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View Full Version : heavy readers: i need help building a personal classics library


Wigglytuff
Dec 13th, 2006, 05:47 AM
i need help building a collection of classics. i wanted to get them all from the same publisher or series so that they would be about the same size and fit nicely on a shelf.

my demands are simple:
hardbound (board, cloth or leather)
acid free paper
print that is at least 12 point (some places make their classics in tiny print, and thats no good)
and of course the chance to build the collection in small incerments (1 book at time or say 5 or even 10 at time)

thats it.

right now i am going for everymans library:
http://ec2.images-amazon.com/images/P/0307385256.01._SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V34680685_.jpg

the only thing is that i have one book and even though on the site it says its acid free paper, the book itself doesnt say so and it doesnt feel like it.

BigB08822
Dec 13th, 2006, 10:27 AM
Mrs. Dalloway is a classic. I don't know if it fits your requirements though, I'm sure it would.

Wigglytuff
Dec 13th, 2006, 02:50 PM
Mrs. Dalloway is a classic. I don't know if it fits your requirements though, I'm sure it would.

no that helps i will look into it.

i was asking, i guess i was unclear, for publishers and collections, like say dover classics or B&N classics and so on? hope that helps.

CooCooCachoo
Dec 13th, 2006, 03:21 PM
Hmm, the Wordsworth Classics are really cheap :lol: But I guess it is not acid-free paper :shrug: Plus, the print will be too small.

Why are you so set on having a series though? I think you should just buy those titles that you think are worth reading. It is about individual books rather than collections, as collections are so subjective and always leave out books that you might consider classics and include books that you might not deem worthy of that status.

Wigglytuff
Dec 13th, 2006, 03:26 PM
Hmm, the Wordsworth Classics are really cheap :lol: But I guess it is not acid-free paper :shrug: Plus, the print will be too small.

Why are you so set on having a series though? I think you should just buy those titles that you think are worth reading. It is about individual books rather than collections, as collections are so subjective and always leave out books that you might consider classics and include books that you might not deem worthy of that status.

i want the set because... well they look nice together. and for most of these set you can get just the books you want, you just have to do some digging. but most places offer the books peice meal

samsung101
Dec 13th, 2006, 03:29 PM
I'd check with a local university or college librarian or classics
dept.

Ask them what publisher they use to get books from.

Since they have to keep the books for years and years in
the library or collections.


Good luck.

Sounds like a terrific project.

Wigglytuff
Dec 13th, 2006, 03:42 PM
I'd check with a local university or college librarian or classics
dept.

Ask them what publisher they use to get books from.

Since they have to keep the books for years and years in
the library or collections.


Good luck.

Sounds like a terrific project.

did not think to do that. i will definitely ask!!!

CooCooCachoo
Dec 13th, 2006, 04:10 PM
i want the set because... well they look nice together. and for most of these set you can get just the books you want, you just have to do some digging. but most places offer the books peice meal

OK ;) It's just that, I think the aesthetics of the story are more important than the aesthetics of the book shelf, but we might differ in opinion here ;)

Anyways, I do think it is a very nice project. I have quite a few classics myself, but I do not often get around to reading them while in uni. One day :D

Oh, and if you come across a collection of (French) plays, please let me know ;)

Wigglytuff
Dec 13th, 2006, 04:40 PM
OK ;) It's just that, I think the aesthetics of the story are more important than the aesthetics of the book shelf, but we might differ in opinion here ;)

Anyways, I do think it is a very nice project. I have quite a few classics myself, but I do not often get around to reading them while in uni. One day :D

Oh, and if you come across a collection of (French) plays, please let me know ;)

well you know, i usually get the books in audio form and read them way. so the books really are not all for reading, but there is some magical about god hardcover books that the files on my computer just dont have. :lol: :lol:

of course the contents matters but most of the classics i want i have read in audio already anyway, but still want to have them in print.

controlfreak
Dec 13th, 2006, 04:45 PM
hell, if it's just for aesthetic purposes and to impress house guests, why not just get some of those hollowed out mock books you find in furniture shops?

