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View Full Version : South Africa parliament OKs gay marriage


Wannabeknowitall
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:01 PM
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - The South African parliament on Tuesday approved new legislation recognizing gay marriages — a first for a continent where homosexuality is largely taboo.

The National Assembly passed the Civil Union Bill, worked out after months of heated public discussion, by a majority of 230 to 41 votes despite criticism from both traditionalists and gay activists and warnings that it might be unconsitutional. There were three abstentions.

The bill provides for the "voluntary union of two persons, which is solemnized and registered by either a marriage or civil union." It does not specify whether they are heterosexual or homosexual partnerships.

But it also says marriage officers need not perform a ceremony between same-sex couples if doing so would conflict with his or her "conscience, religion and belief."

"When we attained our democracy, we sought to distinguish ourselves from an unjust painful past, by declaring that never again shall it be that any South African will be discriminated against on the basis of color, creed culture and sex," Home Affairs Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula told the National Assembly.

The bill had been expected to pass given the overwhelming majority of the ruling
African National Congress, despite unease among rank and file lawmakers. It now has to go to the National Council of Provinces, which is expected to be a formality, before being signed into law by President Thabo Mbeki.

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:04 PM
"When we attained our democracy, we sought to distinguish ourselves from an unjust painful past, by declaring that never again shall it be that any South African will be discriminated against on the basis of color, creed culture and sex," Home Affairs Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula told the National Assembly.

I find that to be very important because America can't seem to comprehend this ideology especially the black community and I really find that to be ashame.

Instead there has been every obstacle put in the way against gay marriage in the U.S.
Noone cares that it's still discrimination because of the difference sexuality and color.
Noone cares that the same Bible thumpers who said that blacks had to be slaves because it was in the Bible are doing the same thing with homosexuality.
Let's not mention the Bible has been translated 6 times and whether you believe the people who wrote the Bible were under the influence of God and became infallible, the same isn't applicable to the ones who translated it.

venus_rulez
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:04 PM
Congrats to the South Africans! And the U.S. still continues to lag behind. :confused:

alfonsojose
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:09 PM
:woohoo: :woohoo:

Qrystyna
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:18 PM
Nice to see South Africa joining the more progressive nations of the world! :yeah:

SelesFan70
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:26 PM
"When we attained our democracy, we sought to distinguish ourselves from an unjust painful past, by declaring that never again shall it be that any South African will be discriminated against on the basis of color, creed culture and sex," Home Affairs Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula told the National Assembly.

I find that to be very important because America can't seem to comprehend this ideology especially the black community and I really find that to be ashame.

Instead there has been every obstacle put in the way against gay marriage in the U.S.
Noone cares that it's still discrimination because of the difference sexuality and color.
Noone cares that the same Bible thumpers who said that blacks had to be slaves because it was in the Bible are doing the same thing with homosexuality.
Let's not mention the Bible has been translated 6 times and whether you believe the people who wrote the Bible were under the influence of God and became infallible, the same isn't applicable to the ones who translated it.

Agreed, but I hope you're as critical of the other major religions that villify homos, too... :)

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:34 PM
Agreed, but I hope you're as critical of the other major religions that villify homos, too... :)

Those other religions are not attacking gay marriage in the U.S. as vocal as Christianity.
I'm not going to be critical of those other religions when it deals with America's domestic interaction with them in the dealing of homosexuality.
Outside of America, I will and have been.

Selah
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:11 PM
Nice precedent set by S.A. I like that the government is not not being hypocritical in its policies in regards to discrimination.

Sanneriet
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:21 PM
Nice to see South Africa joining the more progressive nations of the world! :yeah:


I live here. Don't get carried away. We recently had a high profile government official accused of rape who said the accuser "wanted" sex because she wore a skirt to his office. And HIV doesn't actually cause AIDS according to our health minister.

Selah
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:36 PM
I live here. Don't get carried away. We recently had a high profile government official accused of rape who said the accuser "wanted" sex because she wore a skirt to his office. And HIV doesn't actually cause AIDS according to our health minister.

I get your point. But even though these are horrid sentiments believed by many, it is different than an actual policy taken by government. Now if you tell me that the health minister is setting policy on this belief of his, that is scary, and a big issue. By the way is said government official being tried for the alleged rape?

Selah
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:42 PM
Oh, I wanted to ask you wannabe, why are you singling out the black community in the U.S. here? I understand your point about blacks being discriminated against in the U.S. and then turning around and having anti-homophobic reactions that might lead to voting a certain way (and we should make not that it isn't all blacks, correct?). However, I don't see how that is analogous to the precedent set by South African government, after all blacks are in not largely in control of setting the policies here. Yes, again you can say by their votes but I doubt if all the blacks in every State voted for gay marriage, it would pass, for they aren't the majority. They certainly don't hold sway on a federal level, so i found your 'attack'/comparison a bit out there.

timafi
Nov 14th, 2006, 06:00 PM
woohooo good for the SA:bounce: :bounce:

Wannabeknowitall
Nov 14th, 2006, 06:00 PM
Oh, I wanted to ask you wannabe, why are you singling out the black community in the U.S. here? I understand your point about blacks being discriminated against in the U.S. and then turning around and having anti-homophobic reactions that might lead to voting a certain way (and we should make not that it isn't all blacks, correct?). However, I don't see how that is analogous to the precedent set by South African government, after all blacks are in not largely in control of setting the policies here. Yes, again you can say by their votes but I doubt if all the blacks in every State voted for gay marriage, it would pass, for they aren't the majority. They certainly don't hold sway on a federal level, so i found your 'attack'/comparison a bit out there.

Regardless of the comments in your posts I singled out the black community because of the person who is quoted, Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula, a black South African female leader.

You will rarely if ever hear a quote like that from a black leader let alone a black person in the U.S. and for some of the reasons listed above.
Even if someone were to say something similar to that quote which has happened a couple of times, it is usually taken as an insult for whatever reason to the black community.
I still believe it's an issue whether you think it was a bit out there.

I went after Christianity who appears to be the most vocal against homosexuality in the U.S. after acknowledging the quote.

Sanneriet
Nov 14th, 2006, 06:03 PM
I get your point. But even though these are horrid sentiments believed by many, it is different than an actual policy taken by government. Now if you tell me that the health minister is setting policy on this belief of his, that is scary, and a big issue. By the way is said government official being tried for the alleged rape?

Our health minister does set the policies for treatment for AIDS based on these beliefs and has publicly said that anti-retrovirals are not effective treatments but herbal remedies are. The minister was tried and acquitted.

Selah
Nov 14th, 2006, 06:23 PM
Our health minister does set the policies for treatment for AIDS based on these beliefs and has publicly said that anti-retrovirals are not effective treatments but herbal remedies are. The minister was tried and acquitted.

That is pretty scary stuff considering the incidence of HIV/AIDS in that region.

Wannabe- fair enuff;)

Qrystyna
Nov 14th, 2006, 08:37 PM
I live here. Don't get carried away. We recently had a high profile government official accused of rape who said the accuser "wanted" sex because she wore a skirt to his office. And HIV doesn't actually cause AIDS according to our health minister.

Well, of course, things aren't perfect, but what I meant by my statement is that it's a very nice start towards progression. :) Of course, there is still lots of work to be done.

Scotso
Nov 15th, 2006, 12:39 AM
:banana:

bionic71
Nov 15th, 2006, 01:21 AM
More steps in the right direction...
The right for all citizens to access marriage and for same sex couples to have their their unions given the same legal and symbolic recognition.

DutchieGirl
Nov 15th, 2006, 01:28 AM
Wow! South Africa ahead of Australia. :yeah: For them! :D