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tenn_ace
Dec 13th, 2006, 10:40 PM
Democrat taken to hospital

By Mary Clare Jalonick
ASSOCIATED PRESS

2:31 p.m. December 13, 2006

WASHINGTON – Democratic Sen. Tim Johnson of South Dakota suffered a possible stroke Wednesday and was taken to a Washington hospital, his office said.
Johnson became disoriented during a call with reporters at midday, stuttering in response to a question. He appeared to recover, asking if there were any additional questions before ending the call. If he should be unable to continue to serve, it could halt the scheduled Democratic takeover of the Senate. Democrats won a 51-49 majority in the November election. South Dakota's governor, who would appoint any temporary replacement, is a Republican.
Johnson spokeswoman Julianne Fisher said he had walked back to his Capitol office after the call with reporters but appeared to not be feeling well. The Capitol physician came to his office and examined him, and it was decided he needed to go to the hospital.
He was taken by ambulance to George Washington University Hospital around noon, Fisher said.
“It was caught very early,” she said.
Johnson's office released a statement saying he had suffered a possible stroke.
“At this stage, he is undergoing a comprehensive evaluation by the stroke team,” the statement read.
The White House issued a statement wishing him a speedy recovery.
“Our thoughts and prayers are with Senator Johnson and his family,” said spokesman Alex Conant.
If the two-term senator, 59, is unable to serve when the 110th Congress convenes Jan. 4, South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds would appoint a replacement. Johnson is up for re-election in 2008.
South Dakota Secretary of State Chris Nelson said there are no special restrictions on such an appointment and a replacement would not have to be from the same political party.
Johnson turns 60 on Dec. 28. The centrist Democrat was first elected to the Senate in 1996 and has been one of the more reserved members of the chamber, rarely taking center stage at news conferences.
He served in the House for 10 years from 1987 to 1997. His focus has been on committee assignments important to his state's interests – Indian Affairs and Energy and Natural Resources – as well as a spot on Appropriations. The latter allows him to direct funds to South Dakota.
Johnson narrowly defeated Republican John Thune in his 2002 re-election bid. Thune defeated Democratic Sen. Tom Daschle two years later.
Thune issued a statement saying his prayers were with Johnson and his family. Rounds also issued a statement, saying he was hoping for good news.
Johnson has worked as a lawyer and county prosecutor and served several years in the 1970s and 1980s in the South Dakota state Legislature.
Both Johnson and his wife have battled cancer.
The senator underwent prostate cancer treatment in 2004, and subsequent tests have shown him to be clear of the disease. Barb Johnson is a breast cancer survivor.
The couple have two sons and a daughter: Brooks, who served in the U.S. Army in Bosnia, Kosovo, South Korea, Afghanistan and Iraq; Brendan, a Sioux Falls lawyer, and Kelsey, who works in Washington. In response to one reporter's question on the Wednesday conference call, Johnson said he was most looking forward to spending the holidays with his family and grandchildren.

tenn_ace
Dec 13th, 2006, 10:41 PM
so Republicans can take control back

Paneru
Dec 13th, 2006, 10:54 PM
The first and foremost for him is
that he gets well, the rest comes second.

As far as politics go, I heard on CNN that a handful
of senators have had strokes and still contiued on
in their position, not being forced out.

Yet, if it is something that the Republicans want
bad enough, they'll be monitoring him closely and
look for any sign they can to try and force him out.
That would not surprise me if it did happen.

wta_zuperfann
Dec 14th, 2006, 02:32 AM
I just heard a radio report that it was diagnosed as a brief fainting spell. Details to follow.

partbrit
Dec 14th, 2006, 02:37 AM
No stroke. His spokesperson said so right away, but the news media is not interested in updating the story.

Scotso
Dec 14th, 2006, 04:07 AM
Phew.... that sounds better than stroke.

As long as they can keep him alive I'll be okay. :p

*JR*
Dec 14th, 2006, 01:36 PM
Senate control hangs on hospitalized member's health
POSTED: 9:21 a.m. EST, December 14, 2006
Story Highlights
• NEW: Capitol physician says senator suffered from "an intracerebral bleed"
• NEW: Johnson suffered from "congenital arteriovenous malformation," doctor says
• Senator's condition is critical after undergoing brain surgery
• If Democrat Johnson could not serve, change in Senate control could result

(Note: under Senate rules, he wouldn't have to resign even if incapacitated, meaning the Democrats would still have a 51-49 edge, and 50-49 if everyone shows up to vote on organizing the Senate by party).

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- With Democrat's grasp of the Senate relying on the thinnest of margins, ultimate control of the chamber hung on the health of a South Dakota senator who underwent brain surgery Thursday morning.

Sen. Tim Johnson of South Dakota was in critical condition, said David Boyd, a nursing supervisor at a George Washington University Hospital.

Should Johnson not be able to complete his term, which ends in 2008, South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds, a Republican, would appoint his replacement, which could shift the balance of power in the Senate.

Democrats gained a 51-49 Senate majority after last month's election. A GOP appointee would result in a 50-50 split and allow the GOP to retain Senate control through Vice President Dick Cheney's tie-breaking vote.

Johnson, 59, was out of surgery at 12:30 a.m. Thursday, a source close to the senator told CNN. He was hospitalized Wednesday morning after he appeared to suffer stroke-like symptoms.

Adm. John Eisold, attending physician of the U.S. Capitol, told CNN that Johnson had "an intracerebral bleed caused by a congenital arteriovenous malformation. He underwent successful surgery to evacuate the blood and stabilize the malformation."

"It is premature to determine whether further surgery will be required or to assess any long term prognosis," Eisold said.

Barbara Johnson, wife of Sen. Johnson, said, "The Johnson family is encouraged and optimistic. They are grateful for the prayers and good wishes of friends, supporters and South Dakotans. They are especially grateful for the work of the doctors and all medical personnel and GWU hospital."

Johnson, 59, was taken to the hospital Wednesday after he appeared to suffer the stroke-like symptoms, although a spokeswoman for the senator said subsequent evaluation showed he did not suffer a stroke or a heart attack.

There was no word early Thursday on the nature of Johnson's surgery.

Staffers told CNN that Johnson was conscious when he was transported to the hospital.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, spent time at the hospital out of concern for Johnson, Reid's spokesman said.

Johnson spokeswoman Julianne Fisher said the senator was in the Capitol on Wednesday morning conducting a conference call with South Dakota reporters when "his speech pattern slipped off." (Listen to Johnson's difficulty speaking during a WNAX radio interview -- MP3, 749 kb)

Fisher said the senator was able to walk back to his office in the Hart Senate Office Building, then began having problems with his right arm. He thought he was all right, she said, and went to his desk, but came out a few minutes later and "it was apparent he needed help."

Staffers put him on a couch in the office and called the Capitol doctor, she said. He was taken to the hospital shortly afterward. His wife, in the office to have lunch with him, rode with him, Fisher said.

"It transpired very fast," she said, adding the senator's staff was shaken by the incident.

But, she said of the hospital, "we keep reminding ourselves, this is where they take Dick Cheney."

Although the issue of incapacitation is not spelled out in state law, South Dakota Secretary of State Chris Nelson said he believes there would be "precedent at the federal level."

Nelson said an appointment would fill the vacancy until a general election could be held in November 2008. There are no restrictions on who the governor can appoint, beyond meeting the legal requirements for Senate membership, he said.

South Dakota has not faced the replacement of an elected office holder "in recent history."

Rounds issued a statement saying his prayers were with Johnson and his family. "We are hopeful of good news for our friend and colleague," the governor said.

Johnson battled prostate cancer in 2004, and after surgery, tests showed he no longer had the disease, according to his Web site.

Rocketta
Dec 14th, 2006, 01:50 PM
sounds like he had an aneurysm? :( It will be interesting to see what's going to happen.

samsung101
Dec 14th, 2006, 03:09 PM
The thread title is wrong isn't it?

Shouldn't it be: We wish the Senator all the best in
his recovery.

Senator gravely ill in hospital, that's what the headline should be.


The man had surgery, is in critical condition, but, there is
nothing to show he may not recover and return to his job.

It's pretty morbid to hear and see the Mainstream Media jump
to all sorts of politcal conclusions and rumors on this, when the
man is alive and in the hospital.


Arlen Spector has had chemo and therapy, and is still doing his
job.

Joe Biden had some sort of brain surgery years ago, he's still
there.

Heck,Ted Kennedy broke his back in a plane crash, survived, and
he's still there.

When you think of the age of many senators of both parties, the
balance could go either way many times in the next couple of years.


This man may very well recover fully, and return to work w/little to
no side effects. It happens every day. Medicine and doctors can
do that stuff, with a little help from God too.

He may not, that is a real possibility.
It's a serious medical problem.

But, it's sick to see how the news/infotainment gawkers are covering
this: oh no, WE could lose the Senate WE just won. They're that
invested in the whole thing.

Say a prayer for the man, his family, and his friends, and let it be.

I'd love a GOP Senate again, but, not at the expense of a mans life.

RunDown
Dec 14th, 2006, 03:26 PM
The thread title is wrong isn't it?

Shouldn't it be: We wish the Senator all the best in
his recovery.

Senator gravely ill in hospital, that's what the headline should be.


The man had surgery, is in critical condition, but, there is
nothing to show he may not recover and return to his job.

It's pretty morbid to hear and see the Mainstream Media jump
to all sorts of politcal conclusions and rumors on this, when the
man is alive and in the hospital.


Arlen Spector has had chemo and therapy, and is still doing his
job.

Joe Biden had some sort of brain surgery years ago, he's still
there.

Heck,Ted Kennedy broke his back in a plane crash, survived, and
he's still there.

When you think of the age of many senators of both parties, the
balance could go either way many times in the next couple of years.


This man may very well recover fully, and return to work w/little to
no side effects. It happens every day. Medicine and doctors can
do that stuff, with a little help from God too.

He may not, that is a real possibility.
It's a serious medical problem.

But, it's sick to see how the news/infotainment gawkers are covering
this: oh no, WE could lose the Senate WE just won. They're that
invested in the whole thing.

Say a prayer for the man, his family, and his friends, and let it be.

I'd love a GOP Senate again, but, not at the expense of a mans life.

:eek:

That was nice, and I, too, certainly wish him a full and speedy recovery.

samsung101
Dec 14th, 2006, 03:42 PM
Again, the man could and very possibly will recover, and go
back to work.

We don't know what is wrong with him.
But, modern medicine is amazing, and he could likely recover
and be at his desk in a few weeks or months.

He may not.

But, lots of people have strokes and blood clot problems, and
do recover fully to lead regular lives.

It's just pretty sick of the morning shows and radio and cable
to go more into the Senate balance, than the health of the guy,
or practically have him in the ground already in their despair
not over his condition, but, THEIR senate.

Matt Laurer and CNN seem in a tizzy over losing the Senate they
worked so hard with the DNC to get, more than the fact a relatively
young man is in a hospital in critical condition.....I just find that
kind of sickening.

Let the guy recover.

In peace.

griffin
Dec 14th, 2006, 04:05 PM
The first and foremost for him is
that he gets well, the rest comes second.

:worship:

I changed the title.

SelesFan70
Dec 14th, 2006, 05:48 PM
Good lord, people. The man might be dying and you're worried about who will control the Senate? :help:

*JR*
Dec 14th, 2006, 05:56 PM
Good lord, people. The man might be dying and you're worried about who will control the Senate? :help:
Given "little things" like the US not having universal health coverage (not that its gonna happen in the next 2 years regardless) who controls branches of government affects the lives of many others in terms of the level of medical assistance available, etc. So yes, its legit IMO to discuss the Public Policy ramifications of Mr. Johnson's illness.

tenn_ace
Dec 14th, 2006, 07:32 PM
Given "little things" like the US not having universal health coverage (not that its gonna happen in the next 2 years regardless) who controls branches of government affects the lives of many others in terms of the level of medical assistance available, etc. So yes, its legit IMO to discuss the Public Policy ramifications of Mr. Johnson's illness.


you go, Honey... :worship:

plus there are millions of other issues that could be affected because all republicans care about is to make rich even richer.