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LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:42 PM
Can we make a list of women in rock

Amy Lee
Alanis
Pat Benater
Sheryl Crow
Tracy Chapman
Courtney Love
Bonnie Raitt
Joan Jett
Liz Phair
Joni Mitchell

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:43 PM
Janis Joplin
Sheryl Crow
Tracy Chapman

Blackeyes
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:46 PM
Janis Joplin
Sheryl Crow
Tracy Chapman
LOL 3 Is that all?

furrykitten
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:47 PM
Sharon den Adel

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:47 PM
LOL 3 Is that all?

No there are more

furrykitten
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:49 PM
Amy Lee

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:49 PM
Joan Jett
Bonnie Raitt
Alanis Morrisette
Fiona Apple
The Donnas
Courtney Love

furrykitten
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:49 PM
Avril Lavigne

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:51 PM
Liz Phair
Pat Benater

Barrie_Dude
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:57 PM
Stevie Nicks!

Caro23
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:59 PM
What is the name of the Evanesence Lead Singer

Pheobo
Jul 19th, 2006, 07:59 PM
Kat Bjelland (of Babes in Toyland and Katastrophy Wife)
Karen O. (the Yeah Yeah Yeahs)
Brody Dalle ( The Distillers)
Meg White (The White Stripes)
PJ HARVEY!
Annie Hardy (Giant Drag)
Liz Phair
Aimee Mann
Gwen Stefani (Only No Doubt's Tragic Kingdom/Return of Saturn era...the rest is crap)
The girl in Metric...I forget her name
The Like
Kay Hanley (although not so much with the solo stuff, more with Letters to Cleo)
Nina Gordon (Veruca Salt only)
Louise Post (of Veruca Salt)
Kathleen Hannah/Le Tigre/Bikini Kill
L7
Juliana Hatfield
Jen Trynin
Jessicka (of Jack of Jill and Scarling)
Who could forget my personal favorite, Courtney Love <3 and her band Hole
Melissa Auf Der Maur (solo, and former bassist for Hole)
Shirley Manson (of Garbage)
Amy Lee
The Donnas
Cat Power
Beth Hart
Ani DiFranco (if people actually consider Avril Lavigne to be "rock, then I'm throwing in Ani)

And so many more :hearts:

Great thread.

Barrie_Dude
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:00 PM
Oh! And Fergie from The Black Eyed Peas!

Pheobo
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:00 PM
What is the name of the Evanesence Lead Singer

Amy Lee

furrykitten
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:01 PM
What is the name of the Evanesence Lead Singer

Amy Lee

germex
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:01 PM
Suzanne Vega
Lita Ford
Wendy O Williams
Tarja Turunnen
Doro Pesch
Belinda Carlisle (All the GoGos)
Sussanna Hoffs
Grace Slick
Angela Gossow
Natalie Merchant
Hope Sandoval
Kimberly Goss
Fionna Apple
Tanya Donelly
Louise Post
Nina Gordon
Simone Simmons

blerr
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:04 PM
Jenny Lewis (from Rilo Kiley, not her solo stuff really)

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:04 PM
Wow there are a lot

furrykitten
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:05 PM
Heather Nova

Barrie_Dude
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:06 PM
Hmmmmm, Girls in Rock or Girls Who Rock?

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:08 PM
From my country

Celeste Carballo
Fabiana Cantilo
Daniela Herrero
Hilda Lizarazu
Florencia Villagra
Andrea Alvarez
Juana Molina
Erica Garcia
Claudio Puyo
Alicia Di Santo (Actitud Maria Marta)
Pamela Rodriguez
Flopa
Viudas e Hijas del Rock and Roll
Sandra Mihanovich

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:09 PM
Hmmmmm, Girls in Rock or Girls Who Rock?

Women who plays rock music

germex
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:09 PM
Christina Amphlett (Divinyls)
Kate Bush

Barrie_Dude
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:11 PM
Women who plays rock musicShucks cuz both Jennifer Capriati and Gabriella Sabitini rock! :rocker:

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:21 PM
Oh! And Fergie from The Black Eyed Peas!

She isnt it

Paco
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:24 PM
does metal count here???

Pheobo
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:31 PM
does metal count here???


It counts a lot more than Fergie and Avril Lavigne :tape:

Paco
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:40 PM
so here will be list of metal girls (from bands I listen to :p)
Riitta Heikkonen
Meiju Enho
Tarja Turunen
Tanja

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:41 PM
Metal counts off course

Kitty a band of metal girls?

myxomatosis
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:41 PM
The girl in Metric...I forget her name
Emily Haines :dance:

myxomatosis
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:42 PM
Metal counts off course

Kitty a band of metal girls?You know Kitty?? :eek:

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:49 PM
Yes
why?

Paco
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:53 PM
Well I once heard girl growling :eek: it was nice :) but I do not remeber what band it was :(

myxomatosis
Jul 19th, 2006, 08:55 PM
Yes
why?I thought they were only known in Canada, since they only had one sort of hit song and that was in like, 1999.

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 09:00 PM
Yeah but i have a friend who like metal so i heard the band

LegionArgentina
Jul 19th, 2006, 09:55 PM
Lita Ford

Ferosh
Jul 19th, 2006, 10:07 PM
Nikka Costa

égalité
Jul 19th, 2006, 10:20 PM
Shirley Manson
Kate Bush
Jenny Lewis
Patti Smith
Debbie Harry
Amanda Palmer (of The Dresden Dolls) :)
The ladies of Eisley
Emiliana Torrini
Cat Power
Feist
Alison Goldfrapp
Joan Jett
Gwen Stefani
PJ Harvey
Beth Gibbons of Portishead
Rachael Yamagata
Melora Creager of Rasputina
Sahara Hotnights
Stevie Nicks
Tracy Chapman
Karen O of Yeah Yeah Yeahs
and Meg White (with some hesitation. How much talent does it take to bang on a snare drum for 3 minutes like a toddler with a frying pan and a spatula?)

germex
Jul 20th, 2006, 03:15 AM
Well I once heard girl growling :eek: it was nice :) but I do not remeber what band it was :(
Maybe Angela Gossow from Arch Enemy, although she is not the only one. I remember Sabina Classen from Holy Moses and there is at least anoher famous one but i can not remember. Angela is a very tall good looking blonde and growls like a monster, awesome. :eek:

Albireo
Jul 20th, 2006, 03:40 AM
Annie Haslam
Sonja Kristina
Maggie Reilly
Dagmar Krause
Maddy Prior

Pheobo
Jul 20th, 2006, 06:30 AM
Well I once heard girl growling :eek: it was nice :) but I do not remeber what band it was :(


If it was like cookie monster growling it was probably Kitty :o

They're ridiculous.

Pheobo
Jul 20th, 2006, 06:32 AM
Emily Haines :dance:


Right. I love Metric :hearts:

Grow Up And Blow Away has to be one of my favorite songs of all time.

rebel_ffighter
Jul 20th, 2006, 07:25 AM
melissa etheridge

Purple Rainbow
Jul 20th, 2006, 08:34 AM
Some old school legends for you:

Tina Weymouth (bass player Talking Heads)
Moe Tucker (drummer Velvet Underground)
Marianne Faithful (needs no introduction)
The New York Dolls (seventies female glam rockers)

Purple Rainbow
Jul 20th, 2006, 09:30 AM
Lest we not forget... Debby Harry!

Wintermute
Jul 20th, 2006, 10:07 PM
Meg White (The White Stripes)
PJ HARVEY! :yeah:
Annie Hardy (Giant Drag)
The Like
Nina Gordon (Veruca Salt only)
Louise Post (of Veruca Salt)
Jessicka (of Jack of Jill and Scarling)
Melissa Auf Der Maur (solo, and former bassist for Hole)
The Donnas
Cat Power (more chilled but good)


I love these girls/bands. Also

Cristina Scabbia - Lacuna Coil
Sleater Kinney

:rocker2::music:

Wintermute
Jul 20th, 2006, 10:09 PM
Some old school legends for you:
The New York Dolls (seventies female glam rockers)

Err... weren't they all men?

Martian Jeza
Jul 21st, 2006, 12:07 AM
Amy Lee

:hearts: :hearts: :hearts: :worship: :worship: :worship:

Jakeev
Jul 21st, 2006, 01:30 AM
Can't believe nobody has mentioned Nancy and Ann Wilson yet. Heart is one of the great female-led rock bands of all time!!!!!!

germex
Jul 21st, 2006, 01:46 AM
Talking about the New York Dolls

Err... weren't they all men?

Yes and very ugly . . . I remember David Johansen, Sylvian Sylvan and I think Richard Hell was there for a while.

germex
Jul 21st, 2006, 01:47 AM
Can't believe nobody has mentioned Nancy and Ann Wilson yet. Heart is one of the great female-led rock bands of all time!!!!!!
You are right they are great. I just remembered Patty Smyth from Scandal :hearts:

Kaiwhakahare
Jul 21st, 2006, 01:52 AM
Deborah Harry
Annie Lennox
Bic Runga
Bonnie Tyler
Cher (Some of them)
The Cranberries
Dot Allison
Joan Jett
Jantje Smit :P
Melora Creager

>>krew<<
Jul 21st, 2006, 02:47 AM
killing heidi...if it hasnt been said

Albireo
Jul 21st, 2006, 05:05 AM
You are right they are great. I just remembered Patty Smyth from Scandal :hearts:

You mean Mrs. John McEnroe.

LegionArgentina
Jul 21st, 2006, 02:10 PM
melissa etheridge

:yeah:

Martian Jeza
Jul 21st, 2006, 02:45 PM
I admire her :hearts: :hearts: :hearts: :


http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a379/Hantuchova/photo33.jpg

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a379/Hantuchova/96.jpg

Pheobo
Jul 21st, 2006, 10:24 PM
I love these girls/bands. Also

Cristina Scabbia - Lacuna Coil
Sleater Kinney

:rocker2::music:


Sleater-Kinney :worship:

>>krew<<
Jul 22nd, 2006, 02:26 AM
Shirley Manson! from Garbage! Shes kool

Pheobo
Jul 22nd, 2006, 02:30 AM
Shirley Manson! from Garbage! Shes kool


:D :bounce: :worship:

Wintermute
Jul 22nd, 2006, 02:51 PM
How could I forget Kim Deal? From one of the greatest bands of all time IMO, the Pixies. :bowdown:

Albireo
Jul 22nd, 2006, 04:39 PM
Grace Slick, Signe Andersson (Jefferson Airplane)
Christine McVie, Stevie Nicks (Fleetwood Mac)
Jacqui McShee (Pentangle)

LegionArgentina
Jul 22nd, 2006, 08:24 PM
Sheryl Crow

http://www.acguitar.com/issues/ag86/HappeningsImage.gif

Alanis

http://www.charlieanderson.com/images/Alanis2/amGuitarInBathtub.jpg

Melissa

http://www.guitarfestival.org/history/images/2004/Melissa-Etheridge2_pop.jpg

Lita Ford

[http://i15.ebayimg.com/04/i/06/a8/b0/7e_1.JPG

Joan Jett

http://www.worldsgreatestcritic.com/joanjett768x587.jpg

Janis Joplin

http://www.gindrat.ch/janis/janis-joplin-woodstock-661x750.jpg

Fiona Apple

http://www.cnn.com/SHOWBIZ/9802/25/grammy.faq/link.apple.jpg

Meg (White Stripes)

http://www.philippkoenig.de/images/photos/whitestripes/2c_gr.jpg

Suzanne Vega

http://www.cojeco.cz/attach/photos/3b5878865ca4c.jpg

Perfection
Jul 22nd, 2006, 08:29 PM
OH MY GOD, it baffles me to see that the queen of rock, Courtney Love, hasn't been mentioned once. Yeah, she has her personal problems, but she is definately the best rock chick out there.. all her lyrics are amazing and the songs themselves are all a work of art.

Also Brody Dalle from The Distillers.... she is on par with Courtney when it comes to rock music. The Distillers is one of the best bands of all time, ever.

-Karen O from Yeah Yeah Yeahs
-Auf der Maur :worship: Her style of rock is so different.. I love it. it's like, victorian-goth rock set in Transylvania or something.
- M-O, M-O-R, M-O-R-N-I-N-G-W-O-O-D

drake3781
Jul 22nd, 2006, 08:37 PM
Some old school legends for you:

Tina Weymouth (bass player Talking Heads)
Moe Tucker (drummer Velvet Underground)
Marianne Faithful (needs no introduction)
The New York Dolls (seventies female glam rockers)


Great mention of Moe Tucker, Marianne Faithful,and Tina Weymouth.

I made a long list and the board went down before I posted it, and it was lost. It included them.

BUT... The New York Dolls is an all-guy band led by David Johanssen and Johnny Thunders. I love this band and my favorite song is Lonely Planet Boy.

drake3781
Jul 22nd, 2006, 08:42 PM
How could I forget Kim Deal? From one of the greatest bands of all time IMO, the Pixies. :bowdown:

And Kelly Deal.

I was at a party with her one night, and she was arrested the next day for receiving a package containing drugs. :eek: :p

drake3781
Jul 22nd, 2006, 08:44 PM
OH MY GOD, it baffles me to see that the queen of rock, Courtney Love, hasn't been mentioned once. Yeah, she has her personal problems, but she is definately the best rock chick out there.. all her lyrics are amazing and the songs themselves are all a work of art.



She is mentioned twice on page 1.

LegionArgentina
Jul 22nd, 2006, 11:12 PM
Courtney Love is mention in the page one

Perfection
Jul 22nd, 2006, 11:29 PM
Oh............

'Kay.

*JR*
Jul 22nd, 2006, 11:46 PM
Chrissie Hynde (The Pretenders) :worship:

The Indigo Girls (Amy & Emily) :worship:

Natalie Merchant :worship:

Pheobo
Jul 23rd, 2006, 01:51 AM
OH MY GOD, it baffles me to see that the queen of rock, Courtney Love, hasn't been mentioned once. Yeah, she has her personal problems, but she is definately the best rock chick out there.. all her lyrics are amazing and the songs themselves are all a work of art.

Also Brody Dalle from The Distillers.... she is on par with Courtney when it comes to rock music. The Distillers is one of the best bands of all time, ever.

-Karen O from Yeah Yeah Yeahs
-Auf der Maur :worship: Her style of rock is so different.. I love it. it's like, victorian-goth rock set in Transylvania or something.
- M-O, M-O-R, M-O-R-N-I-N-G-W-O-O-D

HAIL one of the greatest albums ever.

http://img12.imageshack.us/img12/6663/holelivethroughthis1qc.jpg


I don't know why I love posting Courtney-related pictures on this forum so much. I guess I just hope I can convert at least one Courtney hater through brainwash.

Perfection
Jul 23rd, 2006, 02:01 AM
Speaking of pictures of Courtney, she looks so fucking good right now.

Moderator's edit: no getty images please.

Pheobo
Jul 23rd, 2006, 03:06 AM
Speaking of pictures of Courtney, she looks so fucking good right now.




I agree. I'm happy for her, and very excited about her book that's coming out, and her CD.

People have been saying the new CD sounds very Bob Dylan/Janis Joplin, but people said great things about America's Sweetheart too...and that was a disaster. I don't want to hear a whole CD filled with "Hold Onto Me's". I'm hoping for the best though. I want another "Live Through This"...if that's fucking possible.

Wintermute
Jul 23rd, 2006, 11:27 AM
And Kelly Deal.

I was at a party with her one night, and she was arrested the next day for receiving a package containing drugs. :eek: :p

:eek: You must know some cool people. Kelly has had a few run-ins with the law hasn't she?

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 23rd, 2006, 11:47 AM
Most of my favs have been said already so I won't repeat but I add:

Lillix
Lash
Sarah McLoud (ex lead singer of Superjesus, now solo)

"Oh lord, won't you buy me a Meeeeercedes Benz" :rocker2:
Best song ever! :p

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 02:19 PM
More pics of women in rock

Bonnie Raitt

http://www.painetworks.com/photos/hd/hd0665.JPG

PJ Harvey

http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/3098/copiedefolder2ku.jpg

other

http://www.onlineseats.com/upload/concerts/319_con_pj1.gif

Yeah Yeah Yeah

http://www.bbc.co.uk/totp/wallpaper/800x600/yeah_yeah_yeahs.jpg

The Pretenders

http://www.pretenders.org/dl27.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 02:27 PM
The Donnas

http://us.ent2.yimg.com/musicfinder.yahoo.com/images/yahoo/atlantic/donnas/0703_donnas_video_a.jpg

The Indigo Girls

http://satchmo.as.arizona.edu/~jrigby/Pix/IGIRLS/igirls0036-8x6.jpeg

The Jefferson airplane

http://www.altmanphoto.com/JeffersonAirplane.sm.jpeg

Tracy Chapman

http://photos.lacoccinelle.net/87/32/208732.jpg

Joni Mitchell

http://www.robinsonarchive.com/images/photolarge/Joni-Mitchell-Photograph.jpg

http://www.rhino.com/fun/henrydiltz/jan04/9big_jan.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 02:49 PM
Melissa Auf ..

http://www.allmusic.de/bilder/galerie_397/bg_biga_2004_12_06_13_56_39.jpg

Marianne Faithful

http://www.buyolympia.com/combined/images/rockrgrl54_lg.jpg

Tina Weymounth

http://images.jambase.com/photos/jammys2002/TinaWeymouth.jpg

Lucinda Williams

http://www.phillesh.net/philzoneimages/photos/pf-020628-c.jpg

Carina Alfie

http://www.geocities.com/carinaalfie2003/clinism.jpg

http://www.votolatino.com.ar/2003/fotos/Carina%20Alfie.jpg

Ely Guerra

http://www.afropop.org/img/world_music/african_music/mexico/ely/brooklynely%20guerra%20guitar.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 03:04 PM
Argentian rockers

Hilda Lizarazu

http://www.nativoamps.com/Images/PEPSI_MUSIC/dia10/hilda_lizarazu1_L.jpg

Fabiana Cantilo

http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/image_full/argentina/contaminaci-n/fabiana-cantilo-contra-las-pap-2.jpg

Claudia Puyo

http://www.rock.com.ar/img/foto/200/0/938.jpg

Daniela Herrero

http://cambio2000.com.ar/img/daniela.jpg

Celeste Carballo

http://www.ireneocampo.com.ar/imagenes/celestec04.jpg

http://www.sobs.com/photo_gallery/celeste_carvallo/1.JPG

Erica Garcia

http://www.mtvla.com/prensa/vmala02/fotosartistas/images/EricaGarcia.jpg

Gabriela Epumer

http://www.cmtv.com.ar/artistas/fotos%20portada/mariagabrielaepumer.jpg

Pamela Rodriguez

http://www.ritmoycompas.com/conciertos/ima-conciertos/Aurora_Pamela.jpg

http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/700/701467.jpg

Flopa Lestani

http://www.rollingstonela.com/anexos/imagen/04/293544.JPG

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 06:44 PM
Soon more pics

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 09:02 PM
Nina Gordon

http://www.rockmusica.net/palsa/photos/9705vs.jpg

Kathleen Hannah

http://www.midwestbeat.com/concert%20reviews/august-2005/le-tigre/Kathleen-Hannah-77

Kat Bjelland

http://sparror.cubecinema.com/ladyfestbristol/kat_bjelland.jpg

Cat Power

http://www.matadorrecords.com/images/cat_power/chanonline.jpg

Juliana Hatfield

http://www.perrific.com/concerts/JulianaHatfield/Juliana&Joshua6.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 09:14 PM
Tarja Turunen

http://ro.altermedia.info/images/nihghtwish27.jpg

Riitta Heikkonen

http://demeter3.hit.bg/entwine/photos/memb%20riitta%20heikkonen-%20keyboards.jpg

Emily Haines

http://photos.case.edu/photo/242.jpg

Amanda Palmer

http://www.artrat.co.uk/LastRequests/amanda.jpg

Stevie Nicks

http://www.dreampages.com/fleetwood_mac/stevie_nicks_lindsey_buckingham_5.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 10:34 PM
The most important awards for a musician are the Grammys right, here are the femele winner of rock, includes best rock song (general genre( ,best rock album,(general genre)best rock artist /general genre)and Best Female Rock Vocal Performance/only womens)

Sheryl Crow won 6 grammys :

-BEST ROCK ALBUM 1996
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1996
-Best Rock Album 1998
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1999
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 2000
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 2002

Alanis Morrisette won 5 grammys

-Best Rock Album 1995
-Best Rock Song 1995
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1995
-Best Rock Song 1998
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1998

Pat Benatar won 4 grammys

- Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 1980
- Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 1981
-Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 1982
-Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 1983

Donna Summer won 1 grammy

-Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 1979

Fiona Apple won 1 grammy

- Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 1997

Lucinda Williams won 1 grammy

-Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 2001

Bonnie Raitt won 4 grammys

-Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female 1989
-Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal 1991
-Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo 1991
-Best Rock Instrumental Performance 1996

Tracy Chapman won 1 grammy

-Best Rock Song 1996

Melissa Etheridge won 2 grammys

-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1992
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1994

Pink won 1 grammy

-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 2003

Tina Turner won 3 grammy

-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1985
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1986
-Best Female Rock Vocal Performance 1988

Amy Lee won 1 grammy

-Best Hard Rock Performance 2003

Annie Lennox won 1 grammy

-Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal 1986

fnuf7
Jul 23rd, 2006, 10:51 PM
Umm, no idea if she's been mentioned yet, and though she may not be an example of sort of hard-rock music, I'd certainly put Kate Bush in this list! :yeah: She's a genius! :inlove:

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 10:55 PM
Kate Bush :yeah: , she was mention on the page 2

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 10:57 PM
Kate Bush

http://babooshka.free.fr/Wallpaper2/KT-800bass.jpg

Fearful Jesuit
Jul 23rd, 2006, 11:00 PM
nobody mentioned
the one and only Sinèad O'Connor :hearts:
Dolores O'Riordan from The Cranberries :hearts:
Nico (sung several songs of the debut album of The Velvet Underground)

Yoko Ono :bolt:

LegionArgentina
Jul 23rd, 2006, 11:02 PM
The Cranberries was mention but the other no , thanks you for add more to the list

Bette_Midler
Jul 23rd, 2006, 11:15 PM
Suzi Quatro

http://www.pizzazzmagazine.com/img/suzi-quatro.jpg


:hearts:

The Runaways

http://www.bikemenu.com/photos/famous/The%20Runaways%20motorcycle.jpg

:bounce:

ROCKBITCH

http://www.depatriot.com/rockbitch%20back%20in%20holland_bestanden/kiss%20it.jpg

nice group :lol:

Bette_Midler
Jul 24th, 2006, 12:03 AM
Vixen

http://image.listen.com/img/356x237/7/1/2/6/506217_356x237.jpg

Rock Goddess


http://www.guitaristka.ru/zapad/mini/rockgoddes.jpg

Phantom Blue

http://www.rockdetector.com/assets/resized/img/artists/6854-0-220-0-300.jpg


Leather Angel


http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Bass/4311/la_lp2.jpg


Girlschool

http://www.heavyharmonies.com/bandpics/girlschool.jpg

Sabina Classen (Holy Moses)

http://www.metal-district.de/intigfx/holymoses/Sabina02.JPG


ELIS (gothic metal band) R.I.P. Sabine Dünser :sad:

http://www.metalmaidens.com/elis-sabine.jpg

:sad:

Pheobo
Jul 24th, 2006, 01:33 AM
Is anyone else really looking forward to Nina Gordon's new CD?

H.M.PoweredMan
Jul 24th, 2006, 01:42 AM
Cheers Gabrielle for mentioning some decent female rockers for once! Here are some more (and one you just mentioned but I thought I'd take it a bit further)

Girlschool

http://www.girlschool.co.uk/Girlschool_04_013b.jpg

Nothing to Lose live clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1D87CBt0Uo)

Race with the Devil (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwdYrcdo_KA)

Emergency live clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FbR2eczApEI)
(I'm in the crowd in this one!)


Doro Pesch (ex-Warlock and solo)

http://www.guitaristka.ru/zapad/Doro-Aufnahme.jpg

Warlock Myspace page (http://www.myspace.com/warlockrulestheruins)

Doro solo band Myspace page (http://www.myspace.com/doroband)


Veronica Freeman (Benedictum)

http://benedictum.net/images/v/images/V%20-%20headshot.jpg

Benedictum Myspace page (http://www.myspace.com/benedictum)


Erika Swinnich and Annah Moore (Ignitor)

http://www.ignitor.org/IMAGES/photoshoot20060712/Ignitor_2006_02lg.jpg
(Erika is centre, Annah is second from right)

Ignitor Myspace Page (http://www.myspace.com/ignitor)

Broken Glass live clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydZOmp7PU1U)


Leather Leone (ex-Chastain singer, now works as a vet!)

http://www.leviathanrecords.com/leather.jpg

For Those Who Dare video clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kP29UujgYi4)


Kate French (current Chastain singer, also in Vainglory)

http://www.leviathanrecords.com/katevg05.jpg

Vainglory Myspace page (http://www.myspace.com/vainglorymetal)

Chastain - Bullet from a Gun video clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWR8Utdoxz0)


Crucified Barbara

http://www.corky.se/bilder/20050725213642.jpg

Rock 'n' Roll Bachelor clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keNA4P_Ymnc)

Losing the Game clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_BgyJBUJbc)

Play Me Hard clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsC6u3lpLxg)

Pheobo
Jul 24th, 2006, 03:28 AM
Is anyone else really looking forward to Nina Gordon's new CD?


And she's preganant! :eek:

Bette_Midler
Jul 24th, 2006, 10:37 AM
Girlschool


(I'm in the crowd in this one!)




:D :bounce:


btw: thanks for links :D


btw... from spain let me think .....

Dover (Llanos s sisters Cristina and Amparo)

http://www.dover-rocks.de/navigate/flamelogob.gif


http://www.dover-rocks.de/images/dover-2005-2.jpg

Serenade (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMsMsZvbjDY)

DJ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dJKUHSQLVc)

Dover - Serenade (Espárrago Rock) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egB3pvlgiHk)

germex
Jul 24th, 2006, 01:47 PM
Lee Aaron, Cristina Scabbia (Lacuna Coil) and Anekke (The Gathering).
BTW great groups mentioned by Gabrielle and HM PoweredMan!!

LegionArgentina
Jul 24th, 2006, 03:19 PM
May be Belen Argona from Spain.

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 01:50 AM
Sinead o Connor

http://img.tesco.com/pi/entertainment/CD/LF/484451_CD_L_F.jpg

Yoko Ono

http://www.addreviews.com/images/albums/2003-08-04-21-00-48.jpg

Lacuna Coil

http://data1.blog.de/blog/w/whitewarrior/img/lacuna-coil-vocalista.jpg

Courtney Love

http://cdn-channels.netscape.com/gallery/i/l/love/lg1.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 02:49 AM
Soon more pics

korben
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:00 AM
Where has my previous post disappeared :awww: Still can´t believe she had not been mensioned...

Simone Simons (Epica) :hearts:


http://www.uni-sw.gwdg.de/~panders/Images/MeraLuna04/websites/Epica_5.jpg

http://epica.nl/
http://www.youtube.com/

korben
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:23 AM
Sabine Edelsbacher (Edenbridge)

http://www.edenbridge.org/gallery/12/82.jpg

Floor Jansen (After Forever)

http://www.iarwainiel.theblog.com.br/after1.jpg

Anneke Van Giersbergen (The Gathering)

http://evilhammerfest.com/anneke-00.jpg

Sharon Den Adel (Within Temptation)

http://img220.imageshack.us/img220/1782/ndvd593filtered4tz.jpg

>>krew<<
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:06 AM
The Divinyls Singer

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 03:34 PM
Kim Gordon

http://www.nrk.no/img/473766.jpeg

http://www.ilosaarirock.fi/2003/juttukuvat/kimgordon.jpg

Amy Lee

http://www.allstarz.org/~amylee/ev18.jpg

Tina Turner

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/7c/Tinagood.jpg/180px-Tinagood.jpg

Annie Lennox

http://www.filmfestivals.com/pixus/festivals/generic/Annie%20Lennox%20accepts%20the%20Academy%

alfajeffster
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:18 PM
Let's not forget Siousxie Sioux:


http://siouxsie.trinitystreetdirect.com/images/s2.jpg

Talula
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:22 PM
Shirley Manson
Kate Bush
Jenny Lewis
Patti Smith
Debbie Harry
Amanda Palmer (of The Dresden Dolls) :)
The ladies of Eisley
Emiliana Torrini
Cat Power
Feist
Alison Goldfrapp
Joan Jett
Gwen Stefani
PJ Harvey
Beth Gibbons of Portishead
Rachael Yamagata
Melora Creager of Rasputina
Sahara Hotnights
Stevie Nicks
Tracy Chapman
Karen O of Yeah Yeah Yeahs
and Meg White (with some hesitation. How much talent does it take to bang on a snare drum for 3 minutes like a toddler with a frying pan and a spatula?)
The first person to mention Deborah Harry.

Deborah created modern pop/rock for females. Without Debs, no Madonna and all the pop tarts that followed.

Talula
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:24 PM
Let's not forget Siousxie Sioux:


http://siouxsie.trinitystreetdirect.com/images/s2.jpg
No, never forget Siouxsie.

Delibertaely thwarted by record labels and radio. The Scream and Juju are 2 seminal albums. And she could perform live.

Talula
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:28 PM
My last screach on this one:

Kate Bush is derivative, overrated, and sings songs made up in the bath. Lots of different instruments and noises do not an artist make - they are used to cover up a lack of focus, point and melody.

alfajeffster
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:29 PM
No, never forget Siouxsie.

Delibertaely thwarted by record labels and radio. The Scream and Juju are 2 seminal albums. And she could perform live.

Juju is actually my favorite. So many really well crafted songs and it all comes together on a great album. I saw Siouxsie 3 times over the past 10 years. First in 95 on what turned out not to be their final tour, and second with the Creatures and John Cale (got so trashed at that one that I actually got busted for DUI afterward- what a learning experience!), and the last just a year or two ago at the Roseland Ballroom for their reunion tour. I think she's much better live than on vinyl.

partbrit
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:29 PM
Did I miss it, or is it possible that no one mentioned PATTY SMITH?!

Also, there is the always-forgotten Gayle McCormick, one of my favorites, whose career was cut short by throat cancer.

My favorite female rock singer of all time is Ann Wilson.

alfajeffster
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:32 PM
Did I miss it, or is it possible that no one mentioned PATTY SMITH?!

Also, there is the always-forgotten Gayle McCormick, one of my favorites, whose career was cut short by throat cancer.

My favorite female rock singer of all time is Ann Wilson.

Patti was mentioned earlier. What a great lady, and still touring. Heart is actually on the road right now in my part of the country (USA). I saw them last year, and they were, how shall I say FANTASTIC! I'm going to try and see them again.

RainyDays
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:43 PM
Gwen. Stefani.

alfajeffster
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:48 PM
Nasty Nina Hagen! I'd post some pics, but her web site blocks copying them. She's great. Oh, and then there's Lena Lovich (My Lucky Number's One). I'm really showing my age now, but hey, back in the 80s I wasn't listening to Tears for Fears- it was Nina, Siouxsie, and Lena.

Talula
Jul 25th, 2006, 04:57 PM
Nasty Nina Hagen! I'd post some pics, but her web site blocks copying them. She's great. Oh, and then there's Lena Lovich (My Lucky Number's One). I'm really showing my age now, but hey, back in the 80s I wasn't listening to Tears for Fears- it was Nina, Siouxsie, and Lena.
BLIMEY! Someone knows Lene Lovich! She now lives in Norfolk in England. Stateless was a brilliant album. Say When, One In A million, Tonight, Home. Lene was quite cool - a bridge between Siouxsie/X Ray Specs and Kate Bush. Saw her live (yes, now showing my age!) when Flex was released. I even listen to Bird Song now and then!

