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View Full Version : My book about Patty's tennis career.


vogus
Dec 11th, 2006, 07:23 AM
I'm intending to write a journal/book to chronicle some of things i've observed about Patty from a fan/outsider's point of view. Mostly my writing is going to focus on the years in which i saw a lot of Patty's matches, 1999-2002, which is a period when she was not very well known, but she was sometimes doing amazing things on the court in her matches. There was a small group of people who knew about Patty, and being a Patty fan was a little bit like an "underground" movement compared to the rest of the women's tennis mainstream. In many ways she was quite a different person both on and off the court, than she is today. Since the beginning, Patty has always had a kind of cult following among her fans, but her image and fan base have changed a lot since the early days of her career, to the point that not many people really remember what Patty was like before Rainer Hofmann took full control of her career in the spring of 2003. It's highly unfortunate that the only story most people know about Patty is the old bit about Harnecker and the "orange juice" scandal, when in fact Patty's career is memorable and controversial in so many other, more substantial ways. I'd like to pay a tribute to the Patty from that past era and not let it be forgotten, and also to relate some interesting experiences that i got from being present at the tournaments.

*JR*
Dec 11th, 2006, 10:59 PM
What RU calling it, The White Kilometer? ;)

switz
Dec 15th, 2006, 04:34 AM
good luck with it! expect to be sued ;)

vogus
Jan 6th, 2007, 06:15 AM
good luck with it! expect to be sued ;)


I'm not too worried about that because the book is going to be more my story than theirs. I'm not going put things in there that i can't prove. For example, if i were to write in my book that between 1999 and 2003, Rainer Hofmann isolated a shy and vulnerable young Patty from the outside world, then brainwashed her, then re-programmed her into an extension of his own personality, and ultimately pulled off one of the most bizarre identity theft jobs in human history, they could probably sue me for that, because i can't prove it. My book is going to be about the tennis details and my personal experiences and the factual history of the case, rather than conjecturing and assumptions.

*JR*
Jan 6th, 2007, 01:57 PM
For example, if i were to write in my book that between 1999 and 2003, Rainer Hofmann isolated a shy and vulnerable young Patty from the outside world, then brainwashed her, then re-programmed her into an extension of his own personality, and ultimately pulled off one of the most bizarre identity theft jobs in human history, they could probably sue me for that, because i can't prove it.
Under American law @ least, you don't have to IF its clear that you're only expressing your opinion, based on the information available. And your words quoted above are by definition subject to interpretation, so I don't believe any court in a civilized country would expect factual proof. (Google some of the things Maureen Dowd of the New York Times has written about the reasons President Bush has made certain decisions). ;)