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View Full Version : Who here believes in the Global Warming phenomenon ?


brayster87
Nov 18th, 2006, 07:42 AM
Hi guys

what are your current thoughts about this issue?

!<blocparty>!
Nov 18th, 2006, 09:06 AM
It's 2006. You don't believe or not believe in it, it's scienfitic fact.

Current thoughts: We're screwed.

Mr.Kardashian
Nov 18th, 2006, 09:16 AM
i read this book with raised some contradictory points to the issue...... it was only ficiton though so im not saying i dont believe glabal warming is occurring but i have an open mind to the POSSIBILITY that alot of it might be misinformation...

i cant remember wat the book was called but it was very good the author did a lot of research and has a good reputation...

still we need to look after the environment:)

Kim's_fan_4ever
Nov 18th, 2006, 09:39 AM
I'm pretty worried about global warming. I've seen an advertisement on MTV about it saying that even small actions can help to prevent it so I'm trying as hard as I can.
I also agree with what !<blocparty>! wrote. We are so screwed :unsure:

controlfreak
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:05 AM
I do. And I believe it will be pretty calamitous for many parts of the world within my lifetime.

Scotso
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:10 AM
It's 2006. You don't believe or not believe in it, it's scienfitic fact.

Current thoughts: We're screwed.

Scienfitic? ;) And that's not necessarily true, it's not yet proven.

In fact, the Earth goes through periods of warming and cooling often... this could just be a warming period. Personally, I think the evidence of global warming is fairly convincing, but I'm not totally sure as of yet.

Still, I think it's a good idea to implement the changes they suggest, just in case.

Shonami Slam
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:12 AM
people should recieve polution points, and then pay tax accordingly.
as in - if i produce 10 Kg of garbage every day + use 2 Cubes of water, drive 150 KM in my diesel car and smoke a box per day, i should be paying more tax towards enviroment development and protection than someone who creates less garbage and uses less resources.
it's generally speaking about the enviroment, but it has a great deal with global warming as well.

bionic71
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:13 AM
Well, we certainly can't continue ruining our environment and expect everything to be o.k.....We are indeed part of an inevitable cycle of climate change....a brief snapshot of our history shows that climate is always in a state of flux. By not addressing many environmental issues we are certainly having effect on the changes, speeding up the process of change....

Instead of treating the environment as something we need to control and ultimately destroy, we should be nurturing it.

!<blocparty>!
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:20 AM
Scienfitic? ;) And that's not necessarily true, it's not yet proven.

In fact, the Earth goes through periods of warming and cooling often... this could just be a warming period. Personally, I think the evidence of global warming is fairly convincing, but I'm not totally sure as of yet.

Still, I think it's a good idea to implement the changes they suggest, just in case.

You knew what I meant. :p And not proven by who? The Bush administration? :tape: I don't really know how much proof one needs. :shrug:

It's very true that the earth does go through periods of warming and cooling, but the warming it's currently going through is greater than at any other period in history. Coincidence?

gentenaire
Nov 18th, 2006, 03:01 PM
I'm with blocparty on this, it's not a matter of belief, it's a fact. Everyone pretty much agrees that the earth is getting warmer. There's still some disagreement about whether or not the cause is pollution, but not about global warming itself.

MisterQ
Nov 18th, 2006, 03:58 PM
I was worried about predictions of this as a child in the '80s. It angers me that politicians are only getting alarmed and feeling the need to do something about this 20 years later.

It's POSSIBLE that this is part of a natural cycle. But it fits awfully well with what was predicted long ago due to constant greenhouse gas emission.

timafi
Nov 18th, 2006, 04:35 PM
I do :yeah: and this is serious stuff:scared: :scared: :scared:

¤CharlDa¤
Nov 18th, 2006, 04:43 PM
I'm majoring in Environment - Atmospheric Sciences here at McGill and let me tell ya, the situation is indeed problematic. In early spring 2007, the most recent study (that comes out every 5 years) will be rendered publicly, and coming from professors who either participated or saw some previews, we should expect some big waves to be done by government, cause there won't be any doubts no more about the *it's natural warming* vs *it's human induced*. The data that was analysed was already self-explanatory, especially with the resemblance of the carbon dioxyde curves and the temperature raise curves, but of course, it is still possible to doubt, and isn't doubting the main idea behind science? It's just that right now, it would be better not to take the chance to compromise our future and our children's future, and start taking precautions. Better safe than sorry.

The tough thing is, right now, money is the language that the world speaks. And it's tough to put a price on biodiversity loss, eutrophication, human lives and quality of air. The STERN review, that was recently released, does a great job by joining economics to the environment. I personnally think this is the key issue!

^bibi^
Nov 18th, 2006, 05:24 PM
it's not something to "believe in" :rolleyes:

Rollo
Nov 18th, 2006, 06:03 PM
Still, I think it's a good idea to implement the changes they suggest, just in case.

The quote above gets ot the heart of the matter IMO.

Pollution may or may not be driving climate change-but why take the chance? Deforestation scares me the most-I'll never forget the sight of seeing trees cut down for miles around when I visited Borneo in 1993.

Those trees had been primary jungle-and they can never be replaced.

Lord Nelson
Nov 18th, 2006, 07:10 PM
The quote above gets ot the heart of the matter IMO.

Pollution may or may not be driving climate change-but why take the chance? Deforestation scares me the most-I'll never forget the sight of seeing trees cut down for miles around when I visited Borneo in 1993.

Those trees had been primary jungle-and they can never be replaced.Borneo's jungles are disapperaing much faster than that of the Amazon. Also Madagascar's jungles are fast receding. In both cases high population growth is the cause. People migrate to the jungles and cultivate land, in doing so they chop down trees. The governments of Indonesia and Madagascar are not doing much to stop this.

SelesFan70
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:08 PM
I'm with blocparty on this, it's not a matter of belief, it's a fact. Everyone pretty much agrees that the earth is getting warmer. There's still some disagreement about whether or not the cause is pollution, but not about global warming itself.

I would agree with this. Of COURSE the Earth goes through climate changes. We've had 2 ice ages already. However, there is NO proof that humans are speeding up this process. And the Al Gore types that criss cross the planet in their private jets...burning millions of gallons/liters of fuel in doing so...to tell us we have to stop driving and change our way of life are hypocrites. :wavey:

!<blocparty>!
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:21 PM
However, there is NO proof that humans are speeding up this process.

LOLz. There's only overwhelming evidence to suggest that we are. I guess Fox News doesn't talk about it too much. :)

Sam L
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:32 PM
I'm majoring in Environment - Atmospheric Sciences here at McGill and let me tell ya, the situation is indeed problematic. In early spring 2007, the most recent study (that comes out every 5 years) will be rendered publicly, and coming from professors who either participated or saw some previews, we should expect some big waves to be done by government, cause there won't be any doubts no more about the *it's natural warming* vs *it's human induced*. The data that was analysed was already self-explanatory, especially with the resemblance of the carbon dioxyde curves and the temperature raise curves, but of course, it is still possible to doubt, and isn't doubting the main idea behind science? It's just that right now, it would be better not to take the chance to compromise our future and our children's future, and start taking precautions. Better safe than sorry.

The tough thing is, right now, money is the language that the world speaks. And it's tough to put a price on biodiversity loss, eutrophication, human lives and quality of air. The STERN review, that was recently released, does a great job by joining economics to the environment. I personnally think this is the key issue!

You're studying atmospheric sciences? Wow, that's really interesting! :)

It will be interesting to find out more. There's no doubt that global warming is real and it is at least partially human induced.

Sam L
Nov 18th, 2006, 10:36 PM
Borneo's jungles are disapperaing much faster than that of the Amazon. Also Madagascar's jungles are fast receding. In both cases high population growth is the cause. People migrate to the jungles and cultivate land, in doing so they chop down trees. The governments of Indonesia and Madagascar are not doing much to stop this.

True, there's so much focus on the Amazon (which is good) but often people forget there are rainforests in other parts of the world. Indonesia scared me because it has a massive population and there's insatiable demand to develop.

Also, Rollo, I would not have wanted to be there in Borneo in 1993. But ugh that's like 13 years ago, imagine it now. :mad:

Wigglytuff
Nov 18th, 2006, 11:01 PM
dude its a fact.

sure some people dont believe it, but some people dont believe in evolution or that dinosaurs ever existed either. but that does change the fact that its true, its been proven.

Veritas
Nov 18th, 2006, 11:35 PM
My next car will be a Toyota Prius.

But seriously, there are plenty of things day-to-day citizens can do. I try not to use my car everytime I go somewhere. If it's only a 30-minute walking distance, then I walk. If it's too far away, then I take public transport. A lot of things are unavoidable, but it's our job to lessen the impact.

RVD
Nov 18th, 2006, 11:55 PM
I'm majoring in Environment - Atmospheric Sciences here at McGill and let me tell ya, the situation is indeed problematic. In early spring 2007, the most recent study (that comes out every 5 years) will be rendered publicly, and coming from professors who either participated or saw some previews, we should expect some big waves to be done by government, cause there won't be any doubts no more about the *it's natural warming* vs *it's human induced*. The data that was analysed was already self-explanatory, especially with the resemblance of the carbon dioxyde curves and the temperature raise curves, but of course, it is still possible to doubt, and isn't doubting the main idea behind science? It's just that right now, it would be better not to take the chance to compromise our future and our children's future, and start taking precautions. Better safe than sorry.

The tough thing is, right now, money is the language that the world speaks. And it's tough to put a price on biodiversity loss, eutrophication, human lives and quality of air. The STERN review, that was recently released, does a great job by joining economics to the environment. I personnally think this is the key issue!:worship: :worship:
Honestly, those who suggest that this is a natural cyclical phenomena are either severely uninformed, delusional, just don't care, or are a combination of all three. The facts speak for themselves. And if anyone has a doubt whatsoever, Al Gore's environmental documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" breaks it all down for the public in the most layman of terms possible. In other words, there's no misconstruing the evidence that we are in deep... deeeeeep... doo-doo. :sad:

Also, and unfortunately, the U.S. Is the world's WORST offender. :fiery:

Fingon
Nov 18th, 2006, 11:57 PM
I'm with blocparty on this, it's not a matter of belief, it's a fact. Everyone pretty much agrees that the earth is getting warmer. There's still some disagreement about whether or not the cause is pollution, but not about global warming itself.

well, that's a problem, yes, you can prove the planet is getting warmer, you just have to messure the temperature, the causes are a little more complex.

And if it's something we have no control over, then we are really screwed.

Said that, it does appear that pollution has a big part in it, but I wonder how realistic is to pretend to stop it. Isn't it a consequence of the increase in population? I don't honeslty see many alternatives, specially in growing economies such as China or India or Brazil.

Another thing, global warming is a little like healthy eating, part a true need, part just business. There are corporation whose business model is "environment". It's now becoming more difficult to know where to draw the line. I remember seeing an article years ago that predicted that companies dedicated to environmental issues would have a big boost. It's an issue that touches people, so they have really created a new revenue stream with it.

Dawn Marie
Nov 18th, 2006, 11:59 PM
Of course I believe in Global Warming. It's a fact.


Besides I believe other animals (besides the humans) are intelligent. Birds are already moving to higher elevations. If in doubt study the animals. They're smart.

!<blocparty>!
Nov 19th, 2006, 12:01 AM
:worship: :worship:
Honestly, those who suggest that this is a natural cyclical phenomena are either severely uninformed, delusional, just don't care, or are a combination of all three. The facts speak for themselves. And if anyone has a doubt whatsoever, Al Gore's environmental documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" breaks it all down for the public in the most layman of terms possible. In other words, there's no misconstruing the evidence that we are in deep... deeeeeep... doo-doo. :sad:

Also, and unfortunately, the U.S. Is the world's WORST offender. :fiery:

I'd have put down "republican/conservative" there. Much quicker. ;)

RVD
Nov 19th, 2006, 12:11 AM
I'd have put down "republican/conservative" there. Much quicker. ;):lol: Naw, I got love for my Republican homies...in those rare cases when they recognize a real danger. And a solid brick to the head for my Democratic and liberal comrades when they ignore the signs. ;)

You know, here in the Bay Area, we've begun experiencing changes that include tornados, unseasonable long [hot and humid] spells, and rain that one would normally find on the EAST Coast and temperate regions of the Planet. I tell ya when you can have a 9 - 12 inch rainfall in a 24 hour period, that's gotta tell ya something.

And how many hurricanes did the U.S. claim in 2005?! :eek: :eek:
I do believe that it was a record year, with more and worse on the way. :scraed:

Monica_Rules
Nov 19th, 2006, 12:38 AM
I do believe in global warming and do believe that the human race by means of pollution are destroying the world. However i will not reject the notion that what is happen MAY be down to a cyclic change.

The scientist in me makes me question these things.

I am 99% certain climate change is due to our actions though.

quasar
Nov 19th, 2006, 05:32 AM
I believe global warming killed the dinosaurs. For years I've been trying to convince the scientific community that dinosaur farts (scientific name: dinofarts) accumulated in the atmosphere, trapping heat--and nasty smell, and thus leading to their premature demise.

In short, the food requirements of those huge animals imply that excessive amounts of gaseous emanations were being ventilated into the atmosphere as a result of the digestion of such aliments. Those precious dinofarts contained methane, a well-known greenhouse gas that contributes to the warming of our planet.

Synthesizing, fart-induced environmental changes brought about the extinction of the dinosaurs, thus paving the way for our unrestricted evolution as the dominant species of the planet.

In other words, we owe our existence to farts! Yes, those invisible--yet irresistibly seducing gaseous substances, traditionally neglected and ostracized, have finally proven that they are not only ephemeral flashes of passion from the deepest confines of uranuses; instead they are the maternal figure that breathed life into humanity as we know it: they reside at the genesis of our existence.

Paraphrasing the great Descartes: Dinos farted, therefore WE now exist.

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it. :)

Cheers,

Carlos

Yasmine
Nov 19th, 2006, 05:43 AM
it's not something to "believe in" :rolleyes:
exactly :yeah:
how can anyone even think about doubting about it is beyond me :tape: probably because they have no water restriction and still live comfortably in their country :tape:

irma
Nov 19th, 2006, 05:47 AM
When I grew up (the eighties) you could skate on natural ice almost every year. Now it almost became a miracle
We had some snow the last years but maybe one or two days a year

In summer we had some extreme hot days that you saw less 20 years ago

so imho it's clearly visible

The earth was never a stagnating planet but I don't believe it ever went as quick as it seems to go now. I don't believe it's good and we should do something!

gentenaire
Nov 19th, 2006, 08:56 AM
Said that, it does appear that pollution has a big part in it, but I wonder how realistic is to pretend to stop it. Isn't it a consequence of the increase in population? I don't honeslty see many alternatives, specially in growing economies such as China or India or Brazil.

I think the only way is to come up with a sort of labelling. It's hard for our companies to compete with China and India, where they don't have such strict green laws and labour laws. It makes it an unfair competetition. I think the only way to force growing economies to adopt similar laws is by stopping them from exporting to our parts unless they can prove the items have been produced in a semi-environmental way. I think it's vital that we do try to convince the growing economies from adopting green laws because it's actually a lot easier to make new factories environment friendly than it is to convert existing ones.

Another thing, global warming is a little like healthy eating, part a true need, part just business. There are corporation whose business model is "environment". It's now becoming more difficult to know where to draw the line. I remember seeing an article years ago that predicted that companies dedicated to environmental issues would have a big boost. It's an issue that touches people, so they have really created a new revenue stream with it.

You're spot on with this. I'm confronted with this daily. I'm a building engineer. I mainly calculate and design HVAC installations (=heating, ventilation, air conditioning). A lot of energy can be saved in buildings. Most buildings now are far from energy efficient. I've been specialising somewhat in energy efficiency of buildings. It's big business now. We have newer stricter laws for new buildings. But like you said, I do meet with a lot of companies whose products are considered energy efficient and who would sell to anyone and everyone, never mind that for some cases, their product isn't the best choice. It actually makes it all less efficient, because the client could have saved more energy with the same investment. That bothers me.

Shimizu Amon
Nov 19th, 2006, 09:02 AM
Well I believe we have a serious situation, but if it's really that bad. I don't know. I do believe though that we need to ask ourselves what we can do to have a contribution to improve the health of our environment.

¤CharlDa¤
Nov 19th, 2006, 06:50 PM
You're studying atmospheric sciences? Wow, that's really interesting! :)

It will be interesting to find out more. There's no doubt that global warming is real and it is at least partially human induced.

It's indeed so interesting. I'm only in my first year and I still learned a lot about environment, climate and meteorology. Just understanding how all of this works, even if it only is the basis, completely changes your vision of the global changes happening right now. Everything is so linked that a mini-change somewhere can have huge repercussions. And that's what people need to understand so this societal problem can be solved.

¤CharlDa¤
Nov 19th, 2006, 06:53 PM
:worship: :worship:
Honestly, those who suggest that this is a natural cyclical phenomena are either severely uninformed, delusional, just don't care, or are a combination of all three. The facts speak for themselves. And if anyone has a doubt whatsoever, Al Gore's environmental documentary "An Inconvenient Truth" breaks it all down for the public in the most layman of terms possible. In other words, there's no misconstruing the evidence that we are in deep... deeeeeep... doo-doo. :sad:

Also, and unfortunately, the U.S. Is the world's WORST offender. :fiery:

Thanks for the worshipping ;)

That documentary by Al Gore is indeed amazing. It's the best tool right now to make the general public understand a little better what is going on, and not necessarily in very complicated scientific concepts. I totally think it should be shown in every single school in America and why not all around the world, as anyways, it's our and the new generation who will have the power to change all of this and who will also suffer from the consequences.

Parsley
Nov 19th, 2006, 07:34 PM
Scienfitic? ;) And that's not necessarily true, it's not yet proven.

In fact, the Earth goes through periods of warming and cooling often... this could just be a warming period. Personally, I think the evidence of global warming is fairly convincing, but I'm not totally sure as of yet.

Still, I think it's a good idea to implement the changes they suggest, just in case.

The only research done which reject it are funded by some oil companies Esso...

Oizo
Nov 20th, 2006, 01:39 PM
I think it's 1 Minute to 12 to save our planet. I hope I am wrong, but it definitely looks not good. At all.

Kunal
Nov 20th, 2006, 02:05 PM
i believe it and i think it is legit....

but i read this book by michael crichton called 'State of Fear'

and although it was a fiction novel....it raised the possibility of this being a hoax.....very nicely narrated as well...got me thinking....u never know where vested interests lie.....

but then again when facts are so straight up...u dont know what else to think about except for that its happenin

Mileen
Nov 20th, 2006, 03:04 PM
It's 2006. You don't believe or not believe in it, it's scienfitic fact.

Current thoughts: We're screwed.

it's not a scientific fact at all. One big problem is the temperature measurements are done close to airports where it is warmer. There are a lot more of these examples.

gentenaire
Nov 20th, 2006, 03:09 PM
it's not a scientific fact at all. One big problem is the temperature measurements are done close to airports where it is warmer. There are a lot more of these examples.

How many airports are there on the North Pole?

!<blocparty>!
Nov 20th, 2006, 04:33 PM
:haha:

Oh dear.

!<blocparty>!
Nov 20th, 2006, 04:36 PM
it's not a scientific fact at all. One big problem is the temperature measurements are done close to airports where it is warmer. There are a lot more of these examples.

Just out of curiosity... why the hell is the earth warmer near AIRPORTS? :eek::eek::eek::eek:

mandy7
Nov 20th, 2006, 05:10 PM
we're screwed, big time

temps aren't supposed to be over 10 degrees at the end of november in holland.

Yasmine
Nov 20th, 2006, 05:14 PM
The only research done which reject it are funded by some oil companies Esso...
:rolleyes: how surprising! :tape:
it's not a scientific fact at all. One big problem is the temperature measurements are done close to airports where it is warmer. There are a lot more of these examples.
funniest post of the year :haha: are there any awards given for that kind of posts anywhere? :rolls:

Just out of curiosity... why the hell is the earth warmer near AIRPORTS? :eek::eek::eek::eek:
:shrug: yeah I'm wondering that too, puzzling actually ummm...

smiler
Nov 20th, 2006, 08:43 PM
The people who think our planet is "screwed" should know that the planet was here a long, long time before humans -and will remain long after we are gone. Life as we know it almost certainly cannot be sustained indefinitely, but the planet is not screwed.

There is no doubt in my mind that human activities are contributing to climate change, the rise in greenhouse gasses since the industrial revolution is astonishing! :eek:

In my view it is not true to say that orbital forcing is solely responsible for the current trend of global warming, but it should also be remembered that orbital forcing in the past has been responsible for very abrupt, dramatic changes in this plant's climate, which the earth has always recovered from.

My point is that while human activities are clearly having a very real impact on the environment, we don't have a full understanding of all the interactions and feedbacks that control our climate- we simply can’t say for sure what is going to happen in the future.

¤CharlDa¤
Nov 21st, 2006, 01:44 AM
The concentration of CO2 right now is of 380 ppm in the atmosphere, which is more than it ever was in the past 420 000 years. The temperature change right now is more abrupt than any other changes in history (at least up until where we can know), including the various extreme glaciations. I think it is safe to say that yes orbital changes could have an influence, but such an influence is totally useless when compared to the human activities.

Of course we are doubting about the future, but that's the point. One thing we know for sure: reducing the amount of GHG couldn't make things worst, and very very likely would make them better. So I don't see why people need absolute proof, cause we most likely will never get it. Various models were created, by groups of scientists from all around the world, and they used the actual optimal knowledge on the various interactions right now. The results have all been clear enough. So let's just start working already!

BTW, i don't think the planet is actually screwed. The planet as we know it right now could be though. And i agree that some people go overboard predicting the end of the world. But hey, if they don't go overboard, people won't care!

meyerpl
Nov 21st, 2006, 01:58 AM
I've got to come down on the side of EVERY REPUTABLE SCIENTIST ON EARTH who isn't on the payroll of big oil or some other special interest group who would like to maintain the status-quo and say, yes, global warming is real and a very serious problem.

Vincey!
Nov 21st, 2006, 02:03 AM
Yeah I do and it's really serious, it's already too late for some animals and plants...DAWN MONEY :fiery:

Vincey!
Nov 21st, 2006, 02:05 AM
I can't be more agree with all that C-D said :worship:

Derek.
Nov 21st, 2006, 02:21 AM
What are the serious threats we could face in our lifetime because of global warming?

Or are the major issues more of the future?

Dan23
Nov 21st, 2006, 02:26 AM
The threats arent really 'serious'. Changes like more extreme weather and rising ocean levels are about all that will happen in our lifetime. The Earth goes through these cycles naturally over thousands of years.

!<blocparty>!
Nov 21st, 2006, 04:49 PM
The threats arent really 'serious'. Changes like more extreme weather and rising ocean levels are about all that will happen in our lifetime. The Earth goes through these cycles naturally over thousands of years.

I'd call that pretty serious. :weirdo: MILLIONS of people will die if sea levels rise by the heights many scientists are predicting within the next few decades.

Volcana
Nov 21st, 2006, 07:10 PM
I believe in global warming. I also believe that until obvious catastrophic damage (there's already subtle, but catastrophic, damage), nothing substantitive will be done. Biggest reason, corporations fund the elections in a lot of the major polluting countries, and they won't give money to politicians who'll do anything that run up their costs.

Vincey!
Nov 21st, 2006, 09:42 PM
The threats arent really 'serious'. Changes like more extreme weather and rising ocean levels are about all that will happen in our lifetime. The Earth goes through these cycles naturally over thousands of years.

This is natural on thousand of years but not in hundred of years...and this is the problem with this global warming.

brayster87
Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:40 AM
I'd call that pretty serious. :weirdo: MILLIONS of people will die if sea levels rise by the heights many scientists are predicting within the next few decades.

yep i agree with you!!

mc8114
Nov 22nd, 2006, 01:34 PM
exactly :yeah:
how can anyone even think about doubting about it is beyond me :tape: probably because they have no water restriction and still live comfortably in their country :tape::worship:
Well said :yeah:

The only research done which reject it are funded by some oil companies Esso...and they're part of the Exxon Mobil family