New Wave was still the best wave in my eyes!

alfajeffster
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:19 PM
BLIMEY! Someone knows Lene Lovich! She now lives in Norfolk in England. Stateless was a brilliant album. Say When, One In A million, Tonight, Home. Lene was quite cool - a bridge between Siouxsie/X Ray Specs and Kate Bush. Saw her live (yes, now showing my age!) when Flex was released. I even listen to Bird Song now and then!

New Wave was still the best wave in my eyes!

I never really listened to much of her stuff outside of "Lucky Number", but I used to like to watch her videos- what a performer. Also, I thought when Robert Smith joined the Banshees, I couldn't have been any closer to heaven. Too bad Siouxsie said "I am Siouxsie, nobody but Siouxsie sings lead vocals in Siouxsie and the Banshees", when Robert wanted a more active role, and so he went back to the Cure. Still, Nocturne is a terrific live album, and I always like Robert/Siouxsie's "Dazzle" from Hyaena.

You're right about Kate Bush. Largely over-rated. I don't think she has a voice that projects enough to be a performer. You spend half the time trying to understand what she's mumbling.

And then there's Wendy O and the Plasmatics...:eek:

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:20 PM
Nina Hagen:yeah: Ann Wilson :yeah:

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:25 PM
Ann Wilson

http://www.rogerfisher.com/images/heart/ann_outstretched-hand_dog-and-butterfly-tour.jpg

http://www.mikelull.com/Stars%20Guitars/images/ANN_WILSON.jpg

http://www.cathedralstone.net/Pics/Heart.jpg

alfajeffster
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:26 PM
For yes, I do love Nina:

http://mishami.image.pbase.com/u48/andrzej/upload/35525274.WEBCRW_0950WEB.jpg (http://www.pbase.com/andrzej/nina_hagen)

Martian KC
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:26 PM
Is Shirley Manson going solo? Cos it will be the hottest album yet.

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:30 PM
Nina Hagen

http://origin.wdr.de/themen/panorama/personen/hagen_nina/_img/olivia_jones_400q.jpg

http://www.news-photographer.com/france/france_007.jpg

http://www.openmusic.ru/articles-respond-enciclo/0035-nina_hagen/0035-nina_hagen_05.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:34 PM
Lena Lovich

http://www.sohoweeklynews.com/Book/Music/lena_lovich_std.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:43 PM
Patti Smith

http://www.openmusic.ru/articles-respond-enciclo/0052-patti_smith/0052-patti_smith_02.jpg

http://www.gerardmalanga.com/hires/0028.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 05:47 PM
Soon more pics

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 06:14 PM
Other women in rock is Alannah Myles

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 06:15 PM
Other Maria del Mar , from Canada

partbrit
Jul 25th, 2006, 06:29 PM
I don't know if we said Cyndi Lauper. Her new stuff is great, by the way.

And there is one of my old favorites, Laverne Baker, who gets characterized as r&b because she was African American, but she was not. And Ruth Brown.

alfajeffster
Jul 25th, 2006, 06:31 PM
I always liked this pic of Grace Slick and Janis Joplin (circa 1967)


http://www.geocities.com/gslicktrip/images/classicgracejanis.jpg

Bette_Midler
Jul 25th, 2006, 09:38 PM
For yes, I do love Nina:

http://mishami.image.pbase.com/u48/andrzej/upload/35525274.WEBCRW_0950WEB.jpg (http://www.pbase.com/andrzej/nina_hagen)



aww Nina es mi adoración :bounce:

Isabel Pantoja presenta a Nina Hagen (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lS2JfaVFsGE)

here is a very rare video, in spain with heavy metal rociera lady Isabel Pantoja

btw:fabulosa del rock duro europeo totalmente europeo :lol:

LegionArgentina
Jul 25th, 2006, 11:08 PM
I don't know if we said Cyndi Lauper. Her new stuff is great, by the way.

And there is one of my old favorites, Laverne Baker, who gets characterized as r&b because she was African American, but she was not. And Ruth Brown.


Cyndi Lauper rock ?? :tape:

Elisse
Jul 26th, 2006, 12:01 AM
Skin from Skunk Anansie


http://www.skinmusic.net/images/fk_packshot.jpg


:rocker2:

partbrit
Jul 26th, 2006, 12:14 AM
Cyndi Lauper rock ??

Well, for one thing, several women on this list are not rockers, per se. And for another, yes, Cyndi has done her share of rock. Even after Blue Angel. Even now.

Bette_Midler
Jul 26th, 2006, 03:22 PM
Back to spain ...

Alaska (bands: Kaka de Luxe, Pegamoides, Dinarama, Fangoria)

http://geneura.ugr.es/pop/alaska.gif


ALASKA Y LOS PEGAMOIDES - BAILANDO (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EuzyrVd5O8o)


Alaska Y Dinarama - A Quien Le Importa (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nspt5vbeAo)


Thalia s cover - A Quien Le Importa (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCPxq9gjzWs)

Cersei
Jul 26th, 2006, 03:31 PM
Skin from Skunk Anansie


http://www.skinmusic.net/images/fk_packshot.jpg


:rocker2:
:worship:

Bette_Midler
Jul 26th, 2006, 03:39 PM
Skin from Skunk Anansie


http://www.skinmusic.net/images/fk_packshot.jpg


:rocker2:

Hedonism (Live) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgm8v9HoJeQ)

:hearts:

LegionArgentina
Jul 26th, 2006, 05:09 PM
Skunk Anansie
:kiss:

Albireo
Jul 26th, 2006, 05:40 PM
Nona Hendryx.

LegionArgentina
Jul 26th, 2006, 05:46 PM
Is it strange there are a fer rockers from Australia, Spain and Italy

alfajeffster
Jul 26th, 2006, 06:16 PM
Nona Hendryx.

I saw Nona Hendryx at the Club DV8 in San Francisco in 1986 ("Going through the motions, I sweat, I sweat, until I'm soaking wet!")- what a great stage performer. Whatever happened to her?

LegionArgentina
Jul 26th, 2006, 09:01 PM
Nona pics

http://www.ricodrozario.com/images/Nieuw_werk_fotoboek/Nona_Hendry_kl.jpg

http://stilllife1.bravepages.com/images/3948.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 26th, 2006, 09:03 PM
Meg White

http://www.students.stedwards.edu/kbrigan/meg.jpg

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nottingham/music/2004/01/images/white_stripes_nottingham_300.jpg

Albireo
Jul 27th, 2006, 01:55 AM
I saw Nona Hendryx at the Club DV8 in San Francisco in 1986 ("Going through the motions, I sweat, I sweat, until I'm soaking wet!")- what a great stage performer. Whatever happened to her?


From allmusic.com (the best music site on the Web, BTW):


One-third of the pop/soul act Labelle (their big hit was "Lady Marmalade"), Nona Hendryx, by far and away, made the hippest solo records of any member of that group (the others being Patti LaBelle and Sarah Dash). After Labelle called it quits in 1976, Hendryx released her self-titled debut record, which was an amazingly strong amalgam of soul and hard rock. It also went almost completely ignored by critics, soul fans, and even Labelle fans, and Hendryx took her strong, clear, booming voice and did lots of session work in the late '70s and early '80s. It was here that she fell in with a hip crowd of musicians, specifically as a result of her time singing backup for Talking Heads. This association with David Byrne led to her working with Bill Laswell, who, along with his band Material, helped Hendryx put together a second solo record entitled Nona. A strong album that's not as wild-eyed as her debut, Nona did spark greater interest in Hendryx's considerable talents, and after that, her solo career flourished to the point where she no longer needed studio work to supplement her income. Although some of her late-'80s records sound a little formulaic, Nona Hendryx is a dynamic, daring, and extremely talented performer, who, as is often the case, didn't receive the credit she's due. But unlike Patti Labelle, who has chosen a career as the most histrionic singer in MOR soul/pop, or the relative invisibility of Sarah Dash, who sang backup for Keith Richards' X-Pensive Winos, Hendryx has taken the road less traveled, and that has meant a more aesthetically rewarding and interesting career.

Apparently, she hasn't released an album since 1996.

LegionArgentina
Jul 27th, 2006, 05:30 PM
Thanks for the article

LegionArgentina
Jul 27th, 2006, 05:31 PM
Other rocker Andrea Echeverry from Colombia

LegionArgentina
Jul 27th, 2006, 10:12 PM
The Corrs
The Carpenters
Joan Baez

alfajeffster
Jul 28th, 2006, 12:52 PM
The Corrs
The Carpenters
Joan Baez

The Carpenters and Joan Baez rock? The only thing Karen Carpenter ever rocked was a toilet seat, and Joan (I do like her quite a bit) is pretty much a country-folk singer. I've never heard anything she did with rock music overtones. It's a shame she's retired- same with Joni Mitchell and Grace Slick. What is it about gardening in Marin County that does this to performers?:confused:

LegionArgentina
Jul 28th, 2006, 03:22 PM
Yeah its a shame, i like Joni Mitchell.

alfajeffster
Jul 28th, 2006, 03:39 PM
Yeah its a shame, i like Joni Mitchell.

I absolutely love Joni Mitchell, but truth be told, her voice is gone from all those years of chain smoking. The last thing she did was a husky jazz ensemble effort, but you could tell her throat was pretty much past it, and she wasn't going to morph like Billie Holliday did with her voice.

Bette_Midler
Jul 28th, 2006, 03:54 PM
Other rocker Andrea Echeverry

from Colombia



Aterciopelados

http://www.theotherlookofcolombia.com/aterciopelados.jpg

http://www-rcf.usc.edu/~fabianga/atercio1.jpg

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B000005MBT.03.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

http://www.ciudadviva.gov.co/octubre05/periodico/5/3big.jpg

http://www.elmundonewspaper.com/uploaded_pictures/506_3.jpg


Florecita Rockera - Atericiopelados (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uu2Zeu2lrNI)

Aterciopelados - Luz Azul (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COjvnhsGmYs)

Aterciopelados -- Bolero Falaz (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWSHghmS4FM)

Aterciopelados - Bolero Falaz MTV Unplugged (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_3k55BXmWE)

Bette_Midler
Jul 28th, 2006, 04:01 PM
I don t know if post or not this band hahaha

B52 (Cindy Wilson and Kate Pierson)

http://www.theb52s.com/gallery/ct3.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a4/B52s3.jpg

:D

LegionArgentina
Jul 28th, 2006, 05:50 PM
Great pics of Andrea ¡

Thanks

germex
Jul 28th, 2006, 07:42 PM
I just remembered Sass Jordan, she is a Canadian Rocker, very good one.

LegionArgentina
Jul 28th, 2006, 09:28 PM
:yeah:

LegionArgentina
Jul 28th, 2006, 09:32 PM
Sass Jordan

http://www.navyclub.org/photos/voices%2002/4.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 02:47 AM
Shirley Manson

http://celebrities.biteus.org/wp-content/uploads/2006/03/Shirley%20Manson.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:00 AM
Alanis

http://www.chartattack.com/gallery/19990329-alanis.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:01 AM
Sherly Crow

http://www.csupomona.edu/~admckettrick/the%20Portfolio/rock_for_choice_2004/sheryl_crow3.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:12 AM
Liz Phair

http://www.concertshots.com/Aug%2003%20Images/cs-LizPhair20-Atlanta8803.JPG

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:24 AM
Kim Gordon

http://www.ilosaarirock.fi/2003/juttukuvat/kimgordon.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:26 AM
Melissa Auf Maur

http://www.bunnybass.com/e-zine/girls/04.girlpictures/aufdermaur10.jpg




http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/thumb/2/2f/180px-Melissaadm.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:32 AM
Melissa Etheridge

http://www.guitarfestival.org/history/images/2004/Melissa-Etheridge2_pop.jpg



At the Grammys 05

http://www.neilsonclyne.com/audiotechnica/NSCA_3_05/GRAMMYs_2005/MELISSA_ETHERIDGE.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:37 AM
Linda Perry from 4 Non Blondes

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:57 AM
Soon more pics.

No female rocker from Italy or Mexico?

Wintermute
Jul 29th, 2006, 03:20 PM
The Like

http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/7541/thelike011lq0.jpg
http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/4731/thelike022vm1.jpg
http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/5082/thelike021bk7.jpg
http://img68.imageshack.us/img68/2430/thelike017zg6.jpg
http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/9421/thelike009yj4.jpg

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 05:58 PM
Great pics

H.M.PoweredMan
Jul 29th, 2006, 06:12 PM
A couple more I forgot:

Kim Goss (Sinergy)

http://www.metal-rules.com/interviews/images/Sinergy/Sinergy_band.jpg

Sinergy MySpace page (http://www.myspace.com/sinergyrock)


And of course, the ultimate girl rockers......

http://www.myrevelations.de/bilder/visuals/cover/Poison_-_Look_What_The_Cat_Dragged_In-front.jpg

:p :p :p :p :p :p :p :p :p :p :p

germex
Jul 29th, 2006, 07:26 PM
Soon more pics.

No female rocker from Italy or Mexico?

From Mexico I like Marcela Bovio, she sings and plays violin with Ayreon, Stream of Passion and Elfonia :bounce:
Other than her there are several altough i dont like them very much, since they are more pop oriented, ie Julieta Venegas, Ely Guerra (mentioned before here), and a few others.

LegionArgentina
Jul 29th, 2006, 09:54 PM
Yeah Julieta when was in the band Tijuano No and some song now but she is more rock/pop singer.

*JR*
Jul 30th, 2006, 12:25 AM
I absolutely love Joni Mitchell, but truth be told, her voice is gone from all those years of chain smoking. The last thing she did was a husky jazz ensemble effort, but you could tell her throat was pretty much past it, and she wasn't going to morph like Billie Holliday did with her voice.
Ironic in that in her great live version of The Circle Game (on the album Miles of Aisles) Joni says in encouraging the audience to sing along with the chorus: "The more out of tune voices, the better".

BTW, Joni also wrote and recorded a song in 1968 that went nowhere, called From Both Sides Now. A year later, someone not yet mentioned ITT (Judy Collins, who the Crosby Stills Nash & Young hit Suite: Judy Blue Eyes was about) dropped the word "From" and had her biggest hit ever with it as Both Sides Now.

Also: Lucinda Williams was pictured earlier ITT, but Dar Williams wasn't.

http://www.puresongwriters.com/images/photo_dar2.jpg

And in the one copied below, Grace Slick looks like a certain tennis player. :o

http://www.altmanphoto.com/JeffersonAirplane.sm.jpeg

Albireo
Jul 30th, 2006, 01:34 AM
And in the one copied below, Grace Slick looks like a certain tennis player. :o

http://www.altmanphoto.com/JeffersonAirplane.sm.jpeg


Did Grace ever call Janis Joplin a "disgusting bitch?"

LegionArgentina
Jul 30th, 2006, 11:27 PM
Yeah she call her a disgusting bitch, but i saw some pics together, may be she was friend of Janis

Pheobo
Jul 31st, 2006, 12:32 AM
Let's root for the chicks in the alt. rock band game.

LegionArgentina
Jul 31st, 2006, 05:39 PM
ok

*JR*
Jul 31st, 2006, 05:57 PM
Let's root for the chicks in the alt. rock band game.
Speaking of Chicks...

http://www.dixie-chicks.com/lgimages/newchicks.jpg

Wintermute
Jul 31st, 2006, 07:52 PM
Soon more pics.

No female rocker from Italy or Mexico?

From Italy, Cristina Scabbia from Lacuna Coil.

http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/2161/lccristina02138qf8.jpg
http://img345.imageshack.us/img345/9137/lccristina06349ik7.jpg

Seems to be a school day at Ozzfest.
http://img309.imageshack.us/img309/1386/lccristina07350wa1.jpg

LegionArgentina
Aug 2nd, 2006, 04:05 PM
Great pics of Cristina ¡

Thanks

LegionArgentina
Aug 2nd, 2006, 04:07 PM
We can post some bios

PATTY SMITH

Punk rock's poet laureate, Patti Smith ranks among the most influential female rock & rollers of all time. Ambitious, unconventional, and challenging,


Smith's music was hailed as the most exciting fusion of rock and poetry since Bob Dylan's heyday. If that hybrid remained distinctly uncommercial for much of her career, it wasn't a statement against accessibility so much as the simple fact that Smith followed her own muse wherever it took her -- from structured rock songs to free-form experimentalism, or even completely out of music at times. Her most avant-garde outings drew a sense of improvisation and interplay from free jazz, though they remained firmly rooted in noisy, primitive three-chord rock & roll. She was a powerful concert presence, singing and chanting her lyrics in an untrained but expressive voice, whirling around the stage like an ecstatic shaman delivering incantations. A regular at CBGB's during the early days of New York punk, she was the first artist of the bunch to land a record deal and release an album, even beating the Ramones to the punch. The artiness and the amateurish musicianship of her work both had a major impact on the punk movement, whether in New York or England, whether among her contemporaries (Television, Richard Hell) or followers. What was more, Smith became an icon to subsequent generations of female rockers. She never relied on sex appeal for her success -- she was unabashedly intellectual and creatively uncompromising, and her appearance was usually lean, hard, and androgynous. She also never made an issue of her gender, calling attention to herself as an artist, not a woman; she simply dressed and performed in the spirit of her aggressive, male rock role models, as if no alternative had ever occurred to her. In the process, she obliterated the expectations of what was possible for women in rock, and stretched the boundaries of how artists of any gender could express themselves.


Smith was born in Chicago on December 30, 1946; her parents moved to Philadelphia when she was three, and then to the nearby, less urban town of Woodbury, NJ, when she was nine. Something of an outcast in high school, she found salvation in the poetry of Arthur Rimbaud, the writings of the Beats, and the music of soul and rock artists like James Brown, the Rolling Stones, the Doors, and especially Bob Dylan. She attended the Glassboro State Teachers College, but dropped out due to an unplanned pregnancy. She gave the baby up for adoption and took a job on a factory assembly line, thus saving enough money to move to New York City in 1967. She worked in a bookstore and met art student/future photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, who became her lover despite living most of his adult life as a homosexual. In 1969, Smith went to Paris with her sister, busking on the streets as a performance artist. Upon her return, she moved into the Chelsea Hotel with Mapplethorpe for a brief period, then became involved with underground theater, not to mention playwright Sam Shepard; she co-authored and co-starred with him in the somewhat autobiographical play Cowboy Mouth in 1971. During this time, she was also working on her poetry, and met guitarist Lenny Kaye, also a Bleecker Street record store clerk and rock critic. Kaye had written a magazine essay on doo wop that impressed Smith, and the two found that they shared a love of early and obscure rock & roll. When Smith gave a public poetry reading at St. Mark's Church in February 1971, she invited Kaye to accompany her on the electric guitar for three pieces.


Over the next two years, Smith continued to perform in plays and poetry readings; she also wrote for several rock magazines, published two volumes of her poems, and began contributing lyrics to the literary-minded metal band Blue Öyster Cult. She and Kaye performed again in late 1973, and their partnership grew into a much more regular occurrence. The following year, they added pianist/keyboardist Richard Sohl, and their performances grew into unique blends of Beat-influenced poetry, improvised spoken word with equally spontaneous musical backing, and covers of rock & roll oldies. Regular gigs around New York cemented their growing reputation, and in June 1974, with Mapplethorpe paying for studio time, the band cut a groundbreaking independent single, "Hey Joe" b/w "Piss Factory." The former added a monologue about Patty Hearst, while the latter recounted Smith's stint as an assembly line worker in vivid detail, incorporating lyrical snippets from the rock records in which she took solace. Both songs featured Television guitarist Tom Verlaine, who briefly became Smith's lover, and along with Television's own "Little Johnny Jewel," the single helped kickstart the independent, do-it-yourself aesthetic that remains punk rock's hallmark even today.


In late 1974, Smith and her band played a few gigs on the West Coast. When they returned, they added guitarist/bassist Ivan Kral to flesh out their sound, and joined Television as part of the emerging new-rock scene at CBGB's, a dive bar in the Bowery. Their two-month stand in early 1975 sometimes featured drummer Jay Dee Daugherty, who became a regular member, and attracted the notice of Arista Records president Clive Davis, who offered Smith a record deal. She entered the studio with ex-Velvet Underground member John Cale serving as producer, and in late 1975 released her debut album, Horses, which was essentially the first art-punk album. Rapturously received by most critics, Horses offered unorthodox covers of party-rock tunes like "Gloria" and "Land of 1000 Dances" (Smith opened the former with the declaration "Jesus died for someone's sins, but not mine"), as well as a mix of original songs and lengthy, improv-driven spoken word pieces. Despite nonexistent airplay, it sold well enough to climb into the Top 50.


The 1976 follow-up, Radio Ethiopia, was credited to the Patti Smith Group, and placed some of Smith's most straightforward rock songs ("Ask the Angels," "Pumping (My Heart)") directly alongside some of her most experimental, free-form pieces (the title track). In early 1977, Smith was performing in Tampa, FL, when she twirled herself right off the stage; she broke two vertebrae in her neck and was forced to take some time off to recuperate. During that period, she wrote a book of poetry titled Babel. She returned to recording in 1978 with Easter, a more accessible nod in the direction of album rock radio, which featured Smith's writing collaboration with Bruce Springsteen, "Because the Night." The ballad climbed to number 13 on the pop charts and sent Easter into the Top 20; plus, 10,000 Maniacs' 1993 cover of "Because the Night" became their biggest pop hit, and made the song something of a standard for the Lilith Fair generation. Easter also contained Smith's most notorious cut, "Rock n Roll ******," which attempted to redefine the term as a badge of honor for anyone who lived outside the establishment. Some critics roasted her for the conceit in the ensuing controversy, but the song achieved a measure of redemption when it was included on the Natural Born Killers soundtrack in 1994.


1979's Wave found Smith's sound becoming increasingly polished, thanks in part to new producer Todd Rundgren; however, many reviewers found it her least developed set of material. Smith had been living with Blue Öyster Cult keyboardist Allen Lanier for some time, but now took up with MC5/Sonic's Rendezvous Band guitarist Fred "Sonic" Smith; indeed, Wave's "Dancing Barefoot" and "Frederick" were both dedicated to him. The couple married in 1980, and Smith retired to a life of domesticity near Detroit, raising two children with her husband. In 1988, Smith re-emerged for a one-off album, Dream of Life, on which Fred co-wrote all the material and also played guitar, with backing by Smith Group members Sohl and Daugherty. However, it wasn't intended to establish a full-fledged comeback, and Smith disappeared from music again following its release. She continued to write, however, completing a poetry collection called Woolgathering (among other projects), and gave occasional readings.

Sadly, in the span of a few years, Smith lost some of her closest associates: longtime friend and album-cover photographer Robert Mapplethorpe died in 1989, followed a year later by pianist Richard Sohl. At the end of 1994, both her husband and her brother Todd died of heart failure, within a month of one another. A grief-stricken Smith returned to performing as a means of therapy, and re-formed the Patti Smith Group -- with Kaye, Daugherty, and new bassist Tony Shanahan -- for a few small-scale tours aimed at reconnecting with her audience and reorienting herself to the concert stage. In 1996, the group entered the studio and recorded Gone Again, which featured a new second guitarist in Oliver Ray and guest spots from Tom Verlaine, John Cale, and Jeff Buckley. Gone Again took a stronger, more optimistic tone than might have been expected, and was well received by many critics. Following closely on its heels, Peace and Noise appeared in 1997, and earned a Grammy nomination for the track "1959"; a much darker affair than its predecessor, it took into account the deaths of two more of Smith's inspirations, Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. Smith returned in 2000 with Gung Ho, the most aggressive-sounding and socially conscious album of her comeback; the song "Glitter in Their Eyes" also earned her a second Grammy nomination. Smith and Arista parted ways in 2002, with the label issuing Land (1975-2002), a double-disc compilation of hits and rarities, as a wrap-up. Smith subsequently signed with Columbia. Her first album for the label, Trampin', appeared in spring 2004. Horses received the deluxe 2CD treatment in 2005 when it was reissued by Arista in a "30th Anniversary Legacy Edition". ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 2nd, 2006, 04:11 PM
MARY LOU LORD

Playing her way from the subways and streets of London and Boston, guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Mary Lou Lord broke into the indie-rock scene in 1994 on the Kill Rock


Stars label. After appearing on a KRS compilation, Lord released a self-titled EP in 1995 and a second EP, Martian Saints, in early 1997. Got No Shadow, her major-label debut with Sony Music's WORK Group, was released in 1998.


Lord's interest in music started when she worked as a DJ for a college radio station in the Boston area as a teenager. When the station changed format, she decided to concentrate on making her own music. After a stint at Boston's Berklee School of Music, she moved to London and learned the art of busking in the subway. She moved back to Boston and continued to play mostly acoustic covers on city sidewalks and in subways. In eight years of busking, she refined her talent and determined what music she liked to play. A KRS executive heard her play and eventually signed her to the label.


While most of Lord's live shows have been just her and her acoustic Martin guitar (even those beyond the subway), with the recording of Got No Shadow, she moved in the direction of electric pop-rock. She has recorded songs for two tribute albums -- "Power to the People" for Working Class Hero, a John Lennon tribute, and "Jump" for Everybody Wants Some, a Van Halen tribute released in fall of 1997.

Lord made the leap to the majors in 1997, signing with the Sony subsidiary Work. Her major-label debut and first full-length album Got No Shadow was released in January 1998. On it she performed songs by Nick Saloman of Bevis Frond and Freedy Johnston, as well as some of her own. The album, her first full-length release, was produced by Tom Rothrock and Rod Schnapf, co-founders of the WORK Group. Saloman also produced Lord's long-awaited sophomore album, Baby Blue. The album appeared on Rubric in March 2004. ~ Nick Kemper, All Music Guide

Danči Dementia
Aug 2nd, 2006, 04:14 PM
Yeah Julieta when was in the band Tijuano No and some song now but she is more rock/pop singer.


:wavey: .

Julieta Venegas was great she was a girl with sttitude but like she wasn't been succesful she cahnged her music style and her dark clothes for things more feminine she took off her piercing at the nose and now all her and her music its SHIT.

I was huge fan of her but after I heard her song of"quieres andar conmigo" :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :mad: I said WTF is wrong with her :mad: .
Tijuana No :worship: its incredible band (they don't exist anymore) I went to their farewell :sad: .

Ely Guerra is :worship: and I like her very much 'cos she doesn't want to leave her style to be succesful(like Julieta did).

Other Mexicans: Kenny y los electricos :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

LegionArgentina
Aug 2nd, 2006, 04:14 PM
LIZ PHAIR

Growing out of the American underground of the late '80s, Liz Phair fused lo-fi indie rock production techniques and styles with the sensibility and structure of classic


singer/songwriters. Exile in Guyville, Phair's debut album, was enthusiastically praised upon its 1993 release and spawned a rash of imitators, particularly American female singer/songwriters, over the following years. For her part, Phair wasn't able to break into the mainstream, even with the support of the press and MTV. Whip-Smart, her second album, was heavily promoted upon its 1994 release, yet despite its relatively strong chart positions, it was viewed as a disappointment and Phair's momentum declined steadily during the mid-'90s, as she took several years to record her third album.


Phair (born April 17, 1967) was born in New Haven, CT, and adopted by wealthy parents, who raised her in the Chicago suburb Winnetka. After high school, she studied art at Oberlin College in Ohio. At Oberlin, she became fascinated with underground indie rock and eventually became friends with guitarist Chris Brokaw, who later joined Come. Following their college graduation, Phair and Brokaw moved to San Francisco, where she tried to become an artist.


Eventually, Brokaw moved out east and Phair moved back to Chicago, where she began writing songs. Soon, she began releasing homemade tapes of these songs under the name Girlysound. While she supported herself by selling her charcoal drawings on the streets of Wicker Park, she was becoming involved in various portions of the Chicago alternative music scene; in particular, she became friends with Urge Overkill, a drummer named Brad Wood, and John Henderson, the head of the Chicago-based indie label Feel Good All Over. Henderson and Phair tried to re-record some of the Girlysound tapes with Wood, yet the pair had a falling out during the sessions, leaving Wood as Phair's only collaborator. Brokaw, who had by then joined Come, was still receiving Girlysound tapes and he gave a copy to Gerard Cosley, the head of Come's record label, Matador. By the summer of 1992, Matador had signed Phair and she began recording her debut album in earnest.


Adapting its title from an Urge Overkill song, Exile in Guyville, her debut album, was released to strong reviews in the summer of 1993. Many articles focused on Phair's claim that the double album was structured as a response to the Rolling Stones' classic Exile on Main St. Over the course of the year, the record slowly built a dedicated following in America, both among critics and alternative rock fans. At the end of the year, it topped many Best of the Year critics polls, including The Village Voice and Spin. With all the attention focused on Phair, many indie rock figures -- particularly members of the Chicago noise rock scene such as Steve Albini -- were developing a resentment toward her and launching an attack at the singer and the heavy media attention Exile in Guyville received. The criticism couldn't halt the progress of Phair and Exile, and in early 1994 she launched her first tour, which was plagued by her stage fright. Around the same time, MTV began airing "Never Said" and, as a result of all the hype, the album briefly appeared in the charts in February. By the spring of 1994 it had sold over 200,000 copies -- a remarkable number for an independent release.


By that time, Phair had begun work on her follow-up record. Matador had signed a distribution deal with Atlantic Records in 1994, and her second album was going to be one of the first to be heavily promoted by the alliance. Indeed, Whip-Smart was released to a whirlwind of media attention -- including Phair, dressed only in negligee, on the cover of Rolling Stone -- and debuted at number 27 upon its fall 1994 release. "Supernova," the first single from the album, received heavy airplay on MTV and alternative rock radio, becoming a Top Ten modern rock hit. However, Whip-Smart received mediocre reviews and never developed into the hit that it was expected to be. Phair didn't tour to support the album and was slow to deliver a second single. By the time the title track was released as a single in the spring of 1995, the album had disappeared from the charts.

Phair quietly retreated from the spotlight during 1995, marrying Jim Staskausas, a Chicago-based film editor who had previously worked on Phair's videos. Later in the summer of 1995, she released the Juvenilia EP, which was essentially the "Jealousy" single amplified with the first official release of Girlysound material. During the summer of 1996, she released "Rocket Boy," a single pulled from the Stealing Beauty soundtrack that received little attention. For much of 1996, Phair worked on her third album with producer Scott Litt, yet by the fall, she decided to scrap the sessions, unsatisfied with their sound. Toward the end of 1996, Staskausas and Phair announced she was several months pregnant. On December 21, 1996, Phair gave birth to her first child, James Nicholas Staskausas. Her long-delayed, much-anticipated third LP, whitechocolatespaceegg, finally appeared in mid-1998. Five years later, Phair returned with a self-titled effort. Liz Phair, which appeared in June 2003, found singer/songwriter Michael Penn and the Matrix in the production seat as well as Phair herself. Jimmy Chamberlin, Wendy Melvoin, and Pete Yorn also contributed to Phair's newly slick sound. When Liz Phair finally appeared in June 2003, it was panned by purist rock critics and militant Liz nerds who felt she'd sold them out with the record's pop star sensibilities. But Phair stood up for her work in typcally brash fashion - sometimes it seemed like she even invited the fan boy ridicule - and the album was a decent hit for her behind its single "Why Can't I", peaking at #27 on the Billboard 200. The quieter Somebody's Miracle appeared in fall 2005.

LegionArgentina
Aug 2nd, 2006, 04:19 PM
PJ HARVEY

During the early-'90s alternative rock explosion, several female singer/songwriters rose to prominence, but few were as distinctive or as widely praised as Polly Jean Harvey.





Over the course of three albums, Harvey established herself as one of the most individual and influential songwriters of the '90s, exploring themes of sex, love, and religion with unnerving honesty, dark humor, and a twisted theatricality. At the outset of her career, she led the trio PJ Harvey, who delivered her stark songs with bruisingly powerful, punkish abandon, as typified by her 1992 debut, