikhail Prokhorov and his party
companions, Chakvetadze was invited to be in the top three
the electoral list, with which the party went to the Duma elections. "Unfortunately, on
following the elections to the State Duma party received and interest. Many of those
who has initiated and participated in the elections, withdrew from the other party,
a more successful political projects, "said Chakvetadze.
"I'm not one of those people who make sudden or hasty decisions. I'm up to
the latter had hoped that the party still can express ourselves and come back
the political arena of the country. However, this did not happen. Finally
disillusioned with the party, I sent a statement about its withdrawal from the
"Just cause". I realized that we no longer need each other, "
entered into it.
Soon, Chakvetadze, according to supporters of the party's site
intends to concentrate on sporting matters. Today international
sports channel Eurosport, invited Anna as an expert
comment on the broadcast of the Australian Open. In addition, tennis player
is actively engaged in projects on the development of children's sports, which in
the near future will be presented to the public.

http://www.itar-tass.com/c12/629194.html



Father: Anna Chakvetadze dejected in the "Right", but not in politics

Saint Petersburg, Jan 23-r-sports, Taras Barabash. Russian tennis player
Anna Chakvetadze pulled out of "just cause" as the banana pancakes
the party, not in politics in General, said the Agency "p-sport" father
ex-fifth World Jamal. However, in the "Right"
argue that professional tennis has never been a member of the party was not.

Chakvetadze took third place in a federal list of candidates
"Just cause" in elections to the State Duma of the VI convocation. The party did not
was able to overcome the 5% barrier and getting into Parliament.

"Anna very dejected, not so much in politics as in" Right
case ". She's not in the policy, dejected, and in particular the party
the structure, "said the father of the tennis correspondent of the" r-Sport "
the phone.

In addition, Jamal Chakvetadze stressed that Anna had the "Right
case ", even when the party was led by Mikhail Prokhorov. The businessman was removed
as President of the "right-wing" in the fall of 2011.

"It turned out that Prokhorov, and Anna in this party.
Not to spoil this picture, although it was known that nothing
will not win this party without leaders and dejected, she stayed in
"The Law" and from there came out, "explained the father of female players.

In turn, the Chairman of the "just cause" Andrei Dunaev said RIA
News that Chakvetadze never had been in the party, "was only
the list in the elections to the State Duma, but it was not a member of the party. "

Chakvetadze is narrated by Australian Open tournament matches on the channel Eurosport.

King Halep
Jan 31st, 2013, 02:18 AM
"THE FIRST TIME I WAS ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE SCREEN"
-The main question which all care about: how you feel and do you plan to return to the Court?
-Of course, I plan to, but I have long been bothered by the injury of the back, with
the beginning of last year. At the end of the year, spin again fell ill. In general I
long was treated, but not yet passed, requires a long time,
long pause. About the return of his so far can not say anything.
It is clear that for any athlete to rate
tournaments – it's the way he is in training. And in training so far
more than an hour a day I can't play. So naturally, I
It will be performing at competitions is properly
You can't prepare for.
– Of course we wish you health, and welcome to the position of Politika. How do you like the new role?
– I am very interested to comment – a very different game review, and
the first time I'm on the other side of the screen. I miss this
The Australian Open, but I am very pleased that I was invited
pokommentirovat′. Watch matches, very interesting, such a sensation as if
you are out there you are.
– What a match remembered most during the first game week?
- Certainly the most striking so far is the opposition between Djokovic and Vavrinki.
– In your view, how could impose Nowak Stanislasu your game?
Is a feeling that the Swiss just all turned out, and, of course,
very upset that he lost. Very worthy was a match. But Novak,
turn very carefully played. Well done, not lowered hands,
still, there's some pressure on Novak's world,
need to confirm the title. And here goes the opponent, the player rankings, and
This game impose sharp. Novak – well done, fought to the end,
broke the back and, of course, luck played a role. Vavrinke almost
lucky, but he is very worthy of fighting.
– At this tournament you will schedule more drops out comments?
the men's matches. What are the differences between a male and female tennis?
– I must point out that not many looked to the men's tennis (laughs). Now I'm already starting to gradually understand tennis, who as
plays. This is of course all very visible on TV. Here's what to
the TV doesn't show, so is the speed of ball flight. When you watch live
tennis, little other sensations. About the differences between women's and
men's tennis-Oh well, it's clear that men and stronger and faster,
Yes. But women's tennis is interesting in its own way. Women, first, not
perekručivaût ball, play flat strokes, its nuances is, prolonged
drawings also present. But I guess you can't select what tennis –
male or female is brighter. There are colorful players and tennis in General
interesting how women's and men 's.

But Azarenka has yet to play with Svetlana Kuznetsova. For her actions was able to take good?
– I have not seen, unfortunately, its matches but Svetlana – well done. She had health problems, she did not play and has now returned to the tour, and with NET, it is, of course, luck. Nice to have in the first quarters Kuznetsova has not got on a seeded tennis players – it helped gain confidence. Today, she defeated Caroline Wozniacki , 7-5 in the third set. Well Done, Svetlana! Already a very good result and a good comeback. Victories in matches at the tournament in Sydney, gave her a confidence. With Azarenka, of course, will now be a difficult match.
– What expect from the second week of the tournament?
- I'm waiting for the exciting matches and they will be. The second week of grand slam tournaments are always interesting-very
good, striking players. Probably very interesting semi-finals, will
Let's wait

http://u.to/JdXNAg


http://i.eurosport.ru/2013/01/21/940865-15526267-640-360.jpg

Potapovushina
Jan 31st, 2013, 07:07 AM
:tears: :hug:

Hartson
Feb 8th, 2013, 08:03 PM
New article
http://translate.google.ru/translate?sl=ru&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=ru&ie=UTF-8&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.championat.com%2Ftennis%2Fartic le-151843-anna-chavetadze---o-fed-cup-i-prodolzhenii-karery.html

cosmoose
Nov 4th, 2013, 04:30 PM
How Anna Chakvetadze, Rising Star at 20, Became a Retiree at 26

“If I could turn back the clock, I would try to listen to my body more,” she said. “I would not push myself so hard. When I was out for seven months in 2011, I wanted to practice more and become a better player. But when you have a break, you have to take it easy and start slow again. I was maybe rushing too much, and I wasn’t ready for all the training I was putting myself through.”

“Sometimes, when I watch tennis, I want to be at the tournaments to chat with the girls,” she said. “And I miss playing matches. I miss that feeling when you’re playing well, you’re in good shape and you feel there’s so much you can achieve. But unfortunately, I had to quit. I thought I would quit a lot later than 26, but it wasn’t to be.”

Link (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/sports/tennis/how-anna-chakvetadze-rising-star-at-20-became-a-retiree-at-26.html?smid=tw-share)

Jason A.
Nov 4th, 2013, 04:53 PM
Great article! Thanks for posting it, Cosmoose. :yeah:

Tezuka.
Nov 4th, 2013, 05:31 PM
How Anna Chakvetadze, Rising Star at 20, Became a Retiree at 26

“If I could turn back the clock, I would try to listen to my body more,” she said. “I would not push myself so hard. When I was out for seven months in 2011, I wanted to practice more and become a better player. But when you have a break, you have to take it easy and start slow again. I was maybe rushing too much, and I wasn’t ready for all the training I was putting myself through.”

“Sometimes, when I watch tennis, I want to be at the tournaments to chat with the girls,” she said. “And I miss playing matches. I miss that feeling when you’re playing well, you’re in good shape and you feel there’s so much you can achieve. But unfortunately, I had to quit. I thought I would quit a lot later than 26, but it wasn’t to be.”

Link (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/sports/tennis/how-anna-chakvetadze-rising-star-at-20-became-a-retiree-at-26.html?smid=tw-share)

:sad: :hug: