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View Full Version : Are Australian's accent are the most complicated to understand for Overseas people?


Brett.
Nov 16th, 2006, 02:18 AM
Mostly, my friends told me that everyone from oversea thinks that Australian accent is very complicated to understand than rest of the countries around the world. Why's that?

I find that is very hard to believe. Lol

hdfb
Nov 16th, 2006, 02:26 AM
You're kidding...... In my opinion the Scottish accent is 100 times harder...

Kirt12255
Nov 16th, 2006, 02:28 AM
It's only because we speak so fast and forget to take breaths. We also have alot of lingo hense why Kath and Kim released a dictionary of terms before their show aired overseas.:lol:

PointBlank
Nov 16th, 2006, 02:53 AM
For English speaking people the hardest Ive heard are Scots, not Australians. Also, people from Northern USA(Wisconsin, Minnesota, SD, etc.).

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 16th, 2006, 02:57 AM
Most Americans who have had to call a customer service number for a computer product would say Indian.
I lie and say I have a bad connection sometimes but honestly it's not a very good accent on the phone.

aussie12
Nov 16th, 2006, 03:18 AM
australians have alot of words that other countries not use, like fair dinkum etc. which is probably why it hard for them to understand us.

Beefy
Nov 16th, 2006, 03:23 AM
People just think of the stereotype accent, but there are quite a few people in the country who do speak well. I would say Scots, maybe the Irish, if you're from the north of England, the Welsh and Afrikana's to be hard to understand

kiwifan
Nov 16th, 2006, 04:52 AM
You're kidding...... In my opinion the Scottish accent is 100 times harder...

I agree, Scottish is toughest for me. :lol:

Haute
Nov 16th, 2006, 05:00 AM
Most Americans who have had to call a customer service number for a computer product would say Indian.
I lie and say I have a bad connection sometimes but honestly it's not a very good accent on the phone.

My Anthro prof is Indian and I agree with you there. A lot of times we have to have him repeat what he's just said because we can't understand it. His Vs sound so much like Ws, so it gets confusing at times.

V.Melb
Nov 16th, 2006, 05:01 AM
Australians do not use the word 'fair dinkum' --- I have never heard it used and its a gross stereotype of a dumb aussie.
Also, people forget to mention that the majority of Australians have a normal accent - ie. Nicole Kidman, Kate Blanchett, Heath Ledger.

THEN, There is the 'broad' accent, which is rarer and not a great amo
unt of the population have it. ie. Steve Irwin.
Unfortunantly, most of the world think all Australians speak like Steve Irwin using a very 'country; Australian lingo.

And all the lingo used in Kath and Kim, well of course its been hyped up.... and they have accentuated the whiny australian accents. I hope people realise that the Australian accent is nothing like a dumb chubby red headed guy who lives in the desert '"g'day maaaiiite. fair dinkum maiiite. "

and with all the immigrants from Europe and Asia, the accent is softening up even more IMO. my parents are immigrants to Australia, my accent is not strong at all...

Hayato
Nov 16th, 2006, 05:24 AM
Australians do not use the word 'fair dinkum' --- I have never heard it used and its a gross stereotype of a dumb aussie.
Also, people forget to mention that the majority of Australians have a normal accent - ie. Nicole Kidman, Kate Blanchett, Heath Ledger.

THEN, There is the 'broad' accent, which is rarer and not a great amo
unt of the population have it. ie. Steve Irwin.
Unfortunantly, most of the world think all Australians speak like Steve Irwin using a very 'country; Australian lingo.

And all the lingo used in Kath and Kim, well of course its been hyped up.... and they have accentuated the whiny australian accents. I hope people realise that the Australian accent is nothing like a dumb chubby red headed guy who lives in the desert '"g'day maaaiiite. fair dinkum maiiite. "

and with all the immigrants from Europe and Asia, the accent is softening up even more IMO. my parents are immigrants to Australia, my accent is not strong at all...

that's right.

OZTENNIS
Nov 16th, 2006, 05:39 AM
scottish!

OZTENNIS
Nov 16th, 2006, 05:39 AM
why dont u make a poll?

LoveFifteen
Nov 16th, 2006, 05:55 AM
I love the Aussie accent, and I don't find it difficult at all. :hearts:

Sometimes it takes a few sentences to get used to a Scottish accent. :o

But Indian takes the naan cake! :spit:

mandy7
Nov 16th, 2006, 06:06 AM
it's way easy to understand
i only had problems the 1st day of my trip
the next half year or so were fine

scots and drunk irish ppl on the other hand :lol:

égalité
Nov 16th, 2006, 06:22 AM
I'm from New York and I went to Mississippi over spring break last year. Now THAT'S a challenge.

rebel_ffighter
Nov 16th, 2006, 07:01 AM
I had an australian teacher so for me is piece of cake...I found it difficult thought when I had to get used to english and scottish at university

Kunal
Nov 16th, 2006, 07:10 AM
i didnt have any problems to understand my australian friend.....but my other european friends sometimes didnt get anything he was saying....i found it hilarious....its prolly a lil harder to understand than other accents

drake3781
Nov 16th, 2006, 07:14 AM
You're kidding...... In my opinion the Scottish accent is 100 times harder...

I was last year in Scotland (Edinburgh) and in Norteast England (Newcastle). I found the Newcastle accent more difficult.

In fact it was ridiculous and amazed me that we were speaking the same language, but I often I had to ask people to repeat themselves and speak more slowly in order to understand them. :lol:

OZTENNIS
Nov 16th, 2006, 07:16 AM
ture, indian is quite hard to understand, but i still reckon scottish

drake3781
Nov 16th, 2006, 07:22 AM
Most Americans who have had to call a customer service number for a computer product would say Indian.
I lie and say I have a bad connection sometimes but honestly it's not a very good accent on the phone.


I took the question to be about variations in the accents of native English-speakers.

Indians have to learn English as a second (or third, etc.) language.

samn
Nov 16th, 2006, 08:15 AM
I sometimes find the Queen difficult to understand. Her "Meh husband and eh..." accent makes Her Maj unintelligible at times.

More proof that we should be ruled by Her Majesty Virginia of Wade, Queen of SW19. Those South African vowels have a majestic ring to them. ;)

Marcus1979
Nov 16th, 2006, 08:37 AM
what about the asian or indians on telecommunication call centers
I have trouble understanding what they are saying most the times

not meaning to sound racist btw just they talk as fast as a machine gun fires bullets.

Yasmine
Nov 16th, 2006, 09:19 AM
scottish accent is much tougher to understand than aussie accent imo :p

Selah
Nov 16th, 2006, 09:29 AM
Not at all, barring the slang they use i guess but most difficult to understand for me would be Irish and some of those English accents that need subtitltes in movies :eek:

Martian Stacey
Nov 16th, 2006, 10:11 AM
I don't really understand how a typical Australian accent would be difficult to understand. Maybe people who didn't speak English as a first language would have some difficulty understanding if we speak fast, but I think that would be the same for Americans, English, etc.

I have trouble understanding most heavy accents, including Scottish and some English accents, I have to take a few seconds to work out what they're saying :lol:

fnuf7
Nov 16th, 2006, 10:30 AM
I have no trouble with the Aussie accent, in fact I'd say it's one of the easiest to understand :D

One accent I do sometimes have trouble understanding is an accent form somewhere in the southern states of America, now no idea which state/city/area it is, but there is one particular accent I just cannot understand for some reason. It's too harsh an accent, thye speak far too fast, and also seem to stumble over their words so it all becomes one long stream of noise as opposed to distinct words...no idea whe it's from though...:shrug:

rockstar
Nov 16th, 2006, 10:41 AM
would it be safe to say that australians pronounce their 'A's as 'I's instead?

anyway, i once heard this vietnamese speaker speaking english, i couldn't understand a single sentence :tape:

Marcus1979
Nov 16th, 2006, 10:44 AM
I don't think we pronouce A as I

well I don't anyway

daniela86
Nov 16th, 2006, 10:58 AM
I have several Australian professors at University (and a good Aussie mate:p) and it's not difficult understanding them :p I actually love their accent :drool:
I never heard the Scottish accent but now I'm very curious:p I have to find a Scot to speak with:p

sillyboy
Nov 16th, 2006, 11:21 AM
Try a thick Scottish or Irish accent

You'd have better luck talking to someone buried in 20 feet of cement

MyskinaManiac
Nov 16th, 2006, 11:24 AM
Lol. I actually think we've got one of the clearest. I mean Americans have no trouble understanding us. It's more or less the Irish and Scottish - and they're lazy when it comes to pronouncing the words.

Kunal
Nov 16th, 2006, 11:42 AM
chinese people talking in english is also pretty hard to decipher

MyskinaManiac
Nov 16th, 2006, 11:48 AM
Yeah, it's because their translation or words and the way the strings sentences together is just everywhere. I'm training to become a teacher, and it is widely believed that the Chinese language is easier for european people to learn by the otherway around is not true. They struggle on the concepts of English in particular, I mean it's a horrid language with many rules to learn.

kiwifan
Nov 16th, 2006, 02:26 PM
I have no trouble with the Aussie accent, in fact I'd say it's one of the easiest to understand :D

One accent I do sometimes have trouble understanding is an accent form somewhere in the southern states of America, now no idea which state/city/area it is, but there is one particular accent I just cannot understand for some reason. It's too harsh an accent, thye speak far too fast, and also seem to stumble over their words so it all becomes one long stream of noise as opposed to distinct words...no idea whe it's from though...:shrug:

Cajun - New Orleans - Louisiana

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siigTFsR0iw :cool:

tennisboi
Nov 16th, 2006, 03:22 PM
The Welsh accent is the hardest for me to understand I love Scottish and Aussie accents there so sexy...

fnuf7
Nov 16th, 2006, 04:42 PM
Cajun - New Orleans - Louisiana

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siigTFsR0iw :cool:

Nope not that one, I could understand him ok ;)

An example of the kind of accent I can't quite understand a lot of the time is from that new Sean Penn film 'All The King's Men', there are loads of speechs he does in that film that I simply have no idea what he's saying...ok so he's acting so I've no idea if that's a technically accurate accent or whatever but whatever the hell accent he was talking in was impossible for me to understand :lol: Maybe it's just Sean Penn I can't understand ;)

Parsley
Nov 16th, 2006, 04:44 PM
Scottish. Welsh comes a distant second.

TheBoiledEgg
Nov 16th, 2006, 04:44 PM
the hardest to understand is the Geordie accent :o :help:

most of them sound as thick as two planks.

--aya--
Nov 16th, 2006, 08:38 PM
i find australian accent cute:D

Milli
Nov 16th, 2006, 08:47 PM
Aussie accent is damn cute. I love Australia in general so...

wally1
Nov 16th, 2006, 08:52 PM
I was last year in Scotland (Edinburgh) and in Norteast England (Newcastle). I found the Newcastle accent more difficult.

In fact it was ridiculous and amazed me that we were speaking the same language, but I often I had to ask people to repeat themselves and speak more slowly in order to understand them. :lol:Edinburgh is an easy accent to undertand. A stong Glasgow accent is the tough one.

Gerri
Nov 16th, 2006, 09:57 PM
I think Australians are easy to understand but then I've watched Neighbours for 150 years so I'm used to it.

Really strong Northern Irish accents can be tough. A N Irish woman asked me directions a few years ago and I couldn't tell she was speaking English at first.

wipeout
Nov 17th, 2006, 12:03 AM
It's weird how some people think Scottish and Irish accents are sexy but people also say they can't understand what we're saying. :lol:

The reason people have trouble with our accents may be that they are simply just not as used to hearing our accents as we Scots and Irish are to hearing English, Australian and American accents. You guys are all over our TVs and radios. We know all about you and how you sound. :p

wipeout
Nov 17th, 2006, 12:09 AM
the hardest to understand is the Geordie accent :o :help:

I agree with that. The Geordie ex-footballer Paul Gascoigne is the only native or non-native English speaker that I have ever had trouble understanding a single word. :eek: :help: :scratch:

drake3781
Nov 17th, 2006, 02:26 AM
Edinburgh is an easy accent to undertand. A stong Glasgow accent is the tough one.

What do you think about Newcastle English speakers (if you've heard them)? How do you name that type of English accent?

Grachka
Nov 17th, 2006, 04:35 AM
What do you think about Newcastle English speakers (if you've heard them)? How do you name that type of English accent?
Geordie. I can understand them, but half the time I wish I couldn't. :p

I can understand why some people most people everyone finds Glaswegians incomprehensible. :angel:

LefandePatty
Nov 17th, 2006, 04:41 AM
Hmm that's okay.. The last time I talked to Australians(a few weeks ago ïn Zürich), Bryanne Stewart and Jarmila's coach, I didn't have any problem to understand them, and I'm not THAT good in English...

DutchieGirl
Nov 17th, 2006, 07:16 AM
People just think of the stereotype accent, but there are quite a few people in the country who do speak well. I would say Scots, maybe the Irish, if you're from the north of England, the Welsh and Afrikana's to be hard to understand

:scratch: I assume you mean Afrikaner's, and in that case, English is not their first language. Afrikaners = people with Dutch background who settled in RSA. If you just mean the South Africans with an English background who live in RSA, then you shouldn't call them Afrikaner's. ;)

DutchieGirl
Nov 17th, 2006, 07:40 AM
the hardest to understand is the Geordie accent :o :help:

most of them sound as thick as two planks.
































Most of them are! :angel: (JOKE)!

Привет
Nov 17th, 2006, 08:07 AM
We aren't that hard to understand, although I don't have that much experience speaking with people from overseas. I reckon stronger accents are harder to understand. And no, we pronounce 'A' as an 'A', because that is what it is :)

samn
Nov 17th, 2006, 08:14 AM
the hardest to understand is the Geordie accent :o :help:

most of them sound as thick as two planks.

<intolerant and judgmental mode>

Well, if they're anything like the Geordie poster boys, Ant and Dec, most of them probably are as thick as two planks.

</intolerant and judgmental mode>

samn
Nov 17th, 2006, 08:16 AM
I agree with that. The Geordie ex-footballer Paul Gascoigne is the only native or non-native English speaker that I have ever had trouble understanding a single word. :eek: :help: :scratch:

Now, see, Gascoigne is an accent unto himself. His dialect is a mix of Geordie and abusive drunk.

Brett.
Nov 29th, 2006, 01:03 AM
Wow i didn't realise of how many posts there are! lol

I don't find Scottish accent that rarely difficult at all when i went to Edinburgh and Northern Scotland in October!

I met a elderly couple in Scotland who is originally from Cornwell or something - its so complicated to understand.

~Kiera~
Nov 29th, 2006, 02:29 AM
I'd go with Geordie and Scottish accents.

Sunny_Boy
Nov 29th, 2006, 02:41 AM
I also have to agree, Scottish accents are the hardest to understand for me

Brett.
Nov 29th, 2006, 03:21 AM
What is Geordie?

fufuqifuqishahah
Nov 29th, 2006, 03:22 AM
how Australians say Andrew (my name) is so funny =)

Princess Sarah.
Nov 29th, 2006, 03:27 AM
scottish ppl