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View Full Version : Is The Williams Dynasty In Full Force?


GogoGirl
Jun 9th, 2002, 06:43 PM
I am sooooo sick and tired of folks commenting and complaining about the fact that Venus supposedly laid down for Serena in the FO final yesterday. Whattttttttt?

If Venus had won the final - then folks would have been commenting on the fact that Serena laid down for Venus. They would have exclaimed that Serena had been the better player the entire tourney thru - so why didn't she play up to the level she was doing in the earlier rounds?

I'll tell ya. IMO - the Sisters can't win for losing. I mean - how soon can folks forget that Jen & Amy traded service breaks for most of their match? It happens - so why can't it happen between Venus & Serena?

The main point is - that the Sisters got to the finals. If they didn't deserve to get there - they would not have gotten there. It is just that simple and point blank.

It is not their fault that no other player could take them out - and to bring Davy and Martina into the mix is bordering on the ludicrous. Even if these two had been at the tourney - would mean in no way, they would have taken either Sister out.

Venus and Serena have both proclaimed that the other one was their toughest opponent. Why is that sooooo hard to believe? And besides all that - they know each other's games. And in knowing each other's games, by no means mean that one of them will always be able to get to/return all of the shots that the other one may execute.

The biggest denominator to me in this dealeo is that FATE is playing her hand. If the Sisters are supposed to dominate for as long as they will in the future - then there is nothing anyone can do about it. The only thing I would suggest to some folks is that they pray the Sisters retire sooner than later. And they should hope that there will never come another two sisters that join professional tennis and end up winning at all costs. And/or pray that a player playing right now - would learn how to beat them consistently.

One of the costs being - all the crap the Sisters have to take and put up with just because they are winners. I know they get a little (and not a lot) irritated w/the press always questioning their every move and each and every success they achieve. I know, I am tired of it and I am not one of them.

My advice to folks that want to see others in the finals at any tourney - should just not watch the Sisters' matches. I know some folks didn't watch the match yesterday - and that is just good on them. Find something else to do w/your precious time. Who really cares when you get right down to it? The Sisters don't.

Venus & Serena are in a lose-lose situation with many folks - and IMO - they could care less. First you have some that used to complain that they don't play enough - and then when they do - some complain (not calling any names) that they are being manipulative by playing in separate tourneys. And in doing so - they are messing up the field. What!!!!!!!!????????? Never have I heard so much mixed up and off the wall philosophy in all my life.

Serena said it best. If nothing else - they have gotten others to think about playing tennis for fun or sport. They have shown the youngsters that there are other sports to pursue other than the 3 basic sports in the US today, and w/them being football, basketball and baseball. And I agree with Serena, because they are role models to thousands of children of all colors and creeds.

The way they approach the game and play it must be working, because they are winners. Folks just need to get ova it and move on. Let these Sisters bask in the flow and glow of all the hard work they put into the sport. And let them continue to have faith in themselves, parents and God. Not a one can do anything about what is meant for these two Sisters to go thru. One can't take away any pain they may ever feel, so back up off them and stop trying to take away their joy.

Venus and Serena will not be turned around and pointed down a path they are not supposed to travel. They are wise enough to know that the path they need to follow - has already been laid out for them - and it is paved in their parent's and God's glory.





Williams dynasty is just beginning
Expect Venus or Serena to win year’s final two majors



PARIS, June 9 — Saturday’s French Open final between Venus and Serena Williams opened a new chapter in the Williams’ book. Before Serena took her second career Grand Slam trophy with a 7-5, 6-3 victory at Roland Garros, it was all about Venus. Now the question is whether or not anyone will be able to stop the sisters from dominating women’s tennis for many years to come.


June 8 — Venus and Serena Williams talk with Bud Collins of NBC Sports after their French Open title match.


SERENA CATCHES UP WITH HER SISTER
Venus might not have been the first sister to taste Grand Slam success — that honor was Serena’s at the 1999 U.S. Open — but from that point on, she was the outstanding player in the family. Venus was the sister with four Grand Slam trophies — the 2000 and 2001 Wimbledon and U.S. Open titles belong to her. And she was the sister that had soared to world No. 1 status.
Even though Serena had beaten Venus twice in their seven meetings, and had won a Grand Slam trophy, it wasn’t enough to compete with her big sister. But now all that has changed. Their father, Richard, always said that Venus would have the first impact on the tour, but that Serena was the more talented player and that she would eventually prove that to be true. Saturday might have been the day that we all saw that Serena was making headway to challenging Venus. But to be honest, I think both Venus and Serena are superb talents and will be battling it out on tennis courts around the world for a long time.


Images from Serena Williams' victory over sister Venus in the French Open final.

CAN ANYONE STOP THE SISTERS?
At the moment, both Venus and Serena are miles beyond the other women on tour in terms of their capabilities. Except for when Jennifer Capriati is serving well, there is no player to give Venus or Serena a real challenge. There’s no way to deny that Capriati’s serve is what separates her from the Williams’ sisters. She is going to have to work to improve her serve or she will not be able to take many matches from Venus or Serena. I think it was obvious in the semifinals that once Serena won the second set, Capriati was out of contention and let her serve lead her down the wrong street.

It will be interesting to see what type of effect Lindsay Davenport or Martina Hingis will have on the sisters if they return from injuries. Davenport, who could match Venus and Serena in power, had knee surgery in January and has yet to begin to mount a comeback. Hingis, who just underwent foot surgery, is on the sidelines at least through Wimbledon. While Hingis is much smaller than both Venus and Serena, she is a player who is crafty at working out a game plan for every player. Sometimes a mental edge can beat out physical weapons if the player is as good as Hingis.

VENUS, SERENA ONLY GETTING BETTER
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It’s going to be very interesting to watch the progress of Venus and Serena. I suspect that the hunger to win and the momentum they build will keep shifting between them. But at this point I can only see Venus and Serena dominating the next few majors. In the last 11 Grand Slams, the sisters have won six of the coveted Grand Slam titles and it doesn’t look like they’ll slow down anytime soon.
What’s important to note is that the other players need to start thinking about their own games and how they might devise a plan to beat Venus and Serena. As it stands now, they are the most powerful players on the tour and deserving of the No. 1 and No. 2 ranking they move into on Monday morning.

DOMINANCE TO CONTINUE IN 2002
Venus Williams
Without a doubt, I expect to see either Venus of Serena lifting the trophies at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. I just don’t see any other player that will keep them from that accomplishment. I expect Venus will head off to Wimbledon in two week’s time and defend her title for a third straight Wimbledon championship. At this time, Venus’s game is more conducive to the grass than Serena’s and her two titles at the All England Club make her the best woman on that surface.

RYNJ
Jun 9th, 2002, 06:44 PM
If they make all the GS finals for the rest of the year, yes. But now I think there just getting started.

AjdeNate!
Jun 9th, 2002, 06:45 PM
There's other players on the WTA Tour? Whodyathunk it!? :p

Rubylips
Jun 9th, 2002, 06:55 PM
Really, why do they keep speaking of hingis , lindsy.The sisters own the two of them,before any of them got injury.Lindsy stated Venus was the one to win.She stated Venus was just to strong ,and powerful.When Venus beat Lindsy at wim,and they ask her if justine had a chance ,Lindsy stated ,not this year.SO WHY DO THEY KEEP SAYING THIS MISS.?

RYNJ
Jun 9th, 2002, 06:58 PM
SO WHY DO THEY KEEP SAYING THIS MISS.?

because the MISS that person ;)

disposablehero
Jun 9th, 2002, 07:01 PM
If they dominate the tour for a period longer than the past 4 weeks, then I would certainly say so.

HEAVYHITTER
Jun 9th, 2002, 07:01 PM
Bud is right, the girls should just come out and lay down their racquets.

GogoGirl
Jun 9th, 2002, 08:27 PM
This writer was kinda ruff on Martina.


June 8, 2002, 11:50PM

Meltdown hastens big-babe tennis era
By DALE ROBERTSON

Copyright 2002 Houston Chronicle
PARIS -- The Williams vs. Williams, No. 1 vs. No. 2 confrontation at Roland Garros on Saturday proved roughly four parts flop to one part fabulous, with the most memorable points being the comically bad ones. No wonder the sisters so hate to face each other.

But Serena's 7-5, 6-3 victory for the French Open championship was not without merit. It squared the family's Grand Slam head-to-head finals standing at 1-1, providing a hopeful early indication that what figures to be a lengthy and compelling internecine rivalry won't be one-sided either way.

While Big Sis still has a leg up -- two actually -- in overall Slam matches between the two, Serena made significant psychological strides on a blustery afternoon that marked the three-year anniversary of a bizarre, unprecedented and arguably destiny-altering moment for the two-headed Williams monster.

While the event in question was only superficially disturbing as it occurred -- and seemingly unrelated to what transpired this day -- in retrospect we see how it impacted the past, present and possibly future of tennis.

Martina Hingis' total meltdown over a simple line call -- one probably in error, but who knows and did it really matter? -- was indeed seminal, a volcanic temper tantrum that altered the course of tennis history.

When Hingis' gold-dusted career imploded in its wake, it cleared a wide swath for Venus and Serena, immensely gifted but grossly underdeveloped, to fast-track their way to the top.

Further, it provided an unexpected epilogue to Steffi Graf's splendiferous run while serendipitously forging a union of champions' genes that makes Jaden Gil Agassi without a doubt the most celebrated 7-month-old prospect ever.

All because Hingis lost her nut for no good reason? You got it.

That afternoon, Martina was routinely going about her business of cleaning Steffi's aging clock.

Up a set and an early break, Hingis was four games from claiming her sixth major in less than 30 months, and she wasn't yet 20 years old. Even Graf, once the very definition of precocity herself, hadn't accomplished so much so quickly.

But then came the dispute, and when Hingis wasn't given the overrule she sought, the spoiled-brat teenager from hell lurking inside the pretty Swiss coquette suddenly boiled over, and a remarkable career began to unravel before our eyes. The most accomplished tennis teen of the 20th century hasn't won anything of import since.

First, the late-blooming Lindsay Davenport eclipsed her. Then came the Venus-Serena one-two punch followed by the startling rise of the comeback kid, Jennifer Capriati.

Collectively, the quartet reinvented the women's game with a boom-boom style Pam Shriver dubbed "big-babe tennis," a game that left the clever stylist Hingis on the outside looking in.

The distractions of tumbling into and out of love in conjunction with numerous physical maladies -- brought on by a not-insignificant weight gain as her adolescent body matured -- and uninspired practice habits completed the wreckage.

At present, Hingis is out indefinitely, recovering from surgery to repair ligaments in her left ankle after having ligaments in her right ankle fixed only last fall.

Between the injuries and ennui, never mind her current infatuation with Spain's hot young golfer Sergio Garcia, it's unclear if she'll ever again be a factor on the final day of major tournaments. Had Capriati not proved it's possible to rise from the ashes of self-immolation, we'd have to summarily dismiss Hingis as done. The game doesn't wait for anybody.

It's a given the two Williamses, the best female athletes ever to choose tennis as a vocation, would have claimed the summit as their own family fiefdom eventually. But Hingis' breakdown rushed the process. What we'll never know is how long Martina could have kept the sisters at bay with her almost arrogant confidence and sublime tactics. No less of an expert observer than Chris Evert had once called Hingis "a genius."

It was Evert, of course, who first tantalized us with the idea of two superstars falling in love, marrying and producing an offspring full of perfect genes. Chrissie and Jimmy Connors conquered Wimbledon together in 1974 while they were engaged to be married. But the relationship faltered in autumn's chill, and they soon parted ways.

Graf and Andre Agassi, in contrast, went a decade without connecting on a level deeper than polite hellos. But Graf's lucky break at Roland Garros, when the unhinged Hingis handed her a championship she hadn't expected to add to her stash, coincided with Andre's capping his career Grand Slam here.

Their convergence of shared elation created a strong chemical reaction. They were in Paris, after all. Unlike Chrissie, only 20 when she fell for Jimmy, Steffi was 29, close to retiring and ready to put life on the front burner. Agassi had recently divorced Brooke Shields. Voila!

Marriage and the baby Jaden Gil followed. Assuming bloodlines do matter, Pete Sampras' men's record of 13 Slams won was immediately in jeopardy. As for Graf's Open-Era women's standard of 22, if a distant threat looms, her name is now Williams, not Hingis.

More good news for Graf there, though: Saturday's result indicates Venus and Serena will share the spoils, beating each other often enough to preserve Steffi's perch on Olympus.



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