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Rocketta
Aug 19th, 2006, 08:49 PM
Spike Lee crafts complex, monumental look at Katrina

By Barry GarronFri Aug 18, 8:31 PM ET


Spike Lee calls his four-hour documentary on Hurricane Katrina a requiem, which it is, but that only begins to describe it.

The film, broken into four parts, is much more than a memorial chant to those who died in a natural disaster that went largely unmitigated by manmade relief. It also is a comprehensive look at what the storm did to the lives of the people who survived it.

The docu doesn't shrink from any part of the story. It includes the vast landscape of devastation, which is indisputable, as well as the assignment of blame for the tragic and inadequate response, some of which remains debatable. Lee's work is big enough to allow for conflicting opinions, though in most cases, it isn't hard to discern where the filmmaker stands.

There are powerful images and words during both nights, but if you must choose only one to watch, pick the first. Acts I and II deal with the predictions of the hurricane, the terrible storm and the immediate aftermath. The faces of Katrina's victims, as they describe their life-or-death ordeals, are flat-out unforgettable. Individual accounts put larger stories -- everything from the horrors at the Superdome to the extent of looting -- into greater perspective

Acts III and IV, though no less important to the telling of the story, are more reflective and less visceral. They highlight the inadequate government response and, through news footage and interviews, offer a variety of reasons and excuses. The final night also deals with life after Katrina including, in particular, a segment on the emotional wounds likely to last for generations. Both nights show the genius of Terence Blanchard, whose original music heightens the drama, and of the editors, who made superb choices from a huge volume of material.

Before 2005 ended, Lee had begun the first of his eight trips to New Orleans to gather the interviews and images that he would weave so masterfully into what may well be the ultimate account of this sorrowful chapter in American history. Overwhelmingly, his subjects were well chosen for the range of their experiences and their vivid first-person accounts. The few exceptions, such as Harry Belafonte and activist/candidate Rev. Al Sharpton, seemingly were picked to raise the level of indignation over the lack of adequate government response.

Katrina's swath of destruction was far wider than just the city of New Orleans. Lee acknowledges the damage to parts of Mississippi and other areas in Louisiana, but his focus is almost entirely on the Crescent City and its residents. Although Katrina's wrath was felt by everyone in its path, Lee is particularly sensitive to the toll it exacted on New Orleans' least powerful citizens, most of them black. While this adds to a subtext in the documentary that race was a key part of the story, it also focuses attention on the greatest human costs and the need to avert such suffering in the future.

Executive producer: Sheila Nevins; Supervising producer: Jacqueline Glover; Line producer: Butch Robinson; Producers: Spike Lee, Sam Pollard; Director: Spike Lee; Director of photography: Cliff Charles; Supervising editor: Sam Pollard; Editors: Getta Gandbhir, Nancy Novack; Original music: Terence Blanchard.

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter

Rocketta
Aug 19th, 2006, 08:50 PM
has this aired on HBO yet? I can't wait to watch it. I know I can't see it when it airs because it airs in the middle of the work week but I have onDemand. :bounce:

RVD
Aug 20th, 2006, 12:37 AM
I probably won't get to watch this until it's available on DVD. :lol:
Oh well, at least that way I can replay interviews with the politicians saying how proactive they were, and how they responded in the most efficient way possible. :tape: :devil:

:worship: :worship: to Spike Lee.
The most influential [albeit, underappreciated] film maker of all time. :cool:

Rocketta
Aug 20th, 2006, 01:04 AM
http://www.hbo.com/docs/programs/whentheleveesbroke/index.html

Acts I and II premiere Monday, August 21 at 9pm (ET/PT), followed by Acts III and IV on Tuesday, August 22 at 9pm.

harloo
Aug 20th, 2006, 02:10 AM
http://www.hbo.com/docs/programs/whentheleveesbroke/index.html

Acts I and II premiere Monday, August 21 at 9pm (ET/PT), followed by Acts III and IV on Tuesday, August 22 at 9pm.

Awe man, I just got rid of HBO on Direct TV. I guess I'll just have to find a torrent or wait for the dvd release.:o

Rocketta
Aug 20th, 2006, 03:55 AM
Awe man, I just got rid of HBO on Direct TV. I guess I'll just have to find a torrent or wait for the dvd release.:o

You should know by now never to drop HBO. :help:

decemberlove
Aug 20th, 2006, 06:12 PM
:help:You should know by now never to drop HBO.

Ha. Yep.

I can't wait for this.

Rocketta
Aug 20th, 2006, 06:35 PM
:help:

Ha. Yep.

I can't wait for this.

Hey DLove, are you watching Deadwood?

*JR*
Aug 20th, 2006, 11:42 PM
I heard on the news that the film includes a segment advancing the following conspiracy theory: that the government blew up certain levees to deliberately submerge (and thus empty) black neighborhoods, so that white developers will get that land.

Rocketta
Aug 20th, 2006, 11:55 PM
I heard on the news that the film includes a segment advancing the following conspiracy theory: that the government blew up certain levees to deliberately submerge (and thus empty) black neighborhoods, so that white developers will get that land.

Well clearly that is impossible of a thing to happen because we all know our governement treats all of it's people equal. :help:

RVD
Aug 21st, 2006, 12:02 AM
I heard on the news that the film includes a segment advancing the following conspiracy theory: that the government blew up certain levees to deliberately submerge (and thus empty) black neighborhoods, so that white developers will get that land.:lol:
Pfff...
*wets fingers and smacks *JR*'s fo' head*

harloo
Aug 21st, 2006, 01:05 AM
You should know by now never to drop HBO. :help:

:lol: I've dropped it two times and everytime something I wan't to see comes on.

:D

Rocketta
Aug 21st, 2006, 05:11 AM
:lol: I've dropped it two times and everytime something I wan't to see comes on.

:D

That's what I'm saying. :o

venus_rulez
Aug 21st, 2006, 05:26 AM
I heard on the news that the film includes a segment advancing the following conspiracy theory: that the government blew up certain levees to deliberately submerge (and thus empty) black neighborhoods, so that white developers will get that land.



Somebody's crazy uncle Jerome probably said that while he was sitting in his living room in his underwear watching the news coverage and it spread. Since I had never heard any such thing before that post, i'm going to hope that no reasonable person believes that.

*JR*
Aug 21st, 2006, 05:21 PM
Somebody's crazy uncle Jerome probably said that while he was sitting in his living room in his underwear watching the news coverage and it spread. Since I had never heard any such thing before that post, i'm going to hope that no reasonable person believes that.
I specifically recall hearing it reported (as a fringe rumor, 2B sure) in the immediate aftermath of Katrina. BTW, Spike (in answering the interviewer's question about this) said that it was a very small part of the movie. (Had Oliver Stone been the guy who made it, that probably would have been the major theme). :o

Pureracket
Aug 21st, 2006, 05:24 PM
That's what I'm saying. :oStop acting like you know all about HBO. Ya'll just got cable out there about a year ago.

SelesFan70
Aug 21st, 2006, 05:26 PM
though in most cases, it isn't hard to discern where the filmmaker stands.

Suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuure :tape:

Louis "Calypso" Farrakhan is spreading the bombed levees theory. That's some mighty good work by those bombers to make sure water only goes where they want it to go. :help: I dunno how they would have gotten away with it if Bush hadn't created Katrina and steered her toward New Orleans. :help: They probably would have blamed the bombs on al-Qaida. :help:

(It's so much fun reading left-wing blogs!)

Pureracket
Aug 21st, 2006, 05:28 PM
Suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuure :tape:

Louis "Calypso" Farrakhan is spreading the bombed levees theory. That's some mighty good work by those bombers to make sure water only goes where they want it to go. :help: I dunno how they would have gotten away with it Bush hadn't created Katrina and steered her toward New Orleans. :help:Sometimes your middle-of-the-road ideology brings a smile to my face. No, you're not far-rightwing @ all.

SelesFan70
Aug 21st, 2006, 05:29 PM
Sometimes your middle-of-the-road ideology brings a smile to my face. No, you're not far-rightwing @ all.

One has to be absurd to demonstrate absurdity. That's what Rush tells me each night when we speak on the phone. :wavey:

samsung101
Aug 21st, 2006, 06:21 PM
Al Sharpton and Harry Belafonte?

Including these two clowns, and at this point in their
political activist careers they are clowns of the left
and sound pieces for Hugo Chaves and Castro and
Cindy Sheehan, only muddles what is probably a well
done, and one sided story.

New Orleans sucked as a city before Katrina.

The bombed levees theory is about as plausible as
Elvis is still alive theory.

But, no one questions these guys on their outrageous
lies.

Spike was on with Tavis Smiley. No doubt left as to his
theme or spin on the show. I'm sure it's high quality work.
He always does that. But, there is no question he is using
the HBO doc to assign blame, and to point fingers. Few
of those fingers point at the hapless Mayor Nagin, Crying
Governor Blanco, or the lying Police Chief, or the police
men who left town and did not help out, or the residents
who ignored multiple warnings to leave any way they could.



Unless old Spike included the facts about how much money
Bush proposed for NO before Katrina hit, how he addressed
the levee problem long before Katrina and was voted down
in Congress for increases, how the Army Corps of Engineers
for decades failed to fix the levees properly, how the levees
themselves are run by individual govt. entities, and nothing
gets done, how Nagin and his city team failed to follow the
emergency plans FEMA had practiced with them just weeks
before, how Blanco failed to lead or work with the Feds before,
during and after Katrina, and how FEMA and the feds were set up
in like 8 states before it even hit to help out, then skip it.

It's not a full story, it's a story of the bad reaction, and how
people suffered.

Sad to see it. A once in a hundred year storm hits ,and some
people died. I'm sorry about that. But, we just had massive
flooding and storm in No. Cal., the East Coast and millions were
evacuated. Few died. Hundreds of thousands had their homes
wrecked, jobs ended, and lives turned upside down.

No Anderson Cooper showed up.
No Oprah.
No BBC.
Spike wasn't at the Sacramento Delta watching homes
wash away.

I wonder why.



Why?

They had local first response teams that worked. Local
first response teams of police, fire, and city that got the
job done first. Then brought in federal and state help.

NO failed to do that from the start, to even now.

Even as the NO police chief admits he lied, added to the
news media lies we saw over & over presented as truth, we
get this.


The billions sent to Lousiana and NO over the years
by both parties from D.C. was largely wasted, and the
city mired itself in catfights, paybacks, and doing nothing
to improve itself. Other Gulf coast cities grew and
prospered, while NO went the other way. The
welfare mentality of NO helped lead to the problems
it had, and has even now. Too bad, it should be so
much better. But, if they don't want to change, the
city won't develop into a better place.

Pureracket
Aug 21st, 2006, 06:25 PM
Again, you rightwingers can use your mean-spirited rhetoric as much as you want. Your playground descriptions like "clowns" do nothing to actually answer humanity's call. Sitting back calling names to anybody who disagrees with your warmongering administration certainly doesn't help.

decemberlove
Aug 21st, 2006, 06:38 PM
Hey DLove, are you watching Deadwood?

No. I missed the first season and now I'm just fucking lost. I'm going to have to catch it on DVD or something. I try to get into it, but I don't really know what's going on anymore.

Rocketta
Aug 21st, 2006, 07:07 PM
No. I missed the first season and now I'm just fucking lost. I'm going to have to catch it on DVD or something. I try to get into it, but I don't really know what's going on anymore.

awww, :sad:

It's sooooooo good. :o

yeah definitely catch season one on DVD...it takes about 3 episodes to get into it.

I'm looking forward to The Wire starting....:bounce:

RunDown
Aug 22nd, 2006, 04:17 AM
Kudos to spike for this documentary. And Kudos to the New Orleans man whose quote made it to my signature :yeah: :lol:

Rocketta
Aug 22nd, 2006, 04:52 AM
tell me about it rundown.....I won't get to watch it until later. :(

venus_rulez
Aug 22nd, 2006, 06:31 AM
Al Sharpton and Harry Belafonte?

Including these two clowns, and at this point in their
political activist careers they are clowns of the left
and sound pieces for Hugo Chaves and Castro and
Cindy Sheehan, only muddles what is probably a well
done, and one sided story.

New Orleans sucked as a city before Katrina.

The bombed levees theory is about as plausible as
Elvis is still alive theory.

But, no one questions these guys on their outrageous
lies.

Spike was on with Tavis Smiley. No doubt left as to his
theme or spin on the show. I'm sure it's high quality work.
He always does that. But, there is no question he is using
the HBO doc to assign blame, and to point fingers. Few
of those fingers point at the hapless Mayor Nagin, Crying
Governor Blanco, or the lying Police Chief, or the police
men who left town and did not help out, or the residents
who ignored multiple warnings to leave any way they could.



Unless old Spike included the facts about how much money
Bush proposed for NO before Katrina hit, how he addressed
the levee problem long before Katrina and was voted down
in Congress for increases, how the Army Corps of Engineers
for decades failed to fix the levees properly, how the levees
themselves are run by individual govt. entities, and nothing
gets done, how Nagin and his city team failed to follow the
emergency plans FEMA had practiced with them just weeks
before, how Blanco failed to lead or work with the Feds before,
during and after Katrina, and how FEMA and the feds were set up
in like 8 states before it even hit to help out, then skip it.

It's not a full story, it's a story of the bad reaction, and how
people suffered.

Sad to see it. A once in a hundred year storm hits ,and some
people died. I'm sorry about that. But, we just had massive
flooding and storm in No. Cal., the East Coast and millions were
evacuated. Few died. Hundreds of thousands had their homes
wrecked, jobs ended, and lives turned upside down.

No Anderson Cooper showed up.
No Oprah.
No BBC.
Spike wasn't at the Sacramento Delta watching homes
wash away.

I wonder why.



Why?

They had local first response teams that worked. Local
first response teams of police, fire, and city that got the
job done first. Then brought in federal and state help.

NO failed to do that from the start, to even now.

Even as the NO police chief admits he lied, added to the
news media lies we saw over & over presented as truth, we
get this.


The billions sent to Lousiana and NO over the years
by both parties from D.C. was largely wasted, and the
city mired itself in catfights, paybacks, and doing nothing
to improve itself. Other Gulf coast cities grew and
prospered, while NO went the other way. The
welfare mentality of NO helped lead to the problems
it had, and has even now. Too bad, it should be so
much better. But, if they don't want to change, the
city won't develop into a better place.



You didn't watch the special so it's unfair for you to respond on the quality or the scope of the project, no?

venus_rulez
Aug 22nd, 2006, 06:33 AM
I thought the documentary was brilliant because it didn't feel like most documentaries where the viewer is lead to one conclusion or the other. To me this was people who actually lived throught the disasters or that were profoundly and directly affected by it telling you their stories and what they thought. Beautifully done.

RunDown
Aug 22nd, 2006, 07:09 AM
Al Sharpton and Harry Belafonte?

Including these two clowns, and at this point in their
political activist careers they are clowns of the left
and sound pieces for Hugo Chaves and Castro and
Cindy Sheehan, only muddles what is probably a well
done, and one sided story.

New Orleans sucked as a city before Katrina.

The bombed levees theory is about as plausible as
Elvis is still alive theory.

But, no one questions these guys on their outrageous
lies.

Spike was on with Tavis Smiley. No doubt left as to his
theme or spin on the show. I'm sure it's high quality work.
He always does that. But, there is no question he is using
the HBO doc to assign blame, and to point fingers. Few
of those fingers point at the hapless Mayor Nagin, Crying
Governor Blanco, or the lying Police Chief, or the police
men who left town and did not help out, or the residents
who ignored multiple warnings to leave any way they could


Unless old Spike included the facts about how much money
Bush proposed for NO before Katrina hit, how he addressed
the levee problem long before Katrina and was voted down
in Congress for increases, how the Army Corps of Engineers
for decades failed to fix the levees properly, how the levees
themselves are run by individual govt. entities, and nothing
gets done, how Nagin and his city team failed to follow the
emergency plans FEMA had practiced with them just weeks
before, how Blanco failed to lead or work with the Feds before,
during and after Katrina, and how FEMA and the feds were set up
in like 8 states before it even hit to help out, then skip it.

It's not a full story, it's a story of the bad reaction, and how
people suffered.

Sad to see it. A once in a hundred year storm hits ,and some
people died. I'm sorry about that. But, we just had massive
flooding and storm in No. Cal., the East Coast and millions were
evacuated. Few died. Hundreds of thousands had their homes
wrecked, jobs ended, and lives turned upside down.

No Anderson Cooper showed up.
No Oprah.
No BBC.
Spike wasn't at the Sacramento Delta watching homes
wash away.

I wonder why.



Why?

They had local first response teams that worked. Local
first response teams of police, fire, and city that got the
job done first. Then brought in federal and state help.

NO failed to do that from the start, to even now.

Even as the NO police chief admits he lied, added to the
news media lies we saw over & over presented as truth, we
get this.


The billions sent to Lousiana and NO over the years
by both parties from D.C. was largely wasted, and the
city mired itself in catfights, paybacks, and doing nothing
to improve itself. Other Gulf coast cities grew and
prospered, while NO went the other way. The
welfare mentality of NO helped lead to the problems
it had, and has even now. Too bad, it should be so
much better. But, if they don't want to change, the
city won't develop into a better place.


This entire post is rediculous, especially (but not limited to :lol: ) the part about heroic Bush warning us about the levees and wanting to increase funding prior to Katrina. :help:

Anyway, Rocketta I felt the same way about the documentary the venus_rulez did, for the same reasons.

It was interviews with the citizens, the politicians, the journalists all giving their stories of the aftermath of Katrina combined with footage of everything from stranded people and Coast Guard rescues, to incompetent government officials (at all levels, samsung :rolleyes: ) and dead bodies.

ico4498
Aug 22nd, 2006, 07:39 AM
I heard on the news that the film includes a segment advancing the following conspiracy theory: that the government blew up certain levees to deliberately submerge (and thus empty) black neighborhoods, so that white developers will get that land.

saw the interview with Spike and he said it was included as an opinion held by some. dunno if i'd call that "advancing".

moon
Aug 23rd, 2006, 04:20 AM
This entire post is rediculous, especially (but not limited to :lol: ) the part about heroic Bush warning us about the levees and wanting to increase funding prior to Katrina. :help:

Anyway, Rocketta I felt the same way about the documentary the venus_rulez did, for the same reasons.

It was interviews with the citizens, the politicians, the journalists all giving their stories of the aftermath of Katrina combined with footage of everything from stranded people and Coast Guard rescues, to incompetent government officials (at all levels, samsung :rolleyes: ) and dead bodies.

the dead bodies were awful. :sad:

but the documentary itself was brilliant.

samsung101
Aug 23rd, 2006, 04:06 PM
Has anyone ever read or seen the testimony of
Governor Barbour of Mississippi, in contrast to the
Gov. Blanco testimony before Congress during the
Katrina hearings last year?

Amazing.
She whined.
Blamed Bush.
Blamed Bush.
Blamed FEMA.
Blamed Bush.

Anyone but herself, the Mayor, the city, county, and state
disaster teams, first responders, and plan makers. Nor the
hapless citizens who sat around and waited for help and
whined - not the seniors or handicapped who couldn't get out -
the perfectly able bodied men and women who sat and waited
for help and complained.


The Mississippi Gov. said, yeah, some mistakes by FEMA were made,
the event was huge, many states involved. Best laid plans were
not enough. However, he point blank says the people of Mississippi
took the major brunt of Katrina (not New Orleans), and they did
something different: they picked themselves up, and worked together
to fix things, with and without the Feds. They made Mississippi
get better - of their own efforts, and they weren't going to wait
around or blame others in the meantime.

Fact is Mississippi got the eye of the storm. Not New Orleans.
Many black people in that state were hurt and hit by the storms.
They did something New Orleans did not: they used elbow grease
and personal responsiblity to get through it, and fix things.

As the crime rate of Houston continues to go up, with the new
residents of New Orleans spreading their unusually high crime rate
to that fine city during their stay.

Man made disaster?
Lee calls Katrina in New Orleans a man made disaster far worse than
9/11? Well, with days of warning, days of evacuation efforts
made to millions, and millions surviving, sorry, Spike, your major
premise is wrong. The typical Spike Lee 'victicrat' story...blame
everyone and anyone, and use race as the #1 reason for failure.

Blame the Mayor for being a dope.
That's the #1 guy, the #1 department to blame. As buses were
under water, and as his police force was told to take the day off,
and as the City failed to use the emergency plans it had online and
was supposed to use - for days.

samsung101
Aug 23rd, 2006, 06:19 PM
70% of New Orleans was black before and during Katrina.
The Mayor is black.
The City and County govt. positions, elected and
appointed, are largely held by blacks.
Police chief is black.
Most of the local and state govt. positions are held
by Democrats.
Hundreds of millions of dollars poured into LA and NO
during the Clinton and yes, the Bush years, for
various local and state projects and so called
entitlement programs.

It had a welfare rate of nearly 40%.
A crime rate almost 10 times higher than the
national average.
An unemployment rate about double that
of the rest of the nation.
Before the hurricane hit.

Who did that? Who is responsible for that? Not
Bush. Not FEMA. That was locally grown and
accepted.

Yet, Spike Lee and others blame racism. I'm missing
something. Black leaders elected to positions that
control the money, the resources, the police,
the ambulances, the trains, the buses, and Bush
and his white buddies are to blame. OK, guess
that's easier than giving blame to those who
were in direct control.

That's the part I don't get.

When do we place some responsibility for
a forseeable disaster on those who are in direct
control of the city and the resources locally meant
to deal w/that disaster - every single year? The
same people who were criticized for their actions
in the previous hurricane and the problems at the
Dome.

Guess never.


Yet, a hurricane hits,warning is given for days ahead
of time, people are told to leave ASAP anyway they
can, and people in about 8 states are told to be on
watch, and get out, go north, go to higher ground,
anything. It's not like it was the first hurricane to hit
the Gulf Coast, it happens every single year, in a town
below sea level.


No one disputes mistakes were made, and the personal
suffering of those unable to get out (the aged, sick,
etc.), is terribly sad. But, the federal govt.'s only
huge mistake was not going in and telling Blanco
and Nagin they were idiots, and get out of the way
two days sooner than it did.

Even now, things are slow not because of the feds,
which has bent over backwards to give out cash - even
encouraging fraud, but still giving out cash out of guilt
fast as possible. It's with local and state govt.'s
that cannot give OK's to build, rebuild, throw out,
or replace, or where they will never build again,
it's all politics right now in NO. Bush isn't doing that.
Nagin and Company are.

Nothing the Feds ever do is fast. It's set up to be big
and bureacratic, not fast and efficient. It's working in
a lot more places than one city, it's in several states
working. Why is one city in one state still unable to
move ahead, and yet ready to blame everyone else for
its problems.

*JR*
Aug 23rd, 2006, 11:51 PM
Fact is Mississippi got the eye of the storm. Not New Orleans. Many black people in that state were hurt and hit by the storms. They did something New Orleans did not: they used elbow grease and personal responsiblity to get through it, and fix things.

I agree that Nagin and Blanco deserve a lot of the blame. But your spin sux on the thing I quoted. Why? Because much of NO was built as much as 15 feet below sea level, so when the water level of Lake Pontchartrain rose higher than the levees and some of them gave way (yes, the result of bipartisan neglect of infrastructure for years) the flooding was much worse than in Mississippi, where the water had places to run off into, instead of being contained for a long time.

http://renderv330.mappoint.net/render-30/getmap.aspx?key=5F4E952A962840246E54

Rocketta
Aug 23rd, 2006, 11:55 PM
wow, what would poor samsung do without you Roger? You're about the only left willing to read the long winded posts. :lol: