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~lollipop_girl~
Jan 4th, 2007, 11:59 AM
Well basically as the title says, this is the thread to post all of the articles u find on Ana... Seeing there have been a lot lately I think this thread is starting to be needed ;)
I'll kick us off with an article from almost a week ago, it comes with a GREAT pic too which I'll put in the pic threads :D Enjoy! :bounce:

http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,,20991840-10389,00.html
Handling wild ride
Paul Malone
December 31, 2006 12:00am

MARTINA Hingis says there are many players as good as tennis pin-up Ana Ivanovic, but who don't have the public profile of the emerging Serbian teenager.

Ivanovic was so tennis crazy as an 11-year-old that she went out to practice after NATO bombs had stopped falling on her home city of Belgrade.

She is unflappable and does not shy from the attention which follows her tennis success and her dark good looks.

Ivanovic, seeded third in a field headed by world No.7 Hingis for the Mondial Australian Women's Hardcourt Titles, which start today at Royal Pines resort, improved her ranking 80 places this year to No.14.

The 19-year-old's best tournament was a maiden WTA Tour tier-one title in which she beat Hingis in straight sets in the final in Montreal, a result that led Ivanovic to say she would have a psychological advantage over Hingis next time the two Switzerland-based players met.

Of Ivanovic, Hingis said: "There are a lot of players equally as good, but not as talked about. But she has potential. She had a good season and she's a talented up-and-coming player. If I said I was scared of anybody, I'd be false."

Ivanovic, who happily helped promote the Gold Coast tournament and herself on Friday with a press photo call at a local theme park, said the Montreal win could give her a psychological advantage at their next meeting, which may come on the Gold Coast.

Ivanovic's rise to tennis prominence and her lucrative appearances in advertising campaigns in Europe for the WTA Tour's sponsor and the sporting clothing multinational she endorses, is a wonderful success story.

When the Western military alliance NATO bombed Belgrade in 1999, Ivanovic and her coach curtailed one practice session and started to hit in the mornings, when the locals found the raids were less likely.

"It was scary, but I got used to it," Ivanovic, who has relatives in Melbourne, said.

"My parents tried to be protective, but you could see on the news what was happening.

"We would start coming to practice the next morning and talk about the bombs the night before. It was a difficult time."

Ivanovic's coach David Taylor, the Australian Fed Cup captain, said he had confidence in her continuing ability to concentrate on essential tennis matters and not be distracted by the other opportunities and requests.

"Sure, she's a pretty girl. But what motivates her is tennis and in no way has she made a decision which makes tennis come second to her other interests," Taylor said.

"If it ever did, I'd be worried. I can't ever see it happening."

Ivanovic, who served notice of her improvement in Sydney last January when she beat Amelie Mauresmo, the subsequent Australian Open champion, said she enjoyed the variety offered by the glamour photo shoots she has done for sponsors.

"It's a nice way to get away from tennis and I enjoy getting my make-up and hair done," she said.

"I spend a lot of time in a tracksuit or tennis clothes. The sponsorships are coming from my results and how you look doesn't help you win points.

"I got some confidence that I can actually beat top players and compete for a big title."

Ivanovic is on her fifth trip to Australia, a country she had always wanted to visit as a child.

"The first time I came here I fell in love with the country," she said. "It's always been a pleasure coming back here. I enjoy the sea and the beaches."

Ilikebigboobies
Feb 13th, 2007, 06:31 AM
This thread didn't really take off Katie. :lol: :ras:

Did you want everyone to post articles from her site as well?
Are we even allowed to do that? :scratch: :scared:

~lollipop_girl~
Feb 13th, 2007, 06:25 PM
This thread didn't really take off Katie. :lol: :ras:

Did you want everyone to post articles from her site as well?
Are we even allowed to do that? :scratch: :scared:
I would imagine u can if u give the link to it too but no, I just know when my threads aren't wanted :sobbing: :p j/k ;)

Ilikebigboobies
Feb 21st, 2007, 03:27 AM
This thread just can't seem to take off. :haha:

:sad:

~lollipop_girl~
Feb 23rd, 2007, 10:39 AM
This thread just can't seem to take off. :haha:

:sad:
Fine I will post an article next week :ras:

Ilikebigboobies
Mar 23rd, 2007, 03:56 PM
:unsure:

This thread should be renamed the crap thread. :nerner:

~lollipop_girl~
Mar 25th, 2007, 11:42 AM
:unsure:

This thread should be renamed the crap thread. :nerner:
Shut up :ras:

Note to Josh: Don't piss your gf off :nerner: :hug:

Ilikebigboobies
Jun 19th, 2007, 06:56 AM
:awww: Katie dear.. :hug: Now I am in this thread I guess I should post something. :hug:

Dexter posted many articles in Ana's French Open thread but I don't see any in here. http://yelims4.free.fr/Pasdaccord/NonNon05.gif

What does this say about this thread? :awww: :o :p http://yelims.free.fr/Jetirelalangue/Langue03.gif

predrag
Jun 24th, 2007, 08:25 AM
The take off.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article1977572.ece

Serb and volley
June 24, 2007
Barry Flatman, tennis correspondent

One is blonde, the other is raven-haired. Both are photogenic and happy to exploit the fact. One takes her time over every serve, repeatedly going through the same meticulous routine, the other bounces the ball once before crashing it into play. One seldom returns to the country of her birth and has become consumed with life in America. The other cares passionately about her homeland and sees herself as an ambassador. One maintains a game-face that at best could be described as stern and, on more arduous points, becomes distinctly tortured. Barely controlled glee best personifies the expression the other wears when things are going well; when they are not, she resembles a little girl lost.

This is not just modern women’s tennis but big time business. Image rights abound, glamour is paramount, prospective endorsements stockpiled. This is the sort of rivalry that convinces the powerbrokers of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour that the sport’s appeal is assured well into the next decade. A year ago, Maria Sharapova was the best-known face in women’s sport and, competitively, a class above Ana Ivanovic, who was on the periphery of the big time – promising, attractive and talented but some way short of the game’s top level. All that changed in the space of two sets in the French Open semi-final when the teenage Serb triumphed 6-2 6-1 over the California-based Russian.

Minutes later, a man of obvious affluence was celebrating on the players’ terrace at Roland Garros. “This is the one we have been waiting for, this is the one we have been telling you about,” he insisted. “What an important victory for the future of women’s tennis. Nike’s princess was completely outplayed by the girl in adidas and now Ana will become just as big a star.”

This wasn’t just about winning a tennis match but striking a blow in what used to be called the “sneaker-wars”. Dan Holzman, the Swiss businessman who is the co-owner of a $450m company specialising in vitamin products, first spotted Ivanovic’s potential, both in tennis talent and marketability, when she was just 13. In the years that followed, he invested in her development, paying her expenses and ensuring she got the best in terms of coaching and training.

“I saw she was a great talent, but 99% of my reasoning was that Ana is a humble, modest, well-educated girl with caring parents,” explained Holzman, who now introduces himself as Ivanovic’s manager. “She had the talent to succeed but not the opportunity so I decided to help. Nearly six years on, she is still the same delightful person but now the world is taking notice. And she is the perfect counterpoint to Maria Sharapova.”

Fast-forward a week to Her-togenbosch in Holland and the weather is miserable. Rainy Mondays put a damper on most moods, but fail to darken the most engaging smile in tennis.

Sufficient time had passed to digest the memory of a case of stage fright against Justine Henin, with the tennis world looking on during the French Open final. In the interim, 50,000 compatriots in her home city of Belgrade lauded Ivanovic as a heroine alongside compatriots Jelena Jankovic and Novak Djokovic, who both reached the semi-finals.

Wimbledon, and the chance to underline her growing reputation, is a week away and Ivanovic exudes the sort of excitement that suggests she can hardly wait. She is animated, open and affable. Perhaps it has something to do with those childhood tennis sessions in a drained indoor swimming pool when Nato bombs weren’t falling, but she is revelling in the attention afforded to her.

“People tell me I’m a star now but I find that difficult to believe,” she says. “What I have achieved makes no reason to change my personality and how I view other people.” And therein lies a major part of Ivanovic’s mission. She is determined to improve the perception of a country that was once again tainted by the hostile and allegedly racist behaviour of Serbia’s under-21 footballers and their supporters when they played England in Nijmegen.

Ivanovic has bad memories of her earliest days on the circuit. “Everyone seemed to think Serbians were bad people and I never felt I was welcome,” she remembered. “It was hard for us. At every airport, immigration and passport control always seemed to take half an hour longer for us than the other players. We had to explain what we were doing going into whatever country. There was so much trouble over visas. I was very young, but quickly realised people did not have a good opinion of us.

“I didn’t understand. Now I know but it is wrong to judge somebody because of where they come from. When I go home I see a change for the better in our country and Novak, Jelena and I hope our results will continue that change. We try to present the country and its people in a way people will like.”

There is an appreciation of good fortune that is not always apparent in players of other nationalities but Ivanovic concedes Serbs are natural fighters when it comes to being competitive and all three players share the same tough mentality. Such fortitude deserted her in her hour of need against Henin.

In outplaying Sharapova, as well as beating third seed Svetlana Kuznetsova, Ivanovic produced some of the most powerfully accurate serving seen in women’s tennis. Things went downhill thereafter but even a recollection of the final affords a giggle. “Now it’s funny, but it wasn’t at the time,” she says. “I was so uptight I could not bounce the ball, then I got stressed going for other shots. I experienced something like that a couple of years ago. I was playing the last round of qualifying in what hopefully would be my first ever tier one event in Zurich. I so wanted to win and was thinking more about the result than how I was playing and that made me very tense. I got through but did not seem to learn a lesson from that match. Hopefully the French final will be different. Justine was so clever and she knew how to use my problems to her advantage.”

Many believe Ivanovic, Wimbledon’s sixth seed and the only teenager in the world top 10, will be an even more potent force on grass. She has worked hard on her serve under the occasional guidance of Sven Groeneveld, the Dutch coach who has worked with Mary Pierce, Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario and Greg Rusedski.

Before arriving in Holland, she spent time honing her fitness at the Casal-Sanchez Academy in Barcelona, where Andy Mur-ray spent a few formative years, and believes she will reap the dividends. Groeneveld agrees. “I see so many things in Ana’s game that have potential but she is still in the developmental stage,” he said. “We hope to find a way to maximise what she has, which is big shots and big weapons. Coming into Wimbledon, we will be working on allying her serve to stronger volleys.”

A quarter-final loss to Daniela Hantuchova in ’s-Hertogen-bosch allowed Ivanovic more time to acclimatise at Wimbledon where she will face 137th-ranked Hungarian Melinda Czink in the opening round. Defending champion Amelie Mauresmo potentially awaits in the quarter-finals and a possible rematch against Sharapova in the last four looms.

Holzman has been fending off overtures from the game’s predominant management groups IMG, Octagon and SFX Sports, who lament missing out on a player who is set to become one of the biggest commercial earn-ers in tennis. “They have been quite aggressive and if ultimately they can do a better job for Ana than me, I won’t stand in her way. But I have been reluctant to sign her up to many long-term endorsement deals because the initial offers were not too big and it was clear more lucrative ones were in the near future.

“Currently there is adidas, a racket deal with Wilson and a contract with the same Coty cosmetic company that has contracts with the Beckhams and Jen-nifer Lopez. But there are five or six offers on the table. I am a businessman and I see what has happened with Sharapova. I have no problems with what IMG have done for her, in fact it helped the industry so much in terms of marketability. Before that, there was Anna Kournikova, who was a phenomenon, and there could be no limit to what Ana might financially achieve.”

Being described as “the dark-haired Sharapova” does not sit easily with Ivanovic. She says she is content to let Holzman take care of her commercial activities and doesn’t concern herself greatly with money-mak-ing, but adds: “No woman likes to be compared to anyone. I am flattered when people say these things but it’s about tennis. How you look is nice but it does not help you win points.”

Not in the competitive arena it doesn’t, but away from the court, it is a whole different ball game.

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 11th, 2007, 12:15 PM
THANK YOU predrag! :hug:

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 11th, 2007, 12:18 PM
Serbian teen lacks killer instinct

Ana Ivanovic is one of those people with a naturally nice disposition. She doesn't have that phony smile or behind-the-back, silver-lined tongue like some other high-level athletes do.

On court and off, she's composed, pleasant and intriguing.
Currently ranked No. 17, the 19-year-old Serbian has enormous potential, but she could be lacking that key ingredient that separates champions from pretenders — the ability to stomp on friends and foes alike.

Nice players don't always finish first, or in the case of the bubbly former No. 1 Kim Clijsters, they occasionally finish first but don't completely live up to their potential and become a dominant player.

If you look at the great champions of the past 25 years, all of them had a mean streak or a cold side — Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf, Monica Seles, Martina Hingis, Venus and Serena Williams, Justine Henin. All of them could also light up a room when in the right frame of mind. But when on court, they were relentless closers.

While Ivanovic flashes the occasional devil-may-care attitude, her angelic face is rarely capable of a demonic stare. Yet she does believe that she's capable of winning Grand Slams and reaching the top.

"I'm very different on-court than off," Ivanovic told FOXSports.com. "It's hard for me to get mean and upset off-court, but once on-court, I think I can be tough and mean. It's hard sometimes, but I realize that sometimes I have to be and that's what keeps me motivated for success."

Motivation has never been a problem for the big-hitting brunette.

Ivanovic is a product of war who learned to play during NATO's 1999 bombing raids on Belgrade. On one such morning, after the air raids had stopped and the "safe" siren sounded, she went out to practice.

It was early spring, and NATO had begun more than three months of bombing of Slobodan Milosovic's Yugoslav government, which it believed to be ethnically cleansing Kosovo Albanians.

But the 11-year-old Ivanovic was already in love with her sport. Nothing would stop her from getting one more practice session in.

"It was a little scary and there were certain times when it was dangerous starting around noon throughout the day and night, but at around 6 a.m. the danger would stop, so for a few hours we would practice," Ivanovic recalled.

While NATO eventually dislodged the Yugoslav government and its Serbian paramilitary police forces, Ivanovic blocked out the politics and conflicts. The reason was simple: From the time she was five when she saw a TV commercial advertising a free tennis clinic, she was hooked on the sport.

So on the first day of bombing, she went to a clinic, danger or no.

"The pro said, 'There's going to be bombing today so maybe it's better we should go home early,' but I wasn't done, so I said, 'Let me just finish a basket, please!'"

The Ivanovic family refused to run and hide. While some of their neighbors went underground, her father, Miroslav, and Dragana, tried to keep the peace inside the household.

"It was tough because I was only 11, but my parents always tried to have us live normal," she said. "We never went into the cellar. That was very important because I didn't want to spend four months in the cellar. We always had a full house of people trying to see the positive side."

Ivanovic showed little fear when potential chaos was around the corner. One day, she went to visit her grandparents and a bomb hit a nearby building.

"I could feel the building and windows shaking and that was most scared that I was," she said. "School stopped, people didn't work and it was tough times, but we knew that it would eventually end."

The bombing did end, but not before Belgrade was wrecked and thousands of Serbs were forced to flee the city in search of a better life. The Ivanovic family eventually moved to Switzerland, where Ana continued her on-court progress, found a backer and better training.

Her parents didn't force her to play — she pushed herself, which is why she simply didn't fade away as a foreign player in a strange locale. Just seven years after they moved, she's top-20 player with the potential to crack the top five.

"I've always loved tennis," she said. "If I would have to choose between a friend's birthday party and practice, I always chose practice. I chose tennis for myself, that's why I don't hate it. It always came from me."

Ivanovic stands 6 feet and has a naturally muscular build and good hands. The only thing stopping her from becoming a top-5 player by year's end is a lack of foot speed, proper balance and the ability to think her way through tough spots.

She can crush the ball off both wings, and with her broad shoulders and sturdy legs, she is one of the few top women who isn't faking it when she launches an inside-out forehand. She's also comes to the net quite a bit and is considered the best young volleyer on the tour.

She had an erratic start to the year, reaching the Tokyo final but bowing out early at Indian Wells and Miami. Last week, she reached the Amelia Island semifinals on green clay, falling to French teen Tatiana Golovin in a long three-setter.

This week, she's seeded seventh at the Family Circle Cup in Charleston, S.C., where she could go a long way toward improving her Grand Slam hopes by winning the title. Several top-ranked players, including No. 1 Justine Henin, No. 2 Maria Sharapova, No. 3 Amelie Mauresmo and No. 6 Martina Hingis all withdrew, which could improve Ivanovic's chances.

And those good looks are helping her popularity. Though Maria Sharapova is the current poster child of women's tennis, Ivanovic was named the sport's sexiest player by a fan poll on one Internet site last year, edging out the popular Russian. Her response was to thank her fans, but she added that she was sure she was honored because of her on-court success.

"I think people know me because of how I play tennis, not because of how I look," she said. "But I'm willing to do something different and interesting to keep my tennis for a while."

But when asked whether she could see herself designing her own clothes a la Sharapova and Serena, or leading a red carpet-lifestyle, she waved the question away.

"I enjoy playing tennis," she said. "It's hard work. Like every girl, I like to see what's in, but as far as fashion and design, I don't like that. It's crazy to think about me as model. My dreams are still tennis dreams."

http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/6660184

azdaja
Jul 11th, 2007, 02:27 PM
NATO eventually dislodged the Yugoslav government
i hate it when they take credit for that even though they contributed nothing to the downfall of the milosevic dictatorship which was bound to fall at the first possible occasion anyway :rolleyes: and reading about the 11-years-old ana in a war zone just makes me angry :mad:

other than that thanks for the article :p

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 11th, 2007, 02:32 PM
don't shoot the messenger :nerner:

azdaja
Jul 11th, 2007, 02:46 PM
don't shoot the messenger :nerner:
do you really think i would shoot you? :angel:

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 11th, 2007, 02:54 PM
do you really think i would shoot you? :angel:
U better not after the story I just wrote u about the BellyButtons :nerner:
All true btw as well ;)

azdaja
Jul 11th, 2007, 03:17 PM
U better not after the story I just wrote u about the BellyButtons :nerner:
All true btw as well ;)
well, since you went out of your way to act like an :angel: on the board, i suppose shooting is out of question ;) :p

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 11th, 2007, 03:30 PM
well, since you went out of your way to act like an :angel: on the board, i suppose shooting is out of question ;) :p
Thank u, I knew u were nice some where in that fighting soul of urs ;)

azdaja
Jul 11th, 2007, 03:42 PM
Thank u, I knew u were nice some where in that fighting soul of urs ;)
thanks :angel:

now let's hope this little thread of yours will eventually take off :p

Cp6uja
Jul 15th, 2007, 03:08 PM
Ana named sexiest player at Wimbledon
July 13, 2007 /


The Sun, the biggest-selling newspaper in Britain, has named Ana as the sexiest player at this year’s Wimbledon. Readers of the tabloid publication chose Ana above all other women as the best-looking player to compete at the All England Club this year.

The award is the latest in a long list of accolades Ana has received for her looks. Last year she was named the most attractive female tennis player by The Tennis Channel, and a year earlier tennisrep0rters.net gave her the same award.

Ana’s occasional doubles partner Maria Kirilenko finished second, while Maria Sharapova and Daniela Hantuchova were joint third.

Semi-finalist Ana was the only player among the 'most attractive' quartet to progress beyond the fourth round. :lick: :drool: :kiss: :hearts:

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 19th, 2007, 11:01 AM
Court sirens call shots in the glamour game

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?xml=/sport/2007/06/29/sthodg129.xml

Apart from Tatiana Golovin and her red knickers, the women have been wearing a uniform of 'predominantly white' clothing at Wimbledon. But the Frenchwoman is not the only one with a bit of flair and personality in the women's game. This collection of striking photographs demonstrates that the sport is not filled with automatons who spend their days thinking only about tennis, tennis and more tennis.

There is a reason why Ana Ivanovic did a photo-shoot wearing a dress in a swimming pool. Ivanovic, the runner-up at the French Open and the world No 6 on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, learnt to play tennis on a court marked out in an emptied pool. Apparently, she always had to hit down the lines, as any attempt to run down a cross-court shot would lead to a collision with the walls of the pool. "It was impossible to play," the 19-year-old said. "But that's where I grew up practising and it's where people still practise."
As for Jelena Jankovic, another Serbian and the world No 3, she posed next to studio lights as she aspires to become a screen actress once she is finished with her tennis career. Jankovic would probably just smile and grin all the way through any film role. "I was even offered a role in a movie in Serbia once," she said.

Frenchwoman Severine Bremond was photographed with a grand piano, as she once harboured dreams of becoming a concert pianist. "I wish I could sing and play the piano, but I only ever sing in the shower," Bremond said. A close friend of hers on the tour, France's Camille Pin, disclosed that, in between tournaments, she spends her time scuba-diving.

Jie Zheng was the first Chinese woman to win a Grand Slam title, while Maria Kirilenko could have become a ballet dancer rather than a tennis player. The Russian's mother sent her to ballet school when she was five. "She wanted me to move around a bit more because I was fat," said Kirilenko. How things have changed. She is now employed as a model for a range of tennis clothes designed by Stella McCartney, the daughter of former Beatle Paul. "It's nice to look good, but first and foremost I concentrate on my game."

I want to see the others from the photo shoot :D

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 19th, 2007, 11:17 AM
A couple of little ones:

Strawberries and green
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Cities/City_Supplements/Bangalore_Times/Strawberries_and_green/articleshow/2182929.cms

[Other players mentioned include Sharapova, Nikki, Daniela, Venus and some men]

Ana Ivanovic

Ranked sixth in the world, the gorgeous Ana is in high demand with the international press at Wimbledon. They have delighted in the warm, down-to-earth personality of the Serbian Smasher, as she is known. She has also been described as "the Queen of Hearts", "a model pro" and one newspaper even ran the headline "Ana From Heaven."She also revealed that she didn't receive any Valentine's cards, even though she has been called the prettiest female player ever grace at Wimbledon.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Cities/City_Supplements/Hyderabad_Times/Courting_Glamour/articleshow/2165414.cms

[Other players include: Makiri, Mirza, JJ, Williams' sisters, Sharapova]

Ana Ivanovic

She started her career at the age of 5 and first caught the eye of the tennis world when she reached the final of the Junior Wimbledon tournament in 2004. The dazzling Serb burst onto the scene by winning her first career singles titles, as a qualifier, in Canberra, Australia in 2005. Her ranking continued to rise till she headed into the 2007 French Open, including a victory over Maria Sharapova. The 20-year-girl who broke Aravane Rezai, to take a 2-0 lead, at Wimbledon, is a stunner on the court and off it too. Ana is a blend of grit, grace and glamour. And while the grace and glamour are nice to the eye, it's her grit that makes her a champion. It is said that she has the number 1 visited website of all female sports stars.

Cp6uja
Jul 19th, 2007, 11:57 AM
Latest articles about Ana

USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tennis/2007-07-15-ivanovic_N.htm?csp=34)

azdaja
Aug 14th, 2007, 07:31 PM
an opportunity for me to post something :angel:

http://sport.orf.at/070813-12434/?href=http%3A%2F%2Fsport.orf.at%2F070813-12434%2F12420bigstory_txt.html

Neue Großmacht im Miniformat
Wien-Starter Djokovic gelang es als erstem Spieler, Federer und Nadal bei einem Turnier zu schlagen.

Ana Ivanovic und Novak Djokovic haben zumindest drei Dinge gemeinsam: Sie sind jung, serbische Tennisstars und aktuelle Turniersieger.

Ivanovic, die im November 20 Jahre alt wird, setzte sich am Sonntag im Endspiel des mit 600.000 Dollar dotierten WTA-Turniers von Los Angeles gegen die Russin Nadja Petrowa 7:5 6:4 durch.

Djokovic, nicht ganz ein halbes Jahr älter als seine Landsfrau, verpatzte beim Masters-Turier in Montreal Roger Federer die erhoffte Party zum 50. Turniersieg und bezwang den Titelverteidiger 7:6 (7/2) 2:6 7:6 (7/2).

Damit haben beide serbischen Jungstars ihren Aufwärtstrend vor den in zwei Wochen beginnenden US Open erneut deutlich unter Beweis gestellt. Sie durften sich über den vierten bzw. sechsten Turniersieg ihrer Karriere freuen.

Trio auf den Rängen drei und vier
Während Djokovic als neuer Dritter der Weltrangliste bei den serbischen Herren relativ alleine auf weiter Flur steht (nur Janko Tipsarevic scheint als 47. noch in den Top 100 auf), hat Ivanovic in Jelena Jankovic eine gleichwertige Partnerin im Team.

Die 22-Jährige, die sich im Halbfinale von Los Angeles ihrer Landsfrau in drei Sätzen geschlagen geben musste, liegt im WTA-Ranking als Dritte sogar noch einen Platz vor Ivanovic, die seit Montag erstmals Nummer vier im WTA-Computer ist.

Der größte bisherige Erfolg
Djokovic, der bei der 22. BA-CA-Trophy im Oktober die Nummer eins in der Wiener Stadthalle sein wird, freute sich nach dem Erfolg gegen den zweifachen Montreal-Sieger Federer natürlich entsprechend.

"Es ist ein unglaublicher Sieg für mich. Es war ein noch größerer Erfolg als in Miami (wo er im März seinen ersten Erfolg bei einem Masters-Series-Turnier feierte, Anm.), denn ich habe es geschafft, in den letzten drei Runden die Top Drei der Welt zu schlagen. Ein Traum ist wahr geworden."

Der junge Serbe hatte sich in Montreal der Reihe nach gegen Andy Roddick, Rafael Nadal und schließlich - erstmals im fünften Duell - gegen den Weltranglisten-Ersten aus der Schweiz durchgesetzt.

So etwas war zuletzt Boris Becker 1994 in Stockholm gelungen, als er der Reihe nach Michael Stich (ATP-Nr. 3), Pete Sampras (1) und Goran Ivanisevic (2) aus dem Turnier warf.

Noch nicht am Ziel
Djokovic, heuer schon im Halbfinale von Paris und Wimbledon, macht kein Hehl daraus, dass er damit spekuliert, einmal die Nummer eins der Welt zu werden.

"Es ist noch ein weiter Weg, obwohl ich schon die Nummer drei bin. Ich kann nicht sagen, dass ich daran denke, in einem oder zwei Jahren die Nummer eins zu sein. Ich werde weiter daran arbeiten und so weitermachen wie bisher. Es ist das Ziel meines Lebens, einmal die Nummer eins zu sein, aber ich habe noch viel Zeit."

"Die kommende Nummer eins"
Der Rechtshänder aus Belgrad hat sich in weniger als zwei Jahren von Platz 280 in die Top Drei gespielt. Und dabei wird es laut Nadal nicht bleiben. "Er ist die kommende Nummer eins", so der Spanier.

Auch Federer traut dem Youngster den ganz großen Sprung zu. "Djokovic hat sich innerhalb des vergangenen Jahres stark verbessert. Wenn seine Entwicklung so weitergeht, hat er bald Chancen, ein Grand-Slam-Turnier zu gewinnen. Der Sieg hier in Montreal könnte sein ganz großer Durchbruch gewesen sein."

Niemand ist unschlagbar
Ein ähnliches Ziel wie ihr Landsmann hat wohl auch Ivanovic. Die 19-Jährige, die heuer in Paris erst im Endspiel an Justine Henin gescheitert war und in Wimbledon bis ins Halbfinale kam, hat sich zuletzt gegen zahlreiche Top-Ten-Spielerinnen durchgesetzt.

"Ich habe die meisten der Spitzenspielerinnen geschlagen, und das gibt mir viel Selbstvertrauen. Im Frauen-Tennis kann jede jede schlagen. Wenn ich gegen besser gereihte Spielerinnen antrete, habe ich das Gefühl, auch sie schlagen zu können."

Ivanovic hat von den Spitzenspielerinnen bisher nur Henin und die Williams-Schwestern nicht auf ihrer "Abschussliste". Das könnte sich aber schon bei den US Open ändern. "Ich würde sie gerne herausfordern und wieder gegen sie spielen. Denn ich glaube, ich hätte definitiv eine gute Chance."

Serbiens Tennis sieht jedenfalls einer rosigen Zukunft entgegen.

i will try to translate the article tomorrow (unless somebody does it before me).

Natalicious
Aug 14th, 2007, 11:22 PM
wow really great article, but i'm too lazy to translate :p

azdaja
Aug 15th, 2007, 11:35 AM
wow really great article, but i'm too lazy to translate :p
so am i, but this time i will make an effort.

Dexter
Aug 15th, 2007, 11:38 AM
Thanks for posting, I understood most of it. :angel:

azdaja
Aug 15th, 2007, 12:04 PM
a loose translation:

new superpower in small format
novak djokovic (who will play the tournament in vienna in october) is the first player to defeat both federer and nadal in one tournament

ana ivanovic and novak djokovic have at least 3 things in common: they are young, serbian tennis stars and current tournament champions.

ivanovic, who will turn 20 in november, defeated nadia petrova of russia 7:5 6:4 in the sunday final of the $600k tournament in los angeles.

djokovic, who is less than half a year older than his compatriot, ruined for federer the expected 50th title party by defeating him 7:6 (7/2) 2:6 7:6 (7/2)

with their victories both serbian stars convincingly continue their rise 2 weeks before the us open. they could celebrate their 4th and 6th title respectively.

trio ranked 3 & 4
while djokovic who is new nr3 in the world stands almost alone as a serbian player on atp tour (only janko tipsarevic ranked 47 is in the top 100) ivanovic has in jelena jankovic an equal partner in team (:unsure:)

the 22 years old, who was defeated by her compatriot in 3 sets in the semifinal, is ranked even one place better than ivanovic, who is nr 4 in the world in the wta-computer on monday.

(i'm too lazy to translate the part dedicated to nole, but it basically talks about his ambition to reach the nr 1 and it says that defeating 3 best players in the world in one tournament is an amazing feat.)

nobody is unbeatable
ivanovic has a goal similar to her compatriot. the 19 years old, who was defeated in the final of rg by justine henin and reached the semifinal of wimbledon, has lately enjoyed success over numerous players from the top 10.

"i have defeated most top 10 players and that gives me a lot of confidence. in women's tannis anyone can beat anyone. if i player against better ranked players i have the feeling that i can beat them as well."

the only top player ivanovic still hasn't defeated are henin and williams sisters. however, that could change already at the us open. "i would like to challenge them and play against them again. because i believe i'd really have a chance to win."

in any case the future of serbian tannis looks bright.

Cp6uja
Aug 20th, 2007, 08:39 PM
The Financial Times (UK) (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/255f69f4-4ce8-11dc-a51d-0000779fd2ac.html)

Looks, talent and personality

By Eleanor Preston
Published: August 17 2007 18:46


If there is an ideal of tennis perfection in looks, talent and personality, Ana Ivanovic is probably it. There are pretty players, gifted players and personable players but the 19-year-old Serbian is all three. She could have been dreamt up in a laboratory by white-coated scientists on a mission to make the ultimate 21st-century female player.

Small wonder, then, that if she wins the US Open, which starts in just over a week, she is likely to eclipse defending champion Maria Sharapova as the most marketable individual in the women’s game.


Ivanovic has signalled she is capable of following up May’s run to the French Open final, where she lost heavily to Justine Henin, by winning her debut grand-slam title in New York three weeks today. She built on her performances at Roland Garros by reaching the semi-finals of Wimbledon and has just broken into the world’s top five, sitting at number four, her highest ever ranking.

She lost unexpectedly early in the Rogers Cup in Toronto this week, but that followed a tough week in Los Angeles where she won her fourth tour title. And last year, she proved her ability on American hard courts when winning the US Open Series by being the top female performer in the string of tournaments that lead up to the season’s final major.

Her success in the US 12 months ago, however, failed to be a portent for the main event itself, a pattern that was frequently repeated early in her career. She emerged from the juniors teeming with potential but took time to adjust to life among the professionals. Her looks ensured that she received plenty of attention, but she struggled to make the transition from starring in advertisements for WTA Tour sponsor Sony Ericsson to taking a leading role where it really mattered – on court.

It is one of the cruelties of tennis that it does not allow for gradual development and instead praises prodigies such as Rafael Nadal and Sharapova, who sparkled at 17 but whose careers may not prove to have the same longevity of some of their slower-burning peers. Ivanovic’s rate of progression is more like that of Roger Federer, who was a star at junior level but did not win his first grand-slam title until he was nearly 22. It took a breakthrough – in Federer’s case qualifying for the 2002 Masters Cup in Shanghai – to give him the self-belief required to go from being potential champion to champion. Ivanovic’s effort in making the French Open final could be a similarly career-defining moment.

Few people are better placed to measure her progress than Sven Groenefeld, who worked with a young Federer and has also had long-term coaching relationships with Mary Pierce and Greg Rusedski, among others. Groenefeld is now special adviser to Ivanovic’s sponsor Adidas, and appears to have earned his salary by convincing her that she was more than just a pretty face.

With Groenefeld’s guidance, she became fitter and her passive, predictable game became much more aggressive and vibrant, and thus far more of a match for the bigger hitters at the top of the game. Her cheerful disposition ensured that she was always liked by her rivals but these days she is feared by them, too.

The experienced Russian Nadia Petrova, who Ivanovic beat in the Los Angeles final last week, rates her forehand as one of the most potent weapons in the women’s game. “I would say she just rips it off without even thinking,” said Petrova. “Comparing with any other players, it is the best forehand by far on tour. Her fitness coach did a good job with her [too], she’s lost some weight and is dangerous. Even out of difficult positions, she’s coming up with big shots.”

Groenefeld says: “I think the biggest improvement is her agility, her flexibility and her movement on court so she is set up much better for the ball now. She’s retrieving a lot better and she’s making her opponents play a lot more balls. Definitely, physically she’s made a huge leap and that has allowed her to play a game that suits her better.

“What I try to do is to have a game-plan A and B, and try to find answers for her. It’s basically simple. Life throws you questions and you have to find an answer. It’s the same on the court – what does your opponent offer you and what you can answer with?

“Through being involved with Federer at the early stage, that is a quality that Roger really perfects. He looks at a player and says, this guy is doing this and that really well, so I’ll find an answer and maybe throw an answer to them and see what they’ve got. Ana is doing that and she’s learning how to play the game.”

The fact that it has taken time to complete her tennis education should not be a surprise, indeed it is remarkable that she managed to become a professional at all, given where she comes from. She first wanted to play tennis at the age of five after seeing Monica Seles on television and remembered the number of the local club by heart so that she could nag her mother into calling it.

Yet this was Belgrade in the difficult years following the Balkans War and facilities for talented young tennis players were so spartan that she was famously forced to practice in an empty swimming pool. While she is too young to remember the war itself, Ivanovic was living in Belgrade when Nato forces bombed the city in 1999, and had to cope with the stigma of coming from a country that was then an international pariah.

“In ’99 when the bombing was, I was a little bit afraid. But then by the time you got used to it, you realised that they are not bombing just everything, just special buildings,” she explained. “It was hard financially then. But also, afterwards, the problem was to get visas to travel. Even now I have so many problems to get visa to go abroad to tournament.”

While much has been made of the emergence of talented Serbian players such as Ivanovic, Novak Djokovic and Jelena Jankovic, none really flourished until they left Serbia as young teenagers and went to train elsewhere. While Djokovic went to Germany and Jankovic to Nick Bollettieri’s academy in Florida, Ivanovic headed for Switzerland, where she still trains. No wonder it has taken a while for her to reach what appears to be the brink of everything that young tennis players dream of. She seems poised to turn an imperfect past into a perfect future.


.

Cp6uja
Aug 20th, 2007, 09:06 PM
Reuters (UK) (http://uk.reuters.com/article/tennisNews/idUKL199636520070820?pageNumber=1)

Ivanovic looks for further grand slam success
Mon Aug 20, 2007 3:00AM BST

By Matthew Cronin


LOS ANGELES, Aug 20 (Reuters) - Serb Ana Ivanovic cracked the world top five after reaching the French Open final and Wimbledon semi-finals and now has her sights set on making a big splash at next week's U.S. Open.

"I feel more confident in my game and I feel like I've improved a lot," the 19-year-old Belgrade native told Reuters in an interview.

"I'm very excited to play another grand slam. I've played the U.S. open before and never reached the second week. My goal is to get there for the first time."

With a big serve, one of the most powerful forehands on the women's tour and a sound volley, the 6-foot-tall (1.83 metres) Ivanovic has hit her stride in 2007.

She won her second Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Tier I title in Berlin in May and then at the French Open stunned world number two Maria Sharapova and number four Svetlana Kuznetsova to reach the final, where she was buried by Justine Henin.

At Wimbledon, Ivanovic avoided a natural letdown and powered to the semi-finals, knocking out fellow teenager Nicole Vaidisova in a dramatic three-set quarter-final before falling to eventual champion Venus Williams in the semis.

"It was amazing," Ivanovic said. "It took some time to realise what was happening and that I beat so many top players. But I got more mature and put in the hard work and I could control my emotions much better. I was happy that I finally got the results."

Ivanovic had already showed promise in 2006, winning the Canadian Open, but her results were inconsistent.


BIGGER PUSH

But this year she felt her conditioning had improved, as had her mental approach and she was ready to make a bigger push.

"Somewhere deep inside I felt this," she said. "Winning Berlin helped. I felt more confident and relaxed and I knew not to get too over-excited. That's when I start missing and then I want to improve too fast, then I start to miss and get out of my rhythm."

Ivanovic said much of the key to her success has been her new-found ability to think about what she should be doing technically and strategically in the moment, rather than what lies ahead of her.

She said in her loss to Henin in the French Open final, she had forgotten to do that.

"I was thinking I can win a grand slam now and then it all changed and I got too nervous, but I learned from that."

The Serb is proud that she was able to rebound at Wimbledon and reach the semi-finals, but there she experienced a slight tear in her left knee, which affected her in her loss to Williams.

She consequently pulled out of tournaments at Stanford and San Diego but walked away with the top prize when she made her comeback in Los Angeles.

Ivanovic believes she has found her place in the top echelon of the game.

"I feel an excitement to be where I am," she said. "Reaching the top 10 was my goal for a while and now I feel my game is at a really high level.

"But I need to take it step by step and not think too much about it, because it's dangerous if I don't think realistically."

Cp6uja
Aug 21st, 2007, 06:39 PM
Mens Vogue (http://www.mensvogue.com/health/articles/2007/08/ivanovic)

Cp6uja
Aug 23rd, 2007, 12:37 AM
The New York Observer (http://www.observer.com/2007/welcome-power-serbs)



Welcome, Power Serbs!

Ana Ivanovic and Novak Djokovic, 19 and 20, Threaten to Up-End U.S. Open; McEnroe Says He’s Better Than Roddick; She’s Already the Hottest

by John Koblin

Published: August 21, 2007


Ana Ivanovic, the modest 19-year-old Serbian tennis player, spent this past weekend traveling between the players’ hotel, at the Le Méridien on 57th Street, and the U.S. Open Tennis Center in Queens on a bus that departs once an hour. She is sharing a room with her mom. She’ll be in bed by 10:30, reading The Secret, the best-selling Rhonda Byrne self-help book.

“I want to go to Abercrombie and Fitch,” she said. “I want to get jeans. Their jeans fit me best.”

If she has time, she said, she’ll go to Macy’s too.

Some female tennis stars crave the chance to land high-end endorsement deals, to dress in Prada, to start their own fashion lines. Ana Ivanovic is not one of them. At a time when women’s tennis has been ravaged by indifference, injuries and shameless self-promotion, she may be just the player the Women’s Tennis Association desperately needs. She’s humble, smart, hungry and ridiculously attractive. Oh—and she has perhaps the best forehand in tennis.

Starting Aug. 27, when the three-week U.S. Open kicks off, she’ll be a star.

[Power Serbs: Novak Djokovic, 20, Has Beaten the Best]

On Aug. 19, eight days before the start of the tournament, she strolled into the players’ lounge on the second floor at Arthur Ashe Stadium. She’s got an athletic shape, at 6-foot-1 and 159 pounds. She has almond-shaped brown eyes and a deep brown tan. She wore a pink Adidas T-shirt, and her hair in a ponytail and looked, despite the fact that she had just spent the previous 90 minutes hitting tennis balls, completely fresh.

She arrived accompanied only by her mother, who speaks little English and quickly excused herself from the room.

“I’m sorry for being late,” she said. (She was less than 10 minutes late.) “I was practicing.”

Ivanovic talks in long, unpunctuated sentences full of false starts (“I think, you know, so, yeah …”) but her English, which she learned nine years ago, is fantastically—refreshingly—expressive in a way that the language of the hyper-media-trained players from America and Western Europe rarely is.

She discussed her game, where in the last year she’s made a steady climb from 16th to No. 4 in the world, the youngest player in the top 10.

“For quite a long time I was around 20th, and I obviously wanted to make this step and break in the top 10,” she said. “I just needed more confidence and more consistency in my game so I would win against top players more often.”

She’s done exactly that. This year, she’s 5-0 against Maria Sharapova and Jelena Jankovic, the No. 2 and No. 3 players in the world, respectively. And she landed in the French Open final and the Wimbledon semifinals, her best-ever finishes in Grand Slams.

When it comes to tennis fundamentals, Ivanovic’s most powerful strength is her forehand. She begins the stroke with her arm turned at a high-arching angle that she whips down to smash through the ball in a style reminiscent of Steffi Graf. She learned it when she was 11.

“Since I was young they always told me I had a powerful forehand,” she said. “Really, growing up I realized that’s my biggest weapon, so I want to use it as much as I can.”

She’s also dramatically improved her movement on the court—helping her to move up 12 spots in the world tennis rankings in the past year—and she’s working on an increasingly powerful serve.

But what separates her most from the rest of the women’s game is a growing, almost preternatural understanding of the psychological vagaries of the sport—a rite of passage for every champion.

When Ivanovic was asked about the most important match she ever played, she spoke briefly about her biggest win—defeating Sharapova in the French semis—but more extensively of her most spectacular loss, when she was routed by Justine Henin at Roland Garros in her first Grand Slam final, 6-1, 6-2. “Even if I lost the final and didn’t play the best tennis, I still learned so much from that experience,” she said.

“Each match until the final, I was thinking ‘O.K., this match, I want to play the best I can and see how this goes.’ In the final, I thought ‘Oh, my God, I could win Grand Slam! I might win Grand Slam!’ It went from technical part to emotional part and that was the big mistake. I wasn’t ready for that. Once I was on the court, all these emotions came and I didn’t know how to deal with it. But next time, if I’m in that situation, before the match I know I’m going to feel these emotions and be ready to put them aside and know how to focus.”

After a pause, she added, “Very easy to say, much harder to do, but this match helped me a lot.”

She described Henin as the player she feared the most on tour. (“She’s a great mover and doesn’t make many unforced errors so she makes you win points more than once.”)

And she discussed Venus and Serena Williams—the leaders of the women’s game over the past decade, against whom collectively she is 0-4—with equal humility.

“They both play very powerful,” she said. “It’s still something I have to practice hard on because they don’t give me much time to play my game. They dominate—they are the ones dictating. I really hope I can play against them soon because then I’m more comfortable with that kind of game.”

In other words, the more she sees them, the more she’ll learn and the better she’ll play against them. She’s a true strategist at heart, even though she technically plays without a coach. (She’s given one through her endorsement deal with Adidas, but he’s regarded as a consultant.)

It also says something about her makeup that she is most eager to face the players most likely to expose the weak point in her game: her lack of mobility, which leads to an inability to return strongly hit shots in the far court.

“My biggest weakness, there are so many girls that are hitting very powerful—myself, I hit quite fast—but when someone hits it even harder and faster then it’s going to be hard because I still want to have enough time to adjust and have time to hit the ball,” she said. “I’m working a lot on that aspect right now.”

HER TENNIS CAREER BEGAN WHEN she was four years old and living in a town just outside of Belgrade. She saw a commercial during a televised match between Monica Seles and some player she couldn’t remember, before she understood what tennis really was. It was an important moment.

“In between breaks there was commercial for tennis school,” she said. “I remembered the number and asked my mom to call it for me and for fifth birthday my father bought me small tennis racket and a month later I stared playing tennis.”

Her game, however, isn’t patterned after Seles’s or, Ivanovic will say, anyone else’s. Ivanovic said she didn’t watch much tennis at all as an adolescent or as a teenager. (When I made reference during the interview to the 1999 French Open final between Steffi Graf and Martina Hingis, easily one of women’s tennis most famous matches ever, Ivanovic said she wasn’t familiar with it.)

“It just comes naturally,” she said. “Basically, I think technique is very individual.”

Her early life has been recounted by tennis writers in largely the same way: She grew up in poverty-stricken and war-torn Serbia and grew up playing tennis on a makeshift court inside a converted pool.

That’s partly the truth. When she was 11, she actually began practicing mostly in a tennis bubble, which was reserved for the country’s elite players. She also played on three clay courts in the town next to where she grew up, which may help explain how she won 16 out of 19 matches on clay this year. As a teenager, she began traveling to Switzerland, the European version of the Florida tennis factory.

It was also at the age of 11 that she changed the grip of her forehand, which resulted in the more powerful, looping stroke that is now her most lethal weapon. That change come at the recommendation of her former coach, Dejan Vranes, the person Ivanovic credits most for making her a top five tennis player.

Although he’s no longer her coach—he’s now the Serbian head coach during the international tournament, the Fed Cup—he remains close to Ivanovic. (At the interview, she wore a pair of earrings he gave her when she reached the French Open final.)



THE NEXT BIG STEP FOR IVANOVIC, if she is to continue on her breakneck trajectory, is to make the final at a major played on hard courts. She’s never made it past the third round at the U.S. Open.

On Sunday, she practiced at Louis Armstrong Stadium and said the courts are playing slow—much slower than they were at a warm-up tournament in Toronto a week ago, when she was bounced out of the first round by an unranked Chinese player.

One of the big wildcard factors over the next three weeks, for Ivanovic, will be the reaction of the fans.

New Yorkers always pick a player or two to carry on a wave of good feelings to the championships.

Ivanovic likes this.

“The French and Wimbledon, it’s higher class and it’s very traditional,” she said. “Here, it’s a lot of people and a lot of people that know a lot about tennis. It’s much more enjoyable in this tournament.”

And she could just become It.

The W.T.A. women’s tour is starving for idols at the moment. Kim Clijsters, who won the U.S. Open two years ago, retired this year at age 23. Other marquee players are no longer factors: Amelie Mauresmo is injured; Martina Hingis is trying a comeback after squandering years on a premature retirement.

Maria Sharapova, last year’s winner, was widely regarded as the next star of tennis. She certainly is that—she made more in endorsements last year than any female athlete ever—but with her predictable forehand-and-serve game, she hasn’t quite lived up to those expectations on the court.

Ivanovic, for her part, has begun to receive the star treatment—there are already a number of professional-looking Ivanovic fan-worship sites on the Web—but she seems to regard the press attention, the photo shoots and the all-around notoriety with the same even attitude that she applies to everything else.

“It’s good to do something different and forget about court and practice,” she said. “But it’s also important to keep a good balance, because at the end of the day they ask you to do commercial because you achieved something good in tennis, so in order to achieve more you have to practice hard.”

ezekiel
Aug 26th, 2007, 06:44 PM
I googled this one

RTS wants Ana Ivanovic to be the host of Eurovision
http://www.oikotimes.com/v2/index.php?file=articles&id=697

Dexter
Aug 26th, 2007, 06:55 PM
She's not going to accept it a couple of days before RG gets underway. Or at least if it's still to be hosted in the middle of May.

ezekiel
Aug 27th, 2007, 12:06 AM
http://www.phpbbserver.com/boumbanaboom/viewtopic.php?t=1447&mforum=boumbanaboom

THU 22 MAY 2008 - EUROVISION SONG CONTEST 2008 - SEMI-FINAL/S


SAT 24 MAY 2008 - EUROVISION SONG CONTEST 2008 - FINAL

http://www.soldouteventtickets.com/listings/288/288/9290/Corporate%20Hospitality%20/french-open-hospitality
French Open: 1st Round (http://www.soldouteventtickets.com/ticket/38886/french-open-1st-round)
25/05/2008 (Sun 11:00 AM) Roland Garros - Paris

she could be there at least for semis

Just Do It
Aug 27th, 2007, 09:07 PM
http://www.mtsmondo.com/entertainment/vesti/text.php?vest=68333

I found this story. It is similar to that Ezekiel psoted, though :lol:

Epigone
Sep 7th, 2007, 07:10 PM
ANA IVANOVIĆ U VEZI SA KOLEGOM TOMIJEM ROBERDOM?! (http://www.svet.co.yu/?state=3&izdanje=2&broj=533&clanak=11716) :o

LMK
Sep 7th, 2007, 09:36 PM
Epigone could you tell us what the articles about?

Just Do It
Sep 28th, 2007, 09:36 PM
http://www.svet.co.yu/?state=3&izdanje=2&broj=536&clanak=11840

ANA "ČEKIĆA" NA ŠTIKLAMA!

:sobbing:

Just Do It
Sep 28th, 2007, 09:39 PM
Short translation :

Ana visited one primary school at Kosovo I think, she gave them money and played a volleyvall with them in a skirt and high heels :spit: :lol:

iva_ds87
Oct 7th, 2007, 12:56 PM
A nice article here
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/arash_markazi/09/22/ivanovic/index.html

azdaja
Nov 20th, 2007, 04:09 PM
another article where ana is mentioned on orf (for those who understand german :p ):
http://sport.orf.at/071119-493/?href=http%3A%2F%2Fsport.orf.at%2F071119-493%2F494bigstory_txt.html

http://sport.orf.at/071119-493/tennis_ivanovic_sharapova_catwalk_3k_ap_o.jpg

the article is about tennis players as fashion models and ana is mentioned as "serbian tennis wonder" who is the most sought after tennis player after sharapova for fashion photo shoots and stuff. the add for sony ericsson she did with hantuchova is mentioned as well as her deal with adidas.

ezekiel
Nov 23rd, 2007, 11:20 PM
Ana made appearance on a new tv talk show with Ceca , hopefully it shows up on youtube

http://www.novinepress.co.yu/vest.jsp?id=23971

ezekiel
Nov 24th, 2007, 06:30 AM
I was right :D
http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=VQtOCVj96M0

Cp6uja
Dec 2nd, 2007, 04:56 PM
Ivanovic, Szavay Set To Wow Budapest Crowds
Source: WTA official site (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=1907)

BUDAPEST, Hungary - On December 10, two of the brightest young stars on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour will go head to head in beautiful Budapest for the second edition of the KENO International Tennis Exhibition. The contest will see local favorite Agnes Szavay take on Serbia's Ana Ivanovic in a match which is sure to provide plenty of entertainment for the spectators in the Hungarian capital.

The emergence of Ivanovic as a major force on Tour was one of the most exciting developments of the 2007 season as the 20-year-old took the game by storm. Perhaps the greatest of the young Serb's long list of achievements was her memorable runner-up finish to Justine Henin at Roland Garros, although in a year which saw her collect three trophies and establish herself in the world's Top 5 there was certainly no shortage of highlights.

However, Ivanovic is not the only player to have experienced a significant breakthrough over the course of the last 12 months and her central European neighbor Szavay's ascent up the ranks was arguably just as impressive. The 18-year-old was one of the surprise packages of the year, breaking into the elite Top 20 and lifting two Tour titles along the way. Szavay started out the year ranked a lowly No.185 in the world, but 56 wins later and she finished it sitting pretty at No.19.

"I've been to Hungary many times before and I have good memories," Ivanovic said. "I'm happy that I can return and I'm also glad that I can play a match against Agnes as I've known her for a long time. I always take my matches very seriously and I will do my best at this exhibition as well. Nevertheless, I also would like to enjoy the game and hope that the fans will do so as well."

"This year I"ve beaten many top players and my aim is to do my best against Ana too," Szavay said. "This match is really important to me and not just because I get to play in front of a home crowd, but also because the Hungarian Tennis Federation celebrated its 100 anniversary this year and it would be a nice present if I could win the match against such a good player as Ana."

The KENO International Tennis Exhibition, hosted by PromoSport Ltd., will also be graced by several stellar names from the men's game, including Top 20 stars Ivan Ljubicic and Tommy Robredo and past legends, such as Henri Leconte, Mansour Bahrami, Miloslav Mecir and Karol Kucera.

jamatthews
Dec 5th, 2007, 05:07 PM
http://www.lta.org.uk/Newsroom/GeneralNews/GeneralNews2007/071205IvanovicAtNTC.htm?BSMGuid=55b6eab4-336b-478d-bad6-70c15554bbec

Ana Ivanovic has spent the last week training at the National Tennis Centre in Roehampton as she prepares to travel to Australia for the start of the 2008 season. The 20-year-old, who is the No 4 ranked player in the world, was born in Belgrade, Serbia, and now resides in Basel, Switzerland.

During 2007, Ana rose up the rankings from No 14 at the beginning of the year to the top 10 position that she occupies today. This progression was helped by recording three Sony Ericsson WTA title victories between May and September in Berlin, Los Angeles and Luxembourg. The right-hander also came close to picking up her first Grand Slam title as she made it to the final of the French Open and the semi-final of Wimbledon before falling to Justine Henin and Venus Williams respectively.

During her time at the National Tennis Centre, Ana took time out of her busy training schedule to speak to some of Britain’s talented juniors who were in Roehampton for a Talent Identification camp. The pro player fielded questions from the girls who used the session as a chance to find out what it takes to reach the very top of the game. Three of the questions asked were:

Q: What do you think the main differences are between top 100 players and juniors who are trying to make it there?

A: I believe that strength and fitness are both key factors but experience is also crucial. When I was 16-years-old I felt like my shots were as good as the professional players but I lacked experience and I found it hard to play two good matches in a row.

Q: What age were you when you started playing tennis?

A: I was 5-years-old but I don’t believe that there is one special age to start playing; everyone is different.

Q: Where is your training base?

A: I don’t really have one training base at the moment as I’m on the road so much playing tournaments. I like to train in Spain and Holland whenever I can and also in London now! The National Tennis Centre is an unbelievable facility which is right up there with the best places in the world.

Jazzi Plews, who is 9-years-old and was meeting Ana for the first time, said: “I loved meeting such a great player. I’ve watched her training during the last week and it’s been brilliant to see how good she really is. I want to be a pro when I’m older so seeing Ana play really inspires me to go out and train harder.”

http://www.lta.org.uk/NR/rdonlyres/0DA3835B-7226-4632-8A4E-16477502D150/0/IvanovicAna_140.JPG

dybbuk
Dec 7th, 2007, 07:03 AM
Not quite an article, but close to it I guess. Nastya Myskina wrote about Ana in her blog/column/whatever

I like Ana a lot. She is one of the most promising players on the Tour, and she had such a good season that I decided to write a bit on her.

Ana had been the player to watch for a while. And I had watched her matches even before we played each other at Roland Garros 2006. I won quite easily (62 63). Many were surprised by that score cos I wasn't impressive in my last tournaments. But I knew Ana was a real threat to me and I was prepared to play her. I knew before the match what to expect from her. Her main weakness back then was her backhand and I was simply loading that side during the whole match. Besides, Ana was not in great form, she was nervous and made a lot of errors.

Since then she's improved drastically. She became more mentally tough, she improved her backhand, volleying skills, she strengthened her serve. Technique-wise Ana is a well-balanced player today. At least, that was what I saw in Madrid (at YEC). She became much more consistent.
And I'm not surprised with her improvement. First of all, she's a very talented player but also (which is probably even more important) she's got a great team by her side. She's got a great fitness coach, her parents support her and it really helps when you've got people you feel comfotable with.

That's why I believe Ana will be all right. If she keeps playing, keeps working on her game like she does nowadays she will have a bright future. She's got a potential to become a real champion. She's physically strong and, at the same time, she can think on court. Yes, she hits hard, sometimes she relies too much on the power of her shots but she doesn't forget to move forward to the net to finish the point off. I think she is ready to win a Grand Slam and this should be her goal in 2008.

Credit to AnnaK4Ever (I think that's their username, the stat person, you know who I am talking about :p) for the translation.

azdaja
Dec 12th, 2007, 12:36 AM
nice words from nastya about ana there :D

Sleepwalker64
Jan 6th, 2008, 12:13 PM
Quite fresh and long - Novak and Ana interview

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/osm/story/0,,2234227,00.html

Novak & Ana


War-torn Serbia has produced the two most brilliant and beautiful players in tennis right now. They are funny, charismatic, and if they ever get together and have kids, the rest of the world may as well give up

Interviews by Emma John and Adrian Deevoy
Sunday January 6, 2008
The Observer

Novak Djokovic

Men's tennis in 2007 was all about one man: Novak Djokovic. At the start of the season, he was 19 years old and ranked 16th in the world. By the time he left Wimbledon - stymied in the semis by foot blisters - he was number three. But the moment that defined his stellar year was not, surprisingly, a win. It was his appearance in the US Open final, against Roger Federer, in September. Djokovic may have lost the match, but the sight of Maria Sharapova screaming him on from his guest box - with Robert De Niro alongside - confirmed he had something that Federer, whatever blazer-and-trouser combos he may concoct, will never be able to emulate: style.

Article continues
For a sense of Djokovic's flair, you could watch his Wimbledon quarter-final against Marcos Baghdatis, one of the most thrilling matches of the year, despite being five hours long, or the attacking play that defeated Federer in the final of the Montreal Masters in August. But that is only half the story. For the rest, see Djokovic's YouTube moments: his full-throated karaoke rendition of 'I Will Survive' at the French Open; his on-court impersonations of his fellow players, from a crotch-fiddling Nadal to a prancing Sharapova. Djokovic has charm and, crucially, wit, and has taken it upon himself to be Serbia's most winning, and most committed, ambassador to the world.

In his family's Belgrade office, in one of the city's ubiquitous concrete blocks, the young man who is the family business offers drinks with the kind of manners that would please your mum. I put it to Novak Djokovic that with his sporting ability, the four languages he speaks and the Monte Carlo second home, not to mention last year's $3.9m (£1.9m) prize money, he has to be the most eligible bachelor in Serbia right now. He laughs. There have, it transpires, been a few phone calls from hopeful mothers. 'Yes, that's one of the things that's happening now,' he says with a smile. 'But it's just part of the success. I'm happy, my family's happy, everything is going well.'

The evidence is around us. Djokovic's schedule for his three-day home visit is full of public appearances and private meetings, and the office is bustling. Uncles and cousins come and go, finalising arrangements for a charity event at the Belgrade Arena - one of the largest indoor stadiums in Europe - under the direction of Novak's dad Srdjan. Novak will be playing a doubles exhibition match with Ana Ivanovic, Jelena Jankovic and Janko Tipsarevic who have, in barely a year, effected nothing less than a revolution in Serbian sport. Until their recent successes, tennis ranked lower on the sporting consciousness here than volleyball, handball and water polo. Now it is challenging football and basketball as the country's most popular sport. Since the French Open, the tennis federation has seen a 40 per cent increase in people playing the sport and basketball courts are being hijacked by children wanting to hit balls over an imaginary net.

'Football has always been big here, even though we never achieved anything,' says Djokovic, who is a big fan of Red Star, the 1991 European champions. 'I love football and it's the sport I would really like to play. I've said on national television here that I would really love to play for one of our football clubs when I finished my tennis career. Everybody was surprised, but that's what I really want to do. When I finish, who knows? A couple of games, or half a season.'

Is he any good? 'Yeah!' What kind of player? 'Attacking. I like to score.' This makes sense: given his propensity to strip off his shirt for tennis fans, he would particularly enjoy the celebrations.

Anyway, who has the best body in the men's dressing room? He pauses to consider this quite seriously. 'Oh. Whooh. I would say, for sure, Paradorn Srichaphan. He has not been playing and I haven't seen him for a while. But he still has the best body in men's tennis.' Better than Rafa? 'Rafa? No, no... I don't like bodies like Rafa's.'

I ask if he has any bad habits. 'Breathing,' he replies. Er, right. 'It's something that's bothering me a bit. I still don't have the right breathing on the court, exhaling when you're hitting the ball. You lose a lot of energy if you're not breathing right. Maybe some yoga would help.' In 2005 he had an operation to fix what he calls a 'deviation' in his nose. Sounds weird. 'Yeah, it was! It was the worst time in my life. I was in the hospital and for three days I couldn't breathe because I had things in my nose, it was terrible. But the surgeon was from Italy and he knows how to do the job really well. He did nose surgery with Paolo Maldini and even Prime Minister Berlusconi. So he's pretty famous there.' Those are some important noses. Did he offer any, you know, shaping? 'Aesthetic wise? No, that was something they didn't offer.'

More than a hundred journalists turn up to Novak's morning press conference. With his white shirt tucked in to a pair of jeans, rimless glasses and his earnest responses, he has the air not so much of a sportsman as of a PhD student, or an accountant. Alongside him sit his two younger brothers, teenager Marko and 12-year-old Djordje, both promising players. Marko's shy, but little Djordje is not. When someone asks him who his tennis idols are, he replies: 'I like players from the past like Andre Agassi. But I like myself the best.'

Djokovic's own hero was, and remains, Pete Sampras, because, aged six, it was Sampras he watched win Wimbledon in 1993, jump- starting his love of the game. It is hard to imagine in what way punctilious Pete might have inspired such an extrovert. Djokovic laughs. 'We're totally opposite. Totally opposite personalities. Totally opposite game. But I just love the way he deals with the pressure. He always plays well, always serves well in the important moments. Mentally he was the strongest person I've ever seen. I'm just really sad that I still haven't had the chance to meet him. Maybe in the upcoming season in the States I will.' What will he say when he finally does meet him? 'I don't know... I'll probably say nothing for 10 minutes, I'll be so confused. Then I'll say, "Let's play!"'

One player he has befriended - ever since they began competing - is Andy Murray. You suspect they would make a pretty wild duo. 'Well, we haven't partied too much,' says Djokovic, looking almost demure. 'But on the court you can see how we're both playing with a lot of emotion. He screams a lot, and I throw rackets.' The pair have always been closely compared in ability and potential; but over the past year, while Djokovic has been fulfilling his, Murray has been left nursing injuries and kicking the sofa. Does that make things awkward between them? Novak looks momentarily sheepish. 'Actually, I lost his number.'

Perhaps he has the gossip on what is happening between Jelena and Andy's brother Jamie, who looked so cosy at last year's Wimbledon? He grins. 'No. But as soon as I see Jelena today I'm going to ask her what's going on. I heard she was denying everything, but I think I saw them at the US Open together, so I don't know.' And speaking of these things, what is the deal with him and Sharapova? 'There is no deal,' he says, though he is clearly not offended at the question. 'Obviously when you see her sitting there in the final of the US Open cheering for me you think, "What's going on?" But it's just a nice friendship.'

By 5pm, Djokovic has changed into a velvety brown suit, far more befitting his sex-symbol status, for Serbia's sports personality of the year awards, held at one of Belgrade's slightly shabbier hotels. Apart from a wrestler, a drag racer and a kayaking quartet, Djokovic's only real competition for the title comes from Jankovic and Ivanovic. At the buffet that follows her son's inevitable victory, his mum, Dijana, talks about the tennis academy that the family is hoping to establish in his name. 'The important thing is that the idols for young Serbs now are very good kids,' she says. 'They are people who really worked hard to get where they are now. They didn't steal, cheat, or kill somebody to get there. For 10 years it was so bad. The role models were gangsters, or drug dealers. Everything is changing.'

Afterwards, the Djokovic family head for dinner with one of their own idols - Alberto Tomba, aka Tomba la Bomba, the legendary Italian skier and multiple world champion. Djokovic's father Srdjan was a skier for the former Yugoslavia, and his parents met on the piste; throughout Novak's childhood they ran a pizza-and-pancakes restaurant in the ski-resort town of Kapaonik. While most professional sportspeople shun the slopes - because neither their coaches nor their insurance companies like it - Novak still skis whenever he can. So which is he: speed or style? 'I like to think it's a combination of both,' he says. 'But I try to have more style. I like to look nice on the skis.'

That Djokovic became a tennis player at all is something of a curiosity. As well as inheriting skiing genes from his father, his mother's family contained some serious volleyballing talent. 'Nobody actually played tennis in my family,' he says. But as he watched four tennis courts being built opposite the family restaurant, the five-year-old Djokovic was enthralled. Jelena Gencic, who opened the tennis camp there, is still coaching in her seventies; Djokovic often describes her as the biggest tennis influence in his life. Gencic remembers the day he first arrived to play. 'He arrived half an hour early with a big tennis bag,' she says. 'Inside his bag I saw a tennis racket, towel, bottle of water, banana, wrist-bands, everything you need for a game. I asked him, "Who packed your bag, your mother?" He said, "No, I packed it." He was only five. I said: "How did you know what to pack?" And he said, "I watch TV."' His mum Dijana says that even as a young boy he was a perfectionist. 'I always tried to win,' Djokovic agrees. 'I was as competitive as I am today.'

It was his tennis routine that saw the family through during the Nato bombing campaign in 1999. 'All our family were here in Belgrade during the bombing, and all day we were on court,' Dijana says. 'And this is what saved us. It wasn't any more or less safe than any other place in the street, but if you're sitting at home in the basement, thinking they are going to bomb your home, you're going crazy. It's not good. We were practising all day, and at seven o'clock we would go home and sit with the curtains closed, everything closed and dark the way it had to be.'

Sponsors weren't interested in a young Serb, even when he won junior European titles, so Djokovic's parents had to rely on their extended family for help. Perhaps that partly explains why Djokovic is so keen to be an ambassador for his homeland. 'He always feels he needs to act diplomatically,' says his coach, Marian Vajda. 'He loves his country.' And yet, ironically, his popularity has become so overpowering that he has to train abroad. 'Even to come to see his family is hard,' Vajda says. 'He gets so bothered. Last time we had a practice in Belgrade we had 20 people on the court, so I said no more. It's better for him to practise somewhere else. But of course he misses it so much.'

Belgrade Arena holds 20,000 people. Tonight, every seat is filled, and every person present - little boy, teenage girl, adult male - seems to have a fairly open crush on 'Nole', as they call him here. The other participants in the celebrity doubles match, Tipsarevic, Ivanovic and Jankovic, are announced to loud cheers. When Djokovic appears, however, the cheers turn to hysterical screams. Grown men hurl themselves down the stadium steps to get closer. The four greet one another as the old friends they are; Djokovic, living up to his heart-throb role, offers Ana an elaborate bow that ends on bended knee. The crowd loves it.

Although they played at different clubs, Djokovic has practised and played with Ivanovic since they were five years old. 'She's a fantastic girl,' he has told me earlier, 'one of the nicest I've ever met. She has such a great personality, very calm and very positive. And she's beautiful as well! She has a beautiful smile. She's attracting people wherever she goes because she's very bright and people recognise it and respect her.' Has she ever taken a game off you? 'No!' Then: 'I'm joking. Of course she has. But I could never play with her 100 per cent serious because I laugh with her more than anyone else. I really enjoy practising with her.' Who's better, Ana or Jelena? Djokovic is too gentlemanly to be drawn. 'I just say... I don't know! I wouldn't, because they're both playing great tennis.'

The exhibition match is only one set long, much of it a showcase for his on-court silliness and, of course, impersonations. At the end of the evening, Djokovic and Tipsarevic join the band to sing a popular, though puzzling, song about friendship (sample lyrics: 'I myself am a migratory bird'). Djokovic's voice is not what you would call tuneful, but right now he could release a recording of his tooth-brushing routine and still have a number-one hit. Maybe one day, he says, he could be a singer, or an actor. 'Or who knows what,' he says. 'I'm really enjoying my time.'
Interview by Emma John

Ana Ivanovic

Taking an early evening constitutional along the western shore of Lake Zurich, Serbian tennis star Ana Ivanovic is talking, 19 to the dozen, about the curious world she inhabits. Even the swans turn their heads the better to catch this 6ft 1in peach-skinned girl as she walks, and talks, and sips her large Starbucks takeaway. Then talks some more.

She is wearing skinny jeans, a bitter-chocolate leather jacket and a cream silk scarf. In conversation, as on court, she covers a lot of ground quickly. No sooner has she dispatched the subject of Robbie Williams than she is happily lobbing George Clooney into the conversation and skilfully volleying the topic of Slobodan Milosevic back over the net.

As we head up Zurich's old cobbled streets, she is talking about travel, which, as a professional tennis player, takes up 90 per cent of her time. 'I live in a suitcase,' she says, but you know what she means.

Ivanovic reels off the matches played and the countries visited in the past year alone, and you cannot begin to calculate the air miles and the WTA kudos she has accumulated. There was the Australian Open (she reached the third round), French Open (she lost the final to Justine Henin), Wimbledon (memorably beaten in the semis by Venus Williams) and the US Open (knocked out, fourth round, that Williams woman again).

Meanwhile, without so much as a sip of barley water, she was also off to the Tier I events. 'Tokyo, Miami, Berlin, Rome, San Diego, Toronto, Moscow,' she says in a resigned sing-song.

By the time we have meandered back towards Starbucks (she needs refuelling), it has been made plain that no matter how moneyed, mollycoddled and media-massaged these tennis princesses may be, most of them put in more court appearances per year than Pete Doherty.

Does your personality change once you're on court?
I'm more aggressive. It has to happen because if you're too soft you're going to lose. I'm very easy-going off court, but I really want to win once I'm walking on to the court.

At that moment, do you hate your opponent?
I try not to think about the person, just their tactics, their weaknesses and strengths. I play against the ball. It doesn't really matter who you're playing at that point.

Even if you're facing one of the Williams sisters?
That's a little harder. They play very aggressively.

Are you a bad loser?
Very bad. Even if I play backgammon with my coach I hate to lose. I won't talk to him for, like, an hour. So imagine how it feels when you lose at tennis. That makes me determined not to lose because I hate it so much. Even at a set down and match point I always believe I can come back.

But sometimes you must know it won't happen...
Sometimes. In Australia against [Vera] Zvonareva, I was 6-2, 5-1 and 40-0 down and I was thinking: 'Nothing's going my way today.' And when you're having a bad day, there are normally a lot of people watching, so it's sort of embarrassing.

What do you do half an hour before a big match?
I like to be alone and listen to music. Every match I play, I have a tune in my head over and over. It might only be a few words or a small piece of the tune, but it can drive you mad.

Can your mind drift during matches?
It's not always possible to concentrate completely, so you'll find yourself thinking about something someone said earlier. That's when you have to pinch yourself and get back to what's happening on the court.

Have you ever cheated?
No. Actually, I did once. I was a junior and there was no referee and I played against this Russian girl and she cheated so badly. She was calling balls out that were a metre inside the line. I was so angry, I thought: 'Every time she cheats, I'm going to cheat her back.' So I did.

Earlier this afternoon, Ivanovic made a fleeting appearance on the sports floor of an upmarket (this is Switzerland, they don't do downmarket) department store. As a resident of Basel, she is treated as a local in Zurich. Her approachability is appreciated and fans cluster around as she dispenses multilingual goodwill and free Adidas T-shirts.

Ivanovic's sponsorship deal with the sportswear giant was engineered - like her entire career - by her manager, Dan Holzmann, a Swiss-based German entrepreneur, who took on Ana when she was 14. He needed only two hours before deciding to invest the half a million dollars it would take to groom the naturally gifted girl. Within 18 months of her 2003 pro debut, Ivanovic had paid this seed money back. Holzmann continues to negotiate shrewdly - with Adidas, Wilson, Aqua Viva and Verano Motors - on his charge's behalf. With her global marketability and his business acumen, they make an enviably winning team.

Having remained unmolested for the duration of her lakeside date, Ivanovic is spotted by a few youths. They blush and jostle and, much like your reporter, ask her random questions that she claims to enjoy more than talking tennis tactics. 'Get it over the net and between the lines,' she says of her complex technical game. 'At the end of the day it's really that simple.'

Do you remember the war starting in Serbia?
No, I was too young, but I remember the bombing in 1999 [by Nato, during the Kosovo War]. That was something I'll never forget - the biggest shock of my life. My parents tried to keep it away from us, they wouldn't talk about it or put the news on. But schools were shut, nobody went to work, everything stopped. It was a bit scary, but people really stayed together and protected each other.

Describe your bedroom as a child.
When I was very young I shared my bedroom with my brother. He's four years younger than me. Later we had separate rooms. Mine was apricot-coloured - nice, eh? I was so happy because I had a TV in my room. I wasn't crazy about putting posters up of movies stars or singers. I only really loved Monica Seles - I so was obsessed.

Your parents must have found your tennis obsession strange...
Yes, firstly because I was such a clumsy kid. I couldn't run without knocking something over. Then I wanted to play tennis and no one in my family knew anything about tennis. Looking back, I really don't know what attracted me to it, but I still have a video of my first-ever practice, when I was five. Watching it now, there was a little bit of talent there; I could hit the ball.

Do you feel that you missed out on a normal teenage life?
Not really - I never liked going out to parties. Partying and drinking were never my thing.

Do you cry easily?
I'm quite an emotional person. I cry a lot. I do not like conflict, so if I have an argument with my parents I'll often cry. I become too emotional. I cried after I lost in the Stuttgart Open. Another bad day for me and she [Tatiana Golovin] played better than me. But there'll be plenty more opportunities.

The world's fourth-ranked woman tennis player insists on buying and fetching the foamy mugs of ubiquity from the Starbucks counter. 'I just love these places,' she says without a hint of irony, and if you were 20 years old and had gone from war-torn Serbia to itinerant tennis ace, you might feel the same.

Ivanovic is a wealthy woman these days - she won more than $3m (£1.5m) in 2007 alone. She wears Armani Code perfume, goes on regular frock-shopping raids with her lawyer mother (dad, handily, is an economist) and invests her sponsorship millions on the advice of top European businessmen.

Tall, beautiful, talented, minted. That's it, she's getting the next coffee, too...

Your website is among the most-visited of any female athlete. Which do you visit most often?
I shouldn't say Lime Wire [a music-sharing site], should I? I go to iTunes! And YouTube is always interesting. You can find anything on YouTube.

Who, to your mind, is the most attractive woman on the tennis circuit?
[Laughs] It's hard to say for a girl but... [Maria] Kirilenko. She's quite attractive.

Are women attracted to you?
Oh my God, I've had a few uncomfortable experiences but I'm so allergic to that. I just can't... even now when I see my friends and they just want to kiss the cheek. I prefer men.

Do you prefer men to be philosophical or funny?
I like men who are thoughtful, but overall I would prefer them to be funny.

Here's a funny but slightly philosophical joke: no matter how good you get at tennis, you'll never be better than a wall.
A war? Oh, a wall. Yes, that's funny.

Could you ever date a short man?
I know you should say it's about the person inside, but probably not. I'm tall and it's too difficult.

Why don't you just marry Novak Djokovic and have unbeatable tennis babies?
[Laughs] We're still so young. We're both just 20. We have many more years in front of us yet.

Are all Serbians good-looking?
As a people, Serbians are very tall, and we have olive skin and dark hair, which can look very nice. You have to be very beautiful to stand out.

Would you ever play tennis drunk for fun?
No, I've never done anything drunk. I'm an in-control person. I was tipsy a few times but I can't drink. I told you, I'm a real party-pooper.

Can what you wear affect your game?
It really can. You'll be wearing a dress you don't feel comfortable in or you'll think: 'These shorts keep coming down all the time!' You lose focus if you think your shorts are falling down.

Are you able to jump the net?
No, I'm not. I should learn.

You may need to do that at Wimbledon this year. Is there anything you wouldn't do in order to win Wimbledon?
Oh, I'd do so much that you can't imagine - as long as it wasn't really bad.

Sell your soul?
No, I need that.

Your grandparents?
I love, love, love my grandparents.

Eat a dog?
Eat a dog?! No, nothing that crazy. And I wouldn't do something like jump in the Thames naked. I'm just not that type of person. But you probably understand that by now.

A church bell sounds six. It comes from an elegant clocktower with a wide, round face. Standing beneath the steeple, like its human embodiment, Ana Ivanovic watches the young couples drift by in the fading sunlight. 'I'll have a family and live in my own home one day,' she says without emotion. 'But that's for the future.'
Interview by Adrian Deevoy

Fact file

Novak Djokovic

Age: 20
Ranking: 3
Career highlight: Beating the top three, Roddick, Nadal and Federer, in consecutive days in August last year
Biggest disappointment: Limping out of his 2007 Wimbledon semi-final against Rafael Nadal
Look out for: His powerful, angled forehand and his excellent banter at press conferences

Ana Ivanovic

Age: 20
Ranking: 4
Career highlight: Beating Maria Sharapova to reach her first grand slam final at the 2007 French Open
Biggest disappointment: Having to pull out of the WTA's Rome tournament last year with a knee injury
Look out for: Her strength from the baseline and upcoming appearances as a Unicef ambassador

Mr. Gospodin
Jan 12th, 2008, 06:31 PM
Ana confirmed to take part in Eurovision 2008:

http://img170.imageshack.us/img170/4352/eurovision2008participafg6.th.jpg (http://img170.imageshack.us/my.php?image=eurovision2008participafg6.jpg)



Ana open to love match:

http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/995/anaivanovicopentolovemalt6.th.jpg (http://img218.imageshack.us/my.php?image=anaivanovicopentolovemalt6.jpg)

kirilenko_ishot
Jan 12th, 2008, 09:27 PM
the "Ana Ivanovic open to love match" is pretty interesting esp when in reference to a melbourne romance she replies:
"The people are really kind, so you never know."


Home of cricket hosts tennis match

http://www.news.com.au/common/imagedata/0,,5839078,00.jpg

THAT'S the MCG all right, but not as we've ever seen it before. The stadium has played host to many spectacular events but never has it held a game like this.

For a sports shoe promotion, the top of the G's city end scoreboard was transformed on Friday into a three-quarter size tennis court, suspended above the 100,000 capacity ground and with the city skyline as a backdrop.

And yesterday four of the game's top players were lucky enough to enjoy a hit in this unlikely location.

Marcos Baghdatis, Ana Ivanovic, Alicia Molik and Brydan Klein played a game on the precariously perched court, but were too dazzled by the view to bother keeping score.

All four needed a detailed safety briefing before scaling dozens of stairs inside the scoreboard.

Molik stepped on to court with a bit more trepidation than usual.

spiritedenergy
Jan 13th, 2008, 06:53 PM
SonyEricssonWTAtour
Newsroom
January 12, 2008

Ana Ivanovic

Ivanovic Signs Landmark Contract With Yonex

TOKYO, Japan - Ana Ivanovic, who on Monday will rise to a career-high ranking of No.3 on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, has signed potentially the biggest racquet endorsement deal in the history of tennis. The 20-year-old has agreed to a four-year contract with Yonex and will use the Japanese manufacturer's products immediately.

"I'm delighted to join Yonex," Ivanovic said. "I spent a lot of time testing their racquets and was thrilled to discover that they add something to my game. It was the first time I was trying new racquets and it was a great feeling to be able to play so well with them. I'm very excited about playing with this new racquet."

Ivanovic will play with the black RQiS-1TOUR racquet. She will also use Yonex accessories, such as racquet thermos and grips. Both Ana's racquets and bag will have her name written/embroidered on.

"We are very excited to have Ana in our team," said Yonex International Division General Manager Wataru Hirokawa. "Yonex always demands young prospective players who can win Grand Slam titles and capture the No.1 ranking. We believe that Ana is the one who can do that in the very near future.

"Ana is not only a great athlete with strong passion on court, but she is keen to study finance at university; she always wants to improve herself. Passion on court and intelligence off court are characteristics that match our company image. Of course, she is also a very charming young woman."

Ivanovic added: "I love visiting Asia, and I'm looking forward to spending more time in Japan thanks to this agreement. That's another little thing that makes me very happy to sign this contract."

The agreement is the latest record-breaking deal for Ivanovic: her adidas contract is believed to be one of the most lucrative since Steffi Graf's retirement, while last summer she signed the biggest ever endorsement deal in Serbia.

Meanwhile, during the Australian Open fortnight, Ivanovic will write a daily diary that will be published in The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald, USA Today, on sonyericssonwtatour.com and her official website, www.anaivanovic.com.

Mr. Gospodin
Jan 15th, 2008, 06:56 PM
Who says "you know" more during interviews, Serena or Ana?
During an ESPN interview on Day 1 Serena kept saying "you know".
Ana said "you know" severeal times during her interview after her first match.


Serbian fourth seed Ana Ivanovic battles nervous start

Article from: Herald Sun
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,23059182-3162,00.html (http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,23059182-3162,00.html)
Dave Donaghy
January 16, 2008 12:00am

ANA Ivanovic last night revealed she would be battling internal, as well as external, rivals in
pursuit of her maiden grand slam title.
Ivanovic, 20, said she may have put too much pressure on herself before her match yesterday
against dangerous Romanian teenager Sorana Cirstea.
The Serbian fourth seed struggled through the first set against the 17-year-old before winning
7-5 6-3.
"Yes, I think so. It's been the case in the past years here," Ivanovic said.
"But, you know, today I won the first game and I had 40-love in the second game.
"I had 40-love in the third game, and I lost those games.
"Obviously, you know, stopped going for that much, trying more to put the ball in the game. She
came up with some winners.
"And instead of that, you know, I should just keep playing my game and keep being aggressive,
you know."
Ivanovic said she had to learn how to deal with the pressure she placed on herself.
"Yeah, obviously that's one of the things I'm still learning how to deal because all the
pressure I put on myself," Ivanovic said.
"Obviously coming into Australian Open I always want to do well here and I love coming here --
always a little bit extra pressure.
"But, you know, I really try to work hard. Once I'm on the court not to think too much about
it.
"You know, today, it's no secret I was in the first set a little bit panicking and trying to
find, you know, my game, you know.
"But, as I said, I'm really happy to be through. I can work on this for next matches."
Ivanovic will meet Tathiana Garbin in the second round after the Italian beat Greece's Eleni
Daniilidou 6-2 6-2.
The Serb said she had prepared for a tough fortnight of tennis.
"I had really good preparation in off-season and I feel very fit, you know, ready to go some
tough matches, you know, even tough conditions," Ivanovic said.
"Last week (Sydney) I played some good tennis; coming into this week feeling a little bit more
confident.
"So, you know, I think I can perform better than I did today, and that's all I'm looking
forward to."

Mr. Gospodin
Jan 15th, 2008, 07:00 PM
Was it necessary to have this online advertisement next to Ana's article?

http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/5840/jan2008voguefeb0820issusm8.jpg

Aussies have a sense of humour as well, eh?

Nikkiri
Jan 29th, 2008, 01:10 PM
A bit behind but i thought it was a nice article and thought i'd post it. :)

http://www.theage.com.au/news/australianopen2008/ivanovics-heart-of-gold-no-match-for-sharapovas-steel/2008/01/26/1201157740035.html

http://www.theage.com.au/ffximage/2008/01/26/majanadown_wideweb__470x337,0.jpg

Ana Ivanovic's charm won her the crowd's support but not the Australian Open final

Ivanovic's heart of gold no match for Sharapova's steel



THE L-plate driver crashed. She had a wonderful ride for 13 days, but Ana Ivanovic wasn't ready to win a grand slam tournament yesterday. She lost control of the wheel, and her forehand, late in the first set.

"I still think I have a lot of grand slam finals in front of me," said Ivanovic, who seemed to sustain minimal damage in her straight-sets bingle. "So it's just a learning experience and a learning process."

While Maria Sharapova is only six months older, the Russian has been on the road for many years. Maria has been driving longer, and she also is more driven. "She was in this situation more times than I was," Ivanovic said.

Sharapova had spoken of how she had been in a private "bubble," oblivious to external distractions. Her dad's throat-slitting motion after the Justine Henin match — offensive to others — was an in-joke between them. Her eye was only on the road ahead.

Ivanovic, however, had been with us. The public was invited along for the road trip. When she became teary on the podium, we felt her pain, as the Great Empathiser, Bill Clinton, would say.

If the "Aussie Ana" angle was somewhat overplayed — and it was a highly successful public relations exercise — it was clear that Ivanovic enjoyed the Australian Open as much as Australians enjoyed her company. There was genuine affection on both sides.

Ana's uncle was hosting a backyard barbie "celebration" in Mentone last night. "I hope they won't mention much about the match … because I don't know how happy I will be to talk about it. But, you know, still we gonna try to have fun. It was a great two weeks for me."

The brunette had more fun, but the blonde got it done. Private Maria was to celebrate with her "team", whereas public Ana gave the impression that we'd all be welcome at the barbie if uncle didn't mind. Sharapova, the seasoned pro, took care to thank the WTA's sponsor — which also happens to pay her about $US4 million ($A4.5 million) a year — and ticked all the corporate boxes before, finally, dropping the private shield.

Sharapova was the bookies' favourite, but not the crowd's. About 95 per cent of the audible barracking were exhortations to "Ar-na". Sharapova, eyes only on the white lines and the ball, didn't need them and probably wouldn't have heard them. She did "c'mons" herself.

They were on Ivanovic's side because she seemed warmer and more accessible — plus the Mentone factor. Ivanovic comes across as someone we might know.

Sharapova is 188 centimetres, athletic, articulate and tougher than Clint Eastwood. She earns $30 million a year in endorsements. She writes essays, and gets inspirational text messages from Billie Jean King. The Sharapova package is imposing. No one like that lives next door.

Measured against expectations, including her own, a Sharapova defeat would have been viewed as a train wreck, especially given she was steamrolled by Serena Williams in the final last year. As the L-plater, Ivanovic had less on the line. It is strange to consider that Ivanovic is now the world No. 2, ahead of Sharapova.

The Ivanovic camp was hardly dented. Sven Groeneveld, her implacable Swedish coach (is there any other kind?), even gave yesterday's failure a positive spin.

"I think she's done an incredible job to get where she's at and actually push — the only one really pushed Maria in the whole tournament. I know where she's coming from and I know where she's been and I know where she's going. That's all we're going to wait for."

Ivanovic had not been past the third round here until this year. "I want her to be very proud of what she achieved," the coach said.

Groeneveld's assessments were kind — Ivanovic made 33 unforced errors to Sharapova's 14. She was blessed that the score was as flattering, and that she was within two points of the first set (5-4, 0-30). Bereft of drama and unexpected turns, the final was flat.

Groeneveld's comments were predicated on an understanding of how far his player had come in a short time. Was she ready to win a slam yesterday? The question was rhetorical, and Groeneveld didn't really dispute the notion that Ivanovic was on grand slam training wheels.

"You know, you're facing a player like Maria, you will have to be ready. Do I think she can be better? I think she can be better. So, what is ready? I mean she's on the court, she's in a final, so you better be better. She was as ready as she could be."

She wasn't ready to win. And so she didn't.

kirilenko_ishot
Jan 29th, 2008, 09:10 PM
nice article
shows how much aussies have been converted into ana fans!

Mr. Gospodin
Feb 7th, 2008, 04:30 PM
Ana, Jelena and Novak to appear on post stamps in Serbia:
http://www.pressonline.co.yu/vest.jsp?id=29278 (http://www.pressonline.co.yu/vest.jsp?id=29278)


05.02.2008 , BEOGRAD
Izvor: PRESS


NOLE, ANA I JJ NA MARKAMA!

Naši najbolji teniseri dobijaju uskoro zaslužena mesta na srpskim poštanskim markama. U martu svečana promocija!

http://img144.imageshack.us/img144/2972/postagestampsn1.jpg
IDOLI MLADIH... Jelena Janković i Ana Ivanović

Likovi naših proslavljenih tenisera Novaka Đokovića, Ane Ivanović, Jelene Janković, Nenada Zimonjića i ostalih srpskih reprezentativaca uskoro će se naći na poštanskim markicama Srbije!

Ovu akciju pokrenulo je Javno preduzeće „Pošte Srbije", a likovni izgled markica do kraja februara osmisliće firma „Jugomarka".

Željko Ivanji, direktor Sektora za strategiju, razvoj i marketing „PTT Srbija", kaže za Press da su sportisti naš najbolji brend.
- Ima li nešto lepše od slanja pisma s likom nekoga ko je poznat u celom svetu! To je najbolja promocija za našu zemlju, ali i za same „Pošte Srbije". Ovo nije prvi put da se na ovaj način prikazuju uspesi naših sportista, ranije smo imali sličnu akciju s vaterpolistima. Odluka o izdavanju ovih markica biće doneta na narednoj sednici Upravnog odbora, a potom će preduzeće „Jugomarka" osmisliti likovni dizajn samih markica. Pre nego što nove markice pustimo u promet biće održana svečana promocija zajedno s našim teniserima - ističe Ivanji.

Srpski teniseri već su obavešteni o ovoj ideji, koja ih je iznenadila i oduševila. Goran Đoković, stric Novaka Đokovića, kaže za Press da su u stalnom kontaktu s predstavnicima Olimpijskog komiteta koji su im i otkrili ovu nameru.
- To su divna vest i lep gest Srbije. Čim bude urađen izgled markica, doći ćemo da ih pogledamo. Nadam se da će nam se svideti - kratko je prokomentarisao Đoković, koji je otputovao s Novakovim timom u Moskvu na Dejvis kup.

Ana Ivanović oduševljeno pozdravlja ideju „Pošta Srbije", saznaje Press od sagovornika koji je blizak porodici Ivanović.
- Ana je, naravno, obaveštena o celoj akciji. To je prelepa ideja. Izuzetno lepo i apsolutno pohvalno je što nikoga nisu izostavili, već će cela reprezentacija biti na markicama - ističe sagovornik Pressa.

Generalni direktor TS Srbije Dušan Orlandić kaže za Press da je ovakva akcija dokaz veličine naših tenisera.
- Ovo je izuzetno lepa ideja. Kada se nečiji lik nađe na poštanskoj markici, to znači da je on vrhunski u svojoj oblasti - naglašava Orlandić.


Translation:

Ana said it is a very beautiful idea and she is absolutely thankful that nobody was left out of the postage stamp.

The article states the source of the information was someone that is close to the Ivanovic family.

Maybe Jelena Jankovic was the source?

Mr. Gospodin
Feb 7th, 2008, 04:40 PM
News from Serbia states one of its towns is offering Ana and Jelena land for the construction of a tennis centre.

Mr. Gospodin
Feb 14th, 2008, 10:59 PM
Ana’s childhood tennis club “Partizan” is building a tennis stadium which will be named after her.

The club’s president, Dusan Grujic had many, many good words for Ana and her family. He stated Ana is the only tennis player in Serbia that never took a single Euro from the club, but on the other hand she truly gave very much to the club.

Mr. Grujic said that he can never be in a state of reality when Ana Ivanovic is in question. He recommended Ana’s place after her tennis career is with the club.


http://www.pressonline.co.yu/vest.jsp?id=29724

Ana news
Mar 31st, 2008, 03:35 PM
Ana’s Madrid dress sold for 2 200 Euros

An Austrian humanitarian dinner for Serbian children of Kosovo & Metohija was held at the elite Gazel club in Vienna where Ana Ivanovic’s dress was auctioned for 2 200 Euros.

The dress was created by Belgrade’s Verica Rakočević for Ana’s Year End Championship Madrid ball. The humanitarian dinner was hosted by Austria’s TV host, Dorotea Dodo Roščić, a native of Kosovo & Metohija.

The humanitarian dinner raised 17 000 Euros which will go to the organization “Mother of Nine Jugovićs”.


Source: Društvo - Aktuelno - RTS March 31, 2008 09:25


This is awesome. Ana is able to auction her dresses for charity while she is alive, well and playing. Anyone know how much it cost Ana to have the dress made?

Just Do It
Apr 9th, 2008, 09:45 PM
http://www2.wtaworld.com/showpost.php?p=12909598&postcount=3871

Gossip :devil:

mure
Apr 9th, 2008, 10:04 PM
yeah..ana obviously goes gaga over that guy...but he's like 40 years old :o

dybbuk
Apr 9th, 2008, 10:07 PM
yeah..ana obviously goes gaga over that guy...but he's like 40 years old :o

35 and gorgeous. :p

Mr. Gossip
Apr 10th, 2008, 04:44 PM
http://www2.wtaworld.com/showpost.php?p=12909598&postcount=3871

Gossip :devil:


Hi there JustDoIt,

I am Mr. Gossip. I started a gossip thread for Ana Ivanovic gossip, such as the one you have posted, athttp://www.wtaworld.com/showthread.php?t=339004

Feel free to post or ask questions regarding any spoken or printed gossip in English or Serbian. Add any photos sanctioned or not as well.

-NAJ-
Apr 16th, 2008, 06:28 PM
Srpska teniserka Ana Ivanović svojim donacijama omogućila je da se 15 škola u Srbiji uključi u UNICEF-ov program "Škola bez nasilja", saopštila je beogradska kancelarija UNICEF-a. Anini sportski uspesi nisu jedina pomoć Srbiji - prošlog septembra postala je nacionalna ambasadorka UNICEF-a kako bi pomogla poboljšanju uslova u kojima žive deca.

UNICEF-ovi ambasadori su poznate javne ličnosti iz sveta sporta, filma, muzike, ličnosti koje su spremne da učine sve što je u njihovoj moći da javno govore o problemima dece i mladih, da pomognu da se promeni politika prema deci i da prikupljaju sredstva za programe UNICEF-a.

Ana Ivanović je svojom donacijom omogućila da se 15 osnovnih škola u Srbiji uključi u program "Škola bez nasilja - ka sigurnom i podsticajnom okruženju za decu".

Ovom donacijom u program su ušle škole koje su se prijavile na konkurs i čekale da se obezbede finansijska sredstva.

To su škole: "Vera Radosavljević" iz Negotina, "Vladimir Rolović" iz Rakovice, "Dušan Radonjić" i "Prvi srpski ustanak" iz Aranđelovca, "Vuk Karadžić" i "Jan Kolar" iz Bača, "Ratko Mitrović" iz Čačka, "Milan Rakić" iz Medoševca kod Niša, "Milica Stojadinović Srpkinja" iz Iriga, "Sava Žebeljan" iz Kovačice, "Kupački partizani" iz Kruševca, "14. oktobar" iz Bariča kod Obrenovca, "Branko Radičević" iz Odžaka, "Desanka Maksimović" iz Kovina i "Ivo Lola Ribar" iz Sombora.

Svoju inauguraciju u nacionalnu ambasadorku za UNICEF Ivanovićeva je iskoristila da javno pozove biznismene i kompanije iz Srbije da joj se pridruže i donacijama pomognu program "Škola bez nasilja".

"Ovde se ne radi samo o novcu. Ovde se radi o nastojanju da se reše problemi dece. Zbog toga vas pozivam da mislite na decu. Pitajte decu da li su srećna u školi. Hajde da, molim vas, učinimo sve što možemo da im pomognemo", rekla je ambasadorka UNICEF-a Ana Ivanović.

/



short-Ana will help 15 schools in Serbia to make better conditions for children

SOA_MC
Apr 17th, 2008, 02:26 PM
Ana made #99 on this list
The Annual Independent Critics List of the 100 Most Beautiful Famous Faces From Around the World.

http://www.tccandler.com/columns/100_most_beautiful_women.htm

Cp6uja
May 3rd, 2008, 04:13 AM
Ana Revealed: Behind The Scenes With The Hottest New Face In Tennis
05/02/2008


By: Joel Drucker, Tennis Week

Ana Ivanovic is quickly emerging as the hottest woman on the tour — both off court and on. Now TennisWeek.com takes you behind the scenes for an intimate look at the Serbian superstar. The following feature is the cover story from the latest issue of Tennis Week Magazine.

"That’s just mean," comes the cry from Ana Ivanovic’s practice partner, Marcin Rozpedski, a 32-year-old local teaching pro. On practice court D at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden, site of the Pacific Life Open, Ivanovic has just thrown up a lob volley, forcing Rozpedski to sprint back to the baseline.

Ivanovic smiles, then shuffles back to field Rozpedski’s defensive lob. She strikes an overhead into a corner. Rozpedski tumbles after it to no avail. "You got me, you got me good," he says.

Though her brown shorts and white shirt make her look as lithe and unfettered as an undergraduate on spring break, Ivanovic’s practice is more of a study hall. Her head cocooned by her perpetual visor, she crisply drives a two-handed backhand down the line. Rozpedski replies with a crosscourt forehand, at which point the two exchange rolling topspin forehands.

Upon missing an easy backhand, Ivanovic exclaims, "Oh no." When she steps in and drives a forehand for a winner, she and her coach, Sven Groeneveld, lightly tap knuckles. The clean power Ivanovic consistently generates reveal strokes that were honed as a child in a court built at the bottom of an abandoned swimming pool — clearly a spin-free zone. Most striking is Ivanovic’s exemplary posture.

One of the most-respected coaches in tennis, Groeneveld is kindly but alert, experienced enough to view his charge as a long-term project. As Groeneveld sees it, Ivanovic is exceptionally "fresh," a sparkling gem two to three years from playing her best tennis.

On the side of the court sits Ivanovic’s mother, Dragana, with her left fist under her chin, paying intermittent attention to her daughter’s tennis while staring into the inviting blue sky of the desert. Dragana politely declines to be interviewed. Her thick, frosted hair and stylish wardrobe conjure up sphinx-like elegance and the attendant mystery surrounding a woman who has practiced law in Eastern Europe. It’s not likely she’ll ever be one of these parents wearing a warm-up suit.

Groeneveld and Dragana are the two leads in Ivanovic’s team, a group that’s a model for how a player positions herself for success. There’s also physical trainer Scott Byrnes, who over the last winter improved Ivanovic’s fitness and movement.

It’s a harmonious coterie, one that during the Pacific Life Open passed time at a local bookstore. Says the perpetually giggly Ivanovic, "You pick some books, you put it under your arm. You see it and just read and exchange our thoughts. Oh, is that book good? The problem is that every time I go there I want to buy so many books, but then I can't carry them. I always have overweight when I'm traveling, so I really have to be selective."

Away from the tranquility of bookstores, Ivanovic favors amusement parks. She’s particularly smitten with rollercoasters, at one venue going on six rides in two hours, a pace that left the coach who preceded Groeneveld in the dust. Jokes Ivanovic, “he couldn’t keep up with me.”

These are Ivanovic’s days of innocence and wonder, the grand period of ascent when she’s good and young enough to make a charge for the top, but unsullied by the painful losses and world-weariness that can turn a player sour. The 20-year-old Ivanovic is tennis’ current "It" girl, a silky smooth locus of attention for those who admire her not just her tennis, but also her youthful looks and possibilities as athlete, icon, fashion doll.

Says Tracy Austin, who won the U.S. Open at 16, "The key is organization, in putting things in capsules so that you can focus on the right things at the right times. She’s managing it very well."

But for all the pieces in place that control Ivanovic’s business, the biggest variable is the business of winning matches. It’s now evening at Indian Wells. Ivanovic’s round of 16 match has been reassigned to Stadium Three, a tight court holding 3,000 people. The opponent, Francesca Schiavone, is crafty, combining spin, power, guile and grit — light years removed from the clean-hitting baseliners that comprise the majority of Sony Ericsson WTA Tour players. It won’t be an easy match.

Ivanovic looks at her posse after just about every point. She loses her serve three times in a row, drops the first set 6-2 and in the second is serving at 1-2, 30-40 — and then ropes a backhand down the line, eventually winning the game.

"Her timing when it comes to hitting the ball was always very good," says Groeneveld. "I’m helping educate her, helping her become a true professional, a true student of the game."

Schiavone continues to confound Ivanovic with her variety. Far more than the big occasions on the show courts, these are the kind of knife fights that pose great implications for a competitor’s confidence — just another score in the newspapers, but a rite of passage a player will never forget. As Groeneveld no doubt repeatedly tells Ivanovic, it’s the ability to grub it out that makes a champion. Grappling with Schiavone is light years removed from any photo shoot, fashion show or any of the other glitzy opportunities that tumble into Team Ivanovic’s office.

She’s laboring heavily, striking balls long and into the net, misfiring on serves, tentative on returns. As Ivanovic prepares to serve at 4-5, Dragana exits. But Ivanovic holds for 5-all and takes the second set 7-5. Dragana returns. Up in the third, past 10:00 p.m., she holds a point for 3-1, gives her trademark clenched near-the-chest fist pump and says "This one!" Groeneveld chimes in, "Not this one — every one, every point!" Having picked up the pace and discouraged Schiavone, Ivanovic wins the third, 6-2.

Over the next five days she wins three more matches without the loss of the set to take the title, including her fifth win in six tries versus her fellow Serb, Jelena Jankovic, in the semis; and a forceful victory over formidable Svetlana Kuznetsova in the finals.


Watching TV at the age of five, Ivanovic saw an image of Monica Seles hitting tennis balls and the phone number of a local instructor. She wrote down the number, demanded tennis lessons and was soon playing as often as possible.

But there were other factors intruding on her life. When Ivanovic was eleven years old, NATO commenced its bombing raids on Belgrade. Says Ivanovic, "But then by the time you got used to it, you realized that they are not bombing just everything, only certain buildings. So after a month, I started practicing, and that was good because, during the practice you could not think about what was happening, you were getting into doing something else."

At 15, Ivanovic so greatly impressed Daniel Holzmann, a Switzerland-based entrepreneur, that he relocated her to Switzerland for more training. Holzmann also provided Ivanovic with hundreds of thousands of dollars in sponsorship money. The first time Holzmann saw her play a match, though, Ivanovic lost — and then spent four hours in the locker room crying in fear that Holzmann would drop her. He didn’t, and remains Ivanovic’s manager. She’s particularly proud that she has repaid every nickel Holzmann invested in her. "You wonder sometimes if she doesn’t want it too much," says Groeneveld.

A run to the 2004 Junior Wimbledon final, followed later that fall by a 7-6, 7-6 loss to Venus Williams in Zurich, rapidly earned Ivanovic raves. By the end of 2004, she’d soared 608 spots up the rankings, from 705 to 97. A year later, she’d cracked the top 20.

But it wasn’t just laser-sharp groundstrokes that raised Ivanovic’s profile. The 6-foot-1 Serb is a heartthrob, radiating a lucid, subdued sensuality that is preternatural and captivating without being too threatening. Though she’s attended her share of lively player parties and posed for many a photo spread, Ivanovic is determined to stay grounded.

During Indian Wells, Ivanovic was reading several books about the prominent psychologist, Sigmund Freud. Speaking one night after a match, she said, "Childhood has effect in forming the personality and how much it's important that you have actually nice control, parents, they can show you what's right, what's wrong, you can build your morals and personality of it. So now looking back, my parents did a great job."

As she heads into this year’s majors at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, having reached the finals last year in Paris and this past January at the Australian Open and risen to a ranking of number two in the world, Ivanovic knows the time to step up is nearing. "As long as I didn't believe it inside it was impossible for me to [win Grand Slams]," she says. "But now slowly I believe that I can do it."

For now, win or lose, Ivanovic will retain a large following. One night at Indian Wells, a group of eight topless teenage boys sat in the stands in rapture not just at her forehand. All were students at the Charlie Hustle Tennis Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. For $5, the group had bought a can of paint and adorned themselves with one of the letters of Ivanovic’s last name. The ringleader, Sam Martin, had an "N" emblazoned across his chest and three photos of her on his cell phone. At the next changeover, Sam led his entire squad in a cheer, "Ana, Ana, Ana!"

Getting out of her chair, hearing the chant, Ivanovic looked up for barely a second, then rapidly put her head down.

Another night she left the court mobbed like a rock star, fans thrusting Sharpie pens in front of her for autographs, others congratulating her for winning, another asking for her visor — which she promptly handed over.

Freed at last from the clutches of the crowd, Ivanovic headed to the locker room. As she made her way through the desert evening, Ivanovic was asked, "What would Freud make of all that?"

"I don’t know, I don’t know," she said, bursting into another bout of laughter. "I have to study more."

Cp6uja
May 20th, 2008, 05:33 PM
Exclusive Ana Ivanovic Interview - Part 1 (of 3)
By Valentine Uhovski Wednesday, May 07, 2008


So you think Ana Ivanovic faces a tough challenge on the tennis court? Well she’s still facing the challenge of finishing her education. In a revealing chat with Tennis Week.com’s Valentine Uhovski Ana shared some thoughts about her life and growing up and why she thought she’d like to become a shrink. Tennis Week will post the second and third parts of Ana's exclusive interview in the coming days.

Tennis Week: How’s school?
Ana Ivanovic: It’s been tough. I’ve been trying to finish my economy classes at the moment. When I go back to Serbia, I have to take few more exams. But of course it’s hard to balance and think of tests and studies where you’re competing and winning but education is extremely important, so I need to try to accomplish both and find a time. I don’t like math or numbers as much, so I need a tutor obviously to get me focused.

Tennis Week: What are your favorite subjects?
Ana Ivanovic: I love philosophy and psychology. I actually wanted to major in psychology, but that’s something that requires a lot more face time in school and in classroom. Maybe I’ll reconsider by the end of career, when I have more time! But I still love to read as much as can on those subjects whenever I have time.

Tennis Week: Did you ever really imagine being anything other than a tennis player?
Ana Ivanovic: Not really! I was watching, dreaming, and obsessing over tennis since I was 5. Before that, I’m not even sure if I had capabilities to imagine something else. But it’s surreal for my dream to actually come true.

Tennis Week: Everyone knows your story of growing up in Serbia in challenging times, and then moving to Switzerland to perfect your training. Did you ever feel like you were ever almost a dual citizen of both countries?
Ana Ivanovic: No, I’ve always felt Sebian at heart. It’s where I was born, where I have family, friends, following…It are where I grew up and feel attached to. Of course, I don’t know if I would have same career if I didn’t have an opportunity to move and have my current manager, trainer, and amazing facilities.

Tennis Week: Your parents are both successful professionals in their own right. How have their own schedules changed since you successful ascendance?
Ana Ivanovic: They’ve been so supportive. My brother in particular is my biggest fan. He actually stays up at nights to catch up with all my matches. But my father has traveled with me from early stages, and later when I started traveling abroad my mom became my companion because she was fluent in English, which was a great help! Obviously, it was tough for them to alternate between jobs and finding new ones, but I really appreciate their sacrifice.

Tennis Week: In your opinion, with your success as well as Novak’s and Jelena’s how obsessive has the whole country of Serbia has become due to your collective success?
Ana Ivanovic: We really feel their energy and support. Every time I speak with my father, he talks about the extensive articles his friends and he read about us. You really feel the following, the love, and the passion of our fans. It’s just amazing that they have so much to root for considering it’s such a small country. When we play anywhere, they show up with flags. I received few crazy fan letters, but I appreciate them all because basically without the fans, we’d have nothing to do.

Tennis Week: Do you always dine in the same restaurant during tournaments? Is that a superstition?
Ana Ivanovic: I wouldn’t call it superstition, more like regular rituals. If you like a certain place, the owners and the people are nice to you, why not come back for good service and energy?

Tennis Week: What are you latest obsessions?
Ana Ivanovic: Like every girl, I love shopping but with our crazy schedules you’re mostly bound to a hotel room and movies, books and your music.

(to be continue?)

azdaja
Jun 8th, 2008, 12:47 PM
this article from the rg website really needs to be posted here:
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2008-06-07/200806071212865406062.html?promo=hp_toparticles

Sweet Ivanovic finally shows a mean streak
Saturday, June 7, 2008
By Matt Cronin

Players with the sugary smiles and sweet dispositions don't always win Grand Slams titles, but new world No1 Ana Ivanovic proved on Saturday that just because she is a lovable personality does not mean that she cannot show a mean streak on court.

“I think once you are on the court, it's much easier said than done, but you have to be a killer,” Ivanovic said. “And you have to put them under pressure and show your presence. On and off the court it's obviously different. I still believe it's important to be a fair player and don't lose your appearance just because people might say you're too nice.”

This time, Ivanovic came in as the favourite and despite nerves was mentally stronger and technically sounder than her opponent Dinara Safina. This time, she did not leave the court chocking down sobs like she did in the Australian Open final against Maria Sharapova, when she felt like she was primed to knock off the Russian but made some bad decisions on key points.

“It was very tough loss for me, and I had few sleepless nights after that, honestly,” she said. “It's something I learned from. Part of me was already thinking about possibly holding a trophy. So this time I really tried to change that and don't think about that at all and just focus on my game. And there were some moments where this thought would still come up, but I managed to control it much better and to be aware of every moment of my game. That's something I'm really, really happy about today's game.”

For a girl who learned to play tennis during NATO's bombing of Belgrade, lifting the trophy in front of all France, the world and the now retired champion Justine Henin was ultra- special. “Seeing Justine today in the crowd, it made me feel really, really good,” she said. “I thought, maybe I can be like her, I can win a title. So it was really thrilling when she also handed me the trophy. She said, 'You deserve it and now it's yours.'”

Ivanovic became the first player to win her maiden Grand Slam title at Roland Garros since Anastasia Myskina in 2004, but appears to have a bigger upside. She is tall, strong and super ambitious and has reached the second week at all the other Grand Slams.

But it is on clay where she has been the most consistent and impressive, as growing up in Serbia, she learned to slide into her ground-strokes and in the past year, as she has grown fitter, is able to leg out point after point.

Once she matured emotionally and began to learn not to think ahead in big matches, it was just a matter of time before she could impose if not her "A" then at least her “B” game in a Slam final. But for a girl who spent much of her youth batting balls around in a drained swimming pool, it was still a remarkable achievement.

“I dreamt of this, but it was hard to imagine the reality of this victory, it's so thrilling and amazing,” she said. “You work so hard and you're, off the court, on the court, and you put so much effort into it. I loved the game and I enjoy playing, so this is the best reward I can get.”

Both Ivanovic's long-time manager Dan Holzman and her coach Sven Groeneveld have believed for a long time that Ivanovic could hide her smile during matches and unleash a rapid-fire fury. But they also see a genuinely likeable person who when she walked out on Philip Chatrier court for the final, offered to help a small boy who was carrying a large basket of flowers because it was too heavy for him.

“That's was typical Ana,” Holzman said. “She’s always helping, even in the final of a Grand Slam. Groeneveld could not sit in the friends’ box during the final as Safina also plays for the same equipment provider as Ana, but trusted that Ivanovic had grown up enough to show her independent streak. He does not think that Ivanovic has developed a cold, take-no-prisoners personality to be successful.

“If you look at Roger Federer, whom I admire for his personality and worked with when he was young, I see that his character is always the same,” said Groeneveld. “You don't have to obnoxious and rude to be a great champion. A lot of our great champions have been humble, soft spoken and strong characters and I think Ana fits in that category.”

Ivanovic leaves Paris as the new world No1, but promises to remain the same little girl who always wanted to hit another basket of balls in Belgrade. “I really try to be the same person and I still have friends from primary school and on tour I've seen people change with success,” she said. “I've always told my family and team around me that if I stop acting weird, just pinch me and bring me back, because it's important to have your principles. They haven't had to pinch me yet.”
forget the haters and their invented reasons to justify their hate. this is how ana is perceived by most people.

spiritedenergy
Jun 9th, 2008, 09:50 AM
From The Times
June 9, 2008
Ana Ivanovic gives Avram Grant winning feeling
The former Chelsea first-team coach has his hands on a trophy at last - the Serb's first grand-slam tournament prize

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00349/TTS096601CC185_349526a.jpg

Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent, Paris

A beaming Avram Grant was having his picture taken with a champion's trophy on Saturday. Before Chelsea supporters wonder if the Ricard has flowed too freely or the past three weeks were a miserable illusion, it should be said that their former first-team coach was holding the replica of the French Open winner's cup that will have pride of place on Ana Ivanovic's mantelpiece for ever.

Grant has been in Paris for the past couple of days as a guest of Dan Holzmann, an Israeli-born businessman and long-time friend, who dipped into his pocket to the extent of £15,000 a month when Ivanovic was 15 and he had been taken with her determination to strike it rich in the women's game. She chose to move to Basle, where Holzmann is based, and said that she would pay him back everything she owed over time. The fruits of that optimism were delivered in full here where she won her first grand-slam tournament title and became the latest No 1 on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour.

As Ivanovic emerged from the back-slapping throng in the bowels of the stadium, she walked across to Holzmann and Grant and hugged them both. “I am so nervous, look at my hands shaking,” she said. Holzmann simply told her that today was just the beginning. Grant smiled again - he does smile, you know.

He emphasised he has always had a great affection for tennis, that he attended Boris Becker's first Wimbledon victory, in 1985, that he would love to meet Roger Federer and that the sport presents to him a fascinating insight into the deepest psyche of an individual's personality and is so very different from having to mesh 11 people and their egos into a winning football team. “Ana is an exceptional person, so strong and determined,” Grant said.
Related Links

Ivanovic may not have been able to strut a grand-slam tournament final stage once, let alone three times, were it not for Holzmann's benevolence and the Serb remarked that it is “so amazing” that he did what he did for her with absolutely nothing but a hunch to go on. Holzmann admitted to having a tear in his eye at the conclusion of Ivanovic's 6-4, 6-3 victory over Dinara Safina, of Russia.

Now their thoughts turn to the grass. “It is so different, the points are so much faster, you have to be on the ball from the first point and I'm sure my fitness coach will have quite a few new moves for me to try,” Ivanovic said. “You can loop the ball up here, but not on grass. There are always a few muscle strains after the first couple of days.”

I love these articles:p

mure
Jun 10th, 2008, 09:48 PM
Ana Ivanovic given a heroine’s welcome by thousands of Belgrade crowd
‘I intend to stay at top’

“Ana, we love you!” shouted the thousands of Belgrade fans of Serbian tennis star Ana Ivanovic, greeting their heroine in front of the City Hall on Tuesday. One year ago to the day Ana was standing on the same balcony and then promised to soon get her hands on her first Grand Slam trophy. The 20-year-old Serb has even gone a step further – she not only won the last week’s Roland Garros women’s event, but, with the win, became the world’s number one.

- “I’ve been in the limbo between dreams and reality for the past couple of days. I occasionally need to pinch myself to make sure I’m not dreaming. It’s hard to believe you’re all here because of me. I was at the balcony last year too, but today it’s a special feeling. I did celebrate the title with my team back in Paris, but what I’m sharing with you right now is something special,” Ivanovic said with a quavering voice standing on the Belgrade City Hall balcony.
Ivanovic has achieved two of her primary goals – to win a Grand Slam event and to become the world’s number one. Ana reveals her plans for the future and announces how long she intends to remain on the top.
- “For a long, long time. I’ll try to stay number one as long as possible, but there are a number of other quality players out there who dream the same dream. It all happened in two days and there are no words to describe how I feel. What lies ahead of me is to work and train even harder,” says Ana.
Ivanovic starts her fitness preparations for Wimbledon as early as on Wednesday.
- “I’ll be appearing in London as the number one player in the world, which can only add up extra pressure, but I really want to think only of the next match I play and enjoy playing tennis, as I’ve always done. French Open is only a first step along the way and I certainly intend to win many more titles. I’m not pondering on what I’ll be doing after my career has ended; I am still in the early stages.
Ivanovic’s favourite playing turf is hard surface, as Ana reached the Australian Open final in January on that surface. She will appear at September’s US Open event, where the young Serb is expected to shine once again.
- “Of all Grand Slam tournaments, I like US Open the least, as you spend too much time commuting, and when I finally take to the court after a long ride, I already feel exhausted. There are many players who perform well at hard surfaces, like Maria Sharapova, the Williams sisters, etc.”
The world’s number one found a way to have fun in Paris when not playing tennis.
- “My team probably don’t want to hear about their walk in front of the Triumphal Arch anymore. As for gifts, I think the biggest one I received was the one I got at the dinner party. As any other girl I’d wished to go shopping, so I bought a few things, such as this Luis Vuitton dress I’m wearing right now.”
After beating Dinara Safina in the Roland Garros final, Ivanovic wished to share her joy with her loved ones, but they were hard to reach, perched high up in the VIP boxes of Philippe Chatrier court.
- “I had to go up there and there was no other way of doing that but to climb the linesman’s chair. I don’t even remember who gave me a hand; I just kept repeating, “I’m fine, I’m fine”. I just had to share the joy with my family and coaching staff, there was no way of stopping me.”

http://www.blic.co.yu/sports.php?id=2310

gaviotabr
Jul 23rd, 2008, 04:06 PM
There is an interview with Ana in my local newspaper. It's about the Olympics as it was published in a special about the games.

http://oglobo.globo.com/esportes/olimpiadas2008/mat/2008/07/23/musa_do_tenis_ivanovic_quer_coroar_melhor_ano_com_ ouro_em_pequim-547370364.asp

Sonho olímpico
Musa do tênis, Ivanovic quer coroar melhor ano com ouro em Pequim
Publicada em 23/07/2008 às 09h11m
Fabio Balassiano - Especial para o Globo Online
RIO - Boris Tadic, presidente da Sérvia, compareceu a sua festa de 20 anos e disse que era uma honra poder abraçá-la. Quem hoje olha para a número um do ranking mundial do tênis feminino, considerada a 23ª mulher mais sexy em 2008 e com mais de US$ 5,6 milhões ganhos em prêmios na carreira não imagina como foi a sofrida trajetória de Ana Ivanovic. Ao ver uma partida de Monica Seles na TV aos cinco anos, a menina decorou o número de uma escola de tênis de Belgrado e insistiu aos pais para que treinasse lá. Após a recusa, decidiu investir em si mesma batendo bola em uma piscina vazia.

Foi assim até os 11 anos, quando após treinar em meio aos bombardeios da Organização do Tratado do Atlântico Norte (Otan) em sua cidade natal Ivanovic recebeu a permissão de seus país para levar a carreira a sério. Tão a sério que agora a jovem de 20 anos, primeira do ranking e já com um Grand Slam conquistado (Roland Garros, 2008), chega aos Jogos Olímpicos com a esperança de trazer uma medalha a Sérvia, assim como seu compatriota Novak Djokovic, ídolo local e terceiro melhor entre os homens. Fã de sudoku e embaixadora da UNICEF para causas sociais em seu país, ela respondeu, por email, às perguntas do Globo Online em sua casa na Basiléia.

O GLOBO ONLINE: Como número um do mundo, como você descreveria os seus sentimentos antes dos Jogos de Pequim?
ANA IVANOVIC: Ser a primeira do ranking não muda em nada a maneira como eu enxergo a competição em Pequim, até porque venho pensando nos Jogos há muito tempo. Infelizmente não tive chances de atuar em 2004, e estou muito animada para participar das Olimpíadas pela primeira vez, principalmente porque não se trata de um torneio de tênis comum. Terei a oportunidade de encontrar com outros grandes atletas de modalidades que admiro como vôlei, ginástica e iatismo, e sei que me divertirei muito por lá.

O GLOBO ONLINE: É correto afirmar que o seu país jogará por duas medalhas de ouro no tênis, contigo, Jelena Jankovic (a segunda do mundo) e Novak Djokovic?
ANA IVANOVIC: Sem dúvida alguma nós temos chances de ganhar medalhas, mas acho que será extremamente difícil trazer dois ouros para a Sérvia porque em Pequim estarão os melhores tenistas do mundo, e todos vão querer uma medalha para seus países. Mas temos boas possibilidades.

Com a sua presença, de Jankovic e Djokovic nas primeiras posições do ranking, muita gente falou do crescimento do tênis no país. Foi apenas uma coincidência, ou é resultado do trabalho de base da Sérvia?
Não há muitas escolas de tênis no meu país, mas aos poucos elas estão passando a ter mais destaque. Com certeza a presença de Djokovic e a minha são meras coincidências, e não fruto de um trabalho de base bem feito. Mas ao mesmo tempo eu sei que temos uma população muito determinada e que as dificuldades que passamos quando éramos mais jovens, com bombas e guerras, nos fizeram mais fortes e com mais vontade para triunfar em nossas carreiras.

Depois da sua primeira vitória em Grand Slam, você recebeu o troféu de Justine Henin, ex-número um do mundo. Muita gente enxergou o momento como uma passagem de bastão, já que você assumiu essa posição após Roland Garros. O que aquele momento representou para você?
Receber a taça de Justine foi um momento muito especial para mim. Eu fiquei triste de quando ela se retirou do circuito, porque ela era uma grande atleta e alguém com quem sempre gostei de jogar. É lamentável que eu não tenha esta oportunidade novamente de atuar contra ela, mas eu estou feliz que ela fez esta decisão e está muito segura quanto a isso.

Seu país passou por um processo de independência tumultuado, mas agora vive em uma nova fase. Apesar de não viver mais na Sérvia, como você enxerga a situação por lá?
Foi um período difícil, mas parece que a situação melhorou muito e meu país está se desenvolvendo agora. Fiquei feliz com o resultado das últimas eleições (o democrata Mirko Cvetkovic foi eleito o primeiro-ministro em 27 de junho), mas ao mesmo tempo admito que não acompanho muito o mundo da política e não saberia falar muito sobre isso. De todo modo, procuro me informar falando com meus amigos que vivem na sérvia.

Você visitou o Brasil algumas vezes, e aparentemente admira muito o nosso país. O que Brasil e Sérvia têm em comum?
Adorei conhecer o Brasil quando joguei por aí cinco anos atrás. Foram ótimos torneios em São Paulo e Porto Alegre, e me lembro carinhosamente da alegria e da hospitalidade do povo brasileiro de um modo geral. Acho que a maior semelhança entre os dois países é a vontade de se divertir sempre.



A raw translation:

Olympic Dream
Muse of tennis, Ivanovic wants to crown best year with gold in Beijing

Published on 23/07/2008 at 09h11m
Fabio Balassiano - Special to the Globe Online

RIO - Boris Tadic, president of Serbia, attended 20th birthday celebration and said it was an honour to embrace her. Who today looks at the number one world ranking of female tennis, considered the 23 rd most sexy woman in 2008 and with over $ 5.6 million in career earnings in prizes do not imagine he trajectory of Ana Ivanovic. Seeing Monica Seles match on TV as a five year old, the girl memorized the number of a tennis school in Belgrade and urged her parents to let her train there. After she decided to invest in herself self hitting balls in an empty pool.

It was thus up to 11 years, when after training during NATO bombings in her hometown Ivanovic received permission to take the career seriously. So seriously that now at 20 years old, ranking the first and already a Grand Slam champion(Roland Garros, 2008), comes to the Olympics with the hope of bringing a medal to Serbia, as well as her compatriot Novak Djokovic, local idol and third best among men. Fan of sudoku and the UNICEF Ambassador for social causes in her country, she replied, by mail, questions from the Globe Online at her home in Basel.

The GLOBO ONLINE: As a number of the world, how would you describe your feelings before the Games in Beijing?
ANA IVANOVIC: Be the first in the ranking does not change anything in the way I see the competition in Beijing, because I thought about the Games for a long time. Unfortunately I have not had chance to play in 2004, and I am very excited to participate in the Olympics for the first time, mainly because it is not a common tennis tournament. I will have the opportunity to meet with other major athletes who I admire, as volleyball, gymnastics and sailing, and I know that I am going to have a lot of fun there.

The GLOBO ONLINE: Is it correct to say that your country plays for two gold medals of in tennis, you, Jelena Jankovic (second in the world) and Novak Djokovic?
ANA IVANOVIC: No doubt we have chances to win medals, but I think it would be very difficult to bring two gold medals for Serbia because in Beijing will be the best tennis players in the world, and everyone will want a medal for their country. But we have good possibilities.

By your presence, Jankovic and Djokovic in top positions of the ranking, many people talked about the growth of tennis in your country. It was only a coincidence, or is it the result of the basic work of Serbia?
There are many schools of tennis in my country, but little by little they are going to have more focus. Certainly the presence of Djokovic and I are mere coincidences, not a product of the basic work well done. But while I know we have a very specific population and that the difficulties we had when we were younger, with bombs and war, have made us stronger and more willing to succeed in our careers.

After your first victory in Grand Slam, you received the trophy from Justine Henin, former number one of the world. Many people saw it as a passage of the stick, since you took that position after Roland Garros. What that moment was for you?
Receiving the bowl from Justine was a very special moment for me. I was sad when she withdrew from the circuit, because she was a great athlete and someone I always liked to play. It is unfortunate that I do not have this opportunity again to play against her, but I'm happy she made this decision and is very safe about it.

Your country has gone through a difficult process of independence , but now lives in a new phase. Although you don't live in Serbia anymore, show do you see the situation there?
It was a difficult period, but it seems that the situation has improved a lot and my country is developing now. I was happy with the outcome of recent elections (the Democrat Mirko Cvetkovic was elected Prime Minister on June 27), but at the same time I admit that I do not follow the world of politics and don't know much about it. In any case, I try to get informed by talking about it to my friends who live in Serbia.

You visited Brazil sometimes, and apparently you like our country. What Brazil and Serbia have in common?
I loved to get too know a little bit of Brazil when I played there five years ago. There were great tournaments in Sao Paulo and Porto Alegre, and I remember affectionately of the joy and hospitality of the Brazilian people in general. I think the biggest similarity between the two countries is the desire to always have fun.

gaviotabr
Jul 23rd, 2008, 08:36 PM
Ana is going to take part in Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day again this year!

Demi Lovato, Colby O’Donis and Menudo will team with tennis superstars Roger Federer, Andy Roddick, Ana Ivanovic, Novak Djokovic and more for the 13th annual Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day presented by Hess. The popular full-day tennis and music festival for children and families – including interactive games, musical entertainment, and tennis clinics – will be hosted by MTV’s Susie Castillo and Nickelodeon’s Quddus. The festivities are set for Saturday, August 23 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y., from 9:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. The full-day tennis and music festival kicks off the 2008 US Open, which runs from August 25 - September 7.

http://justjared.buzznet.com/2008/07/23/neil-patrick-harris-sesame-street/

MarieC
Sep 12th, 2008, 05:32 PM
http://http://www.cnbc.com/id/26673516

Ana Ivanovic: A $100 Million Woman?
Posted By: Darren Rovell
Topics:Endorsements | Media | Marketing | Advertising | Sports
Sectors:Media
Companies:Nike Inc

Ana Ivanovic is certainly a very good tennis player and she's a gorgeous woman. Having risen to No. 1 at one point this year after winning the French Open, her first Grand Slam victory, Ivanovic's marketing power is on the rise.

So is the 20-year-old Serb the next big bet for the shoe and apparel brands to throw big money at?

Her deal with adidas runs out at the end of 2009, but sources tell CNBC that her management (DH Management's Dan Holzmann and Gavin Versi) are already hearing from companies who are interested in their client, who started out her career with Nike before switching to adidas.

The plan that has been pitched, according to those who have seen the proposals, is a lifetime deal.

Lifetime deals in the industry are typically deals that run to what is projected to be the end of the athlete's playing career. In this case, it's believed that what's being shopped around to Ivanovic's next shoe and apparel suitor is a 10-year guarantee with the potential for Ivanovic to earn additional money in her post-career life as a brand spokesperson.


The goal, insiders say, is for Ivanovic to have the ability to earn $10 million in some years from this brand if she plays in most tournaments, becomes No. 1 in the world and consistently wins. If that happens, the contract could be the most lucrative endorsement in the history of women's sports.

The challenge will be for her management team to get as much of that guaranteed as possible.

One source told CNBC that adidas is willing to play on the lifetime deal requirement at around $3.5 million a year for every year she satisfies the minimum playing requirements. Bonuses, it's said, could boost the deal to $5.5 million a year. That number could rise if Team Ivanovic agrees to renew well before the contract is up.

Sources said Nike has at least expressed initial interest. The company is committed to quite a stable of stars including Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. And any doubts that Maria Sharapova's recent injury would give her less status with the Swoosh were put out when Nike's Cole Haan announced this week that it would be using Sharapova to launch its Cole Haan Sporting line next year.

If there's a slot to fill, it could be the one that could come vacant if recent U.S. Open champ Serena Williams doesn't extend her contract with the brand. Williams' current contract could have been worth up to $56 million over five years, but fell way short due to Williams' inability to always stay at the top of her game. The fact that Nike [NKE 61.90 0.93 (+1.53%) ]hasn't used her in much of its advertising over the years could hint that they won't pony up much of a guarantee for a player who will turn 27 in a couple of weeks.

It's believed Ivanovic has a third suitor, which could be a Chinese company like Li-Ning, Peak and Anta.

More than two million Chinese play tennis at least twice a week, with the number expected to reach six million by 2010, according to figures released by the State General Administration of Sport in China. The administration also says that among people between the ages of 15 to 25, tennis is the second most played sport behind basketball.

Any brand that is willing to pay a big guarantee has to believe that Ivanovic can stay consistent. She lost to the No. 188th player in the world in the second round of the Open this year. It was the biggest upset to a women's No. 1 since 1975. They also have to believe that she has crossover appeal, which isn't that hard to research. She has 4.1 million Google hits and pictures of her, including one from a new shoot with FHM, are all over the Web.

The other value her management team can sell is her web site. There is no athlete in the entire sporting landscape who has a more updated site that that Ivanovic, who is giving her thoughts to her fans at least every couple of days. The site gets an impressive 900,000 unique users a month, which is extremely high for an individual athlete web site.

Update: One source told CNBC that adidas is willing to play on the lifetime deal requirement at around $3.5 million a year for every year she satisfies the minimum playing requirements. Bonuses, it's said, could boost the deal to $5.5 million a year. That number could rise if Team Ivanovic agrees to renew well before the contract is up. But, if those numbers are accurate, adidas might lose out in the battle for Ivanovic.

gaviotabr
Sep 12th, 2008, 05:41 PM
wow! Thanks MarieC, that's interesting!

So at the end of 2009 Ana might switch sponsors. Those adidas numbers are quite high and they finish saying that with this proposal, they might lose her. Wonder what is being offered to her by other brands.

SOA_MC
Oct 31st, 2008, 03:42 PM
Ana picks up another award
October 28, 2008

Ana has the most beautiful body of any sportsperson – male or female – according to readers of Die Bild, the biggest-selling newspaper in Europe.

The 20-year-old polled more than half of the vote (51 per cent) as she easily beat fellow tennis player Maria Sharapova into second place. American swimmer Amanda Beard was third, while footballer David Beckham finished fourth.

The award is the latest in a long line of accolades that Ana has received for her looks. The Age newspaper in Australia named her the best-looking tennis player of all-time; she has won the ******************** Sexiest Female Player award for the last three years, while she was the highest-placed athlete on the celebrated FHM 100 Sexiest Women in the World 2008 list.

Considering that she is a professional athlete, Ana is more concerned with her on-court achievements and she has been recognised in this area too during 2008. Earlier this month she won the Michael Westphal Award for “best tennis personality 2008”, as voted for by readers of German Tennis Magazine; in July the International Sports Press Association (AIPS) named her “Women's Tennis Player of the Year 2008”, and in March she was recognised by her fellow professional when they voted for her in order to win the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Karen Krantzcke Sportmanship Award 2007.

Asked to comment on her latest award during an interview in Belgrade, Ana was as humble as ever. She looked somewhat surprised when told the news, then commented: “It definitely flatters me. It is because of how I play tennis and due to the results I achieved on the tennis court, but definitely every girl likes to get a compliment and I am no different.”

“That’s why I am happy and satisfied about it. However I want to work very hard and achieve the goals I set, and they concern the tennis court.”

SOA_MC
Oct 31st, 2008, 03:46 PM
Ana winning Awards left right and center, on court and off court

Player of the year, Sportsmanship, Best Looking and now Best Body.

She's got it all:hearts:

Dodoboy.
Nov 1st, 2008, 01:24 AM
:inlove: :inlove:

kim86
Nov 12th, 2008, 02:26 PM
From anaivanovic.com forum, it seems she confirmed the relationship with Fernando:

Have you truly love or are just "good friends"?
It is true that I am in love relationship with Fernando! We became close still on summer grend Slam tournament in New York and then everything started. We are discovering each other, he is a nice guy and I am very happy with him!

The most beautiful world teniss player Ana Ivanovic exclusively for the Press recognized that in conjunction with Spanish counterpart Fernando Verdaskom! Beautiful Srpkinja, whom romance last day rumored all the world media, to settle only for our list and resolve the mystery of the on the first (known public) love!

Ana, in addition to the truth about the connection with Verdaskom, discovered and intends to spend the holiday in Spain, and her goal in 2009. year took another grend Slam tournament.
Worldwide story about your connection with colleague Fernando Verdaskom, that you bodrila the tournament in Doha.

Serbian version (http://www.pressonline.rs/page/stories/sr.html?view=story&id=51052&sectionId=44)

OC521
Nov 24th, 2008, 08:47 PM
Ana launches charity gift campaign
November 24, 2008 /


Ana is the figurehead of UNICEF’s Christmas gift campaign in Serbia. Together with basketball legend Sasha Djordevic, Ana is appearing in print advertising to promote the items, which are sold on a 100 per cent charitable basis.

“When I was a kid I used to receive UNICEF cards,” said Ana. “Now, I am sending them. It is a special pleasure to know that each UNICEF card and product, apart from making a person who receives it happy, directly helps at least one child.”

Items for sale in Serbia include teddy bears, greeting cards and toys such as the “Brio Ant”. Visitors in Serbia can buy the items by visiting the UNICEF Shop.

Funds raised through the gift campaign are used within Serbia to fund UNICEF’s priority programmes, which are aimed at promoting a rights-based approach to the survival, development and inclusion of all children from conception through adolescence.

There is a particular focus on the rights of those children who are excluded due to ethnic background, disability, poverty, violence, abuse or exploitation. Ana fronts the “School Without Violence” programme and she visited a Belgrade school earlier this month.

Source: http://www.anaivanovic.com/?path=start/news&detailpage=1366



http://img221.imageshack.us/my.php?image=anateddybearsn2.jpg
http://img221.imageshack.us/my.php?image=anasashatruckxp9.jpg
http://img391.imageshack.us/my.php?image=anaunicefcardsap1.jpg

Just Do It
Dec 2nd, 2008, 04:22 PM
http://www.blic.rs/sport.php?id=68200 Serbian.

Shortly, Ana is about to organize a wta even in Belgrade instead of Linz tournament, her manager said :eek:

_marial_
Dec 2nd, 2008, 06:45 PM
http://www.blic.rs/sport.php?id=68200 Serbian.

Shortly, Ana is about to organize a wta even in Belgrade instead of Linz tournament, her manager said :eek:

Oh no, not instead of Linz! It's always such a great tournament it would be sad if they wouldn't play it anymore :(

Ben.
Dec 2nd, 2008, 10:37 PM
Ana will be spending her Christmas in Brisbane...training for the tournament :)

Here's the link to the article:
http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,24742162-3102,00.html

lilimi
Dec 11th, 2008, 02:11 PM
Sport & Style by L'equipe interview.(9th dec,2008)
It took me two hours non stop to translate it. So if you want to post it elsewhere, please just say it was translated from French by lilimi.
I hope you'll understand my poor english, if you have problems, tell me. Sorry for the mistakes. I put (!) where i wasn't sure of translation...

Ana - Glam Slam


Born in a Yougoslavia in the middle of the war, Ana Ivanovic, 21, reached the first ranks of tennis. A gifted player, who won Roland Garros, it is another facet of this rough diamond that «*sport and style*» reveals : the one of a new ultra glamourous star we exclusively met in Moscow.

1m85, 67 kilos, a perfect ovale face. A peaches and cream complexion, a gracious silhouette, a devastating smile, sparkling eyes and a spontaneous kindness…Yet, it was a near thing for her(!). The most beautiful roses often grow at the most improbable places: it is the case for Ana.

Born in Belgrade in 1987 in an ordinary family, raised in ex-Yougoslavia, in the middle of the war, Ana’s life is like a novel. A novel about a young girl from the people, tennis player since the diapers’ age, and who one day becomes n°1. A novel about one of the most beautiful women we have ever seen on courts. A kind of Peau d’Ane meets Cinderella. Nevertheless, the beautiful brunette talks about herself with a mix of distance and ingenousness, and with a submachine gun flow that hardly matches her status of borning star.
One thing puzzles you when you first meet this pretty girl. Why tennis? Why this obsession? And why so young? «Yes, I was really young!(Laughs) 5 years old is so young! And maybe i began earlier, actually! When I was a child, i think i’ve never played with dolls, my hands were always busy with tennis balls or rackets. I have videos in which i must be 3 or 4 years old, and I am dancing…but with a racket! I obviously use it as a guitar! (Laughs)».
At that time, in the Balkans, Monica Seles was a big star who aroused many vocations. Ana remembers : «*I forced my friends to sign at the tennis school. I had memorized the phone number so that my mum could call them. As a result, my father saw i was addicted and he bought me a racket for my size. That’s how i ended up in this school*». The journey of a spoilt child, but who is highly motivated. In the middle of the war, at the end of the 90’s, she wakes up at first light, braves the danger and practices like a professionnal since 7 AM in … an empty olympic swimming pool. Not simple, when you’re 11 y.o. It reinforces the character, and the forehand.
So not everything was rosy in Ana’s life? You can harldy believe it today. «It’s true, it was complicated and difficult at that time. My parents didn’t have money, it was difficult to find a financing in order to set up a Professional career. In 1999, in Serbia, it was the war, there were explosions! I was telling myself that I had no chance to become Professional.*»

A mix of ambition and humility

Yet, the tennis gods, who are never far in Ana’s story, were watching over her. She admits : «* I was Lucky to sign a contract with my manager, in Switzerland. I immediately had the opportunity to travel, to participate in more international tournements, and thus, to face other players. I became aware of the fact that I could possible become a good Professional player. I liked this period!*». Her agent, Gavin Versi, confrims: «*Our boss, Dan Holzmann, was immediately seduced by the mix of ambition and humility thatemanated from Ana when they met. He read the determination in her eyes, and immediately offer to finance her career. He didn’t make a mistake*». In fact, Holzmann, who wasn’t a sport agent at all - but an orange juice Tycoon - created DH Manegement just for Ana. According to Versi, he (Holzmann) considers himself more as Ana’s friend than as her manager. After RG, he offered her Cartier earings!*». The die is cast(!). Ana has her Lucky star, and will have the right to make her place in tennis and, ultimately, a place under the sun.
From the hard years, Ana has kept a good nature. She easily laughs and has mischevious eyes. She knows how lucky she was, and the way she has travelled since the grey Belgrade of thge 90’s :*«*It’s a huge gap! I am more and more aware of this each day, and particularly since i had the opportunity to discover other countries, other places, other cities. Today I have the feeling that I just need to snap my fingers to have everything, like magic. It’s an unbelievable chance.*»
But Ivanovic is not the kind of person who forgets where she comes from. «*When I’m back home, I’m obviously aware of the difference. But things change there too, the situation evolves. Over the last years, Serbia has developped a lot. There are more and more positive initiatives, good things to hel people. It is changing, it’s different from the years of war and after-war. I feel good when I see that things are improving, that my country is better. Well, of course, we still can’t compare New York and Belgrade…*»

Happiness and success

Officially, Ana is a happy girl. Anyway, it would be difficult for her to make us believe the contrary, since she has everything : beauty, talent, succes, future. Nevertheless, now that she is famous, some often search for louses in her head(!!), and this irritates her : «* It’s a pity that the media mix all kind of things about me. When I see that I’m immédiately compared to Kournikova because I lost many matches in a row, or that people write that I don’t want to fight…It irritates me. Really! Because it’s not true! But I know I can’t do much against that. You must have your consciousness, and follow the path which is traced for you; to not let exterior things affect your work. Exterior pression is the worst.*» The answer? Ana is convinced that sometimes you have to get out of tennis to play better : «* You can be at 100% on court and go to a fashion runway. Where is the problem? It’s not a runway or glamourous photos that will distract you from your goal!*»
Funny lucidity and determination for a 21-year-old Young girl. From the begining, Ana’s strength is her family: «*they made things easier for me, it’s certain. Of course my parents, but also my brother. He’s four years younger than me, and he’s here, by my side, on court, since he’s a baby! At around 15, when I started to travel, my mother came with me. It was a big sacrifice for my brother who stayed alone for long weeks with my father! And year after year, their support never weaken : my father often looses his voice for having yelled too much for me during my matches!*»

To live Under the sun

Today she admits being more and more interested to the world of fashion and luxury: «*To be honest, one year ago, I didn’t pay much attention. But I’m a girl, and I have the right to like thes kind of things!(Laugh) I love to dress, especially since I spend a lot of time in sport outfits!*» A huge fan of Eva Mendes and Jessica Alba, Ana has a sober style concerning clothes : «*Honestly, I mostly search for clothes that correspond to me and that suit me. In the end, I prefer being confortable than being trendy but unconfortable! I read magazines, and spot clothes, shoes and bags like every girl!(Laughs)*»
Does Ana still have dreams? «*Sure!*» One is Professional: «*being n°1 again! And win the Grand Slam, that’s something I really want to achieve.*» Other dreams are personal: «*I’d love to have a house with sea sight! And also a boat, because i love sailing. Yes, that’s what i want: sea, sun, sand and to always live in summer!*» wher for instance? «*Sydney, why not? I love Australia. I have family there, and i like going back there. Maybe one day, i’ll buy a house there!*» A place where we don’t play tennis in swimming pools…

bruce goose
Dec 11th, 2008, 03:14 PM
Sport & Style by L'equipe interview.(9th dec,2008)
It took me two hours non stop to translate it. So if you want to post it elsewhere, please just say it was translated from French by lilimi.
I hope you'll understand my poor english, if you have problems, tell me. Sorry for the mistakes. I put (!) where i wasn't sure of translation...Lilimi,you made a very strong effort with your translation:smooch::wavey:

lilimi
Dec 11th, 2008, 03:25 PM
Lilimi,you made a very strong effort with your translation:smooch::wavey:
:hug: thank you, it's been two years since i haven't done such an exercise! i tried to keep the spirit of the article (to sum up: Ana is love! :lol: )but i'm afraid some parts must be weird as i use the dictionnary...

gaviotabr
Dec 11th, 2008, 04:19 PM
lilimi! I have no words to thank you for the translation! So I'll keep it simple and efective: Thank you so much! :worship:

jelenacg
Dec 11th, 2008, 07:32 PM
Thank you, I had no problem understanding your `poor` english :)

Cp6uja
Dec 19th, 2008, 04:41 PM
AUSSIE ANAmania (part 2009) is Continue :drool:



Aussie love affair with Ana Ivanovic returns
Article from: The Daily Telegraph (link) (http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,24820195-5012689,00.html)

By Nick Walshaw
December 19, 2008 12:00am

SHE'S the tennis phenomenon who started out in a disused swimming pool. The fighter with the risque sports calendar. A university student with Rolex and adidas sponsorships.

The most clicked sportswoman on the planet.

Serbian glamour girl Ana Ivanovic arrived on the Queensland Sunshine Coast yesterday all smiles, suntan and adventure stories from walking the Great Wall of China. And thank goodness for that. Because if ever Australian tennis fans needed someone to cheer for, it's now.

As Lleyton Hewitt sits at No. 67 in the world and Sam Stosur at 52. As our yellow ball brigade struggles so badly, some bloke named John Tomic is stealing all the headlines.

Which is why Brisbane International director Steve Ayles chased Ivanovic harder than a lovesick schoolboy with his poster. Convincing the world No. 5 to play his tournament from January 4-11 before contesting the Australian Open.

"Oh, Ana was the signature we wanted, definitely" Ayles tells The Daily Telegraph. "Not only is she among the world's most exciting players, she's also among the most marketable. When we spoke about Ana coming down here, she was really genuine. Asking questions about the stadium and so on.

"So while she might not be Australian, no overseas player has more chance of getting the Australian public behind them than Ana."

And little wonder. Because when it comes to complete sporting packages, there is none better than this smiling assassin who now lives in Switzerland.

This pin-up girl who speaks three languages, studies finance and, in June, enjoyed a brief stint at No. 1.

Ivanovic has the desire and grit of an Eastern European boxer. The confidence to play Andre Agassi.

And a body fronting magazine covers, TV commercials and the bedroom walls of almost any teenage boy capable of spelling "tennis".

Sure, she has her own 2009 calendar. Her personal website receiving more hits than any other sportswoman. But Anna Kournikova she isn't. Hasn't been since receiving her first tennis racquet at age five.

Or at 11, training in the bottom of a disused swimming pool while bombs fell in the sky around her.

Back then, NATO was trying to oust dictator Slobodan Milosevic while the little girl with that infectious smile practised. And now when Australian tennis needs her most, she's back.

Costanza
Dec 19th, 2008, 07:35 PM
Ana's here

By Peter Gardiner

It would be fair to say the Coast hopes Ana Ivanovic finds her stay on the Sunshine Coast to her liking.

The head-turning face of tennis, who will certainly will be the darling of the Brisbane International crowd packing into the new Rafter Arena from January 4, quietly set up camp on Thursday at the home of good tennis friends Josh Eagle and Barbara Schett in the lead up to the world number five’s latest assault on the Australian Open.

Ana, the reigning French Open champion and former world number one whose website has aced all her tennis rivals, will be staying not far from local tennis hero Pat Rafter.

Whether Pat, who the Queensland Tennis Centre main court in Brisbane is named after, will be one of Ana’s hitting partners during her stay, is not known.

But yesterday Josh, who is best mates with Pat and is his former doubles partner, confirmed he and Barbara have opened their doors to last year’s Aussie Open finalist.

“I got to know Ana while on the tour circuit and she is a good friend of my wife (Austrian star Schett once was ranked world number seven in singles),” the local tennis coach and television commentator said.

He and Barbara have had to leave Ana to her own devices as they are in Western Australia for a wedding. Then they head off to Austria for Christmas before Josh returns to commentary duties.

Ana has already been spotted running through Noosa National Park and is by all reports entranced with the local beauty.

The feelings are mutual for all those Aussie fans who have cheered her on since her heroics of last summer, where the Serbina turned giant killer to down Venus Williams in the Open semi-final 7-6 6-4.

It announced the start of a stellar year for a new dark-haired Venus with the killer forehand.

http://www.thedaily.com.au/news/2008/dec/20/Ana-Ivanovic-sunshine-coast/

Marilyn Monheaux
Dec 27th, 2008, 02:59 PM
Stunner enjoys racket on, off court
Margie McDonald | December 27, 2008

ANA Ivanovic made half of her earnings to date in just one year, 2008, and she will take some valuable lessons learned from last season into the New Year, along with her healthy bank account.

Ivanovic is also bringing a new racquet and new boyfriend to the Brisbane International, starting tomorrow week.

The Serbian only turned 21 last month and what a coming of age it was. She played in two Grand Slam finals this year, losing to Maria Sharapova in Melbourne but winning at Roland Garros, and moved to world No1 in the first week of June.

She won two other titles (Indian Wells and Linz) in 2008, to give her just over $US3.1million, with a career total of $US6.2m.

Ivanovic is world ranked No5 and is top women's seed in Brisbane, making it a Serbian double-act as Novak Djokovic is the men's top seed.

Add to that the fact Jelena Jankovic is sitting on top of the WTA's computer list and it's a pretty powerful Serbian outfit returning to Australia this summer.

The trio has pushed tennis above basketball and soccer as the most popular sport watched or played at home.

"Now when I go back to Belgrade, I always see kids carrying racquets in the street," Ivanovic said from Sunshine Beach yesterday.

"But there are not enough coaches for all the players there. Still, it's a great feeling knowing I've made a small impact.

"And all of us (Djokovic, 21, and Jankovic, 23) are still very young and we can have a lot more success and hopefully inspire even more kids to play tennis."

Ivanovic's runner-up finish at the Australian Open and semi-finals at the Sydney International mean she is already under pressure to repeat the success of last year.

"No one has bigger expectations than myself," she said. "I try not to put too much pressure on myself but I know I am capable of doing very well.

"In this case, though, it is very important not to get carried away and think about winning tournaments or defending ranking points."

But her consecutive top-five finishes in 2007 and 2008 make her a constant target for players trying to get to where she sits in the rankings.

"I think it's definitely harder to stay at the top," Ivanovic said. "Simply, there is more motivation for your opponents to beat you.

"When you are near No1 everyone has extra motivation to beat you so that's something to deal with in every match.

"Also, to be near the top you obviously have played quite some matches so the other girls know your game better than when you started coming up."

That has been one of the key lessons learned by Ivanovic over the past year. Keep the competition guessing just a little bit.

She changed racquets from Wilson to Yonex and her trainer for the past two years, Sydneysider Scott Byrnes, constantly revamps her routines to keep her fresh and motivated.

"I think my backhand has improved a lot, especially since I changed racquets this year," said Ivanovic, who is credited with having a stinging forehand.

"The Yonex gives me a lot more spin, which helps with my backhand. I can hit through it (ball) more freely and control it better.

"Aside from that, I think my net play has improved a lot and also my movement."

Winning her first Grand Slam at her third attempt (she was the first Serbian male or female to make a Grand Slam final, losing to Justine Henin at the 2007 French Open), also taught her to use the morale boost it provides.

"I have more confidence on court now," she said. "Because I achieved two of my biggest goals (Grand Slam and No1). I am now in a better position to deal with the next time I am in that situation."

She also had her greatest disappointment as thumb and then groin injuries in the second half of the season made for a frustrating time.

"I was unlucky with injury so I wasn't able to progress the way I wanted to," she said.

"I also learnt a lot about dealing with disappointment. Having to withdraw from the Olympics (thumb) was probably the toughest moment of my career so far."

Ivanovic is in for a tough time off the court after confirming her relationship with Spain's Davis Cup player Fernando Verdasco. The Spaniard will also play in Brisbane.

"It's something that comes with success," she said, on intrusions into her personal life.

"It's obviously not one of the better things about being a professional tennis player, but there is no point complaining or trying to avoid it."

She often confronts the public fascination head-on by doing glossy magazine photo and fashion house shoots.

"At the same time, I hope that people are more interested in my tennis than anything that is happening off the court," she said.

Ivanovic has recently bought a E4million ($8.2m) house on the Spanish island of Majorca, to use as a training base away from her home in Basel, Switzerland.

Ana will play her first round match at the Brisbane International on Monday 5 January during the night session, organisers have announced


Can't wait for her return:drool:
Anybody know where I can watch it? Not sure if ES is covering the early rounds or the tournament at all?

Costanza
Dec 28th, 2008, 11:04 PM
Here is something about Son Vida,where is Ana new house.
http://www.mallorcasouthwest.com/pdf/katalog-1008/katalog-son-vida-1008.pdf

gaviotabr
Dec 28th, 2008, 11:18 PM
Here is something about Son Vida,where is Ana new house.
http://www.mallorcasouthwest.com/pdf/katalog-1008/katalog-son-vida-1008.pdf

wow. Ana's house must have a great view!

SOA_MC
Jan 1st, 2009, 10:48 PM
Ana wins three awards from on the baseline.com

Fan Favorite of the Year - Ana Ivanovic
Charming both on and off court, Ana Ivanovic was not surprisingly named Fan Favorite of the Year. The congenial Serbian has a loyal following worldwide, all of whom were pleased to see Ivanovic win her first major and ascend to the number one ranking in 2008.

Humanitarian of the Year - Ana Ivanovic
Despite playing eighteen tournaments in 2008, Ana Ivanovic took time out for charity and humanitarian work. The twenty-one year old French Open champion is a UNICEF National Ambassador to Serbia and was nominated by the US State Department for its 2008 International Women of Courage Award.

Best Official Player Website - AnaIvanovic.com
Ana Ivanovic’s official website is the best source online for news about the Serbian tennis star. AnaIvanovic.com is arguably one of the most popular official websites of any female athlete.

http://www.onthebaseline.com/2009/01/01/the-2008-baseline-award-winners/

SOA_MC
Jan 3rd, 2009, 08:12 AM
Ana Ivanovic training hard for the start of her Australian campaign
Ivanovic begins quest for twin goals

January 03, 2009 SERBIAN stunner Ana Ivanovic is solely focused on a return to No.1 with a hot start to 2009 in Australia rather than pushing her claims as world sport's glamour girl.

Ivanovic will officially kick-start her campaign Down Under on Monday night when she plays her first-round match at the inaugural Brisbane International.

The tournament drawcard will face Czech teenager Petra Kvitova, the world No.50, at Pat Rafter Arena after the centre court was set aside for her in the opening night session almost a week ago.

Ivanovic has been training on the Sunshine Coast for the past fortnight to prepare herself for an assault on the Australian Open.

The statuesque 21-year-old, currently world ranked No.5 after an injury-hit end to last year, is motivated by her 2008 final loss to Maria Sharapova at Melbourne Park.

"I really want to take it one step further this time and hopefully win it," she said at the Queensland Tennis Centre on Saturday.

"But I think it's important not to think too much about the final and take it step by step and enjoy every match."

The No.1 ranking in the game, held by compatriot Jelena Jankovic, who is yet to win a grand slam event, is also at the top of her to-do list, and she is treating the Brisbane event as a key springboard.

"It's very important to start well and get your confidence and I set some goals for myself this season but my main goal is to try to be very consistent and to perform well at the biggest tournaments and then rankings take care of themselves," Ivanovic said.

"I've worked very hard and I believe I have the qualities to get back to No.1 position. It's going to be tough for sure but I can do it.

"I think it's very open. Especially in the last couple of months, women's tennis has been so close with the race for No.1 position and I think it's still in play."

Ivanovic grabbed No.1 last June after breaking through for her maiden grand slam title at the French Open.

Despite the slide, Ivanovic is still viewed as the most marketable women's player in the game with Sharapova.

Brisbane International organisers were quick to make the most of her to promote the tournament with a glamorous photo-shoot on the Kangaroo Point cliffs, wearing a platinum-coloured evening dress.

But the 183cm-tall right-hander, unfazed by the rain and gloom which saw the shot moved, stresses she's an athlete rather than a model and distances herself from talk otherwise.

On her fourth lengthy pre-season trip to Australia, Ivanovic and Spanish boyfriend Fernando Verdasco trained together in Noosa and she admitted they would look to use it as their training base again in the future.

"I want to be here every year. It's a great place to be and I love the beach and people are so friendly and so easy going," said the Brisbane top seed, who has family in Melbourne.

"In the morning when I first arrived from Europe, I woke up at 5.30am and I go to the beach and there are people working out and it's so inspiring to see."

Dexter
Jan 21st, 2009, 01:18 PM
Ana gets advice from the top

Wednesday 21 January 2009
By Helen Gilbert

Roger Federer has been labelled many things; legend, Swiss superstar, the Fed Express. Now he can add superb agony uncle to the list because, according to Ana Ivanovic, he is fantastic at handing out advice.

The No.5 seed made the revelation after her second round defeat of Alberta Brianti at Rod Laver Arena on Wednesday. Speaking during her post-match press conference, she said she often had “nice chats” with the world number two at tournaments.

“He gives me sometimes a nice advice,” she said. “It’s great because he achieved so much. I would love to have the opportunity to spend more time talking to him, because I think there are so many things I can learn from him, from his experience.”

Indeed, Ivanovic might like to pick his brains further over the next two weeks. At the moment the 21-year-old is without a full-time coach. She is working with Sven Groenefeld during the Grand Slam, but it can’t help to dip into the knowledge of a man who has 13 Grand Slam singles titles to his name.

Picturing Federer as an agony uncle is certainly new, but the Serbian thinks he suits the role perfectly. “He’s been, you know, in a position – I think in all positions you can image on a court, dealing with so much pressure, being in the position of No. 1 for so long. I think it would be great to have opportunity actually to speak with him a little bit more.”

So what’s the best piece of advice Ana has received from the cool-as-a-cucumber player who was presented with a cow in his home town of Basel after winning Wimbledon in 2003? Not surprisingly, it is to relax and not stress.

“I think one year at the US Open I spoke to him,” she recalled. “He said that you just basically have to enjoy and try to don’t think too much. Because I used to stress a lot about traveling so much and using so much time in traffic. He said, you know, you can’t change that. You just have to basically accept it.”

Ivanovic admits other people have told her the same thing, but for some reason a nugget of advice from Federer makes her sit up and take note. “When you hear it from someone like him, you know, it gets stuck much more.” Ana, we understand ...

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/articles/2009-01-21/200901211232524004687.htmlInteresting...

Fidello
Jan 22nd, 2009, 01:46 PM
This is so Ana
...As a junior, she was concerned when playing her pals because she feared that if she beat them too emphatically, it could end the friendship...
Article: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article5537091.ece

gaviotabr
Jan 23rd, 2009, 01:51 PM
Ana's presser... :o

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2009-01-23/200901231232630220937.html

Q. Didn't seem to get your form where you wanted to in the third set.

ANA IVANOVIC: She played really well. I thought so. I tried to come back. I fought really hard in the second set and had my chances. Had my chances in the first set and in the third set.

Unfortunately, in important points she played really well. You know, I gave my 100%. Today she was better. She came up with some unbelievable shots and unbelievable angles. I think she played the match of her career.


Q. How did you feel you're playing in comparison to last year?

ANA IVANOVIC: Well, it's very hard to compare. You know, obviously last year I was playing better and better through each match. Today I thought I was fighting really hard, and I had some unbelievable shots. She was playing really well and you come out with different opponents. So it's very hard to compare.


Q. You staged a remarkable comeback last year against. When you broke her back in the third set, did you think you were coming back again?

ANA IVANOVIC: Yeah, I believe until the last point I can still turn around the match. I did in the second set with a couple breaks down and a couple more breaks down. I really tried to fight very hard. I also thought I was a little bit unlucky with a few let cords that went out. Also, I was a little bit disappointed and my serve let me down in few important moments of the match.

Still, like I said, she played an amazing match. I gave my hundred percent, and I can only learn from this and try to work hard. Sometimes losses make you more motivated to work harder.


Q. She did play very well. Were you happy with your own level throughout the match?

ANA IVANOVIC: I thought the first set was lots of ups and downs. It was very hard to find the rhythm, because I felt like points were very short. It was either winner or unforced errors from both of us. That was a little bit disappointing and frustrating, because I tried to come up with longer rallies and everything. She's just the type of player that likes to hit the first shot and that's it.

So that was a little bit frustrating. Especially that I was 5‑3 up and serving for the set. After all, I just, yeah, tried to fight until the last moment.


Q. So how disappointing is this for you, or is it just another maybe roadblock?

ANA IVANOVIC: No. Obviously it's very disappointing, and I'm very, very sad because I really felt I could do well here. I felt physically fit. So it's really, really disappointing. I can just try to learn from this.

Like I said, sometimes losses make you more motivated to work harder, and that's definitely, you know, my aim.

I felt like I was in quite a good level. I just want to keep building on this. There is plenty more tournaments in front of me. That's a good thing about tennis.


Q. Are you surprised that after winning Roland Garros things have gotten more difficult?

ANA IVANOVIC: No. I expect it was going to be tough. Once you become No. 1 player, everyone wants to have a piece of you. All of a sudden you are the person with the target on your back.

You know, I just was with injuries it was really hard and a learning experience for me. I faced a lot of first‑time situations. It's a new experience for me as well. Lots of things I'm experiencing for the first time.

I just want to try to learn from each match I play, and this is definitely a tough one. It might sting at first. In the long run, I hope it makes me tougher.


Q. Have you got anyone in your entourage that's been in a situation like this? You're not working with a coach, are you?

ANA IVANOVIC: No, unfortunately. No one has experienced anything like this. I'm looking for a coach. We have already chat with a couple potential coaches. In the near future, I really would like to make a decision. I think it's important.

Also, without a coach for so long it's a little bit tough. You just need some direction sometimes. That's something I felt was missing in my game. Already for a while we're trying to look into some good possibilities.

Obviously, it's a hard one, so I want to make sure we get the right coach.


Q. You looked a bit nervous out there.

ANA IVANOVIC: Yeah, no. Today I was really not nervous. First match I was a little bit more nervous. Today, no. I really tried to enjoy out there.

Like I said, in the beginning I struggled a little bit with the rhythm, so that was something I was looking for, a little bit longer rallies. Otherwise no, I really didn't feel nervous.

Actually, I was feeling quite confident out there. After I won the second set, I really thought I could do it, I could win the match and turn it around. Yeah, she just played too good.


Q. Do you have any comments on the violence that happened today outside, and your thoughts on fans getting so upset they feel like they have to punch each other?

ANA IVANOVIC: It's very sad. I think sport is a great thing to bring people together. No matter from where you come from, it's important that everyone be enjoying and happy and enjoy the tennis or sport at all. I'm very sad to see these things happening.

Kind of every year here and there a little bit. I really hope in the future people can end this and appreciate the tennis and the hard work we put in and just enjoy it rather than have fights.

дalex
Feb 5th, 2009, 11:47 AM
Google translation of an article in Serbian:
Verdasco: Breaking up with Ana was tough for me (http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pressonline.rs%2Fpage%2Fstories %2Fsr.html%3Fview%3Dstory%26id%3D57813%26sectionId %3D44&sl=sr&tl=en&history_state0=)

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 11:50 AM
Google translation of an article in Serbian:
Verdasco: Breaking up with Ana was tough for me (http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pressonline.rs%2Fpage%2Fstories %2Fsr.html%3Fview%3Dstory%26id%3D57813%26sectionId %3D44&sl=sr&tl=en&history_state0=)

Uff.. Talk about Yellow press.. his interview to the spanish press had at least a dozen words less than this article claims that he said.

And the end of it.. :help::tape:

дalex
Feb 5th, 2009, 11:57 AM
Where's the interview in Spanish? I missed it...

It's a bit yellow, but Isa, you have to understand that I come from the "gossip central" that is JJ forum. :lol:

дalex
Feb 5th, 2009, 12:02 PM
This is not yellow press...:)
Ana: I'll come back to the top (http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.novosti.rs%2Fcode%2Fnavigate.ph p%3FId%3D13%26status%3Djedna%26vest%3D137230&sl=sr&tl=en&history_state0=)

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 12:05 PM
Where's the interview in Spanish? I missed it...

It's a bit yellow, but Isa, you have to understand that I come from the "gossip central" that is JJ forum. :lol:

It's not a bit yellow Alex. It's yellow all around.

I just wish the serbian press could have some fun with the pics of Adam Scott literally making out with Kate Hudson in January, and leave Ana alone! And they sure know how to put a dramatic spin in some very normal words from Verdasco.

Here you have Verdasco's interview:

http://www.20minutos.es/noticia/447688/0/verdasco/entrevista/semifinal/

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 12:06 PM
This is not yellow press...:)
Ana: I'll come back to the top (http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.novosti.rs%2Fcode%2Fnavigate.ph p%3FId%3D13%26status%3Djedna%26vest%3D137230&sl=sr&tl=en&history_state0=)

This is a very nice interview! ;)

jelenacg
Feb 5th, 2009, 12:07 PM
Well press and similar news papers they have like one normal article and then 20 stupid ones
But what can you do they need to write something to sell the paper

дalex
Feb 5th, 2009, 12:18 PM
It's not a bit yellow Alex. It's yellow all around.

:rolls:

I just wish the serbian press could have some fun with the pics of Adam Scott literally making out with Kate Hudson in January, and leave Ana alone! And they sure know how to put a dramatic spin in some very normal words from Verdasco.


It's not that big of a deal. They had articles about JJ getting married next summer and I think there are still people on this forum who think that's true. :lol: Press is the same everywhere, this is not just about Serbian media. Just look how they created drama about #1 talk before AO. I opened the thread in GM about it. It's ridiculous and funny at the same time.

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 12:24 PM
It's not that big of a deal. They had articles about JJ getting married next summer and I think there are still people on this forum who think that's true. :lol: Press is the same everywhere, this is not just about Serbian media. Just look how they created drama about #1 talk before AO. I opened the thread in GM about it. It's ridiculous and funny at the same time.

I think the last paragraph of the article is quite offensive.. it's offensive false gossip.. Very different to the Number 1 controversy or JJ's wedding.. that's not offensive. But yes.. there is such press everywhere. I just wish they would cut it out.. but that's too much to ask.

jelenacg
Feb 5th, 2009, 12:26 PM
Don`t even mention # 1 and all that crazyness about who is a worth #1 and how the order has been restored now :lol::help::lol:
But you are right press is the same everywhere
And kurir(also very `good` serbian newspaper) had a story about Ana and JJ not getting alone very well two days ago
I was like...you got to be kidding me,not again :):)

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 01:11 PM
Fed Cup press conference:

http://www.mtsmondo.com/sport/vesti/text.php?vest=123647

дalex
Feb 5th, 2009, 01:21 PM
I think the last paragraph of the article is quite offensive.. it's offensive false gossip..

Well, to be fair to Press, they did say that it's just a rumour no one is actually taking seriously. Although, I agree it's offensive.

Fed Cup press conference:

http://www.mtsmondo.com/sport/vesti/text.php?vest=123647

I hope it's true that no matter what Ana and JJ will play the doubles match.

Those two playing doubles is love. :inlove:

Even if they secure the victory in singles, they really should practice doubles in a competitive match so they can be ready for future FC ties.

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 01:25 PM
I hope it's true that no matter what Ana and JJ will play the doubles match.

Those two playing doubles is love. :inlove:

Even if they secure the victory in singles, they really should practice doubles in a competitive match so they can be ready for future FC ties.

I agree with you. I think they could use the practice. If they get a strong team in the World Group play off and they need the doubles, they could be in trouble without any practice. Especially if we think that neither plays doubles on the tour.. Ana is not a good doubles player, and JJ isn't one of the best either.. so any practice at this point is good for the team.

jelenacg
Feb 5th, 2009, 01:26 PM
Those two playing doubles is love
No matter if they win or loose just want to see them playing doubles
The title is great For those of you who wake up in 3 am to see their matches :worship:

jelenacg
Feb 5th, 2009, 10:11 PM
More about the new coach :bounce:
Has not yet decided who will be my coach, but the negotiations are at the end. Two candidates are left , whose names can not say now. I believe that will all be known for a week
http://www.pressonline.rs/page/stories/sr.html?view=story&id=57898&sectionId=44
This better be true

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 10:24 PM
More about the new coach :bounce:
Has not yet decided who will be my coach, but the negotiations are at the end. Two candidates are left , whose names can not say now. I believe that will all be known for a week
http://www.pressonline.rs/page/stories/sr.html?view=story&id=57898&sectionId=44
This better be true

Aiss.. so maybe we will know who the coach is in one week? Great.. maybe he can go with her to Dubai!

jelenacg
Feb 5th, 2009, 10:39 PM
That would be great,i really hope this is true

gaviotabr
Feb 5th, 2009, 10:56 PM
That would be great,i really hope this is true

Me too. I'm so curious about the coach. There are 2 posibilities.. I wonder who are they..

jelenacg
Feb 12th, 2009, 08:04 PM
James Blunt will perform in Belgrade on February 23rd and apparently he would like to meet Ana ,according to our journalist that was one of his wishes :lol:
http://www.mtsmondo.com/entertainment/vesti/text.php?vest=124451

gaviotabr
Feb 12th, 2009, 08:11 PM
James Blunt will perform in Belgrade on February 23rd and apparently he would like to meet Ana ,according to our journalist that was one of his wishes :lol:
http://www.mtsmondo.com/entertainment/vesti/text.php?vest=124451

:lol: That was a good one Jelena!

But Ana won't be around by then.. :lol:

jelenacg
Feb 12th, 2009, 08:15 PM
:lol: That was a good one Jelena!

But Ana won't be around by then.. :lol:

Well who knows,Dubai ends on 21.02
So she will have time :lol:

gaviotabr
Feb 12th, 2009, 08:21 PM
Well who knows,Dubai ends on 21.02
So she will have time :lol:

:lol: who knows? But I guess James Blunt will get only an autographed photo for being such a good fan! :lol:

jelenacg
Feb 12th, 2009, 08:30 PM
:lol: who knows? But I guess James Blunt will get only an autographed photo for being such a good fan! :lol:
We`ll see :lol:
Someone posted on her website photo i never saw before, from her practice in Wimbledon last year
I like the message on the shirt
http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/6444/wimbledonpratique23juincw5.th.jpg (http://img105.imageshack.us/my.php?image=wimbledonpratique23juincw5.jpg)
Ans since James Blunt isn`t spanish we don`t have to worry about any distraction :lol:

gaviotabr
Feb 12th, 2009, 08:34 PM
We`ll see :lol:
Someone posted on her website photo i never saw before, from her practice in Wimbledon last year
I like the message on the shirt
http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/6444/wimbledonpratique23juincw5.th.jpg (http://img105.imageshack.us/my.php?image=wimbledonpratique23juincw5.jpg)
Ans since James Blunt isn`t spanish we don`t have to worry about any distraction :lol:

:lol: True!

No time for love! :worship:

Mixo
Feb 12th, 2009, 10:10 PM
Well, in fact James Blunt is half-Spaniard xD I think he has been in Spain (concretly in Ibiza) more time that in his own country xDDD

Costanza
Feb 14th, 2009, 11:41 PM
Golf, girls and Gulfstreams for Adam Scott

HE'S ranked 17 in the world but Adam Scott is fast becoming golf's number-one playboy, linked to a string of sexy stars and now taking delivery of a $75 million jet.
Scott says the long-range luxury Gulfstream G450 business jet will give him greater access to the international golf circuit and ease the stress on his body.

The 28-year-old golfer, who has been captured frolicking on Hawaiian beaches with Hollywood star Kate Hudson, has dated some of the world's hottest women. Last month, he and gorgeous tennis star Ana Ivanovic kept each other company at Noosa.

Ivanovic is supposed to be going out with Australian Open semi-finalist Fernando Verdasco, while Hudson is on-again off-again with actor Owen Wilson. But Scott told The Sunday Telegraph: "Kate is just a good friend." (Ana :unsure:)
Over the past few seasons, Scott has played tournaments in 14 different countries and says it has been tough on his body.

"I think it is important to play everywhere, but it is also what I enjoy doing. Being from Australia, I don't have any choice but to travel," Scott said.
He follows in the footsteps of Greg Norman, who was among the first globe-trotting golf stars to buy his own jet.

Scott could have picked up a cheaper second-hand plane. But an endorsement deal with Gulfstream will help offset some of his expenses. He estimates the end cost to him will be around $1.5 million a year.

Scott will help pay for the jet by making promotional appearances and commercials for the company.

Scott has earned $US21 million ($32 million) so far on the PGA Tour. His international playing schedule has earned him many millions more. His Gulfstream endorsement package is in addition to deals with Rolex, Burberry. Titleist, Footjoy and EA Sports, all of which add about $10 million to his annual income.
After the World Trade Centre terrorist attack and plane hijackings, Scott was one of many golfers who leased smaller jets to play the US circuit.

Scott, who had seats removed on his jet to create more sleeping space, said he'll have his own pilot and will use an Australian company to manage the plane.

Meanwhile, Norman will fly his private jet from Florida to Perth to compete in the Johnnie Walker Classic -- his first tournament in preparation for his 23rd US Masters. Norman earned his spot in the Masters, his first since 2002, because of his stirring performance in last year's British Open.

Norman told a friend via email last week he was having a great time preparing for the Masters.

http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/story/0,28383,25054852-10388,00.html

gaviotabr
Feb 15th, 2009, 12:17 AM
Constanza.. what's the point of posting this article here? It's :bs:. They wanted to mention Ana, and talked about one day that Ana went to the beach with this guy as "keeping each other company".. :bs: And then finished it off with her going out with Verdasco which isn't even true anymore... shows how updated and informed they are.. :tape: Those Adam Scott quotes aren't even new.. he said them early january when they got him making out with Kate Hudson in Hawaii.

I'm sick of these Adam Scott rumours.. Ana's management team has denied them at least 4 or 5 times.

jelenacg
Feb 18th, 2009, 10:36 PM
Brit star gets refusal from Ivanovic :lol:
http://ontennis.com/news/brit-star-gets-blunt-refusal-ivanovic
No love for Blunt :lol::lol:

luv_sweetAna
Feb 18th, 2009, 11:18 PM
Brit star gets refusal from Ivanovic :lol:
http://ontennis.com/news/brit-star-gets-blunt-refusal-ivanovic
No love for Blunt :lol::lol:

:haha:

Doesn't hurt to try, right Blunt? :rolls:

Horizon
Feb 20th, 2009, 11:54 PM
Brit star gets refusal from Ivanovic :lol:
http://ontennis.com/news/brit-star-gets-blunt-refusal-ivanovic
No love for Blunt :lol::lol:
:spit:

Baby boy, Ana is way out of your league :kiss:

Cp6uja
Feb 25th, 2009, 01:27 AM
Today on official WTA site two articles is related to Ana:

About Ana & Rolex (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=3023)
About Ana at BJK Cup NY EXO (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/3/newsroom/stories/?ContentID=2811)

gaviotabr
Mar 11th, 2009, 04:02 PM
There is an interview with Ana today in Diário Lance, Brazil's most important sports newspaper. Nothing really new, but it's always nice to read an interview with Ana here. :D

http://www.lancenet.com.br/esportes/tenis/noticias/09-03-11/504887.stm?ivanovic-quero-passar-mais-tempo-no-brasil

This is a rough translation:

Ivanovic: 'I would like to spend some time in Brazil'
In an exclusive interview, the serbian muse speaks about challenges, injury and future

Guilherme Dutra
RIO DE JANEIRO

The serbian Ana Ivanovic is one of the world's leading tennis players. Known not only for her great talent on court, which led to the title in Roland Garros and the number 1 position in the rankings the last season, she also has beauty in her favor.

This year, Ivanovic faces a number of challenges, as the defense of the title in Paris and the attempt to recover the top of the WTA, currently occupied by American Serena Williams. She also has the task of, alongside Jelena Jankovic, lead Serbia in the Fed Cup.

In an interview with LANCE! , Ivanovic, who this week defends the title at Indian Wells - the tournament begins Wednesday, but her debut will only happen in the second round - talks about the challenges of the season, the controversy surrounding Israeli tennis players in Dubai, injuries, and even about Brazil.

LANCENET!: You led the world rankings after winning Roland Garros last year, but was overcome by Serbian Jelena Jankovic and now the American Serena Williams is number 1. How do you see the competition in 2009?

Sure, tennis is very strong at the moment. There are a lot of great players and many can get to number 1. It will be very difficult to go back there, but I am excited by the challenge.

L! NET: This year you will defend the title of Roland Garros. Are your head already in Paris, or you prefer to think one thing at once?

I am not thinking of Roland Garros at the moment because there are several big tournaments before, starting at Indian Wells. I don't think of defending titles. I prefer to get there as a new tournament and a new chance to win.

L! NET: Serbia lives a great moment in tennis, with you, Jankovic and Novak Djokovic. In April, the country faces Spain in Fed Cup. How do you see the duel?

It will be extremely hard. We don't have much experience in the Fed Cup at the highest level, so it is a great challenge for us, especially playing away. But we will play on clay and I am confident in winning this duel. About the crowd, I'm sure that there will be some Serbs there too and they always give us a large and noisy support.

L! NET: You had to withdraw of the Beijing Olympics because of a problem in your right hand. How is it for a top tennis player to have to be away from a tennis court?

Injuries are a big problem to handle. It is the most frustrating thing that can happen with a professional athlete. You have to accept that you are unable to play. I learned a lot when I was injured and I believe I'm in a better position to deal with it next time. But frankly, I hope there is no next time.

L! NET: In Dubai, the Israeli tennis player Shahar Peer had a visa to enter the country denied. Does the involvement of sports and politics worry you?

It is too bad. I have not seen Shahar since then, but I think she dealt well with it and hopefully I can meet her in Indian Wells. All players and the WTA showed support to her. I really hope this never happens again. It's not good to mix politics with sports.

L! NET: Looking ahead, do you see yourself doing something without involvement with tennis after retirement?

Tennis is obviously very important to me, then I imagine it is difficult not to be involved in any way when I retire. But I'm sure I'll do something different too, maybe in business.

L! NET: If not tennis, what would you like to have done?

If I were not a professional tennis player, I would do anything related to languages, I love that area. (Editor's Note: She speaks Serbian, English and Spanish)

L! NET: Have you ever been to Brazil? Do you think of going in the future?

Yes, one of the coolest trips I did was to Brazil, when I was junior. I played two tournaments. São Paulo is an amazing city and I had good times there. I like the mentality of the Brazilian people, which is relaxed and fun. I heard that the beaches of Brazil are some of the best in the world. I am a beach person and I would like to spend some time in Brazil.

Aww.. She likes my city! :lol:

spiritedenergy
Mar 11th, 2009, 04:39 PM
Sao Paulo:hearts:

gaviotabr
Mar 13th, 2009, 02:30 AM
Very nice article on Ana and JJ by Matt Cronin:

http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/9323238/Ivanovic,-Jankovic-have-sights-set-on-return-to-top?CMP=OTC-K9B140813162&ATT=199

Ivanovic, Jankovic have sights set on return to topby Matt Cronin, Special to FOXSports.com

Updated: March 12, 2009, 7:06 PM EST Comment

INDIAN WELLS, Calif. - The bloom is now off Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic.

In 2008, the Serbian roses enriched the tour's gardens with multi-colored successes and it's not easy to see them drying up and wilting this season.

Coming into this week's BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells — where Ivanovic is the defending champ — neither woman has won a 2009 tournament and both have fallen off the prestigious position they once held — ranked No. 1 in the world.

Now ranked No. 7, reigning French Open champion Ivanovic has just hired a new coach — Martina Navratilova's old tutor, Craig Kardon — in hopes that she can rediscover the confidence that made her the WTA's most talked-about player last June.

For her part, No. 3 Jankovic, who made major strides in ending last season in the top spot, is attempting to reverse the exhausting offseason training regimen that she said did not work for her and took away her most notable asset, her speed.

When they are at their best, they are two of the most emotive players on tour, a pair of effervescent personalities who are entertaining off the court and on. When they aren't hitting their level, all that's apparent on their faces is pure frustration.

"You cannot be fake," Jankovic told FOXSports.com. "It has to be natural. How you feel is what you express, what goes out of you. If I'm not really satisfied with my game and it's a struggle out there, I can't be smiling, and I almost want to cry. It's so difficult to be out there. When I'm happy you can see it, but I'm human."

Since winning the 2008 French Open and briefly taking over the No. 1 ranking, Ivanovic has been engaged in an exhausting uphill battle, injuring her right thumb, being forced to change her grip and unable to successfully compete week in and week out against the world's best. The dark-haired Serbian with the world's most effective inside-out forehand began to go backwards, and she couldn't stop chiding herself for a career that had begun to go awry.

"When you are feeling good about your game, you take it for granted," she told FOXSports.com. "When things aren't going so well you get more tense. You want to work and try harder, but it doesn't come straight away and that was frustrating. Lately I've been feeling a lot less pressure from the outside world and I realized that I want to feel that pressure again. It was a pretty tough few months."

Ivanovic says that Kardon is a great motivator and that things are going swimmingly. They have the same idea as to how her game should be developing, which means closing out points faster. He's direct and clearly tells her when she's doing things right and wrong. They've been focusing on repetition, which is critical for her, especially given that in the past eight months, she has often lost focus in trying to play points in too many different ways.

In her third-round loss to Alisa Kleybanova at the Australian Open, she'd hit a couple good shots, then find herself pulling back and not committing enough. She left the tournament disappointed, realizing that she was giving up too much of the center of the court.

She's not planning on doing that anymore and says that she knows deep down she has the talent to get back to the top. It's a matter of finding a style that suits her.

One of the 21-year-old's biggest problems has been her inability to leave her career on court and in the locker room. She was thinking about tennis way too much — before sleeping, at meals, in practice and sometimes by match time, her brain was sick of it.

"It gets to the point where it's too much and you need to have the balance to be able to switch it off when you get off the court," she said. "Ever since I became No. 1, I thought now I have to improve more because I have to stay here. What else can I do to improve? It began to be habit. Sometimes at night I would lie in bed and think about my game and it got to the point when I was on the court I felt I needed to get away from tennis a little. ... I'm still young and still learning but sometimes I want everything now."

Jankovic has the same drive for success, but she has been entirely dissatisfied with her year to date. She came into the season on top of the world, owning the No. 1 ranking and looking to win her first major. She proudly spoke of how much her lungs expanded after brutal offseason workouts in Mexico. But then her feet got stuck in the cement and she endured tough losses to Marion Bartoli in Australia, Amelie Mauresmo at the Paris Indoors and to Kaia Kanepi in Dubai.

"I don't feel comfortable on court and the results showed," she said. "Things don't always go the way you want them. I want to put the whole concept of my game together again."

Jankovic said she's not feeling the same pressure that she did last fall, when she went all out to finish No. 1 and proved to herself that she could perform under pressure. But she made a mistake in the offseason, when the endurance training she underwent turned her from a sprinter to a marathon runner. She can't get off the mark fast enough.

"I lost my biggest weapon and I felt so uncomfortable about it," she said. "At the Australian Open I felt I had 100 kilos on top of my body. I lost my speed and reaction. My body responded in a bad way."

Jankovic says she's been forced to tell herself to move, rather than playing with instinct, and given that it was her brilliant counter-punching and remarkable anticipation that brought her to the top, that's a troublesome development.

But she's working diligently to rid herself of the phantom 100-kilo albatross that's hanging around her neck and really, in the grand scheme of things, a two-month slump shouldn't be that much to worry about for someone who was born in economically depressed Serbia and is now living the dream of a successful international athlete. As high as she holds herself in esteem, even Jankovic occasionally stays grounded.

"Coming out of a small country and all these kids are starting to play and you've become so big over there, I've come so far," she said. "If someone told me when I began to play that I'm going to be No. 1 and so many people are going to come and see me play, right away I would have signed that contract. I want that life. It's amazing and it's been a great journey."

spiritedenergy
Mar 13th, 2009, 02:39 AM
Very nice article on Ana and JJ by Matt Cronin:

http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/9323238/Ivanovic,-Jankovic-have-sights-set-on-return-to-top?CMP=OTC-K9B140813162&ATT=199

Thanks Isabela very nice article about the Serbian sisters. Hopefully they can and will rise again;)

luv_sweetAna
Mar 13th, 2009, 10:34 PM
From http://www.mydesert.com/article/20090313/EVENTS10/903130344/-1/newsfront

Ivanovic eyes title defense

INDIAN WELLS — After winning the French Open and obtaining the No. 1 ranking, Ana Ivanovic's results began to take a dip after she suffered a right thumb injury. Now expectations are not as high for the BNP Paribas Open defending champion.

And Ivanovic doesn't like that.

“Lately, I've been feeling much less pressure form the outside world,” Ivanovic said. “I realize that pressure is a reward, so I want that feeling again. I want pressure again.”

While the pressure from outside doesn't affect Ivanovic adversely, it was the pressure from within that was eating her up.

A workaholic and a perfectionist, Ivanovic said when she became No. 1 she became obsessed with remaining there. And when Ivanovic's ranking began to drop following her injury, she continued to make it difficult on herself.

After winning the French Open, Ivanovic was 5-6 in her next six tournaments.

“Ever since I became No. 1, I said, ‘I have to do more, improve.' After practice, it was, ‘What else can I do to improve to stay in good shape?' Then injury came and I wasn't spending time on the court, and I was thinking, when I can start, I can do this and this. It became a habit,” she said.

“Sometimes without realizing, I was thinking about tennis. I was lying in bed and thinking about my game. It got to the point, when I was on the court; I need to get away from tennis a little bit.”

During that time, the independent Ivanovic decided she would need a coach to travel with her. She hired Craig Kardon, who has worked with Martina Navratilova.

“I just felt having a coach there and having a certain plan and strategy to follow, it will let me relax more and focus,” Ivanovic said. “That's why I was thinking about trying with a fulltime coach. And I knew what I was looking from a coach.

“I need balance — being 100 percent focused on the court and then switching off outside the court. That's also something I needed a coach to help me with. Craig is really good like that and I'm happy.”


However, Ivanovic said taking her mind off tennis is still not an easy thing.


“Sometimes if I would switch off, I would feel guilty, like time is ticking, I'm not doing enough,” Ivanovic said. “It's part of learning. I'm young and there are still so many things to learn and I'm aware of that, but sometimes I want everything now.”

Now, Ivanovic said when she's in bed, she tries to turn the focus off from tennis, “Thinking about beach, mountain, Sun, happy place.”

One happy place for Ivanovic is stadium court, where Ivanovic took the titles by beating No. 3 Jelena Jankovic in the semifinals and No. 2 Svetlana Kuznetsova in the finals.

“The first time I stepped on center court (this year), there were all these emotions coming back. It was amazing to have that,” Ivanovic said. “When I see the picture of me with the trophy, ‘Was that really me?' I really hope I can do well again because I enjoy playing here.”

If Ivanovic repeats, she would be only the second player to accomplish the feat since the women's tournament began in 1989 to win back-to-back titles. The other was Navratilova in 1990-91.

“It would be amazing for me to (repeat),” Ivanovic said. “I feel good about my game again, I feel I need matches again and I feel confident I can achieve that. To win another title would be really thrilling.”

jelenacg
Mar 17th, 2009, 11:46 PM
Very nice article
He knows Ana very well
http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=168230

Glass Half Full: Tignor On Ana Ivanovic
By Steve Tignor

INDIAN WELLS, Calif.—How will Ana Ivanovic spend the day before her match? She might lie in bed and listen to a smoothie like David Gray or John Mayer. Or she might read some of the Dalai Lama's advice on the art of happiness. Then she'll head to the courts and try to win some money off her coach by hitting five slice backhand drop shots in a row. Finally, she'll finish by sealing up a few Tupperware containers so she has something to eat after her match tonight. The life of a tennis star and global celebrity can be pretty low-key around these parts.

"I'd like to find a restaurant here that's open after 8!" Ivanovic says with a loud laugh and bursting voice that echoes around the players’ lounge at the BNP Paribas Open.

Ivanovic's press conferences are marked by fast-talking and big smiles.
Not that she's complaining. I doubt she needs too many tips on happiness from the Lama. Ivanovic is a glass-half-full kind of person all the way. The analogy itself is too dreary for her personality—why even ask? She'd just drink what's there and fill the glass back up.

When we met for an interview yesterday, Ivanovic said, "Hi, I'm Ana," and shook my hand. Not all the players shake your hand. Roger Federer, sure; Rafael Nadal, not at the beginning of an interview—when I talked to him, he seemed too ADD at that moment to get his arm all the way out—but yes at the end; Dinara Safina, no. When Ivanovic was led into the deserted lounge yesterday, she looked around and smiled.

"It's so quiet here, I love it." (Can her glass be very half full?) Ivanovic took a chair, sat at its very edge, and leaned her head toward each question as if she couldn't wait to get down to communicating. A phrase I've heard applied to certain happy people from my home state of Pennsylvania came to mind. They say that deep down, PA-ers, when all is said and done, "know that the truth is good." The look on Ivanovic's face makes you think she knows the same thing.

Despite her enthusiasm for other people—no pro has as much fun on a practice court with her coaches and none takes questions from the press with such a forthright eagerness—Ivanovic betrays some qualities of the loner. She reads a lot and likes to "lose herself in her thoughts" with her headphones on. She likes this relaxed and out-of-the-way tournament because "it's so nice to have time to yourself."

"Sometimes I wish I could get away from everything and go somewhere where nobody knows me," she says, laughing, of course; it's not a melancholy concept to her. If Ivanovic is a loner, she's a happy loner, not a tortured one. Being alone seems less an escape than just another way for her to enjoy herself, not all that different from running around a tennis court. The sport fits her; it's made for that weird paradox, the outgoing loner.

"But I know I can't just disappear."

"People everywhere know you now?"

"Kind of, yeah," she says, just smiling this time.

It's true, there's no disappearing for Ivanovic, especially when she's on the court. But getting away from it all crossed her mind more than once over the last six months as her results suffered. "I was a little tired of the game," she says, "and feeling a little lost on the court."

She says she had "doubts" out there. "I would ask myself, 'Should I play aggressive [the way Ivanovic says it—aggresseev—the word sounds, well, not all that aggressive] or hit with spin. After a point, I would think, what should I have played? I'd hit one ball one way and the second ball differently." You could see this most clearly at the Australian Open, where she was outhit by Alisa Kleybanova in a sloppy third-rounder.

A lot had happened in a short amount of time for the then-20-year-old. In the spring, Justine Henin had retired abruptly and unexpectedly. While that event allowed Ivanovic to win the French Open and reach No. 1—"my dreams"—it also put her a little ahead of schedule, according to her former coach, Sven Groenefeld, who has said that they weren't quite prepared to handle that success.

"I didn't feel the pressure of No. 1 right away," Ivanovic says, dismissing the idea that she was overwhelmed at Wimbledon by her new status last year. (Actually, "dismiss" is way too strong a word for how she speaks—"smiles it off” is more apt.) "I was just happy with everything all at once. The pressure didn't come until later, after I was hurt [she injured her thumb during the summer of 2008]. At the U.S. Open, I wasn't fit enough to play. These were hard times."

"Pressure" is a word that Ivanovic repeats many times in a conversation—not surprising, she says about three times as many words per minute than most other people. But pressure keeps coming up. The way she says the word, it sounds like she wouldn't know what it was, except that other people are always asking her about it. Still, early this year Ivanovic found herself missing it.

"At the start of the season, I knew something was wrong. I was too relaxed," she says. "Nobody was putting pressure on me anymore! I wanted it back. I know now it makes you sharper. It's a reward."

Though she has struggled since winning the 2008 French Open, falling from No. 1 to No. 7, Ivanovic remains a huge draw.
You can add pressure to the list of things Ivanovic loves. She loves playing tennis, she loves competing, she loves roller coasters, she loves the desert weather, she loves the United States, she loves the BNP Paribas because there's nothing going on, because she gets to "go home and chill out"—she's even found a way to love Coldplay (what won't she love?). And she loves working with her new coach, Craig Kardon, with whom she hooked up with earlier this year after she and Groenefeld split up.

"I enjoy so much working with him," she says of Kardon, ex-helper of Martina Navratilova. "He makes me confident"—another favorite word—"and he supports my aggressive game. We play lots of different games in practice, and we always make bets, which is so much fun."

Ivanovic says she has learned about herself these last six months. She's not utterly dependent on her entourage—she looks to them during matches but doesn't lock eyes with them the way, say, Henin did—and she doesn't need a coach to tell her everything. But she does need someone to back up her own ideas of her game, so there's no confusion in her mind when she's out there alone.

"The coaching relationship gets very intense," she says, "but you're still by yourself on court." Ivanovic thinks she has turned a corner, gotten back to basics—aggresseev-ness—and the world will see the results soon.

"My goal this year is to win a Grand Slam." This was somewhat more ambitious than what Safina stated as her 2008 goal on Sunday: "To stay healthy."

We'll see what happens. Ivanovic has been up and down in the tournament so far, but true to her word, she's been forcing the action, and she's too superior an athlete to lose to many lower-ranked players when she does that. But if she goes down to Flavia Pennetta tonight, we'll be talking about the Serb’s demise all over again.

Beyond her game, what's most interesting about Ivanovic is her stealthy intelligence. As I've said, she's a motor mouth, and it's hard to believe she can think with any depth at that speed. Her conversation can sound something like this, from her presser after her opening match:

"NoobviouslythereweresomethingsIwantedtoworkon. Oneofthemwascomingtothenet. ButIactuallyfeltreallyshortoutthere." Pause to see if anyone catches the joke. No. Nobody could follow her. So she gives the explanation: "I got lobbed a couple of times." How did she work that joke in there? There's more depth of mind in Ivanovic than you might believe possible at first. It's heartening to think someone this sunny on the outside can be quick and thoughtful and not angry on the inside. Maybe the truth really is good.

We know the sport is better off with Ivanovic winning. That's not because she's good looking, or not just that. It's because, when she's hitting her smooth, aggresseev shots and trying out her happy fist-pump, she makes the sport itself look good. Tennis is not just for quiet masters like Federer or fired-up superjocks like Nadal or ultra-confident competitors like the Williamses. It isn't just for loners, either. Ivanovic shows us it can be for lovers, too.

gaviotabr
Mar 17th, 2009, 11:56 PM
Finally! I couldn't open this thread somehow..

Thanks Jelena! That's a great article!

Ana is just so lovable! :hearts:

jelenacg
Mar 18th, 2009, 12:05 AM
Finally! I couldn't open this thread somehow..

Thanks Jelena! That's a great article!

Ana is just so lovable! :hearts:

Yes she is :hearts::hearts:
I really liked article,you can`t read many article as this one
They usually just write the same old stuff
NoobviouslythereweresomethingsIwantedtoworkon :haha::haha:
It`s seems things are going very well with new coach :angel::worship:

spiritedenergy
Mar 18th, 2009, 12:07 AM
Ok it's here now:lol: Thanks Jelena:wavey:

I really like this article, the writer is amazing, and it matches with how i think Ana is.:kiss:

gaviotabr
Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:19 AM
Ana's presser after yesterday's win! Thanks to Blahar, from Ana's web.

March 20, 2009


Ana Ivanovic

INDIAN WELLS, CALIFORNIA


A. IVANOVIC/A. Pavlyuchenkova
6-2, 6-3


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Tonight you didn't allow her to show her game, but do you think that Pavlyuchenkova can be a dangerous player?
ANA IVANOVIC: Yeah, definitely. She can be very dangerous. She's been playing really well. She had a great run had week, you know, beating lots of top 10 players. That's very good and should give her a lot of confidence.
She's very young, and she has a lot of things still to learn and improve. She can be a tough player, definitely.

Q. It's been tumultuous with ups and downs over the last 12 months. How does it feel to be back to almost the site where it all began?
ANA IVANOVIC: Yeah, I feel great. I mean, I've been really practicing well over last few weeks, and have good confidence, you know. During my practices. But I obviously wanted to transfer that into my matches.
That's what I've been doing this week, so I'm really, really happy with my performance.

Q. That was maybe the best late match in a tournament you've had where you've actually beaten someone decisively.
ANA IVANOVIC: Yeah. I mean, I was really happy with my performance. She's not an easy opponent, especially -- she doesn't give you much rhythm. Going into the match, I didn't know anything about her. I haven't actually seen any of the matches she played.
Yeah, I just tried to do my game and to play my game and be aggressive on her serve, and that helped me a lot to be more or less on my service game and win a couple of them easily.

Q. So what's been working for you since you've been here stroke-wise that maybe wasn't working last month or the month before?
ANA IVANOVIC: Um, I just feel much more confident overall with my game, with my aggressive game and stepping forward, coming to the net often.
You know, before I had lots of chances to come in and finish points with the volley, but I kind of wasn't committing enough. And now I feel more confident to do that.
That's something that's been biggest difference I think since, you know, probably French Open.

Q. After reaching No. 1 and winning the French, why do you think, by your standards, you've struggled the back half of the last season?
ANA IVANOVIC: I think there's been a mixture of lots of things. You know, yeah, it took me a while to actually understand what's been happening, and for French Open and for position No. 1 to sink in and realize these kind of things.
Wimbledon I was really emotionally flat, and it was very hard for me to bring myself to that high level like I was at the French Open.
Then after, I've been struggling with injury. It's been frustrating at times, because, yeah, I was expecting myself to do straightaway -- when I was feeling healthy to play at a same level I was, but obviously that wasn't the case.
I needed some time to get back into competing again and get my rhythm back. That was really frustrating. Obviously after you have some tough losses you sort of lose a little bit confidence in, you know, in your abilities and the things you've been doing.
I haven't had clear picture about the way my game should be, and now I feel I have that back. I know what I have to do, and some days I may make more mistakes than the others. But that's the game that brought me so far, and that's the game I have to stick with.

Q. The way you talk about your confidence and level of play, where do you feel you are right now compared to, say, last year at your best?
ANA IVANOVIC: Yeah, I think at the moment, I'm physically fitter than I was last year, and my strokes are a little bit more powerful.
Um, there are still areas I want to work on and improve, and I think there is room for improvement. But overall, I feel a little bit better in all areas, yeah.

Q. And the confidence? Where's that at? Where's that at compared to last year?
ANA IVANOVIC: Obviously, you know, victories I had this week helped me with my confidence. Because coming into tournament I was very confident the way I was practicing, but still wanted to prove that once I was actually on court competing. Because it's different kind of nerves once you're out there. I'm really happy and I feel much more confident.

Q. What is it about the desert that you like so much?
ANA IVANOVIC: Um, I enjoy playing here, really. It's so relaxing. You know, everything is so easy going, and organization, it's great. We have a lot of courts for practicing, and I think the balls also fly faster here. That's something that I like.
Yeah, dry heat, I like playing in heat.

Q. Can you talk a little bit about playing Zvonareva and how you're going to approach that?
ANA IVANOVIC: It's going to be tough. I think she is very confident at the moment. She's been playing really well end of last year and the beginning of this year. I just -- I have -- I think I have, from the first point on, to be there and try to be aggressive and move forward, you know, like I've been playing so far.
Yeah, and it's going to be for sure a tough match, but I look forward to a challenge. It's going to be a good test.

Q. If you win this tournament, are you going to invite your hitting partner, Marcin, to Paris again?
ANA IVANOVIC: He's definitely going to come to Miami, and we're going to see, because he also has some commitments here and everything. He's been really good and really helpful. I enjoy working with him, like I was talking about.
Yeah, we will see.

Q. Can you talk about your serve? Have you been working with Craig on it? It seems like your service speed is up a bit on the first serve, and the kick serve seems to be working a little bit better, too.
ANA IVANOVIC: Yeah, I've been working a little bit on my serve, because I sort of lost a little bit rhythm on it. My ball toss was going all over the place.
Still, sometimes I occasionally toss it really bad, but that's something I've been working on, and trying to commit more and to jump more into my serve and put more effort, actually, in it. But I've been serving much better in my practices, as well. I still have to keep working on it and still get more confidence.
My speed, like you said, it's up, and I'm going for more of the flat serves than I've done in the past. So it also gives me confidence, but there is still, I think, room to build up.

Q. When you've played Vera in the past, I know last year you had some comfortable wins against her, and then she was able to get you at the Championships. Can you see what's been different with Vera and how she's evolved as a player up till now?
ANA IVANOVIC: She can be very dangerous player. Against her, I had -- I think that was probably -- you asked me that question the other day, if I played like a perfect match in last eight months, and I think that was one of the matches I played really well in Linz against her. It was perfect. I think I had hardly any mistakes and was really hitting the ball well.
That's something you have to do against her, you know, to try to dominate and come more forward. And don't give her any chances, because she likes also to use the pace of her opponent. If you sort of don't commit to your shots, she can move balls really well.

Q. Walk us through your day tomorrow. Is there anything physically you're going to do to prepare for the final?
ANA IVANOVIC: No. I'm going to practice, do lunch, and just relax. It's really nice here. I mean, with my coaches, I went on the putting range next to the hotel.
So we do have some fun (laughter.) But, you know, I get upset because I always lose. I'm so bad. So maybe I get revenge tomorrow. (laughter.)

Q. There's been a lot of great champions who have won this tournament, but the only one to win it back to back was Martina Navratilova. Can you talk about the prospects of going for your second straight title here?
ANA IVANOVIC: Oh, that would be amazing. I mean, she's such a great player. To be up there with her would be an amazing feeling for me. I've really been enjoying playing out here, so I hope I can play another good match on Sunday and take the title and be up there with her.

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=55416

gaviotabr
Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:20 AM
I really like to read that Ana is working on increasing her serve speed. I think she can serve so much better and win a lot of cheap points with it.

jelenacg
Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:38 AM
Yes she can definitely
Very nice interview except for the last part `only Navratilova won it back to back`
They want to put the pressure on her :tape::bigcry:

spiritedenergy
Mar 22nd, 2009, 01:44 AM
Yes she can definitely
Very nice interview except from the last part `only Navratilova won it back to back`
They want to put the pressure on her :tape::bigcry:

I thought exactly the same... Come on why did they come up with that?:weirdo: Additionally she was working with Kardon in that period I believe, so I'm sure Ana knew about that, no need to ask this.
Ana don't bother about these senseless comparisons and just do you best out there:kiss:

spiritedenergy
Mar 28th, 2009, 11:36 PM
From the Miami website

Ivanovic Impressive In Opener

Serbian seventh seed Ana Ivanovic dazzled under the lights on Stadium court on Friday evening as she defeated Ukrainian qualifier Mariya Koryttseva 6-0, 6-3 to reach the third round of the Sony Ericsson Open in Miami.

The 2008 Roland Garros champion converted four of nine break point opportunities and saved all four that she faced on her own serve to prevail in just 65 minutes. She goes on to face Agnes Szavay, who knocked out Francesca Schiavone 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.

Ivanovic has an 8-4 event record at the Sony Ericsson Open, with her best result coming on her 2005 debut – when she reached the quarterfinals (l. to Mauresmo). The 21 year old came into the tournament on the back of a runner-up finish in Indian Wells, where she lost to Vera Zvonareva in the title match.

"It feels really good, especially I had a really good performance," said Ivanovic. "I'm happy the way I played, especially from the beginning. She had lots of matches behind her, so she was confident coming into tonight's match. But I really stepped up, and I'm really pleased with the way I played.

"I think from the first round you want victories like today. It's important to win quite comfortably so you get confidence through the matches. And especially against these kind of opponents, you have to be there from the first moment and don't give them any hope."

It looks like she played pretty well:eek:

jelenacg
Mar 28th, 2009, 11:46 PM
Yes but that girl is a qualifier :rolleyes:
And even if Ana has some history with qualifiers you are supposed to beat them easily, so you actually can`t tell nothing from the score

gaviotabr
Mar 28th, 2009, 11:51 PM
Yes but that girl is a qualifier :rolleyes:
And even if Ana has some history with qualifiers you are supposed to beat them easily, so you actually can`t tell nothing from the score

Yes.. it was probably easy for her to play well. But great that she did anyway.. I think any good win can bring her much needed confidence. :worship:

I guess we will have more insight into Ana's play in the next match.

jelenacg
Mar 28th, 2009, 11:58 PM
Yes.. it was probably easy for her to play well. But great that she did anyway.. I think any good win can bring her much needed confidence. :worship:

I guess we will have more insight into Ana's play in the next match.

Probably but i`m worried.
I still have in my head her match against Davenport,she also played very good first match but completely fell apart in next one :tape:

jonnyroyale_13
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:00 AM
Probably but i`m worried.
I still have in my head her match against Davenport,she also played very good first match but completely fell apart in next one :tape:

no disrespect to Szavay, but she aint Lindsay Davenport.;)

spiritedenergy
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:01 AM
Probably but i`m worried.
I still have in my head her match against Davenport,she also played very good first match but completely fell apart in next one :tape:

Me too:lol::tape: Also US Open 2007.. she played amazing 3 matches then against Venus she fell totally flat, like emotionless. But I think and hope that she's overcoming this inconsistency:p

jelenacg
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:07 AM
no disrespect to Szavay, but she aint Lindsay Davenport.;)

:yeah::lol:
But this is Ana we are talking about :o:lol:
Everything depends how she is playing ,she doesn`t need a good opponent to lose

gaviotabr
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:09 AM
:yeah::lol:
But this is Ana we are talking about :o:lol:
Everything depends how she is playing ,she doesn`t need a good opponent to lose

True. Ana loses to herself (UEs..) so many times.. (Serena style!).. :lol:

jonnyroyale_13
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:16 AM
:yeah::lol:
But this is Ana we are talking about :o:lol:
Everything depends how she is playing ,she doesn`t need a good opponent to lose

oh yeah, good point:o:lol:

jelenacg
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:18 AM
Short interview with Ana
http://www.blic.rs/zabava.php?id=85597
I`ll translate
She still wants to achive many things in tennis ,and she think she will retire when she is 31 years old
She wants to have at least 3 kids :lol::lol:
Monica Seles called her to congratulate her when she won RG
She likes basketball and she is a fan of Partizan(Serbian basketball team) like her brother and father
She and Nadal don`t live in the same neighborhood

jonnyroyale_13
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:21 AM
wow, thats a lot of random info.:lol: i always wondered if she talked to Seles.

spiritedenergy
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:25 AM
wow, thats a lot of random info.:lol: i always wondered if she talked to Seles.

Hi Jonny:wavey: Yes pretty random:lol: But nice to hear Monica called her, that's so nice of her:hearts: (does Monica have her phone number then?:scratch:)

jelenacg
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:25 AM
wow, thats a lot of random info.:lol: i always wondered if she talked to Seles.

Me too
Monica:angel::hug:

gaviotabr
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:27 AM
Short interview with Ana
http://www.blic.rs/zabava.php?id=85597
I`ll translate
She still wants to achive many things in tennis ,and she think she will retire when she is 31 years old
She wants to have at least 3 kids :lol::lol:
Monica Seles called her to congratulate her when she won RG
She likes basketball and she is a fan of Partizan(Serbian basketball team) like her brother and father
She and Nadal don`t live in the same neighborhood

Thanks Jelena!

Really nice to know that she talked to Seles. I'm sure it was something special for Ana.

About Mallorca.. Nadal lives in Manacor, which is a like a small city inside of Mallorca.. a bit more than an actual neighbourhood. In Spain, it's called pueblo. Ana has her house in Son Vida, I believe.. which is actually a neighbourhood. So yes.. they don't live in the same area of the city.

spiritedenergy
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:30 AM
Thanks Jelena!

Really nice to know that she talked to Seles. I'm sure it was something special for Ana.

About Mallorca.. Nadal lives in Manacor, which is a like a small city inside of Mallorca.. a bit more than an actual neighbourhood. In Spain, it's called pueblo. Ana has her house in Son Vida, I believe.. which is actually a neighbourhood. So yes.. they don't live in the same area of the city.

Wow how do you know all of this Isabela?:eek::lol::p Pueblo means child in spanish right?

jonnyroyale_13
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:31 AM
she think she will retire when she is 31 years old

will we be able to handle being her fan for 10 more years:scared:

Hi Jonny:wavey: )

:wavey:

jelenacg
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:35 AM
Thanks Jelena!

Really nice to know that she talked to Seles. I'm sure it was something special for Ana.

About Mallorca.. Nadal lives in Manacor, which is a like a small city inside of Mallorca.. a bit more than an actual neighbourhood. In Spain, it's called pueblo. Ana has her house in Son Vida, I believe.. which is actually a neighbourhood. So yes.. they don't live in the same area of the city.

Izzy you know everything :worship::worship:
They heard Nadal was her neighbor and they asked would she invite him for a cup of coffee
Pueblo is something like a village i think

gaviotabr
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:40 AM
Wow how do you know all of this Isabela?:eek::lol::p Pueblo means child in spanish right?

I have many spanish friends, with whom I've learned a lot.. about Spain and the language itself. :D

Pueblo, as Jelena says, means village.

gaviotabr
Mar 29th, 2009, 12:42 AM
Izzy you know everything :worship::worship:
They heard Nadal was her neighbor and they asked would she invite him for a cup of coffee
Pueblo is something like a village i think

:lol: I don't know half of what I wish I knew.. but I have a very good memory, so I can probably recall anything that crosses my eyes.. :lol:

And you are right.. pueblo is like a village.

bruce goose
Mar 29th, 2009, 04:28 PM
Thanks Jelena!

Really nice to know that she talked to Seles. I'm sure it was something special for Ana.

About Mallorca.. Nadal lives in Manacor, which is a like a small city inside of Mallorca.. a bit more than an actual neighbourhood. Ana has her house in Son Vida, I believe.. which is actually a neighbourhood. So yes.. they don't live in the same area of the city.It's a moot point b/c I'd say that Ana will smile for those photo-ops,but she knows better than to trust some slimy playboy who flirts aggressively with her while he SUPPOSEDLY has a steady gf for whom he cares...according to his worshippers.Ana can figure out easily enough,'Why should I think that he'd ever be faithful to ME,either?';)If she CAN'T figure that out,well...then she's gonna have a boatload of man problems ahead....Nice to hear that Seles and Ana seem to have a friendship of sorts.I've always wondered what Monica WOULD have done w/o that maricon aleman stabbing her:sad:.If it had happened in Mexico,we could have stormed the jail and lynched his ass:mad:...AFTER we had stoned him

-NAJ-
Mar 30th, 2009, 10:04 AM
http://img17.imageshack.us/img17/795/rpgceca1.th.jpg (http://img17.imageshack.us/my.php?image=rpgceca1.jpg)http://img17.imageshack.us/img17/2982/090330.th.jpg (http://img17.imageshack.us/my.php?image=090330.jpg)

Serbs are dreaming Ceca and Ana


In a large survey of public opinion that the "Alo" and "TNS Medium Gallup" conducted on the sexual habits of the Serbs, as the first in the list of those that he would prefer to spend the night, found the folk singer Svetlana Raznatovic Ceca.

Ana Ivanovic took second place.



AnaIvanovic:
- I am very honored choice. Every woman likes to get to compliment your look, so it is nice to hear. But do not take such comments seriously, and definitely do not see themselves that way. It's good when you know that people support and monitor your game in tennis. When the word is most attractive about the Serbs, it is difficult to choose because this country is full of handsome men.

bad_angel_109
Mar 30th, 2009, 10:16 AM
wow tnx for the article. woot, go ana! :D

jelenacg
Mar 30th, 2009, 11:01 AM
Since it`s ALO i`m not sure Ana even said something about that

Cp6uja
Apr 1st, 2009, 02:53 AM
Society and Style (Vanity Fair)


Ana Ivanovic Discusses Life on the Tennis Tour (http://www.vanityfair.com/online/style/2009/03/ana-ivanovic.html)
by Jessica Flint
March 30, 2009, 12:02 PM

Professional tennis players might lead the ultimate jet-set life. From Sydney’s Australian Open (instead Melbourne :lol:), in January, to New York City’s U.S. Open, which ends in September, the men and women on the tennis tour globe-trot from one fabulous locale to another, hitting tournaments in cosmopolitan cities such as Paris, London, Madrid, Berlin, Los Angeles, Beijing, Tokyo, Moscow, Monte Carlo, Barcelona, and Shanghai. But it’s not all fun and games. Toting a tennis bag around the planet is hard work! Just ask 21-year-old Ana Ivanovic, a former world No. 1 player, who is currently ranked seventh on the Sony Ericsson W.T.A. Tour. The six-foot-one-inch Serbian stunner swung by the Vanity Fair offices when she blew through New York City on her way to Las Vegas before heading to California’s Indian Wells tournament, and then to Miami’s Sony Ericsson Open. Herewith, she reveals what it’s like traveling for work.


VF Daily: What’s your week-to-week schedule like on the professional women’s tour?

Ana Ivanovic: It’s lots of traveling. We are constantly on planes. Obviously sometimes it can get hard because we live basically from suitcases, and it’s constant moving and changing. But I enjoy it.

Do you get to play tourist in the places you visit, or are you focused only on your tennis game?

Even though it’s pretty intense—most of what we see is the tennis club and the hotel—I try to stay a couple days extra and visit. For example, when I was in China, it was great to go to the Great Wall of China, Summer Palace, and the Forbidden City. The culture is so different, and it’s great to explore and learn more about it. I feel very fortunate to be doing what I’m doing. I love to travel and see different cultures and meet different people.

Have you been to New York City other than during the U.S. Open?

This is my first time in New York during this time of year, which is great to see because we are always here in August. It’s a completely different perception of New York. During the Open it’s pretty intense for the full two weeks, and we don’t get a chance to see much or do much. This time, for a couple days, it was fun to do some stuff because I’m more relaxed. I’m ready to take some time off and come here for a week, because there are so many things to see and explore and visit.

As a tennis spectator, I, for one, always look forward to the chicken Caesar-salad wraps at the U.S. Open. Are there things about the cities you play in that you look forward to?

In every city, I try to make myself feel [at] home. We travel so much, so we don’t get a chance to spend a lot of time at home. Every city and every tournament you play, you try to find something that makes you feel comfortable. In L.A., I always look forward to going to Sushi Fusion. And Nobu I love, so in New York or Miami or Malibu (instead Melbourne :lol:), I go there. I have relatives in Malibu, so I always look forward to going to visit them. In Rome, I love going to the Vatican, and going on very nice walks in the city.

What is the most memorable court that you’ve played on?

I love the French Open. It’s the first Grand Slam that I won. Ever since I played juniors there, I loved the facilities. It’s so special for me, and I think it always will be. Then again, I love playing in Australia ... just playing Grand Slams and being on Center Court! Every Grand Slam has something special about it. It’s hard to distinguish what it is. It’s a different feel. It’s great to have an opportunity to play in different cities for different audiences.

What’s the difference between non–Grand Slam tournaments? Say, Indian Wells and Miami?

Miami is always fun. The tournament is always so busy. Indian Wells is so quiet and relaxed, and the hotel is close to the club and you just practice and go back and forth. But Miami is so hectic. So many more people, so many more things happening. It’s completely different. From Indian Wells to Miami, it’s like, Wow. I need one day to sit back and absorb all of this.

What was it like growing up in Serbia?

In Belgrade, in Serbia, I grew up playing in a swimming pool. They emptied the pool and put carpet inside. It was very hard to get on court because there were too many kids and not enough time, so we would practice in the pool. I recently visited there. The coaches that were working there when I was young were still there. Kids were still practicing. Going back brought back so many memories.

Tennis in Serbia is very popular. It’s like a trend to carry your tennis racket.

What activities are you involved in other than tennis?

I got integrated as a UNICEF National Ambassador for Serbia, for the Schools Without Violence program. Every time I’m in Serbia, I attend schools and try to spend time with the kids and encourage them to behave well, because it’s really unfortunate how much violence there is in schools. I try to take time to educate kids and try to motivate them to be good friends, and I really hope it can make a difference. I started playing tennis because of Monica Seles. I try to think that I might inspire kids to play tennis, too.

spiritedenergy
Apr 1st, 2009, 04:02 AM
I love the Malibu Open, it's right by the sea and Hollywood stars like to attend:inlove::lol::help:

spiritedenergy
Apr 2nd, 2009, 05:53 PM
An article at this link

http://www.badzine.info/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1716:ivanovic-to-try-badminton&catid=19:main-feature&Itemid=51

stated that Ana would start playing badminton, and asking wildcards and then play in the world championship in the summer. It said she was aksed by Yonex after they noticed she struggled with the wind in IW... I hope it was an April fool joke:tape::lol: I guess so because now it's removed but if you google Ana in the news you can still read the beginning of it.

gaviotabr
Apr 3rd, 2009, 03:44 PM
I've found this article in italian about Ana. I tried google translator, but it only got me more confused.. :confused::lol::help:

Meglio essere sexy che la numero uno

Ilaria Solari, Gioia del 11.4.09

Un anno fa, per qualche mese, era in testa alla classifica mondiale delle tenniste. In attesa di tornarci, con gli Internazionali di Roma, si gode un altro incontestabile primato. Magari dandosi un pizzicotto per non distrarsi troppo di raro in campo, Ana è una tigre: tira pallettate micidiali e spicca balzi felini da un bordo all'altro, agitando furiosamente la coda dei lunghi capelli neri. Se manda a segno una palla abbassa la visiera e stringe il pugno. E in serbo sibila: Ajde! Qualcosa come: e vai! Ma fuori è un'altra cosa. Nel corridoio degli spogliatoi degli Open di Miami in cui la incontriamo, sembra una madonnina: fresca di doccia, gli occhi verdi e la pelle ambrata sotto la canottiera bianca. Da atleta consumata, a dispetto dei quasi 22 anni, sa amministrare le energie. Per dirla come la vede lei, se le fai una damartela, gioca "a filo di net". Cioè: si limita a rispondere, facendoti scivolare la palla appena al di là della rete. Quel tanto da non consente di Slanciare. E per distratti n incanta con il suo garbato birignao. Ma anche a riposo, Ana adora giocare: «L'equivoco più frequente sul mio conto? Che io sia un tipo mite e carino. Dico, ma mi avete visto in campo?». Per chi se la fosse persa in azione, basta qualche nota biografica a rendere la potenza del suo ruggito: nata a Belgrado nel Ragazza copertina fortissima, ma anche bellissima, Ana ivanovic è adorata dai cronisti e dagli sponsor Tra i siti personali degli sportivi suo e il più frequentato 1987, secondo la sua precoce agiografia, Ana decide a quattro anni di fare la tennista guardando giocare in tv la connazionale Monica Seles. E siccome in famiglia nessuno ne sa di tennis, manda a memoria il numero di telefono di un vicino centro sportivo, di cui, sempre Ìn tv, si fa pubblicità. Tutto intorno, quella che allora si chiamava Jugoslavia è in fiamme, ma Ana pensa a giocare, «ero piccola, non ricordo molto». Più tardi, la determinazione la spinge ad allenarsi anche sotto i bombardamenti della Nato, «ma solo dalle 7 alle 9 del mattino (le ore più sicure)». A volte, di necessità, gioca nel ventre protetto di una piscina vuota. Passata al rango di professionista, risale rapidamente la classifica infilandosi nella rosa delle prime dieci, con bravate prodigiose, come vincere 16 match in 15 giorni o rimontare di 130 posizioni in un anno. Nel 2008 è stata per qualche mese la numero 1 del tennis mondiale, dopo avrei conquistato il primo Grande Slam al Roland Garros. Ma il suo vero primato è un altro: nominata da reporter e commentatori la tennista, anzi la spartiva, pm sexy del mondo, è una piccola star. La bellezza statuaria, oltre 1 metro e 86 di altezza per un mix insolito di grazia e potenza, le GIOIA 2009 I 63 ha procurato contratti pubblicitari, sponsorizzazioni e parecchie copertine. In Serbia è un personaggio: ha festeggiato Ìl ventesimo compleanno con il presidente Tadic e il suo ritratto campeggiava sui francoholi in occasione delle Olimpiadi di Pechino. Sentirsi dire che è sexy non la mette a disagio. Ci mancherebbe* «Sono lusingata. Ad Anna donna piacciono i complimenti. Onestamente, questo non è proprio un problema. Purtroppo (anzi: fortunatamente) il mio mestiere è giocare a tennis. La bellezza è un utile contorno, di certo non guasta». No che non guasta, almeno a giudicare dai servizi che i giornali dì tutto il mondo le dedicano, pagine da cui spesso ammicca in pose provocanti e guardaroba succinto, come una modella professionista. Lei ride di gusto: «No, sono un disastro, non ml diverte per niente. E poi è così faticoso». Pur essendo ima fuoriclasse, anche il suo approccio all'agonismo pare piuttosto zen: «Preoccuparsi di difendere i titoli, tenere la posizione, è tutto uno spreco di energie. Si vince torneo per torneo, match per match, e c'è da concentrarsi sennò nemmeno si vince. L'ambizione di stare al top disperde le forze e toglie tutto il divertimento». E lei si diverte, c'è da crederle, chi la segue da vicino giura che Ana si gode ogni grande match, ogni dannato allenamento: «Sono una ragazza fortunata, faccio la cosa che mi piace di più, sono nel posto giusto al momento giusto». Sicché non disdegna di socializzare con le colleghe: «Stiamo insieme dalla mattina alla sera, ho imparato ad accendere e spegnere l'interruttore della competitività». Per il suo impegno di ambasciatrice dell'Onu sul diritto all'istruzione, le hanno conferito Ìl premio Women of Courage. Non per questo Ana ha rinunciato ad avere paura dei cani e alla personale scaramanzia di non calpestare le linee bianche del campo. Cose da ragazza, piccoli riti: per farsi forza davanti alle avversarie di solito canticchia: un motivo di Rihanna o di Justin Timberlake. E se perde la concentrazione, «Succede che un pensiero stupido ti attraversi la testa nel momento sbagliato. Come: "che cosa farò stasera". Allora mi dò un pizzicotto sulla coscia e ricomincio a muovermi». Alle giornaliste di moda, forse per un eccesso di zelo, da parecchia soddisfazione: lunghe interviste in cui confessa di adorare Chanel, Prada, Marc Jacobs e Louis Vuitton e thè non rinuncerebbe mai a quel vecchio tubino nero, amico fedele di ogni donna. Ma basta insistere un po' per farle dire che è a suo agio solo "in divisa". CÌ mancherebbe: è un noto marchio sportivo a cucirle i costumini praticamente addosso. Di amore non vuole parlare. L’ha fatto anche troppo l'anno scorso, gridando ai quattro venti di essere innamorata di Fernando Verdasco, aitante collega spagnolo, numero 9 della classifica maschile. Probabilmente ci credeva: ha pure comprato una casa in Spagna: «Una follia», rivela ai giornali, «ma anche un investimento». Un investimento affettivo, forse. Ma è finita. Ajde! È il grido di battaglia di Ana Ivanovic. Ma è da qualche mese che la campionessa serba fatica a rimontare la classifica Venus e Andy bloccano il traffico Uno scenografico match in cima ai Suv, in piena Ocean Drive, tra Venus Williams e Andy Murray, star de! tennis mondiale. È stato inaugurato così il Sony Ericsson Open 2009 di Miami, uno dei tornei più effervescenti del calendario tennistico, fino al 5 aprile. Perché? «Non mi va di raccontarlo. Noi sportivi siamo cosi esposti. Ora vorrei tenere quelle cose solo per me». Perché in fondo, «sono una ragazza all'antica», ammette. E se l'amore fosse una partita di tennis? «Non sarei certo io a servire per prima». A salvarla dalla solitudine, «dalla trafila di stanze d'albergo e ristoranti» c'è sempre mamma Dragana, fascinosa, ex avvocato che ora amministra con piglio manageriale la carriera della figlia. Vive in trasferta con Ana ormai da una decina d'anni. «È la mia migliore amica, mi fa sentire il calore della famiglia. È quella che mi da i consigli migliori. Ne ho bisogno: a fare questa vita finisce che ti senti molto sola, anche se hai intorno tanta gente». Anche perché con gli amici, Ana confessa, «non sono brava. Non sono tipo da Internet e messaggi». Eppure, il suo è il sito più frequentato tra quelli di qualsiasi sportivo: «Ho una specie di diario on line, lo scrivo davvero, poi lo corregge il manager, sa, per l'inglese». Un futuro diverso Ana non sa ancora immaginarselo, «il tennis è Tunica cosa che so fare. Prima o poi dovrò pensare a farmi una vita mìa. Una famiglia, dei figli: vengo da una tribù numerosa: nonni, zii, cugini. Se ci penso, mi immagino una vita così.



So Luca, if there is anything interesting, you can tell us.. :p

spiritedenergy
Apr 3rd, 2009, 04:04 PM
Hi Isa:wavey:

The article is a bit strange, some words and sentences are wrong and there is a part about Venus and Murray in the middle of it?:confused::lol:

Anyways nothing new really, the article is mainly about Ana being sexy, and she likes the compliments, but she's not good at being a model and it's so difficult to pose; she doesn't want to talk about love anymore, and she waits for the man to make the first move. She says she doesn't know anything apart from tennis and when she's done she wants to have a family with kids. She says that the biggest misunderstanding about her is her being nice and quiet, and she says "Did you see me on court???":lol:
She says she enjoys every match (:rolleyes:). About buying the house in Mallorca, she said it was craziness, but also an investment. She says that she learned how to be competitive on court but how to be friend with the other girls outside and she enjoys being with them. She also says she can lose concentration during the match and think "What will I do tonight?", and when that happens she pinches her leg.:lol:

And the title of the article is "Better being sexy than the n.1":tape: Something is not found in the article itself (Ana said pretty much the opposite):help::lol:

gaviotabr
Apr 3rd, 2009, 05:23 PM
Hi Isa:wavey:

The article is a bit strange, some words and sentences are wrong and there is a part about Venus and Murray in the middle of it?:confused::lol:

Anyways nothing new really, the article is mainly about Ana being sexy, and she likes the compliments, but she's not good at being a model and it's so difficult to pose; she doesn't want to talk about love anymore, and she waits for the man to make the first move. She says she doesn't know anything apart from tennis and when she's done she wants to have a family with kids. She says that the biggest misunderstanding about her is her being nice and quiet, and she says "Did you see me on court???":lol:
She says she enjoys every match (:rolleyes:). About buying the house in Mallorca, she said it was craziness, but also an investment. She says that she learned how to be competitive on court but how to be friend with the other girls outside and she enjoys being with them. She also says she can lose concentration during the match and think "What will I do tonight?", and when that happens she pinches her leg.:lol:

And the title of the article is "Better being sexy than the n.1":tape: Something is not found in the article itself (Ana said pretty much the opposite):help::lol:

Thanks a lot Luca! I figured the article was not very well written... google translation is always bad, but this time it just made no sense at all.. :lol: I got it from this link:

http://ubitennis.quotidianonet.ilsole24ore.com/2009/04/03/162699-serena_contro_venus_questa_sfida_martucci_meglio_e ssere_sexy_numero_solari_fognini_formato_super_qua rti_atteso_daniel_gazzetta.shtml

The part abou the focus is funny.. I guess whenever Ana pinches herself on the leg now I'll be thinking that she was wondering about dinner... :lol:

And I guess she means on court, when she talks about not being as nice or quiet as people say. Fistpump!Ana for the win! :lol:

jelenacg
Apr 3rd, 2009, 09:04 PM
and when that happens she pinches her leg

OMG :haha::haha:
I also recomend a little bit of this :smash: when you start playing brainless :lol::angel:

luv_sweetAna
Apr 3rd, 2009, 10:58 PM
and when that happens she pinches her leg

OMG :haha::haha:
I also recomend a little bit of this :smash: when you start playing brainless :lol::angel:

Oh no, she'd have red marks all over her legs then :lol::angel:

gaviotabr
Apr 15th, 2009, 11:42 PM
Monica Seles is a guest at Jon Wertheim's column in SI, and says she enjoys watching Ana play, among other players. I thought that was nice.

Here's the quote:

Do you watch tennis on TV just for fun? Which players do you like to watch?
-- Bobby, Chicago

Yes, I do. I very much enjoy watching Serena, Venus Williams, Jelena Jankovic, Ana Ivanovic and Amelie Mauresmo. I also enjoy watching men's tennis. Like everyone (I hope!), I thought last year's Wimbledon final between Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer was the best tennis I have ever seen.


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/tennis/04/15/monica.seles/?eref=T1

jelenacg
Apr 15th, 2009, 11:49 PM
Monica is :hearts::worship:

spiritedenergy
Apr 16th, 2009, 06:09 AM
Monica is the best... :worship::hearts:

spiritedenergy
Apr 24th, 2009, 10:37 PM
From FHM online voting poll, this is the description of Ana:

Ana Ivanovic

Had five-year-old Ana Ivanovic not witnessed Monica Seles grunting her way through the French Open on television, FHM might never have photographed one of the sexiest and successful tennis stars ever to pick up a racket. Having raked in nearly $6m in tournament earnings, a number one ATP ranking and a legion of male followers, one wouldn’t think there is much left to achieve for the thinking man’s Anna Kournikova, yet Ana may actually help deliver world peace in her new role as Serbia’s UNICEF National Ambassador. All those Grand Slam titles and humanitarian exploits sound time consuming, but the sexy Serbian told us how she prefers to wile away the hours: “Most of the time, I just dance the salsa and do the tango in my bedroom by myself.”

:lol::hearts:

gaviotabr
Apr 24th, 2009, 10:43 PM
From FHM online voting poll, this is the description of Ana:

:lol::hearts:

:lol::lol::lol:

That is so typical Ana! Though we can interpret that in many ways... :lol::lol::lol::lol:..

spiritedenergy
Apr 24th, 2009, 10:50 PM
:lol::lol::lol:

That is so typical Ana! Though we can interpret that in many ways... :lol::lol::lol::lol:..

:lol:

I didn't know she liked tango and salsa, I like tango too:hearts::kiss:

gaviotabr
Apr 24th, 2009, 10:59 PM
:lol:

I didn't know she liked tango and salsa, I like tango too:hearts::kiss:

I like it too! But it's so difficult to dance.. once I went on holidays to Buenos Aires and tried to dance tango with my boyfriend.. total disaster! :lol:

spiritedenergy
Apr 24th, 2009, 11:04 PM
I like it too! But it's so difficult to dance.. once I went on holidays to Buenos Aires and tried to dance tango with my boyfriend.. total disaster! :lol:

:lol: Wow Beunos Aires, I always dreamed of going there:hearts:. I'm also very bad at it, but i would like to learn at some point. Bad thing is that I'm very short so i'm probably not very fit for it:p

gaviotabr
Apr 24th, 2009, 11:13 PM
:lol: Wow Beunos Aires, I always dreamed of going there:hearts:. I'm also very bad at it, but i would like to learn at some point. Bad thing is that I'm very short so i'm probably not very fit for it:p

I don't think being short is a problem.. actually really tall people might have issues, since you need a lot of coordination! :lol:

bruce goose
Apr 24th, 2009, 11:14 PM
I went on holidays to Buenos Aires and tried to dance tango with my boyfriend.. total disaster! :lol:As we hinted in the Fed Cup thread,you're a majestically beautiful dork:)...just like Ana.......And obviously your bf has enough refinement to appreciate dork princesses:p

gaviotabr
Apr 24th, 2009, 11:18 PM
As we hinted in the Fed Cup thread,you're a majestically beautiful dork:)...just like Ana.......And obviously your bf has enough refinement to appreciate dork princesses:p

:lol:

I'm lucky that he definitely loves me, dorky and nerdy and all! :lol:

bruce goose
Apr 24th, 2009, 11:54 PM
:lol:

I'm lucky that he definitely loves me, dorky and nerdy and all! :lol:....And I have zero doubt that he'd consider HIMSELF very lucky;)....Perhaps you can convince him to go against the Latino male standard and actually persuade him to respect women's tennis.Down HERE,we get the usual tidal-wave-sized overflow of soccer games:rolleyes:...plus MORE than enough boringly-predictable ATP...and almost NONE of the WTA:help:.I was truly fortunate to see one of my faves,Bartoli,win her title while covered by a local channel:p

gaviotabr
Apr 28th, 2009, 11:26 PM
There is an interview with Ana in the Madrid Open web:

http://www.madrid-open.com/site/news/9/125

gaviotabr
Apr 30th, 2009, 10:28 PM
Ivanovic looks to Paris to get back on track
Thursday, April 30, 2009
By Myrtille Rambion

After sweeping all before her at the 2008 French Open, Ana Ivanovic has gone on to struggle in the 11 months that have followed. The Serbian has recently started working with a new coach, however, and is looking to get back to winning ways in a city that will always hold the fondest of memories for her.
You only have to say the word "Paris" and Ana Ivanovic's face lights up. It is enough to help the Serbian forget all of the bad times, all of the defeats she has suffered over the past year, as she harks back to her first and only Grand Slam title to date. "This city has always had a special place in my heart," the defending Roland Garros champion says. Even when I was just a junior, but obviously all the more since it was where I reached my first Grand Slam quarter final, then my first major final, and of course last year when I won my first Grand Slam title…"

The rise and fall…

A year after she froze in the 2007 final against Justine Henin, Ivanovic quite simply overpowered Dinara Safina – a result of her pre-season strength conditioning work – and this time around managed to hold her nerve on the big occasion, boosted no doubt by the presence of her mentor Sven Groeneveld. She was the stand-out player in the women's draw last year, and her cries of "Ajde!" ("Come on!" in Serbian) only got louder as she racked up the wins. The photogenic Ivanovic also took over the No1 spot the Monday after the tournament, and everyone thought that she was set to dominate women's tennis for the foreseeable future.

And then her nerves started to get the better of her again. Two weeks later at Wimbledon, she was within a net cord of going out to Natalie Dechy in the second round before losing a couple of days later to Zheng Jie. Far from being a mere blip on the radar screen, it was actually the start of a long slide that would see the Basle resident crash out of the US Open in the second round to Julie Coin, an unknown French player ranked 188th in the world who had needed to go through the qualifying rounds. Her performance at the end-of season Masters was little better, and it was clear that Ivanovic was looking forward to putting 2008, or at least the second half of it, behind her.

"I lost my way, but that's all in the past now"

Ana was struggling, with injuries, low morale and a whole host of off-court distractions. "It's true, just after Roland Garros I really lost my way," she admits. "But it's in the past now. And it's all good experience." In 2009, she decided to shake things up by parting ways with Sven Groeneveld and hiring Craig Kardon, whose coaching resume includes Grand Slam winners Martina Navratilova, Lindsay Davenport, Mary Pierce and Jennifer Capriati. "It's really working between us," said the reigning French Open champion after making it through to her first final of the "Kardon era" at Indian Wells. "We communicate really well, even if it's early days and we're still getting to know each other."

The Serbian is hoping that her new coach will help her regain the confidence that she will need to defend her Paris title in May and June. She will certainly need to be at her best, as the competition has certainly got at lot tougher. Last year's beaten finalist Dinara Safina, who also fell at the final hurdle at the 2009 Australian Open, will be looking for revenge, and having taken over the No1 ranking, the Russian definitely has something to prove.

"I can't wait to get back to Paris"

Ivanovic is of course not the only Serbian in the upper echelons of women's tennis. Jelena Jankovic has also gone through some ups and downs over the past 12 months, but she was a semi-finalist here last year and already has tasted victory in 2009. Then there is Olympic gold medal-winner Elena Dementieva who was the form player at the turn of the year, and of course Serena Williams, who when she decides to concentrate on her tennis is untouchable, particularly when it comes to the psychological battles. Or perhaps Vera Zvonareva and Victoria Azarenka will carry their fine 2009 form over to the Parisian clay…

There will be plenty of competition therefore, but Ivanovic is not one to shy away, particularly when it comes to her favourite tournament. "As soon as I set foot on Philippe Chatrier court, all the emotions come flooding back every time," she explains, flashing her trademark smile, "and it really gives me an extraordinary feeling. I can't wait to get back to Paris."



http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2009-04-30/200904221240441705722.html

spiritedenergy
May 1st, 2009, 12:05 AM
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2009-04-30/200904221240441705722.html

Thanks Isabela:wavey:

Ana I hope you are right :scared:

gaviotabr
May 6th, 2009, 06:41 PM
Ana's presser, Rome 3rd round:

ANA IVANOVIC’S PRESS CONFERENCE


Q. Did you suffer from the change in the game conditions comparing from yesterday even? Yesterday the court was probably much slower than today.
ANA IVANOVIC: It was. It was big difference today on the court. But I think it was for both of us, because she also played late last night. Yeah, it obviously took some time to adjust.
But yeah, I mean, I felt like in the second set I gained back my confidence and my game and I started playing much better. But then, yeah, I think from 4 Love she hardly make any errors, and it was very hard.
I also think my serve I should have mixed it up a little bit more when I was up a couple of breaks. But she played extremely well and hardly made any errors.

Q. How do you feel about your general clay court form so soon before Roland Garros where you're defending your title?
ANA IVANOVIC: Um, I feel really good. I mean, yesterday I played unbelievable match, and that gave my a lot of confidence. Because I was working really hard for my points. Obviously Francesca is very tough opponent. It really, you know, made me feel good.
And my serve is getting much better. I feel power on it. It's back. I just have to stick with the things I been doing. I been working really hard, and obviously haven't played too many matches on the clay courts.
I really hope, you know, next week to have opportunity to compete a little bit more and play some matches, because I been practicing way enough. Yeah, I feel confident.

Q. How do you explain the difference between the early part of the game, the middle, and the end? Was it just your opponent's play, or was there something that changed in your play?
ANA IVANOVIC: In the beginning, I really started poor. I was making way too many unforced errors, I think, and it wasn't much rallies happening in the beginning. It was a little bit frustrating, because maybe it was also because, like I mentioned, last night I played really well, so I just assumed I would start the same.
I wasn't working as hard for my points and I was going for winners way too early. Just once I settled in I felt like I had my game back and, you know, game plan was working well.
But then in the third set, in the end, she start playing much more aggressive and deeper balls. So even when I have chance to come in I wasn't doing that, because I just, you know, I was yeah, staying way too much on the baseline and she was moving me around. Obviously that was a little bit, yeah, frustrating.

Q. Did you suffer from a problem on your foot, or not?
ANA IVANOVIC: On my foot, no.

Q. You have many, many fan in the girl, not just the man. How do you explain the success? I know many, many girl come from many, many kilometers to see you today. How do you explain the success?
ANA IVANOVIC: It's very nice for me to hear that. It's great to have fans. I mean, I start playing tennis because of Monica Seles, so if someone can start to play tennis because of me, I'm more than flattered from that.
But it's always very nice to hear that you have supporters.

jelenacg
May 6th, 2009, 06:59 PM
next week to have opportunity to compete a little bit more and play some matches
So next week you are going to win two matches and then lose :rolleyes:
I don`t see confidence in these words

gaviotabr
May 6th, 2009, 07:11 PM
next week to have opportunity to compete a little bit more and play some matches
So next week you are going to win two matches and then lose :rolleyes:
I don`t see confidence in these words

She is obviously not aiming to win anything.. she is just hoping her opponents are kind enough to handle her matches so she can play them. :rolleyes:

luv_sweetAna
May 6th, 2009, 08:45 PM
''I just have to stick with the things I been doing.''

'Cause clearly you're doing it right. :o:rolleyes::help:

jelenacg
May 6th, 2009, 09:10 PM
''I just have to stick with the things I been doing.''

'Cause clearly you're doing it right. :o:rolleyes::help:

:lol::lol:
Ajde Ana,this is ridiculous

gaviotabr
May 6th, 2009, 10:06 PM
''I just have to stick with the things I been doing.''

'Cause clearly you're doing it right. :o:rolleyes::help:

Yes.. that puzzles me... so.. how long is she going to stick with something that's clearly not working? :rolleyes:

spiritedenergy
May 6th, 2009, 11:37 PM
she seems like a robot repeating the same things over and over...:o Ana do something!:rolleyes:

Princeza
May 7th, 2009, 05:44 PM
Ana :sobbing: :sobbing:

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Q. So how disappointing is this for you, or is it just another maybe roadblock?

ANA IVANOVIC: No. Obviously it's very disappointing, and I'm very, very sad because I really felt I could do well here. I felt physically fit. So it's really, really disappointing. I can just try to learn from this.

Like I said, sometimes losses make you more motivated to work harder, and that's definitely, you know, my aim.

I felt like I was in quite a good level. I just want to keep building on this. There is plenty more tournaments in front of me. That's a good thing about tennis.


DUBAI

"It was a great experience,"
"I very much enjoyed competing in this arena. It was an amazing atmosphere and I feel like we both played some good tennis. I had my chances but she was too good when it mattered most.


INDIAN WELLS

"I felt really confident today. My game is in pretty good shape. The conditions were frustrating and it was tough to adapt to them, but it was a good experience, especially because Miami can also be quite windy."


MIAMI

"I felt really good coming into this week. Yesterday I had a really good practice and was on a high, feeling pretty confident, and I think maybe that was the reason that I expected some things would come easier today on the court than they actually did. So it was tougher than I expected.

"I'm sure I'm never going to make this mistake again: on the positive side I can learn from this loss."

ROME

Q. How do you feel about your general clay court form so soon before Roland Garros where you're defending your title?
ANA IVANOVIC: Um, I feel really good. I mean, yesterday I played unbelievable match, and that gave my a lot of confidence. Because I was working really hard for my points. Obviously Francesca is very tough opponent. It really, you know, made me feel good.
And my serve is getting much better. I feel power on it. It's back. I just have to stick with the things I been doing. I been working really hard, and obviously haven't played too many matches on the clay courts.
I really hope, you know, next week to have opportunity to compete a little bit more and play some matches, because I been practicing way enough. Yeah, I feel confident

gaviotabr
May 7th, 2009, 06:04 PM
Ana :sobbing: :sobbing:

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Q. So how disappointing is this for you, or is it just another maybe roadblock?

ANA IVANOVIC: No. Obviously it's very disappointing, and I'm very, very sad because I really felt I could do well here. I felt physically fit. So it's really, really disappointing. I can just try to learn from this.

Like I said, sometimes losses make you more motivated to work harder, and that's definitely, you know, my aim.

I felt like I was in quite a good level. I just want to keep building on this. There is plenty more tournaments in front of me. That's a good thing about tennis.


DUBAI

"It was a great experience,"
"I very much enjoyed competing in this arena. It was an amazing atmosphere and I feel like we both played some good tennis. I had my chances but she was too good when it mattered most.


INDIAN WELLS

"I felt really confident today. My game is in pretty good shape. The conditions were frustrating and it was tough to adapt to them, but it was a good experience, especially because Miami can also be quite windy."


MIAMI

"I felt really good coming into this week. Yesterday I had a really good practice and was on a high, feeling pretty confident, and I think maybe that was the reason that I expected some things would come easier today on the court than they actually did. So it was tougher than I expected.

"I'm sure I'm never going to make this mistake again: on the positive side I can learn from this loss."

ROME

Q. How do you feel about your general clay court form so soon before Roland Garros where you're defending your title?
ANA IVANOVIC: Um, I feel really good. I mean, yesterday I played unbelievable match, and that gave my a lot of confidence. Because I was working really hard for my points. Obviously Francesca is very tough opponent. It really, you know, made me feel good.
And my serve is getting much better. I feel power on it. It's back. I just have to stick with the things I been doing. I been working really hard, and obviously haven't played too many matches on the clay courts.
I really hope, you know, next week to have opportunity to compete a little bit more and play some matches, because I been practicing way enough. Yeah, I feel confident

Always the same.. She will never learn... :rolleyes:

gaviotabr
May 8th, 2009, 10:03 PM
Not a very positive article.. but hey.. some insight into what's going on.. Unfortunately it has only made me more negative.. :sad:

Ana Ivanovic beats the drum for women's tennis
Image :1 of 3

Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent
Oh yes, women's tennis, we had rather forgotten about that. In the rush to lionise Rafael Nadal, psychoanalyse Roger Federer and canonise Andy Murray, there has been a tendency to overlook how the other half has been getting on. Evidence that the women's tour pales in contrast to the men's is that its most prominent recent headline concerned the deranged father of Jelena Dokic allegedly threatening to “fire a rocket” at the Australian ambassador to Serbia because of his daughter's allegations of physical abuse.

In Rome this week, just to add to the theatre of the absurd, Serena Williams mocked the fact that she was not ranked No1 in the world - and was promptly dumped on her posterior by Patty Schnyder, who called her husband/coach on to the court to give her a pep talk when leading 5-0 in the final set. Before the Italian Open, the two previous high-profile tournaments in the United States were snaffled by Vera Zvonareva, from Russia, and Victoria Azarenka, from Belarus. The earth maintained a steady orbit.

In the BNP Paribas Open final in Indian Wells, California, in March, one all but ruined by powerful winds, Zvonareva defeated Ana Ivanovic in a torrid match and, watching from courtside, it began to dawn that not much had been seen of the Serb recently. Indeed, the most recent time she lifted a trophy was in the middle of October (about the same time as Federer) and since then results had not been up to scratch (much like Federer). But now the clay-court season is under way - pencilled in as the time when she needs to start making the right waves again.

Yet it all looks shaky, Ivanovic having lost a 4-0 lead in the final set in Rome in a crushing third-round defeat by Agnieszka Radwanska, of Poland - not an occasion to dine out on at Sabatini's, where Gabriela used to spend her evenings striving to ignore amorous suitors during the championships in the late 1980s.

Related Links
Ivanovic has high hopes with new coach
Ivanovic refuses to be drawn into catfight
Next week the 21-year-old Ivanovic - the 21st-century Sabatini - was scheduled to play the Mutua Madrileña Open in Madrid, a premier mandated event on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, before an emotional return to Paris to defend her French Open title. It does not look as if she will be walking back into Roland Garros on confidence's cusp. A knee injury has forced her to withdraw from Madrid, which will cost her $250,000 (about £165,000) in bonus-pool payments, though she insists that she will be fit for the French Open.

Win or lose there, she will be exceedingly disarming. On the very pretty face of it, defeats do not get her down, but that is where you would misjudge her. Take it from Ivanovic and Craig Kardon, who coached Martina Navratilova to the last of her nine Wimbledon singles titles in 1990 and was brought into the Ivanovic clan in February, she takes defeat as badly as anyone, to the extent that Kardon has spent a lot of time trying to get her not to be so hard on herself.

“I have not adjusted that well to the clay yet and, as a professional athlete, that is what I need to do,” Ivanovic said. “But I have had a lot of different experiences in the past two years, having to cope when not feeling great, being injured as has happened again this week, being frustrated, losing patience with myself.

“Because I am a perfectionist, I had just assumed I would play perfectly all the time, but I have learnt that in those times I have to find a way to win and I am much more OK with that. I am very excited about what is around the corner, but I do need to stay in the moment.”

Ivanovic has played in the past two Paris finals, being thumped by Justine Henin in the first before returning last May and coping (just) with Dinara Safina, the Russian who was as choked by nerves as Ivanovic had been in 2007. As any first-time grand-slam winner discovers, the letdown can be as marked as the high of the triumph. Ivanovic returned to Belgrade after her victory in Paris and was so immersed in the heady celebrations that she lost her core.

“I did a lot of media and other activities in Serbia. I was completely drained and when I got to Wimbledon I thought, ‘OK, I can relax now,'” she said. “But I couldn't find my intensity at all. If I am in that position again, I have learnt that I need to do what is best for my game, not what people expect of me.

“I am a very emotional person in general and I get really fired up, especially in a competitive situation. I didn't know how to handle things before but it is important to realise that you are not going to be at the top of your game all the time. There are going to be setbacks and real champions adjust to that. You might lose, but you must never lose the belief in yourself. I have won the French, I have won big tournaments and I know I can do it again.”

The volatility of so many results in women's tennis is illustrated by the fact that since Federer became the men's No1 in February 2004, spending an extraordinary 237 weeks there before Nadal usurped him in August last year, there have been nine occupants of the women's pride of place. Ivanovic claims never to have been preoccupied by the rankings since she emerged as a real force and was unaware - until the press told her - that last spring's victory at Roland Garros coincided with her ascension to the top spot.

“All I can do is think about my game, to keep developing it and the ranking will take care of itself,” Ivanovic, now the world No7, said. “I just have to do my best in tournaments and focus on that. There is a lot of calmness in me now and Craig has definitely helped with that. I can still learn heaps, there are goals I want to achieve, but it is better to do that with peace of mind, working with someone I trust.”

Kardon was a good catch. Navratilova needed him for a youthful endorsement of her attacking game when others were challenging the concept and, as he says, he is more the American “hard-court serve-and-volley type of guy who specialises in how to make players more aggressive in their approach”. On the clay, relentless aggression is not always the best method.

“It is about being able to grind, to maintain a good mentality in the longer rallies,” he said. “Regardless of this week's injury, Ana is in great shape, so hats off to Scott [Byrnes, her physical trainer]. When I first saw her in Dubai in February, she and her game were in a state, but she has definitely solidified. She is very tough on herself, sometimes too tough. Scott and I have had to pull her in a little bit.

“Do we want to change things? Yes. Do we have goals in mind? Sure. And there is a stubbornness there, too, just like Martina had. What I have said to her is that champions do the ordinary things a bit better than anyone else. That is what she has to learn.”

Ana the Ordinary? There's not much of a future in that.


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article6251661.ece

bruce goose
May 8th, 2009, 10:19 PM
Not a very positive article.. but hey.. some insight into what's going on.. Unfortunately it has only made me more negative.. :sad:



http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article6251661.eceThis article is quite encouraging,actually,and it goes back to the Ana/Navrat comparison I referred to last year....The first portion,though,where the author bends over and kisses the collective ass of the ATP Tour...just pathetic.Yeah,it's THRILLING when only 2 or 3 guys when every single tournament...just RIVETING suspense:yawn::yawn::yawn:...and on clay,you have only ONE person winning,and he barely breaks a sweat...wake me when it's over:rolleyes:...FYI,that is NOT a slam on Nadal,who's maybe the best ever(before anyone starts whining);it's just that there's ZERO drama when you know in advance who's going to win w/o a doubt....

....And so we have our lovable Roller-Coaster Ana...even though the ride makes me nauseous sometimes after a bad loss...and we get dizzy with the ups and downs....I don't ever want to get off:D....I'll never forget how awesome RG was,along with the gala in Serbia,and I'm gonna stick around 'til she gets her way back....It'll be TWICE as fun next time:cool:

jelenacg
May 8th, 2009, 10:28 PM
This article is quite encouraging,actually,and it goes back to the Ana/Navrat comparison I referred to last year....The first portion,though,where the author bends over and kisses the collective ass of the ATP Tour...just pathetic.Yeah,it's THRILLING when only 2 or 3 guys when every single tournament...just RIVETING suspense:yawn::yawn::yawn:...and on clay,you have only ONE person winning,and he barely breaks a sweat...wake me when it's over:rolleyes:...FYI,that is NOT a slam on Nadal,who's maybe the best ever(before anyone starts whining);it's just that there's ZERO drama when you know in advance who's going to win w/o a doubt....

....And so we have our lovable Roller-Coaster Ana...even though the ride makes me nauseous sometimes after a bad loss...and we get dizzy with the ups and downs....I don't ever want to get off:D....I'll never forget how awesome RG was,along with the gala in Serbia,and I'm gonna stick around 'til she gets her way back....It'll be TWICE as fun next time:cool:

:lol:
Great post :yeah::worship:
This is actually the second year that my bf doesn`t watch mens tennis during clay season :lol:
He just says there is nothing fun in watching sports when you know who the winner will be

gaviotabr
May 8th, 2009, 10:35 PM
I also think that when Ana wins a slam again, which hopefully she will, it will be so much better. All these strugles have to end some day.. but I didn't like any of the quotes.. not from Ana, not from her coach. I'm not sure that's the way to get out of this funk..

spiritedenergy
May 8th, 2009, 10:43 PM
great article Isabela, I like that Ana and Kardon get along so well. The tables can turn at anytime, lets' wait and see.;)

jelenacg
May 8th, 2009, 10:47 PM
I also think that when Ana wins a slam again, which hopefully she will, it will be so much better. All these strugles have to end some day.. but I didn't like any of the quotes.. not from Ana, not from her coach. I'm not sure that's the way to get out of this funk..
What didn`t you like??

Costanza
May 8th, 2009, 10:49 PM
From spanish newspaper "MARCA".
Thanks to Franky(www.anaivanovic.com)
http://i39.tinypic.com/6sqrg0.jpg
http://i44.tinypic.com/23r9u7r.jpg

bruce goose
May 8th, 2009, 10:55 PM
:lol:
Great post :yeah::worship:
This is actually the second year that my bf doesn`t watch mens tennis during clay season :lol:
He just says there is nothing fun in watching sports when you know who the winner will beThanks for the encouragement,Jelena;it gets so tiring when male commentators expect the women to mimic the men in power...otherwise their game is supposedly inferior.Our culture here is so absurdly macho that women's sports get all the respect of Swedish log rolling or mouse racing...and so our sports channels will show a men's junior soccer game between Greenland and the Canary Islands before we can see one of Ana's matches...needless to say,I'm not thrilled with the programming choices...but I'm sure swishy snot John McEnroe would approve:rolleyes:

gaviotabr
May 11th, 2009, 04:19 PM
I don't know when this interview was made, but anyway..

Ana Ivanovic: back on track in 2009
11/05/2009

French Open champion Ana Ivanovic is on the rebound after a thumb injury last season derailed her Olympic hopes. She talks to SETimes about her successes so far and what she hopes to achieve in the future.
Interview by Igor Jovanovic for Southeast European Times in Belgrade -- 11/05/09 Photos courtesy of dh management ag.

Ana Ivanovic is currently ranked 7th in the world. [Manuela Davies/www.doubleXposure.com]

Last season, Serbian tennis player Ana Ivanovic had some of the best moments so far in her professional career. She won the French Open and spent 12 weeks as No. 1 on the World Tennis Association (WTA) list. Only 21 years old, she is one of the most popular female athletes in the world.

Near the end of the season, however, an inflammation in her right thumb forced her out of the Beijing Olympics -- a setback she described as "the most disappointing moment in my career". A string of defeats eroded her WTA ranking, and she slipped to eighth place. Now, following a coaching change, she is putting all that behind her, having already climbed a notch to No 7.

In an interview with Southeast European Times, Ivanovic talks about her goals for this season, her relationship with fellow Serbian tennis star Jelena Jankovic, and the prospects for next year's Fed Cup.

Southeast European Times: You were at the top of the WTA list for three months last year. What caused your decline on the list and the weaker results near the end of the season?

Ana Ivanovic: I think I was quite unlucky to become injured just as I was getting used to being No 1. It was a very frustrating time in my career, especially having to withdraw from the Olympics, which I had dreamed about playing in for many years.

Looking back, I probably should have taken a break from tennis and just waited until the thumb injury healed, instead of struggling and stressing about it for a couple of months.

But now I am healthy and looking forward to getting back to my best form. It will take a lot of hard work but it's a challenge I will enjoy.

SETimes: What have you set as your main goal this season? To return to No.1, to be among the top three female players in the world, win a Grand Slam tournament?

Ivanovic: I have a few goals. Most importantly, I want to qualify for the Sony Ericsson Championships in Doha. I also want to win another Grand Slam. But I am focusing more on improving all areas of my game. If you improve your game then the results and rankings take care of themselves.

SETimes: You hired a new coach, Craig Kardon, who was Martina Navratilova's coach. How is your co-operation with him, and what do you plan to work on the most in order to perfect your playing skill?

Ivanovic: Craig and I are working very well together. We share the same ideas about my game: that I am at my best when I am attacking. He is very positive and encourages me to come to the net more, which I enjoy and believe can be a great strength for me in the future. We also want to improve my serve, so that it is more consistent.

SETimes: Thanks to your participation, and the participation of Jelena Jankovic in the Serbian national tennis team, that team is now one of the strongest in the world. How far do you think you can go in the Fed Cup (the annual international team tennis competition for women) next year?

Ivanovic: I think we can win it. It will be extremely tough, especially if we have some difficult away matches, but for sure Jelena and I have the ability to win this competition, and we definitely have great support too. It will be very interesting to see how it goes.

SETimes: Certain media have reported you do not have a very good relationship with Jelena Jankovic. What is that relationship like now and what is the atmosphere like in the national team?

Ivanovic: No, that's not true. We get on fine. We have a very good team spirit and I have really enjoyed our Fed Cup matches this year. It's always fun to see Dejan (Vranes), who was my childhood coach and is now the captain of the team.

SETimes: Which male and female tennis players do you think will mark this season?

Ivanovic: There are so many good players in women's tennis at the moment. You can see the young girls coming up and even winning big titles, for example Azarenka and Wozniacki. Pavlyuchenkova did very well in Indian Wells too and she will be a dangerous player in the future.

I actually prefer watching men's tennis because I can learn more from it, and it's fascinating to see the battle at the top of the game. I can say that I am friendly with all of the top three, especially Novak of course, and it's going to be very interesting to follow men's tennis at the Grand Slams this summer.

SETimes: Serbian tennis has boomed thanks to you, Novak Djokovic and Jelena Jankovic. Do you think talented young players are following in your footsteps? Which young Serbian player is the one to watch?

Ivanovic: I don't know much about the junior players, but whenever I visit Belgrade I always smile when I see kids carrying rackets around the city. It's great to see and it's clear that tennis has become very popular. I am sure there are some very talented kids and hopefully the facilities will improve for them.

In the Fed Cup team I have spent some time with Aleksandra Krunic. She's 15 and she's fun to hang out with. She's also going to be a very good player.

SETimes: Do you ever think about what you will do after you stop playing tennis?

Ivanovic: I only think about it when I am asked! I am still very young and feel like I have a lot to achieve in tennis before I can think about another career. Tennis is obviously extremely important to me, so it's difficult to think that I won't be involved in some way when I stop playing. But I also think I might enjoy trying something in the world of business. I would also like to use languages in future, because I enjoy that a lot.


http://www.setimes.com/cocoon/setimes/xhtml/en_GB/features/setimes/articles/2009/05/11/reportage-01

gaviotabr
May 14th, 2009, 06:08 PM
http://www.anaivanovic.com/image.php?file=pictures/news/1536/TimesIndia.jpg

gaviotabr
May 14th, 2009, 06:14 PM
So.. Ana talks a bit about the injury.. she says she is confident she will be fit for RG. But somehow all this reminds me a lot about the Olympics.. :sad: I guess she will try to play until the very last minute.

There are only 10 days left... :sad:

jelenacg
May 14th, 2009, 06:16 PM
I think she will play :)

gaviotabr
May 14th, 2009, 06:28 PM
I think she will play :)

I hope you are right.. and that if she plays she is actually fit.

Either way, it's such bad luck.. everytime there is an important tournament coming up Ana gets injured or something alike.. :sobbing:

jelenacg
May 14th, 2009, 06:43 PM
I don`t like the part I haven’t had the preparation I wanted
I hope she was referring she didn`t have enough match play

gaviotabr
May 14th, 2009, 06:53 PM
I don`t like the part I haven’t had the preparation I wanted
I hope she was referring she didn`t have enough match play

I think she is talking about little match play. She had more than a month of practice, but only 3 matches and 1 tournament. And I'm sure she was expecting to play many more...

I worry about when she says that with injuries we never know, but she is confident she will play RG. She has been getting treatment for the past week.. and is still not really sure. That's far and away from the "there is no danger of me missing the French Open" that was posted in her web with the news of the knee injury. And she doesn't talk about how serious it is, even though she was asked. I don't know.. I hope things are going well..

jelenacg
May 14th, 2009, 07:12 PM
We probably won`t know anything for sure until RG starts :rolleyes: but she was moving ok in her match against Schiavone so i think and hope it`s just a matter of resting for a few days

gaviotabr
May 14th, 2009, 07:18 PM
We probably won`t know anything for sure until RG starts :rolleyes: but she was moving ok in her match against Schiavone so i think and hope it`s just a matter of resting for a few days

I hope so as well..

And we definitely won't know anything until the last moment, as usual... :o

gaviotabr
May 14th, 2009, 10:46 PM
Paris Preview

http://blog.tennisweek.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/ana_ivanovic_rolandgarros091.jpg

Chair umpires taking the traditional trip onto the terre battue to inspect ball marks won’t be the only ones leaping out of their seats during this French Open fortnight.

Two of the most popular players in Paris — reigning Roland Garros champion Ana Ivanovic and French favorite Jo-Wilfried Tsonga — have both managed to jump-start Parisian passion when they take the court.

Ivanovic’s tennis baptism sprung stroke-by-stroke from the depths of a bare Belgrade swimming pool and last June she unleashed a wave of winners across the red clay to make a memorable major spash on the world’s largest Grand Slam stage.

Dancing inside the baseline like a diver bouncing on the balls of her feet at the edge of the high board before descending into her grandest dream, Ivanovic reeled off eight of the last nine points to complete a 6-4, 6-3 conquest of Dinara Safina in the Roland Garros final and rise to her first career Grand Slam championship.

A convincing victory completed a two-week run in which the statuesque Serbian with the sparkling smile that makes her such a personable presence on court oozed staying power and star power with each swing to peak in Paris in ascending to the World No. 1 ranking.



http://blog.tennisweek.com/?p=566

jonnyroyale_13
May 16th, 2009, 05:48 AM
"Ivanovic’s tennis baptism sprung stroke-by-stroke from the depths of a bare Belgrade swimming pool and last June she unleashed a wave of winners across the red clay to make a memorable major splash on the world’s largest Grand Slam stage.
Dancing inside the baseline like a diver bouncing on the balls of her feet at the edge of the high board before descending into her grandest dream...."

They really step up the pool analogies and metaphors bigger and bigger each and every slam event:eek:


I worry about when she says that with injuries we never know, but she is confident she will play RG. She has been getting treatment for the past week.. and is still not really sure. That's far and away from the "there is no danger of me missing the French Open" that was posted in her web with the news of the knee injury. And she doesn't talk about how serious it is, even though she was asked. I don't know.. I hope things are going well..

ive been looking through the interviews from 2007 Wimbledon when she wore the tape around the one knee, but havent yet been successful finding any exact quotes regarding that. I dont know if there would be any relevance to that or not, for comparison, but thought id mention it..i dont know why.
Ive got my own hunch and level of confidence about Ana's current status for RG and what it will be in the end, but i started to type it and just dont feel comfortable posting it. It is like playing with fire jinxing this girl sometimes.:help: All i will say about RG from now until then is~ ajde!;)

jonnyroyale_13
May 16th, 2009, 04:33 PM
ive been looking through the interviews from 2007 Wimbledon when she wore the tape around the one knee, but havent yet been successful finding any exact quotes regarding that. I dont know if there would be any relevance to that or not, for comparison, but thought id mention it..i dont know why.


Well Jonny, just for curiosity i found some things about the last knee injury. heres a little timeline to recap;):

2007
June 25 - July 7 , Wimbledon- she later described the knee to be "hurting a lot during the tournament."(see link below) Flew to Italy after Wimbledon to see specialist for an MRI on right knee.

July 12- talked some about the knee at the website, saying she is ordered to rest knee completely for 2 weeks.
http://www.anaivanovic.com/?path=diary&yearmonth=2007-07&detailpage=170

July 28 - practicing again, feeling discomfort in the knee still
http://www.anaivanovic.com/?path=diary&yearmonth=2007-07&detailpage=172


August 6 - 12 Los Angeles - return of Ana, winning title #4 in one of her greatest tournaments eva!:kiss:

gaviotabr
May 16th, 2009, 04:43 PM
Well Jonny, just for curiosity i found some things about the last knee injury. heres a little timeline to recap;):

2007
June 25 - July 7 , Wimbledon- she later described the knee to be "hurting a lot during the tournament."(see link below) Flew to Italy after Wimbledon to see specialist for an MRI on right knee.

July 12- talked some about the knee at the website, saying she is ordered to rest knee completely for 2 weeks.
http://www.anaivanovic.com/?path=diary&yearmonth=2007-07&detailpage=170

July 28 - practicing again, feeling discomfort in the knee still
http://www.anaivanovic.com/?path=diary&yearmonth=2007-07&detailpage=172


August 6 - 12 Los Angeles - return of Ana, winning title #4 in one of her greatest tournaments eva!:kiss:

Took 1 month for the knee to be good again. She has very little time until RG.. :sobbing:

Reckoner
May 17th, 2009, 12:43 AM
http://www.anaivanovic.com/image.php?file=pictures/news/1536/TimesIndia.jpg
I guess nobody else noticed the error here, hey?

bruce goose
May 17th, 2009, 01:06 AM
Actually,Reckoner,I noticed it yesterday but didn't bother to comment....I have such a low opinion of journalists anyway,so it really doesn't change my view of them when they get statistical details like Ana's age wrong

gaviotabr
May 19th, 2009, 07:27 PM
Interesting article on Ana by Matt Cronin for Inside Tennis Magazine:

Ana Ivanovic’s Pursuit of Happiness

by Matthew Cronin


Defending French champion Ana Ivanovic never stops learning, but even a bookworm with an angel’s eyes and a devilish forehand can’t always put into practice what she’s attempting to preach.

As one of the most striking players in tennis history, she might be gracing the covers of men’s and women’s fashion magazines the world over, but she hardly has the personality of a super model. Talking to her, you get the impression that she’s a humanities student at an Ivy League school, thrilled to be delving into the works of Sigmund Freud and Karen Horney.

“It’s amazing the way the mind works,” Ivanovic said. “I’m a very emotional person and even when I’m on court, I always think so much. It’s also great to read about [emotions] and then learn more about them and how they actually function. In some ways, it helps me control my emotions.”

Ivanovic has a super sweet personality, so it’s not often that fans see her lose her temper, but she does boil inside and does get frustrated. Now she’s learning how to identify which emotions are swimming through her head and how to contend with them. “There are a few types of anxiety, so when you’re nervous, what you do to prevent it, or what happens when you get nervous and what kind of emotions are stronger than the others,” she said. “So that’s something I’ve learned, and to also learn how to control it, to go back to your breath or just some little things. But everything is happening [on court] so fast in a blink of an eye. You have to control emotions at that point, and it’s not easy.”

While Ivanovic is bubbly and chatty and has lots of interests, she’s no existentialist who spends days searching for the meaning of life in the cafes of Belgrade’s hippie district. In February, when she met up with her now coach Craig Kardon (an American who coached Martina Navratilova) in Dubai to see if the two would mesh, the two traded personality descriptions. “People who know me say I’m laid back,” Kardon recalled. “Ana said that’s good because I’m laid back too, and her mom and trainer started cracking up and said, ‘You’re not laid back!’ She has the appearance of that and is very nice and laid back in some ways, but when it comes to tennis she’s incredibly intense and wants it all. She wants things done right and thinks a lot about it. We’re trying to get her to think less and try to enjoy the moment and play in it.”

Ivanovic would love to do that, but as Freud would caution her, ridding oneself of a critical super-ego that’s saying she’s underachieving isn’t easy. The bloom is now off the rose and she might well arrive at the French Open — where she’s the defending champ — title-less in ‘09. Now ranked No. 7, she’s significantly fallen off the pace that saw her snare the No. 1 ranking in Paris with a heart stopping semi win over her Serbian rival, Jelena Jankovic, and a final round thumping of Dinara Safina. Since then, she’s been engaged in an exhausting uphill battle, injuring her right thumb and being forced to change her grip, contending with bouts of illness, not knowing whether she should hire a full-time coach or just stick with Adidas’ player development program, getting involved in her public romance with Spanish player Fernando Verdasco and then breaking up with him, and chiding herself for a career that had begun to go awry.

“When you are feeling good about your game you take it for granted,” she told IT. “When things aren’t going so well you get more tense. You want to work and try harder, but it doesn’t come straight away and that was frustrating. Lately I’ve been feeling a lot less pressure from the outside world and I realized that I want to feel that pressure again. It was a pretty tough few months.”

Ivanovic prides herself on being an independent thinker and was blaming herself for everything. She needed a new set of shoulders to lean on because she felt overwhelmed. So she went in search of a full time coach, who would give her a new plan and structure and take some responsibility off her very full plate. And voila, she found Kardon, who is a noted motivator and has a keen eye for strategy. They have the same idea as to how her game should be developing, which means closing out points faster. He’s direct and clearly tells her when she’s doing things right and wrong. They’ve been focusing on repetition, which is critical for her, especially since this year, she’s often lost focus as she tried to play points in too many different ways.

In her third round loss to Alisa Kleybanova at the Aussie Open, she’d hit two good shots, and then find herself pulling back and not committing enough. She left the tournament disappointed, realizing that she was giving up too much of the center of the court. She had her best tournament of the year at Indian Wells, reaching the final before she fell in near hurricane conditions to Vera Zvonareva. Then she lost early in Miami to Agnes Szavay, helped Serbia qualify for the Fed Cup World Group for the first time, and in Rome gave up a 4-0 lead in the third set to Aga Radwanska. Kardon says she needs to find a comfort zone and cannot afford to be riddled with anxiety, “She was in bad spot after the Australian. Her confidence was low, but she’s regaining it and has made improvements. She’s feeling good, but she’s lacking matches to prove it. She has to trust her game and handle her feelings, rather than have her feeling handle her game.”

One of the 21-year-old’s biggest problems has been her in inability to leave her career in the locker room. She was thinking about tennis way too much — before sleeping, at meals, in practice and sometimes by match time, her brain was sick of it. “It gets to the point where it’s too much and you need to have the balance to be able to switch it off,” she said. “Ever since I became No. 1, I thought, ‘Now I have to improve more because I have to stay here. What else can I do to improve?’ It began to be a habit. At night I would lie in bed and think about my game. I got to the point when I was on court that I felt I needed to get away from tennis a little. I needed to switch off …[Then] I would and I would feel guilty, that I was cheating and not doing enough. I’m still young and learning but sometimes I want everything now.”

Instead of breaking down the Xs and Os while talking to her pillow, Ivanovic is trying to teach herself to redirect her mind, which Kardon said is critical, as the more relaxed she is off court, the better she performs on court.

Ivanovic recently read “The Art of Happiness,” by Dalai Lama and has learned to imagine lying on the beach in the sun before resting, rather than brooding on how to chase down drop shots. “I was putting in the hard work and the results weren’t there and I thought I was doing everything right and it wasn’t going right,” she said. “I’m a perfectionist and I got down on myself and started judging myself more than other people judged me. I was suffering a lot. But I know I can be happy.” She has entered that critical stage in her career where she has to prove that her maiden run to her first Slam title was no fluke, that she can push herself to become a dominating player. Her results have been borderline poor, unbecoming of a player with such a tremendous upside. After her coming out party in Paris, she’s won just one medium sized title (‘08 Linz), and has beaten just two top 10 players. Of her notable foes, she’s taken losses to Jankovic, to both Williams sisters, to Nadia Petrova, Amelie Mauresmo and recently to top 10ers Zvonareva and Radwanska.

She’s simply not establishing her game like she did in the first part of ‘08, when she would skip around inside the baseline and launch killer, unreachable forehands to the corners. She has the most effective inside-out forehand in WTA history and arguably the best forehand in the game along with Serena and Sania Mirza. “Its one of the best shots in tennis,” Kardon said. “It’s natural, powerful and she has the right feel. She knows which spins to use, can produce short angles, go corner to corner and it really doesn’t matter if the other player knows it’s coming because it’s such a great shot.”

But the consistency she showed off her solid backhand side has gone away, her first serve is no longer threatening and her second serve lacks bite and kick. She has the best hands at net of any of the younger set, but she’s often hesitant at approaching the cords, even though it’s there where she might make a prosperous living over the next decade. She’s been scuffling, trying to rediscover the zeal that briefly brought her to No. 1, perhaps prematurely given that she’s a late bloomer. “At times she wants it too bad and if she doesn’t she gets frustrated,” Kardon said. “She’s getting better at it and that comes with maturity. She’s done a lot for someone her age and her game will continue to grow. Her serve has gotten better, her returns have really picked up, and she’s feeling more comfortable about coming forward. Her first serve should become more of a weapon, but her toss goes off. It’s become a shadow with her and a [bad] habit.”

The Serbian’s mind appears to be wandering on court, perhaps because she lost a little clarity off court, not allowing herself enough mental breaks and obsessing about her tennis, even when she should be taking breaks. If you look closely at Ivanovic’s history, there are plenty of matches that she has gutted out when she hasn’t been clicking. But those types of wins haven’t been as frequent recently and she realizes that as pretty as she is, she’s going to have to take a page from Nadal’s book and win ugly most of the time. As Kardon says, some player are always “looking for that magic carrot, that uh-huh idea when they really just need to trust what they have.”

Ivanovic says she’s pushing back her perfectionist side and realizes much of winning is being mentally stronger than her foes. “You just have to sort of get through the tough days.” There are likely more difficult days ahead, but it would be altogether stunning if she didn’t regain control of her game, rejoin the top five and be a consistent threat at the Slams. She’s already proven that she’s not “too nice to win a major,” and she’s an ambitious, goal-orientated person who won’t be satisfied hanging around the edges of the top 10. “Champions are never satisfied when they lose and she’s a champion,” Kardon said. “There are a lot of great players in the top five who could break through and dominate if they can put it together. Ana is right there in that group.”

Now the question she’ll have to answer is whether she can display the same type of gutsy play that allowed her to come back from a break down against Jankovic on Court Philip Chatrier last year and seize control of the tournament. “I’m sure the nerves will be there, but that’s a privilege too,” Kardon said. “You choose to be a pro and your goal of winning a Slam is one of them. If she can look at it that way, maybe it will take the pressure off of her.”


http://www.insidetennis.com/2009/05/ana-ivanovics-pursuit-happiness/

jelenacg
May 19th, 2009, 08:10 PM
You’re not laid back :lol::lol:
Good article,some things i`ve already heard
Is it true that she signed an endorsement deal with NetJets

gaviotabr
May 19th, 2009, 10:05 PM
You’re not laid back :lol::lol:
Good article,some things i`ve already heard
Is it true that she signed an endorsement deal with NetJets

It's true Jelena. This is the article from Bloomberg:

Buffett’s NetJets Signs Sponsor Deal With Ivanovic (Update1)
Share | Email | Print | A A A

By Danielle Rossingh

May 19 (Bloomberg) -- French Open champion Ana Ivanovic signed an endorsement deal with NetJets Inc., the private- aircraft venture owned by investor Warren Buffett.

The one-year, rolling contract, was signed this week, Gavin Versi, the tennis player’s spokesman, said in an interview today. Financial details weren’t disclosed.

Ivanovic became No. 1 in the world after winning her lone Grand Slam title in Paris last year. The 21-year-old Serbian, who owns properties on the Spanish island of Majorca and in Basel, Switzerland, has made more than $6.7 million in prize money in her career. She signed a deal with exercise equipment- maker TechnoGym a few months ago, Versi said.

Other endorsements include Adidas AG, Yonex Co. Ltd., Verano Motors and Juice Plus, the food-nutrition company owned by her manager, Dan Holzman.

Ivanovic has slumped to No. 8 in the rankings after her French open title was followed by early losses at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, the next two Grand Slam events.

Roger Federer, the former top-ranked men’s player who is seeking his first French Open championship, also endorses NetJets. The tournament on the clay courts of Roland Garros starts May 24.

To contact the reporter on this story: Danielle Rossingh in London at drossingh@bloomberg.net



http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601079&sid=aRosw2Q.4Aps&refer=amsports

bruce goose
May 19th, 2009, 11:51 PM
Interesting article on Ana by Matt Cronin for Inside Tennis Magazine:



http://www.insidetennis.com/2009/05/ana-ivanovics-pursuit-happiness/Great article,Izzy;I hope it encourages you somewhat that Cronin seems to approve of Kardon's approach....Let's hope we see results this year:smooch::wavey:

Marilyn Monheaux
May 20th, 2009, 10:47 AM
The Cronin article was really interesting. I like how Kardon is trying to help Ana and hope that they'll be successful!

~Kiera~
May 21st, 2009, 02:09 PM
From GQ magazine

http://img35.imageshack.us/img35/6003/47933664.th.jpg (http://img35.imageshack.us/my.php?image=47933664.jpg) http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/8553/19258065.th.jpg (http://img40.imageshack.us/my.php?image=19258065.jpg)

Marilyn Monheaux
May 21st, 2009, 02:19 PM
From her official site


The latest news about Ana!

French Open preview

May 21, 2009 /

Ana is in Paris preparing for the second Grand Slam of the year – the French Open, which begins on Sunday. Ana is the reigning champion, having captured her maiden Grand Slam and become No.1 in the world for the first time during last year’s memorable tournament.

The 21-year-old was forced to withdraw from the Mutua Madrilena Madrid open two weeks ago, but she has recovered in time to compete at Roland Garros. "Thankfully the pain and inflammation in my knee has gone away, so I have been able to practice this week,” she said.

“My timing is pretty good at the moment and I'm optimistic about my chances of success in Paris.

"Obviously I haven't had the preparation I would have liked, but on the positive side I didn't play many matches before the French Open last year too."

In fact, last year Ana played just one match more on clay than she has in the run-up to this year’s event: four versus three.

Twelve months ago, Ana produced a fantastic winning streak in Paris, advancing to the semi-finals without losing a set. After impressive victories over Sofia Arvidsson, Lucie Safarova and Caroline Wozniacki, Ana played near flawless tennis against Czech Petra Cetkovska, whom she overwhelmed 6-0, 6-0 in round four.

Two days later Ana faced world No.11 Patty Schnyder of Switzerland in the quarter-finals. Ana, seeded second for last year’s tournament, once again got off to a good start, dominating the match right from the beginning. The 200th win of her professional career was sealed after only 75 minutes as she triumphed 6-3, 6-2.

Certainly one of Ana’s most thrilling matches of 2008 was her semi-final encounter with compatriot Jelena Jankovic, which paved the way for Ana achieving her lifetime ambition of becoming No.1 in the world.

Unlike the matches before, it was a tie full of ups and downs, but thanks to Ana’s bravery on the big points, after more than two hours, she moved into her second successive French Open final.

In an intriguing Grand Slam final against Dinara Safina, Ana again hit form right on time, beating the Russian 6-4, 6-3 after one hour and 35 minutes to reach a major milestone in her young career.

Despite Ana’s impressive history at this event she prefers not to see herself as a “defending” champion.

“It’s an honour to be known as the defending champion, but for me this is a new Grand Slam and I’m excited about it,” she said. “I am not defending anything. This is a new tournament and a new opportunity to win another Grand Slam.”

According to the latest Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Singles Rankings, the 21-year-old is set to be the seeded eighth. She will conduct the men's draw at Stade Roland Garros at 11.30am local time on Friday.

By Yannic Glowitz

jelenacg
May 21st, 2009, 02:29 PM
Great news :bounce::bounce::bounce:
Good thing is that she was able to practice,so maybe after all it was only a matter of resting her knee for a few days
Thank you Kiera for the article

gaviotabr
May 22nd, 2009, 12:20 AM
New article:

Queen of the courts hopes to reign again

Winning the French Open a year ago made Ana Ivanovic world No 1 and the darling of the circuit. Now, after a year of frustration, she explains to Paul Newman why she is ready to defend her crown


Ana Ivanovic is hoping to put a difficult year behind her and rediscover her form in Paris next week

It is not always easy being either the world's most beautiful sportswoman or the No 1 player in your sport. Twelve months ago Ana Ivanovic was both, her triumph at the French Open underlining her status as the new glamour queen of tennis and putting her on top of the women's world rankings, but at the grand old age of 21 the Serb is having to prove herself all over again. Although Ivanovic will be the star attraction here today when she attends the draw for this year's clay-court finale, which begins on Sunday, she knows that her hard-won reputation – as a sportswoman if not as a face on a magazine cover – will be on the line over the next fortnight. Having had the world at her feet when she celebrated her first Grand Slam victory here last June, she is now hoping to put a year of frustration behind her.


The fact that Ivanovic is now the world No 8 tells you much about her last 12 months. Troubled last summer by a persistent thumb injury and by a loss of form, she has won just one title on the Sony Ericsson tour since last year's French Open, a minor event in Austria in October, and has suffered humbling defeats in the three subsequent Grand Slam tournaments, losing to lowly ranked opponents on each occasion.

Even when she thought she had put her fitness problems behind her, having started 2009 believing she was in her best shape for years, Ivanovic ran into more trouble last month when she hurt her right knee. The injury forced her to withdraw from the Madrid Open, which was to have been her final warm-up for Paris, and she was advised to rest. She has since returned to the practice court, but it remains to be seen whether the knee will stand up to the demands of a Grand Slam tournament.


If injuries are a way of life for most professional athletes, few have to handle the demands of celebrity that accompany a sportswoman with looks like Ivanovic's. Generally she does not complain about the media attention, but was shocked by the intensity of it when she started dating the Spanish player Fernando Verdasco towards the end of last year, a relationship that lasted only a few months.

"It was something new for me," Ivanovic said. "I hadn't realised that people would be so interested in my private life, but all of a sudden that changed. People followed us around and took photographs. To be honest, it took a lot of energy out of me. All of a sudden I was facing these questions and everyone was approaching me about it. Whenever I went out people were looking at me. I was always in the spotlight. I just felt: 'I can't even have an evening to myself, an evening in private.'

"I think it's important to keep a balance between your professional and private lives. I have learnt from this experience. Next time I would handle things differently and talk less about it. I just think it's important to live your life. Obviously, being in the public eye you have less privacy, but it's important to keep a bit of your life private."

That is one reason Ivanovic has been happy to live in Basle. Having been brought up in war-torn Belgrade, where she practised to the sound of Nato bombs falling on the city and spent winters training on cramped tennis courts in a converted swimming pool, she has been eternally grateful to Dan Holzmann, a Swiss businessman who sponsored her from an early age and gave her the chance to work in better conditions.

Is she recognised in the street in Basle in the way that she is back home? "Not as much. And even if people do recognise you I think they're more used to seeing famous people. There are quite a lot of famous people who live in Basle, like Michael Schumacher, so they keep their distance and give you privacy. That's something that I like. They also have a different mentality. They're much more laid-back and reserved than Serbians, who can be very emotional and have short fuses."

The success of Ivanovic, Jelena Jankovic and Novak Djokovic has transformed the Serbian sporting landscape. "Tennis is now one of the major sports and everyone knows about us," Ivanovic said. "Even if I'm just sitting in a car people hoot their horns and stop. I'm recognised everywhere. It's impossible to go for a walk in the city by myself or with a friend. In fact, I rarely go out of the house. I just stay with my family or go to the houses of relatives and friends.

"There is one restaurant near the river that I like to go to occasionally with my parents, but people still come up and ask for photographs. Some even come over to offer me advice on my game."

Ivanovic insists that the glamorous photo-shoots and fashion parties have not distracted her from tennis, though she admits she enjoys that side of her life. "It's very flattering," she said. "Over time I've learnt how to enjoy that a little bit. Every girl likes compliments. But I also realise it comes with the way you play and the way you perform and the things you achieve on court, because there are many good-looking tennis players who are lower ranked and they don't get as much attention. I just have to work hard and achieve things because my main goals are still on the court. But I wouldn't be telling the truth if I said I didn't enjoy it."

Nevertheless, Ivanovic has work to do if she is to get back to where she was a year ago. "Playing Wimbledon was very hard for me after the French," she recalled. "I was emotionally quite empty. After that I was injured and I couldn't practise properly for a month. The injury was very frustrating. Nobody knew why the inflammation kept coming back. I played the US Open when I really shouldn't have, because I had only five days' practice. After that when I was back to feeling 100 per cent I assumed that I would be in the same form, but it doesn't work like that. I had to be patient. I had some disappointing losses. I took them very hard and very personally."

Uneasy about the intensity of working with a permanent coach, Ivanovic had done without one for more than two years until she appointed Craig Kardon three months ago. The American has an impeccable pedigree, having also coached Martina Navratilova, Lindsay Davenport, Mary Pierce and Jennifer Capriati. Ivanovic's results have improved – she reached the final in Indian Wells – though with only three clay-court matches under her belt she looks underprepared for the challenge of Roland Garros.

Nevertheless, a smile is rarely far from Ivanovic's face and she points out that she had only five matches on clay before last year's tournament. "The pain and inflammation in my knee has gone away so I have been able to practise this week," she said. "My timing is pretty good and I'm optimistic about my chances."

From Paris to Paris: 12 months of pain

June 2008 Wins first Grand Slam in Paris but loses to Zie Jheng (world No 133) in 3rd round at Wimbledon.

July Suffers injury to right thumb while practising in Spain.

August Misses the Olympic Games because of injury.

September Loses to Julie Coin (world No 188) in US Open 2nd round.

October Wins tournament in Linz, Austria, her only title in the last 12 months.

November Loses two matches in season-ending Sony Ericsson Championships before pulling out with virus.

January 2009 Loses to Alisa Kleybanova (world No 31) in the 3rd round at the Australian Open.

February Appoints Craig Kardon as her new coach.

March Reaches final at Indian Wells (beaten by Vera Zvonareva) in her best performance of 2009.

April Suffers knee injury playing in Fed Cup and subsequently misses Madrid Open, her final warm-up before French Open.


http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/queen-of-the-courts-hopes-to-reign-again-1689141.html

gaviotabr
May 22nd, 2009, 01:25 AM
After that when I was back to feeling 100 per cent I assumed that I would be in the same form, but it doesn't work like that. I had to be patient. I had some disappointing losses. I took them very hard and very personally."

I'll have the fireworks ready for the moment Ana stops assuming she will play well and actually fights and focuses to play well in every match. This "I just assumed I would play well and then when I didn't I got frustrated" is the biggest WTF thing I've ever read.. you should never assume anything.. and much less let your frustrations handle your game and lose control of it. :o

And we could see how she took the losses.. instead of motivating her to get some sort of refusal to lose, it messed up with her head big time. :sobbing:

gaviotabr
May 22nd, 2009, 01:34 AM
And another..

Navratilova’s Former Coach Has Ivanovic Primed for French Open

By Danielle Rossingh

May 22 (Bloomberg) -- Ana Ivanovic is primed for defense of her French Open title and quest to reclaim the No. 1 ranking in women’s tennis with help from a new coach who has decades of experience guiding Grand Slam champions.

The 21-year-old Serb hired Craig Kardon in February, after a difficult second half of the 2008 season when she slipped to No. 8. The American coached Martina Navratilova to her record ninth Wimbledon singles title and also worked with Grand Slam winners Lindsay Davenport, Mary Pierce and Jennifer Capriati.

Ivanovic had the top ranking for a total of 12 weeks, then lost it after early eliminations at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. The winner of $6.8 million in her career, she says Kardon improved her volleys and ground strokes and has been working on her consistency as she goes into Paris, where the French open starts May 24.

“I feel I have my game back,” Ivanovic said last month in an interview in Lleida, Spain, where she was playing in the Fed Cup. “I have a new coach. I finally have direction again and it feels really good.”

After her French Open title, Ivanovic struggled with focus and injuries. Her return to Belgrade brought thousands of people into parliament square and she had tea with the country’s president, Boris Tadic. She grew up during NATO bombings of the city, which forced her to schedule practices around air raids, and practiced in an empty swimming pool that converted to courts in the winter.

Struggles

It took Ivanovic time to get used to being a Grand Slam champion. After Paris, she lost in the third round of Wimbledon, and failed to win back-to-back matches in the next five events she entered. She was beaten as the top seed by a qualifier in the second round at the U.S. Open in New York in August.

A right-thumb injury had forced her to withdraw from the Beijing Olympics earlier that month. The pain got so bad she was barely able to hold a bottle of water, her agent, Gavin Versi, said.

“It was very tough and very frustrating times as well, with injuries,” Ivanovic said. “After that, I expected myself to be on the same level as when I was healthy. But obviously it took some time to develop the game again and get back on the same level. It was a frustrating process.”

Ivanovic is rated the sixth choice, at 12-1, to retain her French Open crown by British bookmaker Ladbrokes Plc. Dinara Safina, who lost in the final a year ago and is now No. 1 in the world, is the 4-1 favorite.

Practice Scene

Kardon worked with Ivanovic in Spain as part of her comeback. Watched by her father and grandmother, who had traveled from Belgrade for her Fed Cup match against Spain, she practiced her serve. The normally good-natured Serb threw her racket on the clay court out of frustration when she hit yet another ball into the net as the wind played havoc with her toss. Kardon cracked a joke, and Ivanovic smiled, took a deep breath and started again. The next few serves all landed inside the service box.

Ivanovic’s looks -- she has been featured in Vogue magazine -- combined with her athleticism and success on the court have won her contracts with companies including Adidas AG, Yonex Co., Verano Motors and Juice Plus, the food-nutrition company owned by her manager, Dan Holzman. She signed a deal with luxury watch maker Rolex Group a year ago and recently struck an agreement with exercise-equipment maker Technogym.

Old Form

Ivanovic regained some of her old form at the end of last season, winning her eighth tournament in Linz. A third-round exit at the Australian Open this year was followed by a runner- up place at the hard courts of Indian Wells, California, in March. She hasn’t had an ideal preparation for the clay courts of Roland Garros, losing in the third round at Rome and withdrawing from a tournament in Madrid with a knee injury.

Now her focus is on Paris, and reaching the season-ending Sony Ericsson Championships in Doha in October.

“She just has to look at her tennis as if it’s her job, and try not to let her emotions bring her down,” Kardon, 47, said in an interview in Lleida. “Her game is still very young, and she can win as many Grand Slams as she wants to. She can win the French Open.”


http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601079&sid=axmEe4MyWvRc&refer=home

gaviotabr
May 22nd, 2009, 01:47 AM
Now her focus is on Paris, and reaching the season-ending Sony Ericsson Championships in Doha in October.

“She just has to look at her tennis as if it’s her job, and try not to let her emotions bring her down,” Kardon, 47, said in an interview in Lleida. “Her game is still very young, and she can win as many Grand Slams as she wants to. She can win the French Open.”

The YEC just seems like a far away dream.. if she doesn't get a decent result in RG, it will get extremely hard for her to reach it.

And I'm growing convinced that Ana is allowing frustration to wreck havoc with her game more often than not.. even if she is not twrowing racquets, I get the feeling she sometimes boils inside.

gaviotabr
May 28th, 2009, 11:48 PM
Ana has given an interview to Blik. It's in german..


Ana Ivanovic Exklusiv im BLICK-Interview


Von Christian Bürge und Marcel Hauck aus Paris | 00:00 | 29.05.2009
Vor einem Jahr gewann Ana Ivanovic Paris und wurde die Weltnummer 1. Heute kämpft sie um den Anschluss an die absolute Spitze.

BLICK Ana Ivanovic, vor einem Jahr gelang Ihnen hier in Paris grosse Durchbruch. Sie gewannen Roland Garros, wurden die Weltnummer 1. Helfen die guten Gefühle, um zum Erfolg zurückzukehren?
Natürlich sind die schönsten Erinnerungen sofort wieder da. Es waren die zwei fantastischsten Wochen meiner Karriere. Man erinnert sich an jedes Detail. Ich hatte ein sehr gutes Jahr bis dahin. Erst was nach Paris kam, war frustrierend. Denn bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt ging meine Karriere nur nach oben. Dann kamen plötzlich diese Rückschläge. Und es war schwierig, damit umzugehen.

Was taten Sie?
Ich lernte viel über mich selbst. Vor allem geduldiger zu sein. In der Vergangenheit reichte harte Arbeit und ich sah das Resultat sofort. Diesmal nicht. Ich arbeitete, fokussierter und entschlossener denn je, doch die Resultate kamen nicht. Als ich dieses Jahr bei den Australian Open dann früh ausschied, war das sehr hart. Ich wollte in den Final. Ich hatte ein Top-Vorbereitung und dachte, ich sei bereit.

Drückten Sie die falschen Knöpfe?
Ich realisierte einfach, dass ich viel zu oft ans Tennis dachte. Die ganze Zeit. Es war schwierig für mich, abzuschalten, den Schalter zu finden. Immer wenn ich den Platz verliess, dachte ich an Tennis. Plötzlich realisierte, dass Ablenkung vom Tennis den Unterschied ausmachen könnte.

Zum Beispiel?
In Australien wars das Surfen. Aber es ist eigentlich egal was. Andere Sportarten, irgendwas. Etwas friedliches, ruhiges, was die Gedanken vom Tennis weg lenkt.

Novak Djokovic sagte uns, Sie seien stets so fokussiert, dass es schwierig sei, Sie zum Essen auszuführen.
Ich bin fokussiert. Das hat mich schliesslich auch soweit gebracht, zu dem gemacht, was ich jetzt bin. Vor meinen Matches habe ich immer gerne ein frühes Abendessen mit meinen Coaches, spare Energie, gehe ins Zimmer, lese ein Buch. Zwischendurch muss man das aber auch vergessen können. Muss man Spass haben, mit Freunden ausgehen. Ich versuche, ausgewogen zu sein. Früher hatte ich Leute um mich herum, die mir einredeten, ich müsse immer in dieser Tennis-Blase drinbleiben. Jetzt habe ich diese andere Seite wieder entdeckt. Und es hilft. Ich bin auf dem Platz wieder motivierter.

Wer sind Ihre Freunde?
Hier im Tenniszirkus gibt es eigentlich keine. Denn unter den Mädchen gibt es keine richtigen Freundschaften. Aber meine Familie ist hier. Also verbringe ich mehr Zeit mit ihnen. Ich sehe sie ja nicht so oft.
Das Team ist aber während 12 Monaten um sie herum. Ist es nicht langweilig, ständig dieselben Gesichter zu sehen?
Natürlich. Manchmal sage ich: Geht bitte, lasst mich allein! Man muss sich das mal vorstellen. Man reist rund um die Welt. Und beim Frühstück, Mittagessen und Abendessen sitzen dir immer die gleichen Leute gegenüber. Das strapaziert einen dann doch. Und man möchte es gern ändern. Andererseits ist man auch froh um sie, denn man hat nicht viele Freunde auf der Tour. Und meine Freunde von zuhause kann ich ja nicht mitnehmen.

Sie sind in Paris. Eine Frau wie Sie wird sich sicher auch beim Shoppen ablenken.
Ich spar’ mir das für das Ende des Turniers auf. Weil es hier so viele gute Läden gibt. Und ich kenne mich. Ich kann nicht einfach eine Stunde beim Shoppen verbringen. Meistens brauche ich mehr als einen halben Tag. Ich muss aber ein wenig Energie sparen. Und das mache ich beim Shoppen nicht.

Haben Sie sich vergangenes Jahr mit einem Geschenk belohnt?
Ich habe mir Ohrringe gekauft. Letztes Jahr wars für mich ja am Samstag zu Ende. Aber am Sonntag waren die meisten Läden geschlossen. Ich sagte: Nicht mit mir. Jetzt verlängern wir. Das haben wir dann auch gemacht.

Der Titel hat aber auch seinen Tribut gefordert.
Es war eine sehr intensive Zeit. Ich hatte die ganze Aufmerksamkeit der Öffentlichkeit. Ich wollte alles aufsaugen, machte auch alles mit den Medien mit. Danach war ich total erschöpft. Aber es war mein erster Grand-Slam-Titel. Ich bereue nichts.

Wie sehr hat das Rampenlicht geschadet?
Irgendwie verdient man sich ja die Aufmerksamkeit. Man verfolgt ein Ziel mit allem, was man hat. Und irgendwann bist du da. Du bist an der Spitze. Und niemand ist mehr vor dir. Du hast nur noch Leute hinter dir. Du bist die Zielscheibe für alle. Ich brauchte Zeit, um mich daran zu gewöhnen. Weil ich Angst hatte, trainierte ich zu viel. Ich war übertrainiert. Und darum kamen wohl auch die Verletzungen.

Im Winter trennten Sie sich nach kurzer Zeit von Ihrem damaligen Freund Fernando Verdasco. Hat Sie das mitgenommen?
Ich versuche, das nicht allzu sehr miteinander zu vermischen. In gewisser Weise ist es natürlich schwierig, weil wir so sehr im Rampenlicht stehen und die Leute alles über unser Privatleben wissen wollen. In Zukunft werde ich mich in dieser Hinsicht aber noch mehr abgrenzen. Privates sollte privat bleiben. Und mein Privatleben sollte auch nicht mein Tennis beeinflussen. Denn Tennis hat klar Priorität. Es ist das, was ich liebe. Ich habe grosse Ziele. Natürlich kann ich meine Gefühlswelt nicht völlig ausschliessen. Jeder braucht das. Es ist wichtig, eine Balance zu haben. Für mich war diese Freundschaft eben auch etwas Neues. Ich hatte noch nie etwas Ähnliches. Aber ich werde daraus lernen. Eines ist jedoch klar: Ich gewinne oder verliere keine Matches wegen einer Beziehung.

Verändert es gar nichts?
Sicher kann dich ein guter Partner motivieren. Vielleicht kann man den Erfolg zu zweit auch mehr geniessen, gut möglich. Ich brauche einfach jemanden, der mich versteht und der mich unterstützt. Im Prinzip denke ich schon, dass es wichtig ist, jemanden zu haben. Um ein erfülltes Leben zu haben, relaxter zu sein, befriedigt zu sein.

Aber eine Beziehung mit einem Spieler scheint nicht einfach zu sein.
Ja, ganz klar. Aber es ist vergessen, es liegt hinter mir. Ich schaue vorwärts.

Sie bezahlen den Preis der Berühmtheit.
Vielleicht. Aber wir sind gegenüber Schauspielern oder Leuten aus dem Musikbusiness immer noch im Vorteil. Es ist ganz klar. Niemand will ein Paparazzi-Bild von sich in irgend einer Zeitung sehen.

Gut ausgesehen hats.
Oh, danke! (lacht) Nein, aber ernsthaft. Man ist einfach ausgestellt. Ich bin eine scheue Person. Ich mag diese Dinge nicht in den Medien sehen. Ich fühl’ mich ja nicht mal wohl, mit meinen Eltern über meine Beziehungen zu reden.

Die negative Seite der glitzernden Tenniswelt hat auch Jelena Dokic beschrieben, die von ihrem Vater unterdrückt wurde. Haben Sie mit ihr darüber geredet?
Das ist natürlich ein heikles Thema und ich tue mich schwer, mit jemandem solche Dinge anzusprechen. Es ist traurig, keine Frage. Unglücklicherweise gibt es viele solche Fälle im Tennis. Ich realisiere jetzt, wie glücklich ich mit meinen Eltern sein kann, die mich nur unterstützt haben. Dafür kann man Gott danken. Wenn solche Dinge dann in der Öffentlichkeit geschehen, ist es umso peinlicher. Jeder hat seine Meinung, alle urteilen.

Wurden Sie nie unter Druck gesetzt?
Nein, nie. Sie haben mich nie zu was gezwungen. Bei mir wars ja umgekehrt. Ich hab die Eltern genötigt, mich in die Tennisschule einzuschreiben.

Gibt es viele Negativ-Beispiele auf der Tour?
Auf der Tour, vor allem aber in gewissen Klubs. Ich sehe diese überehrgeizigen Eltern oft, wie sie ihre Kinder beim Training anstarren. Ich merke nur schon in der Art, wie sie mit ihnen sprechen, wenn etwas nicht gut ist. Ich kann oft sagen, dass ein Kind vielleicht im Moment talentiert ist, aber später zerstört sein wird. Kinder hören auf ihre Eltern bis in ein gewisses Alter. Wenn sie aber in die Pubertät kommen, wollen sie selbst entscheiden. Dann wollen sie etwas tun, was sie geniessen. Es ist traurig, dass so viele Eltern ihre Träume durch ihre Kinder ausleben wollen.

Wie gelang es Jelena, wieder zurückzukommen?
Schwierig zu sagen. Es ist jedenfalls toll. Ich hoffe, sie kann wieder Grosses erreichen, weil sie eine so talentierte Spielerin ist.

Dem Frauentennis würde es generell gut tun. Das Niveau wird ja immer wieder heftig kritisiert. Was fehlt?
Das grösste Problem beim Frauentennis ist vielleicht, dass die Spitzenspielerinnen nicht so konstant sind wie die Männer. Es gibt viele gute Spielerinnen und immer wieder tolle Matches.

Mats Wilander hat gesagt, in den letzten drei oder vier Jahren hätte er auf der Damentour nichts Gutes gesehen. Was entgegnen Sie?
Zum Glück lese ich diese Dinge nicht. Natürlich haben wir es gegen die Männer im Moment schwer. Die haben Rafa, Roger, Novak und Murray. Alles konstante Spitzenspieler. Und vor allem sind es verschiedene Charaktere. Das ist ein Riesenvorteil und toll fürs Männertennis. Wir warten noch auf so eine Konstellation. Aber wir haben immerhin die Williams-Schwestern, Scharapowa ist wieder da, Safina, dann gibt es uns, die Serbinnen. Die Ausgangslage ist sehr interessant.


http://www.blick.ch/sport/tennis/ploetzlich-bist-du-die-zielscheibe-fuer-alle-120236

gaviotabr
May 31st, 2009, 10:59 AM
Ana gave an interview to spanish newspaper El País:

ENTREVISTA: Roland Garros ANA IVANOVIC 'Número ocho' del mundo y ganadora de Roland Garros en 2008
"Ahora todo se basa en darle duro a la pelota"
JUAN JOSÉ MATEO - París - 31/05/2009


Ana Ivanovic (Belgrado, Serbia, 1987) ex número uno del mundo y campeona vigente de Roland Garros, juega hoy contra una tenista que hace cortes de manga a sus rivales, que chilla y grita, que ordena a la grada silencio, y que ayer fue despedida por el público con un sonoro abucheo. Victoria Azarenka, la número nueve, eliminó a Carla Suárez (5-7, 7-5 y 6-2) en un partido tensísimo que duró dos días porque se acabó la luz el viernes, cuando dos guardias de seguridad debieron mediar para que no se pelearan dos grupos de aficionados bielorrusos. "Conozco a Azarenka desde niña. Es dura. Agresiva. Una jugadora comprometida con sus tiros a la que le gusta dominar", afirma Ivanovic, que habla sobre la presión de ser una estrella cuando aún se siente una niña.

"Me gustaría pedir consejo a gente que admiro, como Seles, pero soy tímida"

Pregunta. ¿Qué tal su casa en Mallorca?

Respuesta. Me gusta mucho. En cuanto tengo tiempo libre, voy. Es como vivir de vacaciones. El año pasado, me entrené ahí con Rafa [Nadal]. Quizás en el futuro volvamos a hacerlo... cuando yo esté más fuerte. ¡Necesito esperar a que él envejezca un poco!

P. ¿Cuál es el mejor consejo que le han dado?

R. Cuando tenía diez años, mi entrenador me decía: 'Ana, si trabajas duro fuera de la pista, los partidos serán más fáciles'. No lo entendía. '¡Los partidos son muy diferentes!', le decía yo. Y él seguía insistiendo. Es una gran verdad. Cuanto más duro trabajas, más fácil es en la pista... me gustaría pedirles consejo a jugadoras como Monica Seles, a tenistas a las que admiro, pero soy un poco tímida. No quiero molestarles, interrumpir su camino, aunque sería muy interesante para mí.

P. Desde que ganó Roland Garros hace un año llegó al número uno, lo perdió, se lesionó... ¿qué ha aprendido?

R. Aquellas fueron mis dos grandes semanas, algo increíble. El momento de ganar un torneo del Grand Slam se ha mantenido más en mi memoria que conseguir el número uno. Ahora me siento una jugadora diferente, más experimentada, porque he pasado por muchas cosas en el último año. He aprendido mucho del juego y de mí misma como persona. Lo más duro fueron las lesiones. Siempre, desde que empecé a jugar, mi carrera fue hacia arriba, subiendo la colina. Siempre fui de éxito en éxito, hasta que, de repente, eso se paró. La lesión fue una decepción. Muy duro. Había asumido que mi carrera siempre iría hacia arriba. No me había dado cuenta de que hay buenos y malos momentos. Eso me ha hecho aprender. Fue durísimo. Me llevó tiempo calmarme, volver a lo básico. Ahora siento que vuelvo a estar en el buen camino.

P. Era una niña cuando estalló la Guerra de Yugoslavia. Aprendió a jugar en una piscina vacía. ¿No sabía ya que la vida es dura?

R. Mucha gente me decía eso, pero sinceramente creo que eso es algo que no te crees hasta que te das cuenta por ti misma. Hasta que no cambia algo en tu cabeza y te dices: 'No pasa nada si no juegas bien, le pasa a todo el mundo. Mira a todos esos grandes jugadores que se cayeron y volvieron a la cima'. Es importante tomar esa decisión, pero es difícil. A nadie le gustan los disgustos, las decepciones, pero son parte del juego y nadie ha encontrado todavía una vía alternativa hasta la cima del tenis. Aún así, sigue siendo duro: quiero hacerlo todo bien. Me aplico al ciento por ciento en todo. Si no hay resultados, me entristezco. Eso me hace juzgarme mucho.

P. Desde que se retiró Justine Henin, ha habido cinco números uno.

R. Henin era muy dominante. Tenía tantos puntos que las demás jugadoras tenían que compartir el resto. Había muchos cambios entre el número dos y el cinco, y de repente, cuando ella se retiró, esas jugadoras eran las número uno. Es emocionante. Nunca sabes quién ganará. Es una oportunidad. Henin le dio mucho al tenis. Ahora, el juego se está desarrollando en otra dirección. Hay jugadoras como Jankovic que son durísimas, que salen y luchan cada bola... no hay un juego como el de antes, subiendo a la red. Ahora se basa todo en darle duro a la bola. Y eso es más duro para nuestros cuerpos.



http://www.elpais.com/articulo/deportes/Ahora/todo/basa/darle/duro/pelota/elpepidep/20090531elpepidep_20/Tes

-NAJ-
Jun 5th, 2009, 06:08 PM
http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/8578/ana20ivanovic20novounut.th.jpg (http://img36.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ana20ivanovic20novounut.jpg)http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/341/ana20ivanovicnovounutra.th.jpg (http://img36.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ana20ivanovicnovounutra.jpg)http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/7884/anci1unutra.th.jpg (http://img20.imageshack.us/my.php?image=anci1unutra.jpg)http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/1143/anciunutra.th.jpg (http://img20.imageshack.us/my.php?image=anciunutra.jpg)


Ana Ivanovic back in the role model

Our tennis player Ana Ivanovic, protective face of "Verano Group, today was an exclusive recording of fashion photographs for the purposes of advertising campaigns fashion brands that represent the company. Take the team of professional fashion photographer and the stylist was held in the recently re-open, house brand "Belgrade" and lasted several hours, during which our teniserka once again tested as a photo model. Ana delighted look and offer clothes and other content that is seen in the house brand "Belgrade." "I love shopping, where can I find in one place! "Belgrade" looks beautiful in the glory - the atmosphere reminded me of the best department stores in Europe, what are the "Herods" in London, "Lafajet Gallery" in Paris or New York, "Saks, and while in my home town.
On the question of how to feel again in the role of photo-model, Ana Ivanovic said: "Cooperation with" Verano Group is a great pleasure for me. Obradovao me that their proposal again, as they say, a big fashion success record in December last year, when we recorded photos of the corporate calendar faithful. I hope that this cooperation will be successful! "Otherwise, it is a fact that was published in the annual" Forbsovoj "list of the most powerful public figures, Ana took the 90th place.

http://www.svet.rs/clanak/ana-ivanovi%C4%87-ponovo-u-ulozi-modela

-NAJ-
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:13 PM
Interview for Novosti
I will be again as I used to be

Although I am disappointed because of elimination in the fourth school Rolan Garos, can not be dissatisfied with what I achieved in the last time, considering all the circumstances that follow me, but almost a year. I'm on the right way, playing all the better, safer, I'm in your options and the player again as I once worked, said Ana Ivanovic in an exclusive interview for the "Evening News."
* Do you have a problem with self-confidence with respect to the variable form and defeated before you experience the last time more than before?
- Self-confidence is a very strange category, because when you think it never can lose, and when it is not you that it never will not return. Now I feel that the return to form and I'm safer on the ground. Well I played in Paris and during the first week of Rolan Garos I am so much overcome. First I think some of your doubts and fears. Just my confidence back. I realized that the defeat, frustration, and some negative things that we are an integral part of sport event.
* However, you are not able to hide the sadness and disappointment after the elimination?
- Yes, it was very difficult after the defeat. Especially as I felt that it was not fair, because I was so bad during the match and had felt dizziness. I am not able to give their hundred percent to me is the most hit. I'm able to play the maximum and that Azarenka was better, I accepted without problems. I feel like because I finished work, I know that I could give more, and I'm not. It hurt me more.
* The last time you have problems with health. The thumb of the hand and knee. Did you think about the break, as the situation would not be repeated by jesenas you constantly playing worsened the situation?
- I did, I think, and breaks. So I went with many doctors, as I heard that many different opinions and to not repeat the mistake when I injured a thumb. It cost me dearly, because I played when I was not ready, and we are confident ljuljalo, because I played a hundred percent that I am fit. With the knee is another good story. There is little pain after training, but work on the recovery, regularly go to massage therapy and how I was completely ready when off the ground again.
* You have had and vrtoglavice that just are not typical for a young athlete. What is?
- Just today, I drew blood, and you'll see, but I think that there is a dose only increased stress, and at the end of last year I had a problem with iron, so that is probably a consequence of a combination of all of that.
* Recently working with renowned coach Kreg Kardonom. What you mean that cooperation?
- I am aware that in me there is room for progress. I was looking for a solution and as of the beginning of the year working with Kardonom, I can say that I am sure that with him can be better than I was.
* Belgrade has seen the first ATP tournament, which would mean that you will soon be in the VTA calendar?
- I watched the details of the "Serbia is open" and is a great desire to experience and I can play the official tournament mečeve of our audience. Serbian tennis is guilty, because all we have and therefore how much this sport
likes of us. It would be incredibly nice for people to experience that feeling, because the tournament usually only watch on television.
* The opportunity to play again you will be in Belgrade in February 2010. against Russia. Kakve su naše šanse protiv tako jake selekcije?
- I think that we have great chances. Although they have a strong team, playing in the field but only against one rivalke. Good for us is that we have a full "Arena" and we'll be able to choose basis. I believe in victory, because we all wish that, after achieving a dream, and to the placement in the elite world, and make other - to win the Fed Cup.
* What is your relationship with Jelena?
- Superb! Play together, bodrimo other players and work as a team. The more we are together in the team will be all the better.
* Many would like to change places with you. What can you order them?
- In the first place that tennis is not only Glamor. First of all tremendously requires much sacrifice, training, prolivenih tears and sweat. I am elected this time, and all children who want to be professional athletes should be to decide alone, and not to be forced. I'd like to be the inspiration for some future champions, such as Monica Seles was me. I always need to know that victory and defeat an integral part of sport, and to defeat once know to be useful and of victory.
* Once we are able to see the old Ana Ivanovic?
- But I believe in Wimbledon - and sent one of the best world teniserki at the end of a call for "News."

ID
Name: Ana Ivanovic
Date and place of birth:
6. November 1987. Belgrade
Height / weight: 183 cm, 69 kg
Professional: from 17
August 2003.
Victory-defeat: 228-81
First on the list-VTA:
9. June 2008.
Current position: 8th
Title: 8 VTA, 5 ITF
Gren slem: Rolan Garos 2008.
Earnings from the tournament: 6753.904 dollars

BRATA SUPPORT
* BROTHER Milos is a basketball player junior team Zemun. Do you have time to follow his career?
- Follow bratovljeve game. Now the league ended, a pause and learn English, because it wants to go abroad to study. Always offer maximum support, as well as on the menu - says Ana.
* Is it so when it comes to girls, because we learn that Milos is very popular among peers?
- Very weak, because it is very closed and does not want to discuss it. I have pliers to Vadim words from the mouth. But wants to know all of what is happening to me, but your stuff well hidden - with a smile says Ana.

Wants to the children
* Have achieved a lot thanks to tennis, where you see the career?
- It is true that I have achieved many goals zacrtane. In addition to tennis is opened many doors and many other features. When you finish the career I would like to commit to more humanitarian work and help all who need help, especially children, with which the work within UNICEF. Of course, I want to one day have his children and family and to focus on them.

IMAM courtier
* Is there a courtier Ana Ivanovic?
- Well, I have ... Here and there ... - With a shy smile says Ana. - I was shy and withdrawn, not only communication so easy.
* Do you men are afraid?
- I do not know if you are afraid. It is better to ask someone from my environment.

Recording, THERAPY, TRAINING ...
One of the best world teniserki allocate the time for our list after recording a set of photos for Ziru in the Palace of Belgrade.
- Every day you spend in the home city is completely filled. Regularly go to therapy and training, so I readily welcomed the season, and are trying to spend time with family and relatives. I'd like to be more to be in Serbia - says Ana.
Ivanovićeva in Friday in the malls, "Zira" and opened "Shopping parti", in which the visitors signed tennis ball.

gaviotabr
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:24 PM
Thanks for all the articles and pics NAJ!!!

:worship:

jelenacg
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:39 PM
I like that they asked her about those dizziness
She said that last year she had problem with iron,and today she went to see a doctor and they took her blood for analysis but she thinks it`s only bc of stress
What is your relationship with Jelena?
- Superb
:haha::haha: no wonder they have good relations,they both suck right now:lol::lol:
Slumping sisters :o:(
I kinda liked it more when she and JJ would just say they are not the best friends at least back then they were both winning :lol::lol:
Her brother is very popular among girls , but he doesn`t want to talk about that with Ana :lol: although he wants to know everything about Ana`s private life :lol:

gaviotabr
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:48 PM
I like that they asked her about those dizziness
She said that last year she had problem with iron,and today she went to see a doctor and they took her blood for analysis but she thinks it`s only bc of stress
What is your relationship with Jelena?
- Superb
:haha::haha: no wonder they have good relations,they both suck right now:lol::lol:
Slumping sisters :o:(
I kinda liked it more when she and JJ would just say they are not the best friends at least back then they were both winning :lol::lol:
Her brother is very popular among girls , but he doesn`t want to talk about that with Ana :lol: although he wants to know everything about Ana`s private life :lol:

Hey Jelena! :wavey:

Interesting interview.. She should take good care of her iron levels. I had anemia as a kid, since I'm a vegetarian, and in those days I used to get dizzy a lot. To balance that, a good nutrition is usually enough. On the other hand, if it's only stress, than she should learn how to deal with it, which I guess is a lot harder to do.. :rolleyes:

I see that she said she was feeling bad and felt she could have given a lot more in the match against Azarenka. Good to see that she knows.. because she was totally empty and there was no fight.. she could have done a whole lot more. :o

-NAJ-
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:52 PM
Jelena and Ana need to motivated each other in some good result. but this year they are following each other only in bad results. :fiery:
Ana need to win one MM tournament so they can play Bali championship. No way that they will play in Doha with this results:tape: but who knows they are now #10 and #12 in WTA race :lol: with this shit of results

gaviotabr
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:56 PM
Jelena and Ana need to motivated each other in some good result. but this year they are following each other only in bad results. :fiery:
Ana need to win one MM tournament so they can play Bali championship. No way that they will play in Doha with this results:tape: but who knows they are now #10 and #12 in WTA race :lol: with this shit of results

WTA :help:

Ana and Jelena :smash::weirdo::banghead::silly::cuckoo:

-NAJ-
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:57 PM
WTA :help:

Ana and Jelena :smash::weirdo::banghead::silly::cuckoo:
WTA 10 x :help:

Ana and Jelena 1000 x :smash::weirdo::banghead::silly::cuckoo:
:lol:

jelenacg
Jun 5th, 2009, 08:58 PM
Jelena and Ana need to motivated each other in some good result. but this year they are following each other only in bad results. :fiery:
Ana need to win one MM tournament so they can play Bali championship. No way that they will play in Doha with this results:tape: but who knows they are now #10 and #12 in WTA race :lol: with this shit of results

Exactly :worship::worship: superb :rolleyes:
Yes Izzy she said that ,good thing is that she is practicing here and goes to therapy

-NAJ-
Jun 5th, 2009, 09:07 PM
Exactly :worship::worship: superb :rolleyes:
Yes Izzy she said that ,good thing is that she is practicing here and goes to therapy

on hard courts or clay probably because we don't have grass courts (i think):help:

gaviotabr
Jun 5th, 2009, 09:07 PM
Exactly :worship::worship: superb :rolleyes:
Yes Izzy she said that ,good thing is that she is practicing here and goes to therapy

I'm happy she is practising. I figure the therapy is for her knee. She could use some therapy for her head as well.. :lol: :smash:

gaviotabr
Jun 5th, 2009, 09:09 PM
on hard courts or clay probably because we don't have grass courts (i think):help:

Probably hardcourts.. there are very few grass courts in the world.. :lol: Mostly England and Netherlands..

I guess both Ana and JJ will be going to Eastbourne to practice on actual grass already early next week.

-NAJ-
Jun 5th, 2009, 09:39 PM
I can't wait to start 2nd part of seasson.

btw gaviotabr Adriana Lima( your compatriot) was in Belgrade last week:lol:

gaviotabr
Jun 5th, 2009, 09:56 PM
I can't wait to start 2nd part of seasson.

btw gaviotabr Adriana Lima( your compatriot) was in Belgrade last week:lol:

Oh! She is married to a serbian isn't she? :lol:

-NAJ-
Jun 5th, 2009, 10:00 PM
yes, to Marko Jaric. She is pregnant. They will have 2 weddings.(in serbia and brasil):lol::help:

jelenacg
Jun 5th, 2009, 10:04 PM
I'm happy she is practising. I figure the therapy is for her knee. She could use some therapy for her head as well.. :lol: :smash:

:rolls::rolls:
I was thinking the same thing
About Adriana yes she is :) she is pregnant also
Our government even offered to give Serbian citizenship :lol:

gaviotabr
Jun 5th, 2009, 10:12 PM
yes, to Marko Jaric. She is pregnant. They will have 2 weddings.(in serbia and brasil):lol::help:

I saw some of that in a gossip TV show here.. :lol:

:rolls::rolls:
I was thinking the same thing
About Adriana yes she is :) she is pregnant also
Our government even offered to give Serbian citizenship :lol:

:lol: Really? What would that do for her? :lol: I guess he can be half brazilian if he wants as well.. :lol: