PDA

View Full Version : News and Articles


Zoltan83
Aug 10th, 2006, 10:47 PM
I put here the message from Loz46

Don't know if you guys have heard this, but I found this article in the Herald Sun newspaper in Melbourne today.

Aussies rally to claim teen
August 10, 2006 12:00am

TALENTED Slovakian tennis teenager Jarmila Gajdosova is considering switching to Australia.

Rated one of the most promising young players in the world, Gajdosova is investigating taking out Australian citizenship.
Ranked 86th in the world, 19-year-old Gajdosova has claimed four singles titles on the International Tennis Federation circuit this season, while establishing herself as a grand slam fixture.

The Bratislava baseliner has forged strong links with Australia, notably through Sydney coach Simon Walsh, trainer Dave Bailey and sponsor Ron Kohn, of Topserve Tennis.

Beaten in the Australian Open junior semi-finals two years ago by Czech world No. 9 Nicole Vaidisova, Gajdosova reached the French Open second round in May.

Gajdosova thumped sixth seed and world No. 49 Anastasia Yakimova 6-2 6-3 in Stockholm overnight to underline her credentials.

Financially independent, Gajdosova has canvassed the possibility of switching allegiances with Australian players and officials.

But, unlike Jelena Dokic who received significant monetary backing from Tennis Australia before her transfer back to Serbia and Montenegro, Gajdosova is bankrolling her own career.

Walsh confirmed Gajdosova is not seeking assistance from Tennis Australia.

"Her interest in the idea of possible citizenship is based on her love for the Australian life," Walsh said.

"She has spent a lot of special times there in the past two years, including Christmas and her birthdays.

"(She) has a lot of close friends there and she feels very at home.

"She has always enjoyed her time there immensely and really her interest is based around looking at her life and future, importantly, after tennis one day.

"She is in a certain position where she is not looking for, or needs, any outside support connected to her tennis.

"Jarmila is 100 per cent financially self-sufficient and also has her own sponsors and support team and resources.

"She is already established in the top 100 at only 19 years of age and does not need any financial or other support -- meaning wildcards.

"Her interest in Australian citizenship has absolutely nothing to do with that.

"It's about her interest and love in Australia."

Gajdosova dominated the Australian leg of the ITF calendar this season, capturing singles crowns in Sydney, Gosford and Canberra.

The right-hander was based in Australia from November to April and registered her first win at grand slam level in Paris in May with victory over Stephanie Cohen-Aloro.

She also boasts wins this year over Wimbledon quarter-finalist Severine Bremond and Australian Sam Stosur.

TA director of player development Craig Tiley described Gajdosova as accomplished.

"She's got a lot of upside to her game, she's an exciting new talent," Tiley said.

"She's been pretty tied into the Australian environment for quite a while. If she's successful with her citizenship application, we would welcome her into the Australian tennis community."

Yes, I read it too today... I don't know (yet) if it's accurate or not.

nigel - dani fan
Aug 11th, 2006, 12:00 AM
I've found the original article:
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,20076225-3162,00.html

There's nothing on Jarka's site yet..
http://www.jarmilagajdosova.com

Zoltan83
Aug 11th, 2006, 02:14 PM
It's not the first time, people are saying that. But the last time, Jarka said it was rumors only.

SloKid
Aug 18th, 2006, 02:31 PM
I really hope she doesn't switch.

Ben.
Dec 14th, 2008, 07:08 AM
Thought it might be of interest. Article is from the Melbourne Herald Sun.

All set for doubles match

December 14, 2008 12:00am
IT is a perfect love match and will be sealed with an ace straight after the Australian Open.

Bright young tennis hopes Sam Groth and Jarmila Gajdosova will marry two days after the Australian Open ends on February 1.

The pair, who have dated for 18 months, will contest the mixed doubles at Melbourne Park.

"There aren't many couples together on tour but it's great to know we have each other," Groth said.

"The longest we've been apart was four weeks which is pretty good when you're on the road a lot."

Gajdosova is originally from Slovakia but has lived here for five years. She is ranked 98 in the world and has earned direct entry into the Open.

Groth is ranked inside the top 250 and will be vying for a wildcard in the playoffs that start tomorrow.

"It'd be good to win the wildcard and take it all out of the picture a bit," Groth said.

"Then I guess it's up to the powers that be and whatever decision they make I don't think anyone deserves it more than anyone else."

Gajdosova will also play in Brisbane on the back of an impressive 2008 with wins in Gimcheon, Korea, Kawana, Traralgon and Taiwan.

"I was 17 when I decided to come out here and I never thought I'd marry an Australian!" Gajdosova said.

The pair will marry in Groth's hometown of Albury.

Daniel.
Dec 14th, 2008, 07:23 AM
They're so awesome, congrats to them.
But planning a wedding is a huge thing and will definately affect their AO preparation and will take away their focus abit.

PointBlank
Dec 15th, 2008, 07:14 AM
she told me the other day she wasnt to marry until early march, the wedding was pushed back as far as i know.

PointBlank
Dec 15th, 2008, 07:16 AM
okay, so i checked what she sent me and im retarded. she said they are to marry 3.2.09 and since im american i read it march second and not febuary third. haha.

hellas719
Dec 20th, 2008, 02:02 AM
shouldn't this be in tennis slovakia, since she plays for them now?

Harvs
Dec 20th, 2008, 04:39 AM
lol, what?

other way round u mean?

steph'
Jan 8th, 2009, 07:25 PM
Getting To Know... Jarmila Gajdosova


BRISBANE, Australia - Upon traveling to the Australian Open as a 14-year-old junior, Bratislava-born Jarmila Gajdosova fell in love with the place - and, later, a young Australian player called Sam Groth. Destiny was set: the young Slovak would forge a new life on the far side of the world.

Indeed, so clear did Gajdosova's commitment to the land Down Under become that in 2007 she was awarded a scholarship to the Australian Institute of Sport; technically she still represents Slovakia but the 21-year-old is casually referred to as an Australian by local media, and fans have also embraced her as one of their own. In any case, a citizenship application is with immigration authorities, and as soon as the upcoming Australian Open is over, the current world No.98 and Groth will tie the knot. The dream of playing Fed Cup for her adopted nation could soon be a reality.

That's good news for both player and country. Ranked as high as No.64 in 2006, when she reached the third round of the US Open, Gajdosova has struggled with injuries over the past couple of seasons. But since last year's US Open she has enjoyed renewed success, especially on the ITF Circuit where she collected four singles titles in 2008. She also registered her best Sony Ericsson WTA Tour result at the Japan Open, beating Shahar Peer before falling to eventual champion Caroline Wozniacki in the semis.

We caught up with Gajdosova at the Brisbane International, where she upset China's Peng Shuai in the first round - her 29th win in 33 matches - and gave No.2 seed Victoria Azarenka all sorts of trouble before falling 76(4) 75.

First things first: Have you ever been camping in the bush?
JG: No, I think I would be too scared! All those snakes and other creatures...

Speaking of which, if you could have an Australian native animal as a pet, what would you choose?
JG: A koala... no, a kangaroo! I saw one from a car once. I wish I could jump high like that.

Do you have a favorite piece of Aussie slang?
JG: You wouldn't be able to publish it on the website! So I'll say dunny (toilet). It's really rude but I love that word.

What do you miss about Slovakia?
JG: Our food - it's great, you should try it! It's very fattening though; I don't think our fitness trainers would be very happy about it. And of course I miss my parents (who are both engineers) and my brother Jan (a former pro skier). I've taken Sam to meet them though.

What do you consider your best assets as a player?
JG: Normally my serve, although I didn’t serve that well against Azarenka today. And I've had a good backhand since I was a kid. But slowly my forehand is coming better. It's hard to say though... things change over time; you improve in one area and try to keep mixing things up.

If you could acquire a shot from another player, what would you choose?
JG: I'd take the second serve of my fiancé, it's an awesome kicker. And I'd like Dominika Cibulkova's footwork - she's really fast.

What has been your best Tour win to date?
JG: In terms of rankings and experience, I would have to say Katarina Srebotnik, and I beat Ai Sugiyama in Sydney last year.

You have just given a Top 15 player a very tough work-out; does that kind of match make you reassess your goals, think maybe you should revise your expectations?
JG: Not really. If I'd won that match I would have got 70 points and maybe moved up 10 places in the rankings, but there's not really that much difference between being No. 90 or 80. It's when you're up where Victoria is that 10 places makes a big difference.

If I am able to keep practicing I will keep improving and one day I'll get where she is, if I'm lucky. For the past two years I was injured a lot, I'd practice for a week and want to play a tournament and then something would happen. It was really on and off. So I really just want to stay healthy and keep playing week to week and get more matches, and see where it takes me.

Your coach has adopted an interesting training technique...
JG: Yes - if I hit drop shots during a match my coach (Chris Johnston) makes me do sit-ups afterwards as 'punishment'... 50 sit-ups for each one. Since I was a kid it was my favorite shot to hit, but I would do it at inappropriate times like second serve returns on match point down. So when he saw me do it the first time he said, 'Nup, you've gotta do sit-ups for that'. He makes me do it even if I win the point so now my first reaction when I hit a drop shot is to say sorry! But he's actually really nice. At least he doesn't make me do it for double faults.

If you could play a player from the past, who would you choose?
JG: Monica Seles. She was really good when I was growing up, and I liked the way she played. Even though I couldn't hit a double-handed forehand, when I started as a kid I imagined that that was the style of play I would like to try to play.

Do you have a favorite tournament?
JG: I used to love playing the Gold Coast event. And of course, the Australian Open - anything at home, really.

Tell us about your wedding plans.
JG: We're getting married in Albury (a town on the border of New South Wales and Victoria), where Sam is from. He's a country boy. My parents can't come because they are scared of flying, but they said they will make us a second wedding in Europe some time around Wimbledon.

Mr.Kardashian
Jan 9th, 2009, 11:16 AM
awww great interview - i reeally really like her :) won 29/ last 33 matches! impressive

OZTENNIS
Jan 9th, 2009, 10:46 PM
Thanks for posting, Jarks is so down to earth and friendly :)

steph'
Jan 12th, 2009, 05:11 PM
An Aussie in the making


Sydney,12 January 2009
AAP

Jarmila Gajdosova continues her fine form from Brisbane to Sydney.

Getty Images

One way or another Jarmila Gajdosova will officially play tennis for Australia - of that she is convinced.

The 21-year-old eased into the second round of the Sydney International on Monday with a 6-4 6-2 win over Italian Karin Knapp.

But she did so under the flag of Slovakia, at least according to the WTA, who fall in line with government policy in not recognising her as an Australian until she has citizenship and a local passport.

In what has been a protracted affair, Gajdosova was granted residency shortly after arriving from Bratislava as a 16-year-old but complications arising from not spending enough time in Australia has meant she is still awaiting citizenship.

"It's going to happen anyway, so it's just a matter of time - sooner or later," she said on Tuesday.

"Hopefully it is going to be sooner so I can have an AUS behind my name which (I've been) trying to do for the last couple of years."

Expected to aid her cause for citizenship is her relationship with Australian professional Sam Groth.

Groth - who received a wildcard into the Australian Open main draw on Monday - and Gajdosova are to be married next month.

"Of course it will help - that's why I am saying I will get it sooner or later," Gajdosova said.

"But still it is like in the (United) States where people get married for the green card so they changed the law as well here so people don't just do it for the sake of getting the papers."

In a quirk the world No.98 gets to play in grand slams as an Australian because the majors operate under a different set of guidelines to the regular WTA tournaments.

"I will be Australian next week. Four times a year I'm Australian. I'm very proud about it too," she said.

Gajdosova received a lucky break on Monday when scheduled opponent, world No.14 Victoria Azarenka, withdrew due to a virus.

She was replaced by lucky loser Knapp.

Azarenka had defeated Gajdosova in a second round clash last week en route to claiming the Brisbane International title.

Gajdosova will play world No.4 Elena Dementieva in the second round.

FanHochZwei
Jan 13th, 2009, 08:23 AM
http://www.medibankinternational.com.au/audio-video - Jarka talks about her 2nd round loss to Dementieva

myriam forever
Mar 15th, 2009, 09:39 PM
Hi everybody

http://www.jarkagroth.com

This is Jarka's new official website.

Diary and new pictures will be online during Miami.

Enjoy it and don't hesitate to let comments or words on the guestbook.

OZTENNIS
Mar 16th, 2009, 12:37 AM
Yay, thanks for posting :)

Podme Jarka

Huntress55
May 29th, 2010, 02:57 PM
Didnt know where to post this, so thought here would be best.
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2010-05-29/201005291275140247835.html

Interview after her match against Nastya!

Q. First time into the fourth round. How does that feel?
JARMILA GROTH: It feels great. Um, I couldn't be any happier. And, also, every year I try to give my dad a good birthday present. I finally made it. It's his birthday tomorrow, so he's very happy that now he got a very nice birthday present.
So it feels great.

Q. Talk us through I get the last minute of that second set. That was pretty interesting.
JARMILA GROTH: Yeah, I got off my second from the frame and still it was a aggressive.
Yeah, look, I thought I played well until then. You know, I made the points right. I play tactically well. Of course I got nervous. I mean, it's my first time fourth round, and I had it very easy a little then, so just in an hour really.
So I got really nervous about it. Match points were played very safely, way too safely for my liking. But I couldn't get myself to hit the ball and play them as I played till then.
So, yeah, then she started playing very well. She got confident after that. She served well. So I lost the second set 7 5; got broke in the first game. But, still, it's just set all.
Um, I got back to my normal game. I thought I moved very well today. My left handed shot worked today as well. Couple lobs and passing shots went well, too.
Yeah, in the end I thought I played well. I hold my nerves somehow. I fought very well, and I thought I played the big points in the end pretty good. Yeah, I can't say much more than that.

Q. Yesterday or day before yesterday you were saying how much you wanted to take the next step and go beyond the third round; you've done it now. When that last point was finished, what did it actually feel like?
JARMILA GROTH: Um, yeah, it was special in some way because it's the first time and, you know, it's here at French as well, so it's on clay. I probably like more to play on a hardcourt and everything else, even I grew up on clay.
And also playing Anastasia, two Australians playing each other is not easy. So there was a lot of nerves going into it as well. But I knew I'm playing well, so I was very happy to finish it in the end. I couldn't be any happier.
You know, I worked very hard and I had my fair share of injuries. I was 50 in the world, but I always wanted to try to get better to it.
So it's great. I can't wish for any better, really.

Q. Looking ahead to the next round, can you look at first possibly playing Kleybanova and then also just look to playing Shvedova?
JARMILA GROTH: Um, well, I think they play pretty similar, so it doesn't really matter. I think Shvedova is up 4 0 in the third anyway even it started to rain right now. So I think they are suspended.
But they play very similar. They are very aggressive players. Kleybanova just beat Ivanovic pretty convincing. She was playing really good.
Shvedova, I mean, she been playing very well for last couple weeks as far as I know. So either way it's gonna be tough. Yeah, I will do my best. I will run as hard as I can, try to play my game, and see if I can beat them.
If I can, I will be probably the happiest person alive. If I don't, I will be still proud of what I've done and achieved. I think I still did pretty well.

Q. You had the crowd well and truly on your side in that match. How did you manage to do that?
JARMILA GROTH: I don't know. I smile a couple times. I really don't know, actually. They were really nice actually, very supportive, which was really nice.
I don't really know. I just try to concentrate on what I had to do, and, yeah, as I said, yeah, I smiled a couple times. They kind of enjoyed it, I guess.

Q. You were both questioning the line calls a bit.
JARMILA GROTH: Questioning, yeah. A couple I questioned were very close. Because the clay, it's very like sort of a hardcourt, so you can't see the mark from far away. So it's hard for me to judge how far or how wide the ball is. So yeah, I question it.
But, I mean, to give it credit, a couple were really wide, so...

Q. Do you think there was a different level of tension with two Aussies playing each other and you both really wanted to win?
JARMILA GROTH: Yeah, I don't think it's easy to play someone who you know and from the same country as well. So it was tough as well.
I mean, we actually played each other once couple years ago, so that doesn't really count because it's been a while ago. She's been playing well. She played well i Fed Cup and she played well to get to third round obviously. She beat good players.
I knew it was gonna be tough. Just a matter of who can play better in the big points when it counts and can mentally stay there longer.

Q. So you gave your father a birthday present. What did the husband have to say?
JARMILA GROTH: I just woke him up. He was real angry in the beginning, but then he was very happy for me. And then he was kind of sad actually that he can't here to watch my success, as it's the first time in the fourth round.
So in a way he was happy; in a way he was sad. But he loves me, so he wish me all the best for the next round, and he'll watch it on TV hopefully.

Q. I saw you defending with your left hand several times.
JARMILA GROTH: Yeah.

Q. Can you play with both?
JARMILA GROTH: Yes, I can, actually. My natural is left handed. I can do everything left or right hand, left or right foot. I'm weird, I know. Kind of it's natural for me to do that.
My parents made me to actually play right handed when I was younger because there's a story behind it. When I was born I couldn't move my right side. I was born early, and so my right side of my body didn't function, right?
So my parents got scared so they keep working with me, you know, and pressing the pressure points so my right sides are functioning. They made me to be a right hander. So even when I eat, my knife and fork is in the opposite side.
I can do anything with left or right. Either way. When I play basketball, I throw left or right, whichever I get to. If I play soccer, I kick left or right, whichever side comes to me. So to play a left handed shot, it's kind of normal for me to do.
Because I'm right handed, my right hand it's stronger than the left. Obviously the ball doesn't go as fast, but I still can sort of judge it, how to lob. I can play overhead, serves. It's not that hard.

Q. How long did your parents have to sort of work out your...
JARMILA GROTH: A while. I was born about almost a month early. I had 1200 grams and I was losing weight. They didn't give me big chance to survive, and now look at me. I'm supposed to be on diet every time, so it kind of sucks.
So they were really scared. Of course my mom and dad, they wanted me to be normal, even I don't think that happened. I'm still weird. But, um, so they worked very hard to do that until I actually become a right hander.
But my backhand, that's why my backhand used to be the better side when I was younger, when I was a junior, just because if you watch my backhand, my left hand is dominating on my backhand side. The right hand is just to hold the racquet, really.

Q. Is you're naturally a left hander and just right handed manufactured through...
JARMILA GROTH: Yeah.

Q. They should be proud of you.

JARMILA GROTH: Thanks.

Q. This is really more for radio so that we've got some preview for the next round. Look at the two players individually as to what you're gonna have to do.
JARMILA GROTH: Well, Kleybanova, very good backhand. Definitely her favorite shot; backhand side is the stronger one; likes to go down the line on it. She's been playing well as far as I've seen. Very good ball striker from both wings. Plays very fast, very hard.
So the natural will be probably to make her run and try to change the pace so I can get her out of rhythm so she doesn't hit the ball in the same you know, around her waist.
Shvedova, as far as I know, good serve, big serve, big forehand. She's a very strong girl. She kind of moves well as well for her height. So similar way. I'll want to get her out of her striking zone and make her run. Couple times go behind so I get her off her feet a little.
I will have to hold my serve either way, and hopefully I'll get a break.

Drine
Jun 21st, 2010, 03:39 PM
Ambidextrous Aussie alert
Monday, 21 June 2010

One to watch for gatherers of curious facts at Wimbledon on the first day of the 2010 Championships - Jarmila Groth, playing in the fourth match to take place on Court 15. The Australian, ranked No.92 in the world, is ambidextrous. Her opponent today, Renata Voracova of the Czech Republic, will need to watch out for Groth playing strokes with either hand. The technique seems to pay off, judging by last month's French Open where she reached the fourth round.
Groth, aged 23, says she is able to "do anything with left or right, either way" - from eating, to shooting a basketball, to kicking a football. In other words, she is the same with her feet as her hands, and anyone who has tried to kick a ball with the "wrong" foot will know how very strange it can feel.

"To play a left-handed shot, it's kind of normal for me to do," she says. According to Groth, her ability is rooted in the fact that she was born a month prematurely, weighing about two-and-a-half pounds (1.2 kilograms), and could not use the right side of her body.

"I was losing weight," explains Groth. "They didn't give me a big chance to survive." But survive she did, and in the subsequent years her parents did all they could to help her regain the use of the right side of her body, mainly through massage, and the situation gradually improved. Groth - born in Slovakia but an Australian since her marriage to ATP player Samuel Groth last year - gradually became perfectly ambidextrous.

"I'm weird, I know," she smiles. "Even when I eat, my knife and fork are on the opposite sides. When I play basketball, I throw left or right. If I play football, I kick left or right, whichever side comes to me." She adds that while her right hand is stronger, she can hit a whole range of shots with her left.

"Obviously the ball doesn't go as fast, but I can still sort of judge it, how to lob," she says. "I can play overheads and serves. It's not that hard."

http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/blogs/2010-06-21/201006211277130533473.html

Drine
Jun 28th, 2010, 08:34 PM
Jarmila Groth - 28 June 2010


Q. You must be disappointed today. But your last month has been very satisfying.

JARMILA GROTH: Uhm, yeah. Disappointed, true. I had the chances in the second set. But, yeah, I mean, I made fourth round both Grand Slams, so I should be happy, right?

Q. Did you tighten up or did she loosen up towards the end of the second set?

JARMILA GROTH: Uhm, I mean, she always serves well. I got a good first game when I broke. I should have hold my serve. Play couple loose points on my serve.

My percentage of the first serve went down, as well, so it was not as good as, you know, the first set. So I didn't get any free points or anything.

She's a good enough player to, you know, keep up. So, uhm, but, yeah, she serves so well. I got a chance in the breaker as well again. Ended up hitting double‑fault. So that doesn't help.

Q. Before the game, what did you think you needed to do to be able to beat her?

JARMILA GROTH: I knew I had to hold serves. I've been serving very well the first three rounds. So if I could keep it up, which I did the first set, where I got broken in the last game, just a little bit strange because I still made a lot of first serves. So that was one thing.

And then I knew she was going to serve well. Had to somehow try to make the returns. Hopefully, you know, win a couple points off the ground.

Yeah, and I tried to be aggressive, take the chance when I could, because otherwise she would make me run a lot. It's not easy to play her. She's very tall, she moves well, so it's really hard to get her going. That's what I tried to do.

Q. How close do you think you came to beating her today?

JARMILA GROTH: Well, I lost, so I don't think I was close enough.

But, look, I had still 5‑3, 5‑4, serving for a set twice. Came back in the breaker, you know, taking a couple points now and then. Even the last match point, I still got a short ball in the end. Could have been 6‑All if I didn't miss‑hit the ball.

But, yeah, she's a good player, so she knows how to handle herself, and she did.

Q. How much do you think your game has come along this year to make last 16 on clay and grass?

JARMILA GROTH: I think I improved, you know, pretty good. I think I'm better physically, and in general overall in all my game. But I guess it's good only for the fourth round so far, so...

Q. What do you think of her level of play?

JARMILA GROTH: Well, she gave me a couple of free points, especially the 6‑5 game, when I broke her again. Uhm, I wasn't sure if it's because I put pressure on her that she actually had to hold and she had to make balls. She been down the whole set until then every game almost. So I'm not sure if it's that or if she just played a loose game.

But, you know, she served well. It's hard to return. It's hard to get anything going in. You know you have to keep holding serve. So it's really difficult. She still moves well. I mean, I thought she played good enough to beat me, which I think if she has to step up, she will be able to do that.

Q. What do you need to do to your game to take it to the next level of these other players?

JARMILA GROTH: That's a good question. I'm not sure right now actually.

Uhm, as I just finished, I'll give you answers that are not very nice right now. I need to hold serve. If I play somebody who serves well, especially like Venus does, there's no way I can lose my serve three times in a set where I'm actually winning. I can't get broken that easy, especially serving for the set.

I thought off the ground I played pretty solid. I took a chance when I could. Couple mistakes here and there. But it's grass, again. It's not like you get the same bounce every time.

Uhm, yeah, returns, can't really comment on that because her serve is, you know, different to everybody else's serve. I thought I'd been returning till then pretty well. I've been breaking a lot. You know, it's lots to learn from, I guess, and there's things improve and I will try to watch the match or something and figure out what it is.

Q. What did you think when things were delayed at the beginning? Did you know whether anything was going on?

JARMILA GROTH: I knew Venus was just warming up. It's okay. It's normal. I knew she's just on her way because she waits literally till it's time and then she goes to locker and she gets the stuff.

Q. What did you think when the fans booed her?

JARMILA GROTH: I wasn't sure why actually. I still don't know. No idea actually why.

Q. You can be very hard on yourself sometimes when you do make mistakes. Does that motivate you or does that distract you, do you think?

JARMILA GROTH: Can be both. It depends. I always been hard on myself since I was little no matter what I did. If it came to tennis, I always just decide I don't mind to be beaten, but I hate to lose because of me.

So the points that she plays well, serves well or does, you know, well, that's fine with me. I will give her as much credit as I possibly can. But I hate to lose because I make a silly error and give her the point. That's why I get angry with myself, frustrated with myself, because I just can't stand doing that.

If I want to get better and play with, you know, the better players, bigger girls, try to make it past the fourth round of a Grand Slam, I can't afford to do that. That cost me the second set, minimum.

Q. What are your plans for the next few months?

JARMILA GROTH: Yeah, I'm playing World TeamTennis for next two weeks, so I'm going to States I think end of this week or sometime like that. Then I'm coming back and I play Istanbul Cup, Copenhagen, Montréal and US Open, I believe.

But that can change. I'm not sure if there is something else between Montréal. I'm not really good with tournament schedules and points and rankings, so I have no idea actually.

Huntress55
Jun 29th, 2010, 06:19 AM
Q. How close do you think you came to beating her today?

JARMILA GROTH: Well, I lost, so I don't think I was close enough.


:lol:

I love her interviews. Obviously she seems a bit disappointed, highlighting what she did wrong. But she knows how good Venus is, and she knows she had chances, and she does also highlight what she did well, so thats positive.

Tenisci
Jun 30th, 2010, 10:15 AM
Jarmila Groth - 28 June 2010


Q. You must be disappointed today. But your last month has been very satisfying.

JARMILA GROTH: Uhm, yeah. Disappointed, true. I had the chances in the second set. But, yeah, I mean, I made fourth round both Grand Slams, so I should be happy, right?

Q. Did you tighten up or did she loosen up towards the end of the second set?

JARMILA GROTH: Uhm, I mean, she always serves well. I got a good first game when I broke. I should have hold my serve. Play couple loose points on my serve.

My percentage of the first serve went down, as well, so it was not as good as, you know, the first set. So I didn't get any free points or anything.

She's a good enough player to, you know, keep up. So, uhm, but, yeah, she serves so well. I got a chance in the breaker as well again. Ended up hitting double‑fault. So that doesn't help.

Q. Before the game, what did you think you needed to do to be able to beat her?

JARMILA GROTH: I knew I had to hold serves. I've been serving very well the first three rounds. So if I could keep it up, which I did the first set, where I got broken in the last game, just a little bit strange because I still made a lot of first serves. So that was one thing.

And then I knew she was going to serve well. Had to somehow try to make the returns. Hopefully, you know, win a couple points off the ground.

Yeah, and I tried to be aggressive, take the chance when I could, because otherwise she would make me run a lot. It's not easy to play her. She's very tall, she moves well, so it's really hard to get her going. That's what I tried to do.

Q. How close do you think you came to beating her today?

JARMILA GROTH: Well, I lost, so I don't think I was close enough.

But, look, I had still 5‑3, 5‑4, serving for a set twice. Came back in the breaker, you know, taking a couple points now and then. Even the last match point, I still got a short ball in the end. Could have been 6‑All if I didn't miss‑hit the ball.

But, yeah, she's a good player, so she knows how to handle herself, and she did.

Q. How much do you think your game has come along this year to make last 16 on clay and grass?

JARMILA GROTH: I think I improved, you know, pretty good. I think I'm better physically, and in general overall in all my game. But I guess it's good only for the fourth round so far, so...

Q. What do you think of her level of play?

JARMILA GROTH: Well, she gave me a couple of free points, especially the 6‑5 game, when I broke her again. Uhm, I wasn't sure if it's because I put pressure on her that she actually had to hold and she had to make balls. She been down the whole set until then every game almost. So I'm not sure if it's that or if she just played a loose game.

But, you know, she served well. It's hard to return. It's hard to get anything going in. You know you have to keep holding serve. So it's really difficult. She still moves well. I mean, I thought she played good enough to beat me, which I think if she has to step up, she will be able to do that.

Q. What do you need to do to your game to take it to the next level of these other players?

JARMILA GROTH: That's a good question. I'm not sure right now actually.

Uhm, as I just finished, I'll give you answers that are not very nice right now. I need to hold serve. If I play somebody who serves well, especially like Venus does, there's no way I can lose my serve three times in a set where I'm actually winning. I can't get broken that easy, especially serving for the set.

I thought off the ground I played pretty solid. I took a chance when I could. Couple mistakes here and there. But it's grass, again. It's not like you get the same bounce every time.

Uhm, yeah, returns, can't really comment on that because her serve is, you know, different to everybody else's serve. I thought I'd been returning till then pretty well. I've been breaking a lot. You know, it's lots to learn from, I guess, and there's things improve and I will try to watch the match or something and figure out what it is.

Q. What did you think when things were delayed at the beginning? Did you know whether anything was going on?

JARMILA GROTH: I knew Venus was just warming up. It's okay. It's normal. I knew she's just on her way because she waits literally till it's time and then she goes to locker and she gets the stuff.

Q. What did you think when the fans booed her?

JARMILA GROTH: I wasn't sure why actually. I still don't know. No idea actually why.

Q. You can be very hard on yourself sometimes when you do make mistakes. Does that motivate you or does that distract you, do you think?

JARMILA GROTH: Can be both. It depends. I always been hard on myself since I was little no matter what I did. If it came to tennis, I always just decide I don't mind to be beaten, but I hate to lose because of me.

So the points that she plays well, serves well or does, you know, well, that's fine with me. I will give her as much credit as I possibly can. But I hate to lose because I make a silly error and give her the point. That's why I get angry with myself, frustrated with myself, because I just can't stand doing that.

If I want to get better and play with, you know, the better players, bigger girls, try to make it past the fourth round of a Grand Slam, I can't afford to do that. That cost me the second set, minimum.

Q. What are your plans for the next few months?

JARMILA GROTH: Yeah, I'm playing World TeamTennis for next two weeks, so I'm going to States I think end of this week or sometime like that. Then I'm coming back and I play Istanbul Cup, Copenhagen, Montréal and US Open, I believe.

But that can change. I'm not sure if there is something else between Montréal. I'm not really good with tournament schedules and points and rankings, so I have no idea actually.

Good to play in Istanbul. The tournament is held where she trains, so it will be good for her. Btw, Turks love her much. They say you can find Jarka in Istanbul traning with all age groups.

Falling
Jul 5th, 2010, 10:25 AM
Jarmila is 76 on the wta ranking..

Huntress55
Aug 28th, 2010, 03:11 PM
http://www.perthnow.com.au/sport/tennis/hopman-cup-organisers-to-watch-us-open-as-sam-stosur-books-brisbane/story-e6frg273-1225911317775

Hopman Cup organisers to watch US Open as Sam Stosur books Brisbane

HOPMAN Cup director Paul McNamee will keep an eager eye on Jarmila Groth and her fellow Australians when the US Open begins in New York on Monday, as he attempts to fill the massive hole left in the Perth tournament's line-up after Australia's No. 1 women's player Sam Stosur opted to play in Queensland instead.

Stosur said she would begin her 2011 campaign at the Brisbane International, which clashes with the January 1-8 Hopman Cup, as she looks to build on a year which included her maiden grand slam final appearance at the French Open and her rise to a career-high No. 5 world ranking.

Belgian seven-time grand slam champion Justine Henin headlines a list of five major title winners for Hopman Cup XXIII, the strongest field in the event's history, with two of the eight teams yet to be named.

Lleyton Hewitt will again lead Australia's hunt for only its second tournament title against the US, Serbia, Belgium, France and Kazakhstan, but his partner has not been announced.

McNamee said while Stosur's presence would be missed, he was not surprised the Queenslander chose home over Perth.

"It's understandable because she's from Brisbane and we're very happy we've had Sam twice and that we had her this year," he said.

"I guess we were fairly prepared for that (Sam choosing Brisbane) and to be honest, it's a trip down memory lane with Lleyton Hewitt missing a few years and choosing to play in Adelaide, which is understandable."

Jelena Dokic went from possible replacement to ruled out after her 15-match winning streak was brought to an abrupt end on Friday with a 6-1 6-4 US Open qualifiers loss to Briton Laura Robson, runner-up at the 2009 Hopman Cup alongside Australian Open finalist Andy Murray.

Dokic had won three straight second-tier challenger events before arriving in New York.

McNamee denied Hopman Cup had already chased a replacement in the expectation Stosur would not compete the tournament and earmarked Groth as the likely substitute.

"The next step was clearly, once we knew Sam wasn't playing, to see how the US Open played out and see how all the women go," McNamee said. "To be honest, one is down already, Jelena Dokic, who was a possibility.

"(Anastacia) Rodionova is still there, she plays Sam (Stosur) in the second round.

"Jarmila Groth is our No.2 right now and unless someone has an amazing US Open, she'll still be our No.2.

"She's Australia's No.2 ranked player right now, behind Sam Stosur, so all things being equal, she would be the one I go to."

Groth's US Open hunt hit a snag before it begun this week as she was drawn to face in-form 2006 champion Maria Sharapova first up.

-------------

Jarka at the Hopman cup would be:hearts:

Huntress55
Jan 13th, 2011, 09:51 AM
Groth through to semis in Hobart
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/01/13/3112432.htm?site=sport&section=tennis

Australia's Jarmila Groth reached the semi-finals of the Hobart International on Thursday after compatriot Alicia Molik crashed out in the second round.

Players finally took to the court early on Thursday afternoon, after two days of rain threatened to force a rescheduling of the final.

Groth, who upstaged world number six Sam Stosur at the Brisbane International last week, showed ominous form as she comfortably defeated Italian Roberta Vinci 6-1, 6-2.

The Slovakian-born Aussie said she had hoped to finish early after spending so much time waiting in the players' lounge.

"I haven't played much so I was trying to get it over and done with," she told reporters.

"I think I played well. She's a tricky player.

"It wasn't easy... I made a few errors with my serve, but overall not too bad."

Groth will take on the winner of the quarter-final between her Czech doubles partner Klara Zakopalova and tournament top seed Marion Bartoli of France.

Molik lost her second-round match against Italy's Sara Errani 6-1, 6-0 on Thursday afternoon, crashing out in just 48 minutes.



There is also an audio interview on that page :D

stangtennis
Apr 18th, 2011, 12:35 PM
https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/756142186/Jarmila_twitter_normal.jpg Jarka_Groth (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth) Jarmila Groth
always have though time in your life,get hurt,make mistakes,wrong choices,missed opportunities-always believe there is a light at the end
13 Apr (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth/status/58152156208959489)

https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/756142186/Jarmila_twitter_normal.jpg Jarka_Groth (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth) Jarmila Groth
Don't worry guys everything is fine I am doing great,training hard and ready to fight on the weekend. Just showing you the deep side of me:)
13 Apr (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth/status/58248317406167041)

https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/756142186/Jarmila_twitter_normal.jpgJarka_Groth (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth) Jarmila Groth
Everything is done!nothing can hurt me anymore!looking forward to new life and new beginnings!fingers crossed for only happy ones :)
2 hours ago (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth/status/59896190636015616)

https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/756142186/Jarmila_twitter_normal.jpg Jarka_Groth (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth) Jarmila Groth
There was big change in my life!but I am happy and excited about upcoming clay court season and rest of the year!thanks all for your support
1 hour ago (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth/status/59906693793984512)


Is Jarmila splitting up with her husband Samuel Groth?
They don't follow each other on Twitter anymore either:
http://twitter.com/Jarka_Groth/following
http://twitter.com/SamuelGroth/following

HowardH
Apr 18th, 2011, 01:12 PM
Very curious, and sad if it is true.

Hmm. They are a cute couple, wouldn't want them to split up. Hopefully just passing troubles, they are young after all.

Huntress55
Apr 19th, 2011, 12:23 AM
Yeah Im not liking the look of that :sad:
They are a cute couple. If its true, Jarka :hug:

stangtennis
Apr 20th, 2011, 07:27 AM
Jarka Tweets some more about her love life.

https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/756142186/Jarmila_twitter_normal.jpg Jarka_Groth (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth) Jarmila Groth
Some people love you and care about you but some are with you only for what you have and for what they can take from you for free!!!
2 hours ago (https://twitter.com/#!/Jarka_Groth/status/60545453539856384)

https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/756142186/Jarmila_twitter_normal.jpg Jarka_Groth (https://twitter.com/#%21/Jarka_Groth) Jarmila Groth
You love person from your heart and give them everything you have and they turn around and all they wanted?!!is not love and not you!!!
2 hours ago (https://twitter.com/#!/Jarka_Groth/status/60549184528453632)

Rovegun
Apr 20th, 2011, 07:59 AM
it looks they´re spliting up unfortunately... I was worried when I was reading her tweets and was wonderig what was happening... if you put such kind of comments on twitter and share it with people you are not in good mood... hopefully all will be fine with Jarka....

HowardH
Apr 20th, 2011, 09:55 AM
Sam doesn't seem like a bad guy so if this is truly a breakup I wonder what happened? Long distance relationships (which is effectively what they had, 9 out of 10 days) are always hard, admittedly, because you just aren't spending that much time together. Combined with the difficulties of being pro athletes, and Sam struggling with his tennis, and you've got a lot of stress and loneliness (and probably financial pressure for Sam, who hasn't been winning so much and is no longer supported by Tennis Australia, I believe), when they should be in a honeymoon period. And sometimes people let their guard down just for a second and do or say something stupid without thinking (mostly us guys unfortunately :o).

If it is Sam's fault I hope he does everything he can to save it. Might need a heck of a lot of effort to prove he deserves a second chance and most of all, he has to really really care about her and want her back. Even if you lose the fight to keep her you'd surely want to show you were genuinely sorry for whatever it is. Do whatever it takes to prove it. I wouldn't let Jarka go without a damn hard fight.

Also, if it is a breakup, I'd expect Sam to suffer more. Women generally handle breakups better because of their large social networks which keep them supported (notice Jarka's social network on twitter). Guys struggle to cope because break ups make a guy feel like a failure, and they have no one to talk about it with. Tennis-wise, this means that I don't think this would affect Jarka's results either way (as we have seen so far in Fed Cup).

I really like(d) them as a couple, so I really hope this works out, but it does look bad.

Rovegun
Apr 20th, 2011, 01:59 PM
Howard, I agree with some parts and the time will show us what will happen... they are/were a very nice couple it´s pity they have some problems between them but we don´t see into them... I only guess like you that the main problem was long distance relationship it´s never easy to live with someone who you can´t see so often especially tennis players need to have someone along with them who´s not included in tennis but there are a few couples who are happy together and both are/were tennis players...

I just want to say when you´re a tennis player and your boy/girlfriend is a tennis players as well and you both are pros you have very little time to spend together so if one is a tennis player and one is a student or works they don´t spend much time together but spend much more time togethern than they both are pro players...

stangtennis
Apr 20th, 2011, 10:58 PM
https://si3.twimg.com/profile_images/1016926567/matt_me__normal.jpg TennisReporters (https://twitter.com/#%21/TennisReporters) Matt Croni
@1UsernameTaken (http://twitter.com/1UsernameTaken) I forgot to tweet that Aussies sources confirm that Jarka Groth has split with husband Sam
4 minutes ago (https://twitter.com/#%21/TennisReporters/status/60823080238456832)

Vicky88
Apr 21st, 2011, 07:15 AM
I'm not prepared to comment on what may or may not have caused the split as when it comes to marriage there are only two parties who know the full story.

That said, I do hope they manage to retrieve their relationship as they have been together for so long it would be sad to see it splinter like this.

the life of two travelling pros can not be easy, especially when one is achieving more success than the other.

dok-stos
Apr 21st, 2011, 12:01 PM
Jarka will be right.
I wish the best for both parties.
But Jarka has the talent to go top 20. I think she knows this and can push and get through her personal issues :)

stangtennis
Apr 22nd, 2011, 10:06 PM
Jarka has already changed her last-name back to her maiden name Gajdosova again at the official WTA website: http://www.wtatennis.com/player/jarmila-gajdosova_2257889_9530

GeeTee
Nov 5th, 2011, 02:15 PM
Wow - hasn't been an update here for a looooooooooong time...

Has anyone else read this???

Istanbul-based coach Gavin Hopper expected nothing less than her qualifying for next year's season-ending WTA Championships in Turkey for the top eight players on tour.

"I sent her a message saying I was watching (the WTA Championships in Istanbul) last night and said that 'I won't accept anything but you being here next year," Hopper told AAP.

"This is where you live during the year.

"If you play here or not play here is going to depend on what you do over the next few months to prepare yourself'.

"She replied: 'I am ready to play there and I will do whatever it takes to get there'."

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1600359/Time-for-Gajdosova-to-rebound:-Hopper

SidTheKid
Nov 6th, 2011, 07:08 PM
Nice ambitions hope they will become reality :) Also she is on holiday in Slovakia maybe Ill meet her :lol:

Huntress55
Nov 7th, 2011, 12:17 PM
Its a good goal to have but those UEs will have to go.

Territory
Jan 7th, 2012, 11:27 PM
Article on TA website. You don't really see players being raw and honest like this very often. Poor Jarka.

Gajdosova asks fans for chance (http://www.tennis.com.au/news/2012/01/07/gajdosova-asks-fans-for-chance)

Australian No.2 Jarmila Gajdosova has pleaded with fans to give her another chance in the wake of her Hopman Cup humiliation.

Gajdosova will begin the defence of her Hobart International title just days after she was reduced to tears during a 6-0 6-0 loss to world No.9 Marion Bartoli in Perth.

The 24-year-old was jeered by sections of the crowd and accused of looking disinterested.

She admits the loss, and the reaction to it, both hurt.

“Every human being doesn’t like to be criticised and being told things that you don’t want to hear or that are not truthful,” she said.

“It’s hurtful after all.

“I’m no exception to the rule and I wish I didn’t (lose badly) but every person is entitled to their opinion and I can’t stop them.

“I just hope that people at least would give me a chance to get to know me before they say things that I did.”

World No.33 Gajdosova says she can bounce back and give herself a chance of nabbing a third WTA title and doing better than last year’s first round exit at the Australian Open.

“It was one of those days that unfortunately I had no control over,” she said of the loss to Bartoli.

“She didn’t give me a chance to get into the match or any kind of a rhythm so unfortunately everything went very quickly.

“As embarrassing as it was for me and I wish I didn’t have to be there at that time … you learn and you try and forget and it was one of the first matches so you try and improve out of it.

“We do play 35 weeks of the year so it’s one of the matches only.”

The tough start to her season comes after a difficult 12 months for the likeable Slovakian-born right-hander.

Gajdosova endured the break-up of her marriage to Sam Groth and threatened to close down her Twitter account because of abusive comments about her performances.

The fifth seed will begin her title defence in Hobart against Japanese world No.49 Ayumi Morita, the pair sharing a 2-2 record against each other.

“Every first round’s going to be tough,” Gajdosova said.

“Everybody’s trying to get ready for the grand slam.

“Either way it’s going to be a very good match.”

stromatolite
Nov 24th, 2013, 02:56 AM
Really nice positive article about Jarka's comeback:

Jarmila Gajdosova back on track after debilitating illness

Tennis
DateNovember 24, 2013 (1)

Linda Pearce
Sports writer for The Age

The Australian who once struggled to get out of bed for days is faring well on the comeback trail.


This is the story of an Australian tennis player who was sidelined for seven months with an energy-sapping illness so debilitating that for many weeks she would go to bed on Friday night and stay there until Sunday. But this is not Sam Stosur's tale, however similar it may sound.

Stosur had reached the top 30 before being diagnosed with Lyme disease in 2007; the Queenslander who could barely push a trolley around her local supermarket won the US Open two years after her tentative return.

Jarmila Gajdosova, for now, has more modest ambitions than her Fed Cup teammate, having just written the happy first page in the diary of her comeback from mononucleosis, or glandular fever.

''Every case is different, and as well as I knew [Stosur] recovered from hers and did so well ever since, my first step is to see if I can come back at all,'' says Gajdosova, the former world No.25 in singles and - with Matt Ebden - the reigning Australian Open mixed doubles champion. ''I always had hope, but only time will tell.''

So far, so encouraging. This month, in her first tournament since the April diagnosis that had explained so much, Gajdosova qualified and reached the semi-finals of a $125,000 WTA tournament in Nanjing, China. She also strained her right shoulder, having played seven matches in a week after seven months without any matches at all. Still, that was a minor complication. Nothing, certainly, like what the 26-year-old had already been through.

Indeed, 2012 had started badly (her marriage to fellow professional Sam Groth ended in April) and finished horribly (with the death from throat cancer of her mother, in September). By December, she was unwell, but knew only that she felt tired and sluggish. Annoyed to think that it must have been her fitness that was the problem, Gajdosova started pushing herself harder - and dangerously so.

''I didn't feel well pretty much the whole of January, but I didn't know why I didn't feel well, and it just progressively got worse, to the point that I couldn't actually get through the whole match, and I felt myself getting really tired and slow, and I couldn't react to the balls,'' Gajdosova said from her US base in Dallas.

''So eventually I got fed up with it and I got myself checked after Fed Cup, and they told me I had mono since December and I made it much worse because I tried to train through it, tried to do even more. I hurt my spleen, so the doctors said pretty much, 'stop and rest'.

''The doctor said if I would have trained for one more week, I could have damaged it really badly, but I stopped at the right time. He said I would recover, but he didn't know to what degree I would be able to compete at the level I had [before], and that's why the tournament in Nanjing is pretty good proof, I guess, that I can. It's just a matter of time and the right scheduling, so that I make sure it doesn't come back.''

Former top-five Swede Robin Soderling and talented Croatian Mario Ancic are among the players who never recovered from the virus that also flattened Roger Federer for a time, and Gajdosova admits the prospect of her career ending prematurely played on her mind as she was stuck in her apartment for three months, losing weight and strength as she reverse-hibernated in the fierce Texan summer.

''I had no idea what I was getting into, I had no idea what was going to happen, what my future is going to look like, but I had to just hope for the best,'' she says. ''I had to go to the doctor's every six weeks for the blood check-ups and everything, and it was kind of just a wait-and-see game, and then I decided to try and use my frozen ranking and enter an event, just to see how it goes, and I actually did really well. Physically I felt good, I was in very good shape. I didn't feel tired and I was recovering from the matches pretty easy.''

Her fallow period, however worrying, also had its upside. ''I think I got sick in the first place because of everything [that had happened], and pushing through and trying to play through it, and I think my body just eventually had enough.

''And then in a way, yes, it was a good break, because it gave me time just to recover my body, and mentally, and actually step on the court with the joy and happiness again in my life. So in a way it was very positive, and on the other hand it was very negative, because I wasn't sure if I can ever play again, but now looking at it I feel very grateful and happy that I can step back on the court and I can train the way I want to train, and that I get to compete again.''

Tennis Australia's Todd Woodbridge has also noticed that Gajdosova is in a far more positive place than in 2012. ''I think with a lot of the off-court things that Jarka had dealt with over the prior 12 months, the mono gave her a real opportunity to rest, enjoy some life and normal life. She recognised how much she loved tennis, so that [Nanjing] result was really, really good news for her personally, and also for Aussie tennis.''

Positive in a Fed Cup sense, says Woodbridge, who rates a full-strength Australian team as a strong title contender, while there is also a desire to fill the vast numerical gap between 18th-ranked Stosur and No.131 Casey Dellacqua, who is next. Only Stosur, indeed, has earned direct entry into the Australian Open's main draw, meaning that Gajdosova will front up at next month's wildcard play-off for the first time, as part of a field that will also include Dellacqua, Jelena Dokic and rising star Ash Barty.

''I've never played the play-off - I never had to,'' says the Bratislava-born baseliner, who arrives in Melbourne on December 1 to reunite with coach Chris Johnstone, and will attend the Newcombe Medal with her American boyfriend, Adam.

''But I'm excited. I have not played for seven months, so anything I do right now is a good test for me, and it may not be perfect, but I'm looking forward to it, and I will do all I can to make sure I get as far as I can to win the wildcard. But overall I'm just really happy to be back in competition, and to come back home.''

A step back to somewhere she has never been is also a move forward to where she wants to return. ''Yeah, in a way it's like a new beginning, and whatever's gonna happen is gonna happen, and I'm not too fussed about it. I'm just going to take it match by match and see if I can improve, and get back to the groove, the way I used to play.

''If I do it straight away, it will be awesome; if I don't, I don't want to put any timeline on when I want to be back to where I was, because it's still a long way. But I'm just happy that the body's holding up, and I can train and I can compete every day.''


Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/sport/tennis/jarmila-gajdosova-back-on-track-after-debilitating-illness-20131123-2y2nh.html#ixzz2lWmGs5B9