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View Full Version : Experienced Cat raisers, help!!


Pheobo
Nov 14th, 2006, 02:42 AM
Remember that kitten I rescued a few months ago? Well, he's been great. He's gotten big, too, although I'm guessing he still has a lot more growing to do. Anyways, I love having him around, but there's one problem. When I'm holding him and he's purring, he'll start sucking on my tshirt like he would a nipple. I don't think he was fed by his mommy very much because he was abandoned very young, but it's soooo annoying. I've tried punishing him, distracting him with something else to get him to stop, but he still does it. I'm afraid he's going to do it when he's older too. Has anyone else had this problem with a cat before? Any advice?

hurricanejeanne
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:07 AM
Have you asked your vet about this?
How old, exactly?

Some cats tend to stay "traumatized" after something like being abandoned. My youngest cat was and was left in a parking lot for dead until my dad heard it. Needless to say it doesn't like the sound of cars, loud noises, and strange people.

I have another cat who tends to drool when she purrs. And she's 5 years old.
Your kitten may never get out of this, but if he's still a "baby" so to speak, it could just be a phase until he goes into heat.

But if you haven't asked your vet that's the best thing to do, they might have a better explaination. :)

But glad to hear the little kitty is doing well. :)

drake3781
Nov 14th, 2006, 04:07 AM
I'll take a stab at this; it might sound cruel, but it's the way to break ferrets of biting, and it works and IMO does not hurt them or traumatize them.

Whenever the cat does it, give it a sharp flick on the side of the nose, and say "No" once, loudly and firmly. Don't flick more than once or say "No" more than once, and don't say it in a high or excited voice. Just a calm but loud "No". And you can keep holding/petting the cat afterward. But repeat if the cat does it again. You have to be patient, maybe repeating this each time for a week or two, doing the exact same thing each time.

And I wopld not worry about why the cat does it; it's time for the behavior to stop no matter why the cat is doing it.

ys
Nov 14th, 2006, 04:24 AM
The question is .. how do you cook them?

treufreund
Nov 14th, 2006, 04:35 AM
i just got home from a trip and my cat was alone for 2 days. Now she is obsessed with following me, sitting on my lap and even climbing on her hind paws to rest her body on my chest and rub her face on my face. she is just ridiculously affectionate and needy. Even when I harrass her she still lets me pick her up and starts to purr loudly. she is really crazy loving!

Pheobo
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:12 AM
I'll take a stab at this; it might sound cruel, but it's the way to break ferrets of biting, and it works and IMO does not hurt them or traumatize them.

Whenever the cat does it, give it a sharp flick on the side of the nose, and say "No" once, loudly and firmly. Don't flick more than once or say "No" more than once, and don't say it in a high or excited voice. Just a calm but loud "No". And you can keep holding/petting the cat afterward. But repeat if the cat does it again. You have to be patient, maybe repeating this each time for a week or two, doing the exact same thing each time.

And I wopld not worry about why the cat does it; it's time for the behavior to stop no matter why the cat is doing it.

I haven't tried flicking him on the nose, but I do give him a light smack on his rear leg quarter and he'll run away...but later he continues with the same thing. I'll try the flick and the "no" next time he does it.

My friend suggested I just throw him outside when he does it but I can't do that because I haven't gotten him fixed (I don't think he's old enough, anyways) and my next door neighbor has a bunch of cats running around the neighborhood

Mrs. Peel
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:36 AM
I'll take a stab at this; it might sound cruel, but it's the way to break ferrets of biting, and it works and IMO does not hurt them or traumatize them.

Whenever the cat does it, give it a sharp flick on the side of the nose, and say "No" once, loudly and firmly. Don't flick more than once or say "No" more than once, and don't say it in a high or excited voice. Just a calm but loud "No". And you can keep holding/petting the cat afterward. But repeat if the cat does it again. You have to be patient, maybe repeating this each time for a week or two, doing the exact same thing each time.

And I wopld not worry about why the cat does it; it's time for the behavior to stop no matter why the cat is doing it.

I used this method to train my cat to no longer give me lovebites. I know that she was trying to be affectionate but I just don't like to be bitten. It was very effective and she stopped biting within a week. If the cat relapses just use the nose tap again.

Scotso
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:53 AM
Uhm, if it's still a kitten, give up on trying to train it. Kittens will be kittens, and if you can't handle the things that they're going to do, you should give it to someone that can.

And punishing the kitten for something like that is sending a really poor message. The kitten is showing you affection. If it doesn't grow out of it, then you should consider behavior modification. But like I said, it's a kitten, you just have to put up with these things.

Scotso
Nov 14th, 2006, 05:55 AM
Oh, and it might be a sign that it's not getting the proper nutritional needs, as well.

controlfreak
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:01 PM
The question here, it strikes me, is why haven't you taken off your t-shirt and let the cat start sucking on your nipple?

miffedmax
Nov 14th, 2006, 03:40 PM
The nose flick (or nose bop as we call it around my house) is pretty effective. I had a cat who used to knead like crazy on me and that got him to stop after awhile.

From what I understand, it's based on the fact that the cat thinks your his mother (which you are, in many ways). Sucking shirts, kneading, drooling, etc. are all behaviors kittens do when looking for a meal from mom. I don't think it's a sign the cat's been hopelessly traumatized, and these behaviors can be annoying.

The tap on the nose can be very light (probably lighter than the swats you're administering) and more annoying than painful.

It sounds like you're doing great. BTW, I'd keep the cat indoors even after he's been fixed. It can be a big, bad world out there, especially if your kitten didn't have the chance to learn basic survival skills from its mother.