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View Full Version : Werthein Hands Out His 2006 Baggie Awards


pierce0415
Dec 6th, 2006, 10:45 PM
MVP, women: Justine Henin-Hardenne (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/319/). The Belgianette only bagged one Slam. But she reached the finals of all four and took the WTA Championships title.

MVP, men: Federer. Let's just skip the justification and go right to the next category.

Best Veteran Breakthrough, men: Gentleman James Blake (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/29/) played some of the best tennis this side of Federer and finished the year in the top five. Now if he'd just turn it up at the Slams.

Best Veteran Breakthrough, women: Mauresmo. Sometimes the tennis deities get it right.

Match of the year, men: Nadal d. Federer, 6-7, 7-6 (5), 6-4, 2-6, 7-6 (5), Rome final. No. 1 vs. No. 2. Breathtaking action. Squandered match points. A fifth set tie-breaker. A dash of bad blood. This one had it all.

Match of the year, women: Mauresmo d. Henin-Hardenne, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, Wimbledon final. No histrionics. No dubious injuries. No eardrum-splitting grunts. No flagrant coaching. (OK, maybe a little.) Just a fine, well-fought match between the most complete players in the women's game. Wish there were more like this.

Coach of the year, men: Federer. Yes, the last thing he needs is another award. But too often the hagiographers overlook this fact: With all due respect to Tony (papa) Roche, Federer is essentially a brain trust of one.

Coach of the year, women: Loic Courtreau, the man whose loyalty to Mauresmo imbued her with confidence. This category, incidentally, will become competitive next year, thanks to the WTA's unfortunate decision to permit mid-match coaching.

Most Improved Award, men: Marcos Baghdatis (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/443/). Marooned outside the top 50 when the year started, he reached the Aussie Open final, the Wimbledon semis, fell apart a bit in the fall and still finished No. 12. All the while his smile never deserted him.

Most improved, women: Anna Chekvetadze. Russian sliced her ranking from 33 to 13 and her titles included the Tier I Kremlin Cup. A player to watch in 2007.

Bets moment, men: Check this out.

Best moment, women: After years of watching her considerable talent get trumped by her shaky nerves, Mauresmo took a deep breath and outlasted Henin-Hardenne to win the Wimbledon final. Interviewed courtside, Mauresmo gushed: "I don't want to talk about my nerves any more!"

Best comeback, women: After three years away from the sport, Hingis finished seventh in the rankings, proving there is a place for nuance and guile amid all the heavy hitting.

Best comeback, men: When a French Open fan heckled Blake for questioning a line call, Blake invited the fan to hop over the rail and check the mark for himself. The fan did. Blake was vindicated.

Best analogy: Asked to describe the difference between the U.S. Open and Wimbledon, Russia's Svetlana Kuznetsova (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/151/) remarked: "It's completely like black and blue maybe, or white and black, you know, or red and black, whatever, you know. It's just different. It's like Sprite and Coke, you know."

Best smile in the face of defeat: After getting waxed in a doubles match in Cincinnati, Spain's Feliciano Lopez (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/297/) grabbed the courtside microphone and jokingly asked the crowd for a donation. "I need to collect some money for lessons, please."

Best newcomer: Even in a notoriously fractious sport, the Hawk-eye technology that enabled players to challenge line calls earned rave reviews across the board. Look for more tournaments to adopt it in 2007.

Biggest disappointment, men: Since Marat Safin (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/37/) won the decisive Davis Match, we'll tap Richard Gasquet (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/246/), whose talent is beyond reproach but his results are beyond maddening. Now that he's in his 20s, it's time to decide whether he's a top five player or simply another Henri Leconte.

Biggest disappointment, women: Venus and Serena Williams (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/134/). For all their protestations -- tennis is their priority, they're ready to return to the top -- both sisters were, sadly, non-entities. Will we ever even see them back in the late rounds of a major?

Best swan song, men: In his final U.S. Open, Andre Agassi fired something up for the memory banks, beating rising star Baghdatis in five-setter that took on the dimensions of a 12-rounder.

Best swan song, women: In her final U.S. Open (or so she says), Navratilova, weeks from turning 50, teamed with Bob Bryan (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/123/) to win the mixed doubles title.
Best doubles team, men: Though their results tailed off in the second half of the year, Bob and Mike Bryan (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/233/) finished No. 1 and added two more majors to their joint mantle.

Best doubles team, women: Lisa Raymond (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/102/) and Sam Stosur are similar players, yet they complement -- not replicate -- each other on the doubles court.
So long, farewell: Agassi, Shinobu Asagoe (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/61/), Steve Bellamy, Alex Corretja (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/118/), Al Costa, Mariana Diaz-Oliva (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/187/), David Higdon, Thomas Enqvist (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/287/), Nicolas Escude (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/21/), Felix Mantilla (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/22/), Sarge Sargsian.

Five storylines to follow in '07
• Can any candidate mount a serious threat to King Roger?
• Can Sharapova take the WTA by the reigns?
• Can the tours' scheduling changes curtail the rampant injuries?
• Can Roddick and Connors continue working in harmony?
• Can tennis' leaders come together and formulate a business model that takes advantage of the sport's relentless internationalization?

goldenlox
Dec 6th, 2006, 10:48 PM
Best analogy: Asked to describe the difference between the U.S. Open and Wimbledon, Russia's Svetlana Kuznetsova (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/151/) remarked: "It's completely like black and blue maybe, or white and black, you know, or red and black, whatever, you know. It's just different. It's like Sprite and Coke, you know." :D :worship: :cool:

.Andrew.
Dec 6th, 2006, 10:49 PM
Thanks pierce0415 for this :)

Wannabeknowitall
Dec 6th, 2006, 10:56 PM
I disagree with the men's best comeback.
I would prefer Rafa Nadal and his response to Federer calling him one-dimensional during the clay season.
He makes the final of Wimbledon and takes a set off of Federer on grass.

iPatty
Dec 6th, 2006, 11:18 PM
kuzzy. :haha:

Sugar_Kane
Dec 6th, 2006, 11:21 PM
Match of the year, women: Mauresmo d. Henin-Hardenne, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, Wimbledon final. No histrionics. No dubious injuries. No eardrum-splitting grunts. No flagrant coaching. (OK, maybe a little.) Just a fine, well-fought match between the most complete players in the women's game. Wish there were more like this.

Basically he's saying it wasn't a Sharapova match

ZeroSOFInfinity
Dec 7th, 2006, 12:58 AM
Best Veteran Breakthrough, women: Mauresmo. Sometimes the tennis deities get it right.
Match of the year, women: Mauresmo d. Henin-Hardenne, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, Wimbledon final. No histrionics. No dubious injuries. No eardrum-splitting grunts. No flagrant coaching. (OK, maybe a little.) Just a fine, well-fought match between the most complete players in the women's game. Wish there were more like this.
Best moment, men: Check this out.
Best moment, women: After years of watching her considerable talent get trumped by her shaky nerves, Mauresmo took a deep breath and outlasted Henin-Hardenne to win the Wimbledon final. Interviewed courtside, Mauresmo gushed: "I don't want to talk about my nerves any more!"
Best comeback, women: After three years away from the sport, Hingis finished seventh in the rankings, proving there is a place for nuance and guile amid all the heavy hitting.
Best analogy: Asked to describe the difference between the U.S. Open and Wimbledon, Russia's Svetlana Kuznetsova (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/151/) remarked: "It's completely like black and blue maybe, or white and black, you know, or red and black, whatever, you know. It's just different. It's like Sprite and Coke, you know."
Biggest disappointment, women: Venus and Serena Williams (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/134/). For all their protestations -- tennis is their priority, they're ready to return to the top -- both sisters were, sadly, non-entities. Will we ever even see them back in the late rounds of a major?1) You can say that again, mister. :worship: :worship: :worship:
2) Not so, Mr. Werthein - anyone who watches the Mauresmo-Clijsters semifinal in the WTA Championships will definately say that it was the best match of the year...no?
3) I don't get what he meant here....:confused:
4) :lol: :lol: :lol:
5) As people say... "Form is temporary. Class is permanent". ;)
6) :haha:
7) He could be right about this... but never, ever rule the sisters out when they are back on song...

spencercarlos
Dec 7th, 2006, 01:09 AM
I disagree with the men's best comeback.
I would prefer Rafa Nadal and his response to Federer calling him one-dimensional during the clay season.
He makes the final of Wimbledon and takes a set off of Federer on grass.
No womens tennis but I don´t see what Nadal´s comeback was about, yeah he missed the first month of the season and cameback to dominate the clay courts once again, but still his results on fast surfaces regressed rather than progressed, and even his number of titles won got worse.
We don´t have to mention what James Blake had to go through and finally he is shinning and is the best player from the US.
Even Roddick had a nicer comeback late in the year after his early year results.

As for the women i think everything pretty much went with the book, and Mauresmo´s win over Henin was the best slam final for the year.
The flip money on the most improved player went to Anna Chekvetadze, which i would not agree because i think Vaidisova and Jankovic made more impression at the grand slam events in general.

SelesFan70
Dec 7th, 2006, 01:12 AM
I'm surprised he didn't give "Most Improved" to Nicole Vaidisova since he was really up her ass early in the year. :o

Wannabeknowitall
Dec 7th, 2006, 02:11 AM
No womens tennis but I don´t see what Nadal´s comeback was about, yeah he missed the first month of the season and cameback to dominate the clay courts once again, but still his results on fast surfaces regressed rather than progressed, and even his number of titles won got worse.
We don´t have to mention what James Blake had to go through and finally he is shinning and is the best player from the US.
Even Roddick had a nicer comeback late in the year after his early year results.



Well since Blake's comeback in the category is about a immediate response from a comment by someone, I thought it was appropriate for Nadal to be there instead if that's how Wertheim is going to look at it.

Federer commented that Nadal was one-dimensional during the clay season.
As soon as he got a chance to debunk that comment he did.
He made it to the finals of Wimbledon and took a set off of Federer.
So much for one-dimensional.