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Mother_Marjorie
Aug 19th, 2006, 05:19 AM
Sharpton: 'Gangsterism' Harming Blacks

By CLIFF BRUNT
Associated Press Writer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- Many black youths fall under a spell of "gangster mentality," preventing them from becoming leaders and making a positive impact in politics, the Rev. Al Sharpton said.

The civil rights activist faulted Hollywood and the record industry for making "gangsterism" seem cool and acceptable.

"We have got to get out of this gangster mentality, acting as if gangsterism and blackness are synonymous," Sharpton said Thursday at the annual conference of the National Association of Black Journalists.

"I think we've allowed a whole generation of young people to feel that if they're focused, they're not black enough. If they speak well and act well, they're acting white, and there's nothing more racist than that."

The key to leadership is taking the initiative to change things, said Sharpton. He said his National Action Network is just one group willing to help young black leaders get into politics.

"Nobody broke in my house in Brooklyn and dragged me out the projects and made me a leader, I wanted to do that. Clearly, we would work with young people who want to do the work," he said.

Lottie Shackelford, vice chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said during the same panel discussion that the time is ripe for getting more young black people involved.

"So many young folks are waiting to be asked, or they say they want others to move so they can gain a slot, and I say, there's room for everybody. Let's work together," she said.

Sharpton, who competed in several Democratic primaries during a 2004 presidential bid, said he might run again in 2008 but will decide after this November's elections.

harloo
Aug 19th, 2006, 06:04 AM
I cannot respect a man who's hair is longer than one of my sisters. What male senior citizen goes around wearing a bone straight perm? I've always wondered how Sharpton manages his do.
Pink Sponge Rollers or Hot Curlers? Palmer's Coconut Grease or Dog Maine?
:) Now that's gangsta! Man, I swear some of these media appointed black leaders are a JOKE.

DunkMachine
Aug 19th, 2006, 09:55 AM
I cannot respect a man who's hair is longer than one of my sisters. What male senior citizen goes around wearing a bone straight perm? I've always wondered how Sharpton manages his do.
Pink Sponge Rollers or Hot Curlers? Palmer's Coconut Grease or Dog Maine?
:) Now that's gangsta! Man, I swear some of these media appointed black leaders are a JOKE.

That's no perm, the man has "good hair".

Pureracket
Aug 19th, 2006, 02:10 PM
From the "we already knew dept." . . . lol! Some of Matt's stuff is cool, but alot of it is kinda obvious. I like his obsession with what he apparently thinks are demeaning articles on minorities - kinda like why I'm sure the threadstarter posted this article. . .LOL!!!!!

*JR*
Aug 19th, 2006, 02:54 PM
From the "we already knew dept." . . . lol! Some of Matt's stuff is cool, but alot of it is kinda obvious. I like his obsession with what he apparently thinks are demeaning articles on minorities - kinda like why I'm sure the threadstarter posted this article. . .LOL!!!!!
When Bill Cosby said essentially the same, it became "attack the messenger" here, re. Fat Albert having been a stereotype that Coz made $ off of back when, that he never recovered from his son's murder, etc. When the late C. Dolores Tucker did (or I cited her) the bigoted words of her onetime ally William Bennett were used as a way to try to discredit her.

Now I guess Sharpton (who I freely admit has a checkered past with things like the Tawana Brawley case) will be attacked for trying to raise his profile for the 2008 Democratic primaries. OK, he may well be. But that, his hair, etc, don't affect whether he's right in this case (which he is) any more than the thread starter's motivations.

Re. your words about "we already knew", OK. Now has the black community risen up in huge numbers to express outrage @ the gangsta rap culture, etc? To cite Sharpton's friend Jesse Jackson's speech to the black ministers in Washington DC from the early 90's, blacks are (still) far more likely 2B harmed by the BBB (Bad Black Brother) than by the KKK (or others like them).

Infiniti2001
Aug 19th, 2006, 03:14 PM
I cannot respect a man who's hair is longer than one of my sisters. What male senior citizen goes around wearing a bone straight perm? I've always wondered how Sharpton manages his do.
Pink Sponge Rollers or Hot Curlers? Palmer's Coconut Grease or Dog Maine?
:) Now that's gangsta! Man, I swear some of these media appointed black leaders are a JOKE.

What does his hair and his words have to do each other? :shrug:

No Name Face
Aug 19th, 2006, 03:29 PM
anyone who has half a brain knows this already.

way to go captain obvious.

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 19th, 2006, 04:15 PM
From the "we already knew dept." . . . lol! Some of Matt's stuff is cool, but alot of it is kinda obvious. I like his obsession with what he apparently thinks are demeaning articles on minorities - kinda like why I'm sure the threadstarter posted this article. . .LOL!!!!!

Silly little man (and I use the term "man" loosely). You are always whining about something or somebody. Always complaining about where posted articles come from instead of discussing them.

Its a pattern from you as of late. Just about anything I post in Non-Tennis you complain about because you ignorantly think everything I post comes from Matt Drudges website.

FYI, once again, this article didn't originate from Matt Drudge's website. I'll slowly type so you have a better chance of understanding. A-S-S-O-C-I-A-T-E-D P-R-E-S-S.

Please work on that obsession. And entertain the possibility of getting laid so you aren't so critical.

PureIgnorance.

harloo
Aug 19th, 2006, 06:36 PM
What does his hair and his words have to do each other? :shrug:

I think presentation is very important when addressing the public especially if you are a leader. Futhermore, what he says isn't going to be respected much because he is a polarizing figure. I have always questioned what type of statement he was trying to make with the outrageous hairstyle. The only older black men I know with a perm and style like that have been in jail and have lived some of that "gangsta lifestle" he's talking about.:cool:

Sharpton represents everything that's wrong with black leadership today. For him to state the obvious about the plight of black youth in the inner cities while at the same time associating himself with rappers and entertainers who sell this image is hypocritical. Personally, I just don't have any respect for the man especially after the Tawanna Brawley episode.
:o

CJ07
Aug 19th, 2006, 08:02 PM
I can't believe I agree with Al Sharpton

*JR*
Aug 19th, 2006, 08:20 PM
I think presentation is very important when addressing the public especially if you are a leader. Futhermore, what he says isn't going to be respected much because he is a polarizing figure. I have always questioned what type of statement he was trying to make with the outrageous hairstyle. The only older black men I know with a perm and style like that have been in jail and have lived some of that "gangsta lifestle" he's talking about.:cool:

Sharpton represents everything that's wrong with black leadership today. For him to state the obvious about the plight of black youth in the inner cities while at the same time associating himself with rappers and entertainers who sell this image is hypocritical. Personally, I just don't have any respect for the man especially after the Tawanna Brawley episode.
:o
I accept that Sharpton (along with Jackson, Cosby, and others who say things like this, even if for their own prestige more than to really change things) may well have "feet of clay". So I have a very simple challenge to make: others do it, then.

Like Michael Jordan, who made $20 a pair of Air Jordans sold x many millions of pairs. (And Shaq, LeBron, etc.) And major black actors like Jamie Foxx. And politicians like Barack Obama. And Oprah, a one-woman media empire. And media personalities like Wendy Williams. Etc. etc.

The bit about all this being obvious rings hollow. It was equally obvious in the 1950's, etc. that black America was victimized by segregation, lynchings, and a host of other indignities. Martin Luther King didn't shrug and say that it was obvious, he organized a virtual insurrection.

Now its more complex, as blacks are the main victimizers as well as the victims. (And a star doesn't want 2B seen as "uncool", especially as the gangbangers and drug dealers have more money to buy all the stuff many of them are paid to endorse). Plus these folks rarely live in the urban "war zones".

Lastly, Martin Luther King organized the famous march from Selma to Montgomery, and on Washington DC (where he gave his "I Have A Dream" speech). Who will lead the marches on the headquarters of companies like Def Jam Records?

GoDominique
Aug 19th, 2006, 08:53 PM
Silly little man (and I use the term "man" loosely). You are always whining about something or somebody. Always complaining about where posted articles come from instead of discussing them.

Its a pattern from you as of late.
Fixed your post.

RVD
Aug 20th, 2006, 12:08 AM
I can't believe I agree with Al SharptonHmm..., yeah.

It's gotta be tough for someone like A.S. to present a 'known' problem with the reputation that he has. but I agree with you... and Al. :)

After witnessing, firsthand, the influence that gangsta rap has on [all] teens, it (imo) has become enemy #1 in many communities. I'm a product of such an environment, but managed to emerge relatively untouched by the gangsta world.
What the article doen't mention, however, is the mental and physical repercussions that teens endure when they do rebuke the temptation of the gangsta rap [world] and associated idiosyncrasies. For instance, in certain communities, not only is it impossible to avoid, it is down-right terminal to do so. You become a target, as well as your family.
So, to lip-sync the dangers is all well and good. So many have done so in the past, and currently as well. But to offer zero suggestions on how to do it, like say---

...GOING AFTER THE HUGE DISTRIBUTORS: RECORD COMPANIES; MARKETING FIRMS; CLOTHING; JEWELRY; and the myriad PARAPHERNALIA SHOPS...

... it remains nothing more than lip-synching, a la Bill Cosby. :rolleyes:
And to be honest, since gangsta rap has been bastardized, manipulated, and rebuilt to damn near create the illusion of ultimate success, I don't see how one would go about changing it [short-term]. :shrug:

It's really sad that we have such ineffective and opportunistic [non]leaders in the Black community. It would be so great to have another MLK Jr. emerge from this the wastelands we call Black America. :sad:

For those unaware of the crap called gangsta rap:
It represents a small, yet growing sector of the Hip-Hop culture, that marketing firms use to exploit at the expense of an entire group of people [for profit]. Moreover, I hate it when bruthas sell-out and are too damn weak to forego the dollars signs that are further hurting their own communities. :fiery:

Pureracket
Aug 20th, 2006, 02:29 AM
Silly little man (and I use the term "man" loosely). You are always whining about something or somebody. Always complaining about where posted articles come from instead of discussing them.

Its a pattern from you as of late. Just about anything I post in Non-Tennis you complain about because you ignorantly think everything I post comes from Matt Drudges website.

FYI, once again, this article didn't originate from Matt Drudge's website. I'll slowly type so you have a better chance of understanding. A-S-S-O-C-I-A-T-E-D P-R-E-S-S.

Please work on that obsession. And entertain the possibility of getting laid so you aren't so critical.

PureIgnorance.SWOOP!!!!!

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 20th, 2006, 02:51 AM
SWOOP!!!!!

Yeah, "SWOOP" down and kiss my ass! :kiss:

Pureracket
Aug 20th, 2006, 03:00 AM
Yeah, "SWOOP" down and kiss my ass! :kiss:"I'd rather kiss a Wookie."

le bon vivant
Aug 20th, 2006, 03:07 AM
I accept that Sharpton (along with Jackson, Cosby, and others who say things like this, even if for their own prestige more than to really change things) may well have "feet of clay". So I have a very simple challenge to make: others do it, then.

Like Michael Jordan, who made $20 a pair of Air Jordans sold x many millions of pairs. (And Shaq, LeBron, etc.) And major black actors like Jamie Foxx. And politicians like Barack Obama. And Oprah, a one-woman media empire. And media personalities like Wendy Williams. Etc. etc.

The bit about all this being obvious rings hollow. It was equally obvious in the 1950's, etc. that black America was victimized by segregation, lynchings, and a host of other indignities. Martin Luther King didn't shrug and say that it was obvious, he organized a virtual insurrection.

Now its more complex, as blacks are the main victimizers as well as the victims. (And a star doesn't want 2B seen as "uncool", especially as the gangbangers and drug dealers have more money to buy all the stuff many of them are paid to endorse). Plus these folks rarely live in the urban "war zones".

Lastly, Martin Luther King organized the famous march from Selma to Montgomery, and on Washington DC (where he gave his "I Have A Dream" speech). Who will lead the marches on the headquarters of companies like Def Jam Records?

Why do you always use "gangsta" rap music to generalize the plight of the entire black community all the time? Especially when gangsta rap died in the mid 90s. Unless you consider "drinking Cris," wearing diamonds on my neck and wrist, and fucking bitches to be "gangsta".

*JR*
Aug 20th, 2006, 02:16 PM
Why do you always use "gangsta" rap music to generalize the plight of the entire black community all the time? Especially when gangsta rap died in the mid 90s. Unless you consider "drinking Cris," wearing diamonds on my neck and wrist, and fucking bitches to be "gangsta".
OK, I'll be the first to admit that I'm not current on trends in rap. So let me simply endorse 100% what RVD said a few posts back about what I guess could be called "gangsta culture". However its expressed, hoodlums are role models far too often, with predictably negative consequences.

Wigglytuff
Aug 20th, 2006, 03:02 PM
seriously, this shit is pointless.

1-violence and self degradation doesnt help ANYONE regardless of race.
1b-to say or imply that its limited to a particular group of people, not only ignores the causes but usually serves to reinforce and maintain the very degradation and violence they claim to be against.
2-focusing on a patricular group of people, based not on recent trends or reality, but on outdated and cliche stereotype serves only as an excuse for those who are ignorant, racist or just plain assholes to hold on to those ideas.
3-the people who make these statements (sharpton, cosby and others) are the epitamy of morally corrupt individuals and are in no place to preach or provide any guidance to anyone, at least until they get their own acts together.

harloo
Aug 20th, 2006, 04:30 PM
I accept that Sharpton (along with Jackson, Cosby, and others who say things like this, even if for their own prestige more than to really change things) may well have "feet of clay". So I have a very simple challenge to make: others do it, then.

Like Michael Jordan, who made $20 a pair of Air Jordans sold x many millions of pairs. (And Shaq, LeBron, etc.) And major black actors like Jamie Foxx. And politicians like Barack Obama. And Oprah, a one-woman media empire. And media personalities like Wendy Williams. Etc. etc.

You have the prestige aspect and attention garnered from the criticism correct. Jackson and Sharpton have made career's off of exploiting civil rights. What I find so interesting is how those who demonize Sharpton and Jackson foam at the mouth when these "appointed leaders" have anything negative to say about black people in general. ;)

It would be nice if Mr. "I have no comment on controversial black issues" (Michael Jordan) would share his opinion on the the negative effects of gangster music. Considering he is someone that influences black youth I'm pretty sure his message would be well recieved. As far as Oprah and other entertainers, maybe that would be a good idea? ;)

The bit about all this being obvious rings hollow. It was equally obvious in the 1950's, etc. that black America was victimized by segregation, lynchings, and a host of other indignities. Martin Luther King didn't shrug and say that it was obvious, he organized a virtual insurrection.

Now its more complex, as blacks are the main victimizers as well as the victims. (And a star doesn't want 2B seen as "uncool", especially as the gangbangers and drug dealers have more money to buy all the stuff many of them are paid to endorse). Plus these folks rarely live in the urban "war zones".

Exactly, MLK and other civil rights activists ORGANIZED a virtual insurrection. They didn't just talk about the situation and think the problem would eventually be solved. We need a proactive leader who will speak out and at the same time fight against the evils of explotation.

What's disturbing is that (Sharpton and Jackson) have no problem interacting with the artists who sell "gangster music". If they were really serious a campaign to challenge the music industry's exploitation of rap would of been enacted years ago.

Of course a campaign of this nature would meet opposition but I believe consistent pressure would bring about change. The new leaders of today don't have the concern or stamina to even endure a campain of this nature. So in essence the back and forth talking, criticizing, and grandstanding will continue. Same s##@, different day.:o


Lastly, Martin Luther King organized the famous march from Selma to Montgomery, and on Washington DC (where he gave his "I Have A Dream" speech). Who will lead the marches on the headquarters of companies like Def Jam Records?

It sure won't be Al or Jesse.:lol: :o

Pureracket
Aug 20th, 2006, 04:35 PM
You have the prestige aspect and attention garnered from the criticism correct. Jackson and Sharpton have made career's off of exploiting civil rights. What I find so interesting is how those who demonize Sharpton and Jackson foam at the mouth when these "appointed leaders" have anything negative to say about black people in general. ;)

Like the threadstarter?

harloo
Aug 20th, 2006, 04:36 PM
Like the threadstarter?

:tape: ;)

harloo
Aug 20th, 2006, 04:53 PM
After witnessing, firsthand, the influence that gangsta rap has on [all] teens, it (imo) has become enemy #1 in many communities. I'm a product of such an environment, but managed to emerge relatively untouched by the gangsta world.
What the article doen't mention, however, is the mental and physical repercussions that teens endure when they do rebuke the temptation of the gangsta rap [world] and associated idiosyncrasies. For instance, in certain communities, not only is it impossible to avoid, it is down-right terminal to do so. You become a target, as well as your family.
So, to lip-sync the dangers is all well and good. So many have done so in the past, and currently as well. But to offer zero suggestions on how to do it, like say---

...GOING AFTER THE HUGE DISTRIBUTORS: RECORD COMPANIES; MARKETING FIRMS; CLOTHING; JEWELRY; and the myriad PARAPHERNALIA SHOPS...

... it remains nothing more than lip-synching, a la Bill Cosby. :rolleyes:
And to be honest, since gangsta rap has been bastardized, manipulated, and rebuilt to damn near create the illusion of ultimate success, I don't see how one would go about changing it [short-term]. :shrug:

It's really sad that we have such ineffective and opportunistic [non]leaders in the Black community. It would be so great to have another MLK Jr. emerge from this the wastelands we call Black America. :sad:

For those unaware of the crap called gangsta rap:
It represents a small, yet growing sector of the Hip-Hop culture, that marketing firms use to exploit at the expense of an entire group of people [for profit]. Moreover, I hate it when bruthas sell-out and are too damn weak to forego the dollars signs that are further hurting their own communities. :fiery:

:worship:

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 20th, 2006, 06:17 PM
Like the threadstarter?

Don't project your racial hostilities onto me. I'm not the one the problem :wavey:

RVD
Aug 23rd, 2006, 10:34 PM
*BUMP*

Three days later, this well-respected journalist make the exact same points as I did. :bounce: :cool: :worship:
...though actually sorta eerie. :scared: :lol:

When gangsta rap becomes grim reality

Chip Johnson (mailto:chjohnson@sfchronicle.com)
Tuesday, August 22, 2006

The carnage on the streets of Oakland these days just doesn't make any sense as the body count of youths -- particularly black teenagers -- mounts.

Just a few days ago, controversial civil rights activist the Rev. Al Sharpton, in a keynote address at the annual National Association of Black Journalists conference in Indianapolis, warned of the dangers of doing nothing about the glorification of the gangster lifestyle.

"We have got to get out of this gangster mentality, acting as if gangsterism and blackness are synonymous," Sharpton said.

"I think we have allowed a whole generation of young people to feel that if they're focused, they're not black enough. If they speak well and act well, they're acting white, and there's nothing more racist than that."

I'm not a big Sharpton supporter, given some of his more extreme viewpoints, but I agree with him on this one. Heck, 10 years ago, the Rev. Calvin Butts of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem said the same thing about the alarming trends in violent gangster rap music, but he was dismissed as a religious conservative.

There isn't a city in the continental United States where teenagers have embraced the message of the gangster musician with more zeal than in Oakland, which has produced some of the most notable artists who make up the genre today.

Unfortunately, the lifestyle glorified in the music videos is a dicey proposition in urban America, because some of our young people aren't just playing it -- they're living it.

Consider Oakland's most recent homicide, its 89th of the year: the drive-by shooting death of Andrew Porter, a 16-year-old junior at Oakland High School. He was killed in a hail of bullets late Saturday night while walking with a large group of people to a party on 81st Avenue.

While Andrew's mother said her son, a starter on his high school football team, was a good kid who was not involved in crime, a different -- and threatening -- picture of his purported circle of friends emerged on a Web site.

The posting on MySpace.com honors his death -- and vows revenge.

The site, which appears to be devoted to an Oakland street gang, includes this: "{lcub}RIP{rcub} Andrew ~ Mob Squad ~ We go get who did it bra." The site includes links to chat rooms, message boards and other Internet locations.

Andrew Porter is the 27th of Oakland's 89 homicide victims this year who have died short of their 20th birthday. That's nearly 1 out of 3.

Some of the photographs on the Web site show teens throwing up a three-finger gang sign, while other brandish handguns. One rolling image, headlined "Foothill Fruitville," shows a man holding two automatic pistols, one in each hand.

Another part of the site is set aside for slain members of the group, and includes the faces and names of at least two other African American teens from Oakland who have been gunned down in the last two years.

Davelle Tatum was just 16 when gunmen -- waiting for him to arrive home -- opened fire in June 2005, killing him. A separate memorial was posted to note the death of Willie Clay, 19, who died when someone fired on a group of people near the corner of 22nd Avenue and East 28th Street, for years a known drug hotspot.

Three days after Clay's death, Purnell Brewer, a well-known and feared street drug dealer, was gunned down on 26th Street nearby.

The MySpace site is ostensibly dedicated to the members of a gang whose turf, "Murder Dubbs, East Oakland" is known to authorities as the area around 22nd Avenue between East 21st and 29th streets where nearly a dozen people have been killed so far this year.

What's particularly troubling, beyond the remarkably short lives of these young men, is that these teenagers and young adults operate the site so publicly, and have posted links to advertisements selling "Bling-bling" hip-hop jewelry and clothing -- all the accoutrements that a budding young street thug will need. :hehehe:

Young black men, many of them without guidance or role models in their lives, are slipping from society's grasp faster than we can catch them. But it's particularly galling to see corporate America cashing in on the carnage.

I mean the record and fashion industries, and all the other companies promoting gangster-like behavior through the distribution of their products. It only makes matters worse.

The kids on the streets of Oakland and other cities are just going along with what's hip and cool, which is the exact same thing my generation did 30 years ago, whether it was smoking pot, sporting a freakin' fro or hanging with the bad dudes.

And just like us, many of the kids who find themselves caught up in a real-life gangster drama may have just been playing at first.

But for anybody who's had their head in the sand, playing street thug in the nation's toughest inner cities, including Oakland, ain't no game, man.

Chip Johnson's column appears on Tuesdays and Fridays. E-mail him at chjohnson@sfhchronicle.com.

***********************************************

tennisbum79
Aug 23rd, 2006, 10:57 PM
Another outrage du jour.

Although I agree with the essence of what he says, I never see any follow-up to this pronoucement.

While white teens grow out of this gangster stuff, it seems to hook black teens for awhile longer in their adult lives.

*JR*
Aug 23rd, 2006, 11:22 PM
Young black men, many of them without guidance or role models in their lives, are slipping from society's grasp faster than we can catch them. But it's particularly galling to see corporate America cashing in on the carnage.

I mean the record and fashion industries, and all the other companies promoting gangster-like behavior through the distribution of their products. It only makes matters worse.

White corporate executives doing this are morally no better than the slaveholders were. And black ones are traitors to their race. :fiery:

SelesFan70
Aug 23rd, 2006, 11:27 PM
Sharpton is just jealous that Russell Simmons is endorsing Michael Steele (R) for the Maryland Senate seat. :lol:

RVD
Aug 23rd, 2006, 11:46 PM
Another outrage du jour.

Although I agree with the essence of what he says, I never see any follow-up to this pronoucement....which is really the larger crime, imo. It's all well and good to denounce something, but if it's done for 'short-term' political gain, then all it does if offer more [free] press to the offending businesses. Iím not saying that I'd like to see Gangsta Rap to disappear. I'm suggesting that this particular genre not be the face of the music Hip-Hop Culture like many of these business would have society believe.
While white teens grow out of this gangster stuff, it seems to hook black teens for awhile longer in their adult lives.True. However, White teens have Acid Rock, Heavy Metal, Rock & Roll, etc..., to fall back on for there devilish musical experiences. :devil: :lol:
Whereas, Gangsta Rap offered minority youths a way to express their anger and menace [musically]. It really only becomes a problem when teens try to emulate the fantasy/illusion. :fiery:

RVD
Aug 23rd, 2006, 11:51 PM
White corporate executives doing this are morally no better than the slaveholders were. And black ones are traitors to their race. :fiery:TRUE! And... TRUER! :fiery: :worship: