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tennisboi
Aug 24th, 2006, 02:54 PM
Leading astronomers have decided that Pluto should no longer be classified as a planet. The decision means that the Solar System has been reduced from nine planets to eight. The International Astronomical Union made its decision after a week of heated debate at a conference in Prague.

They approved new guidelines which define what a planet actually is.

The new definition is: "A celestial body that is in orbit around the Sun, has sufficient mass for its self-gravity to overcome rigid

body forces so that it assumes a ... nearly round shape, and has cleared the neighborhood around its orbit."

Pluto is automatically disqualified because its oblong orbit overlaps with Neptune's.

It has been put into a new category of 'dwarf planets'.

When the debate started a week ago, there were proposals to reaffirm Pluto's status and make planets of its largest moon, as well as two other objects.

However, the asteroid Ceres, which was a planet in the 1800s before it got demoted, 2003 UB313, an icy object slightly larger than Pluto, and Charon, the largest of Pluto's three moons, will not become planets.

Pluto was first classified in 1930 and at the time was thought to be bigger than Earth.

The eight planets which make the grade are: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060824/ap_on_sc/planet_mutiny_7

Josh B.
Aug 24th, 2006, 03:00 PM
ok, so the call pluto a "Dwarf PLANET" so its still a planet, just a lil smaller than others!

scientists are clowns!

and i thought Sedna was the tenth planet dicovered a couple of years ago

GoDominique
Aug 24th, 2006, 03:15 PM
He got what he deserved. Buh-bye. :ras:

Sam L
Aug 24th, 2006, 03:19 PM
Pluto is automatically disqualified because its oblong orbit overlaps with Neptune's.

Yeah this was always the odd equation in Pluto's status. I'm glad it's demoted. I think it's better to have clear established rules as to what is a planet.

This makes it interesting in that we have 8 planets. The first 4 closest to the sun are rocky planets and the last 4 are gas giants. The latter are all bigger than the former.

I think it's an interesting balance.

controlfreak
Aug 24th, 2006, 03:29 PM
This is probably the most significant news development of my short life!

In my school days, Mercury-Venus-Earth-Mars-Jupiter-Saturn-Uranus-Neptune-Pluto was one of the few things that was actually retained in the cavernous space between my oddly mis-shapen ears.

And now it's... just.... gone. :sad:

Rtael
Aug 24th, 2006, 03:35 PM
If the weird orbit thing disqualifies Pluto, wouldn't it disqualify Neptune too?

SelesFan70
Aug 24th, 2006, 03:41 PM
Maybe they don't want the "end" of our solar system to be Uranus. :lol:

Timariot
Aug 24th, 2006, 04:07 PM
It's a right decision, with historical parallels (ie. Ceres). New definition still isn't particularly good, but it's way better than the mess they proposed earlier, which would have promoted Ceres and Charon (!) as planets and probably like dozen other TNO objects which are bigger than Ceres. Meanwhile, there would have been like half a dozen moons in the Solar systems, each of them more massive than all those new "planets" combined, and they would have remained as mere moons. It would have been ridiculous.

Good thing New Horizons is already funded, though. Why the US Congress would hand out money for expensive mission on some...asteroid.

Bette_Midler
Aug 24th, 2006, 04:39 PM
bastards scientists :sad:


vamos plutón vamos :bounce:

Stavie
Aug 24th, 2006, 04:42 PM
the solar system wont be reduced.even if they say that pluto isnt a planet they found out another 2 or 3 new planets in our solar system.so...dont worry...;-)

njnetswill
Aug 24th, 2006, 04:48 PM
It makes sense. I'm glad they didn't decide to include Pluto and add Ceron and stuff, that would have been much worse.

Wigglytuff
Aug 24th, 2006, 05:09 PM
ok, so the call pluto a "Dwarf PLANET" so its still a planet, just a lil smaller than others!

scientists are clowns!

and i thought Sedna was the tenth planet dicovered a couple of years ago
http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/images/clown.jpg = http://www.joeschmidt.com/img/einstein-google.jpg

i think scientists are NOT clowns.

venus_rulez
Aug 24th, 2006, 05:27 PM
It's been engrained in our brains for so long that the common person will still say and believe that we still have 9 planets.

Jakeev
Aug 24th, 2006, 05:39 PM
It's been engrained in our brains for so long that the common person will still say and believe that we still have 9 planets.

I have to agree with that. Most of us grew up with this knowledge about the solar system.

But what I wish they would have done is at least wait 10 years til the New Horizons probe arrives at Pluto. Then they could have had this wacky debate.

Drimal
Aug 24th, 2006, 05:51 PM
http://moons.info/moons/rotatable-globes/jpeg-256x256/Pluto-090.jpg

Good bye planet Pluto! :tears:

There were times some astronoms said that Pluto and it's moon Charon were a "double planet's system" and now Pluto is no longer classified as a real planet because of it's orbit. :rolleyes:


So Charon is still a "moon" of "dwarth planet" Pluto? :scratch:

Sassy-Na
Aug 24th, 2006, 05:58 PM
the aliens from pluto, are gonna to invade the Earth because of that :angel:

vogus
Aug 24th, 2006, 06:02 PM
If the weird orbit thing disqualifies Pluto, wouldn't it disqualify Neptune too?


i think the point is not so much the weird orbit, it's that Pluto is just one of a large number of similar small iceballs that have irregular orbits very far out. It was a question of either give dozens of new objects planet status, or demote Pluto.

Neptune is a huge object 50 times the size of Earth, so its status is safe.

samsung101
Aug 24th, 2006, 06:11 PM
Schwew........I'm glad they
cleared that up for all of us.
I was worrying about Pluto.

Don't worry Pluto, little kids all
over the world know more about
you than Uranus thanks to
Mickey Mouse.

Sally Struthers
Aug 24th, 2006, 06:39 PM
so do I win my bet with my nerdy friend that Pluto is really a Kuiper Belt Object? :tape: :lol:

jbeacinu
Aug 24th, 2006, 06:58 PM
WTF...Magical School Bus called it a planet...so I am calling it a planet...fuck scientists!

Timariot
Aug 24th, 2006, 07:06 PM
so do I win my bet with my nerdy friend that Pluto is really a Kuiper Belt Object? :tape: :lol:

Pluto is and has always been a KBO, regardless of whether it's classified as a planet or not. So, go collect your prize!

GoDominique
Aug 24th, 2006, 07:41 PM
I wished they had done this earlier so that Colin Matthews wouldn't have been tempted to compose "Pluto" for Holst's "The Planets" suite. :rolleyes: :lol: ;)

The Crow
Aug 24th, 2006, 07:46 PM
We all knew it was a one-slam wonder really, so no surprise there.

vogus
Aug 24th, 2006, 10:00 PM
for you astro-buffs, btw, there are great views of Jupiter now in the southwest in the early evening hours after sunset.

MH0861
Aug 24th, 2006, 10:05 PM
It will ALWAYS be a planet in my mind! :sad: :lol:

The Daviator
Aug 24th, 2006, 10:33 PM
Pluto :sad:

Paul.
Aug 24th, 2006, 10:43 PM
i remember when i was taught a saying to remember the order of the planets


My Very Easy Method Just Speeds Up Naming Planets

its not going to work now :sad:

meyerpl
Aug 24th, 2006, 10:49 PM
Fuck. Well, that's life. One day you're a heavenly body, the next day you're space debris.

le bon vivant
Aug 24th, 2006, 11:03 PM
Geeks. :tape: :bolt:

GoDominique
Aug 24th, 2006, 11:11 PM
Moron. :tape: :bolt:

Pheobo
Aug 24th, 2006, 11:13 PM
Oh well.

Fingon
Aug 25th, 2006, 02:16 AM
If the weird orbit thing disqualifies Pluto, wouldn't it disqualify Neptune too?


Because Nepture is quite big and if we demote it could come a beat as up.

Sam L
Aug 25th, 2006, 02:33 AM
Neptune's orbit maybe a bit "weird" but the difference is it's not significantly impacted by another planet like the way Pluto is. That's the big difference.

Sam L
Aug 25th, 2006, 02:44 AM
Actually, isn't Neptune on basically the same orbital plane as the rest of the seven planets?

It is. That's why it's still a planet. But it doesn't comply to some laws of orbital physics. Apparently. :)

Fingon
Aug 25th, 2006, 02:50 AM
It is. That's why it's still a planet. But it doesn't comply to some laws of orbital physics. Apparently. :)

Neptune is actually a bad boy, its gravity influences the Uranus that is basically turned on its side.

but again, it's too big to consider it anything other than a planet, only the sun itself, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus are bigger.

Mattographer
Aug 25th, 2006, 02:51 AM
Did you know "Xena" 2003 UB313's moon called "Gabrielle"? :haha:

Xena and her sidekick got named after the show! :lol:

RatedR Superstar
Aug 25th, 2006, 02:55 AM
poor plutonians, their planet got demoted into a "dwarf planet" :lol:

Timariot
Aug 25th, 2006, 04:31 AM
Did you know "Xena" 2003 UB313's moon called "Gabrielle"? :haha:

Xena and her sidekick got named after the show! :lol:

There is also "Santa" (discovered in Christmas). IIRC there is also "Buffy" somewhere. All those names are of course unofficial.

égalité
Aug 25th, 2006, 04:38 AM
Pluto :hug:

Don't worry, you'll forever be immortalized in this Bjork song:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=TfufXtOE_Qo

hurricanejeanne
Aug 25th, 2006, 04:38 AM
WTF...Magical School Bus called it a planet...so I am calling it a planet...fuck scientists!
:lol: No shit, right?

You know, I understand completely why they are disqualifing Pluto.
But I am biased towards Neptune. I have always had a little liking for astronomy. :o

Rest In Peace Pluto... :sad: you're always a planet to me :angel: .

drake3781
Aug 25th, 2006, 04:57 AM
I object!

Can I object? :confused:

Prizeidiot
Aug 25th, 2006, 07:25 AM
Ah, good riddance, Pluto is a rock, not a planet :p

Seriously, Pluto, in terms of size could be a moon on one of Jupiter's moons. Not to mention that whacky orbit that means sometimes it is closer to the sun than Neptune...

mc8114
Aug 25th, 2006, 12:18 PM
Pluto :hug:
I'm gonna miss you :awww: you dwarf planet :lol:

Hulet
Aug 25th, 2006, 03:38 PM
Neptune is actually a bad boy, its gravity influences the Uranus that is basically turned on its side.

but again, it's too big to consider it anything other than a planet, only the sun itself, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus are bigger.
Here is what I don't understand under the new definition. A planet is supposed to clear its neighbourhood of smaller objects. Now that Pluto is no longer considered a planet, wouldn't it render Neptune a non-planet because a non-planetery body, namely Pluto, is still hanging around Neptune's neighbourhood?

Fingon
Aug 25th, 2006, 05:18 PM
Here is what I don't understand under the new definition. A planet is supposed to clear its neighbourhood of smaller objects. Now that Pluto is no longer considered a planet, wouldn't it render Neptune a non-planet because a non-planetery body, namely Pluto, is still hanging around Neptune's neighbourhood?

don't ask me :o

the fact is, it's really not important whether we call them planets or solar system objects or whatever, from the scientific point of view it makes no difference but what they are trying to do is to be clear about what common people know and learn.

One of the reasons they were restrictive in their criteria is that if they included Pluto they would have to add potentially hundreds of other objects and that would have made it impossible to remember.

Nepture is clearly "perceived" as a planet, it's too big to be considered anything else. You could even argue that Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Nepture are not really planets as most of their volume is gas, but what do you call them then?

Fact is, Pluto is still there, just called differently.

Sam L
Aug 25th, 2006, 11:01 PM
Here is what I don't understand under the new definition. A planet is supposed to clear its neighbourhood of smaller objects. Now that Pluto is no longer considered a planet, wouldn't it render Neptune a non-planet because a non-planetery body, namely Pluto, is still hanging around Neptune's neighbourhood?

No the other body must significantly impact the orbit of the body to stop making it a planet.

In other words it's about whether a body can stand on its own without significant influences from other bodies.

Yes Neptune's influenced a little by Pluto but that's nothing compared to the influence on Pluto by Neptune.

Cat's Pajamas
Aug 25th, 2006, 11:04 PM
:bigcry:

fufuqifuqishahah
Aug 26th, 2006, 06:08 AM
It will ALWAYS be a planet in my mind! :sad: :lol:

awww how cute. =)

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ceres, "Xena", and pluto are the dwarf planets now. are there any more?

Timariot
Aug 29th, 2006, 06:41 PM
awww how cute. =)

------

ceres, "Xena", and pluto are the dwarf planets now. are there any more?

Yes, probably at least a dozen and probably many many more. Most of them lie at the Kuiper Belt (look "Trans-Neptunian Objects" from Wikipedia etc) but several of the larger asteroids from inner asteroid belt may fit the bill too.