Wigglytuff
Dec 13th, 2006, 04:56 PM
hell, if it's just for aesthetic purposes and to impress house guests, why not just get some of those hollowed out mock books you find in furniture shops?
because i want a private library
Private library
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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A private library is a library held by a private owner or owners rather than by a public institution, usually only for the use of a small number of people or one person. As with public libraries, some people use stamps, stickers, or embossers to show ownership of the items. Some people have sold or willed their private libraries to established institutions such as the Library of Congress.

The first libraries were all private, usually restricted to nobility, aristocracy, scholars, or theologians. Most of the surviving texts of the ancient world come from private libraries, as public libraries were subject to destruction during war.

Bibliophily
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Bibliophily is the love of books. Accordingly a bibliophile loves books, but especially "for qualities of format". Bibliophilia is generally considered to be incorrect, but some would say it is a new, recent, usage. That practice of loving or collecting books is dubbed bibliophilism, and the adjective form of the term is bibliophilic. Also, a bibliophile is a book collector. The term entered the English language in 1824, according to the Merriam-Webster's reference below. It is to be distinguished from the much older notion of a bookman (which dates back to 1583), which is one who loves books, and especially reading; more generally, a bookman is one who participates in writing, publishing, or selling books.

The classic bibliophile is one who loves to read, admire and collect books, often nurturing a large and specialised collection. Bibliophiles do not necessarily want to possess the books they love; an alternative would be to admire them in old libraries. However, the bibliophile is usually an avid book collector, sometimes pursuing scholarship in the collection, sometimes putting form above content with an emphasis on old, rare, and expensive books, first editions, books with special or unusual bindings, autographed copies, etc.

Bibliophilia is not to be confused with bibliomania, an obsessive-compulsive disorder involving the collecting of books to the point where social relations or health are damaged, and in which the mere fact that an object is a book is sufficient for it to be collected or loved. Most bibliomaniacs, then, are compulsive hoarders, identifiable by the fact that the number of unread books in their possession is continually increasing relative to the total number of books they possess and read. Extreme bibliophilia may amount to a diagnosed psychological condition.

controlfreak
Dec 13th, 2006, 06:53 PM
so what you are saying is, you want to be a bibliophile?

Wigglytuff
Dec 13th, 2006, 07:38 PM
so what you are saying is, you want to be a bibliophile?

i want to build a personal library. the bibliophile is there to get across some of the reasons quality bound books matter.

ASV
Dec 13th, 2006, 08:47 PM
beloved.

and

a portrait of the artist as a young man.

Haute
Dec 13th, 2006, 09:36 PM
You'll definitely want to go with Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, possibly The Stranger by Albert Camus (or the original French Version L'Étranger), and The Awakening by Kate Chopin is also a good choice as well.

Reuchlin
Dec 13th, 2006, 11:55 PM
I get it you are talking about series...

I think that Oxford Classics is the best series-- don't know if thye produce the most attractive books though...

Wigglytuff
Dec 14th, 2006, 12:44 AM
I get it you are talking about series...

I think that Oxford Classics is the best series-- don't know if thye produce the most attractive books though...

thanks. i have never heard of the "Oxford Classics" i will check them out.:)

Sam L
Feb 19th, 2007, 09:56 AM
Did you end up getting this? I'm thinking about starting one too but I buy my books randomly from all sorts of publishers. I do have some Everyman's books and I like quality of the paper. I don't know if it's acid free though.

Wigglytuff
Feb 19th, 2007, 02:53 PM
yeah i went with everymans but it doesnt say acid free so its not, but they have a good weight and i think are the best bet on a budget.

Jane
Feb 19th, 2007, 03:47 PM
Easton Press
Franklin Library
Folio Society
Library of America
Heritage Press

These are ones I am familiar with. I am sure there are others.
All of these publish/published classics with high quality bindings. Easton Press books are still published and the company has a web site at eastonpress.com. Ebay is a great place to buy quality books. Look under Books/Antiquaian & Collectible.

I agree that content is the most important thing about a book, but there is something very satisfying about reading a finely bound book. Good luck on building your library.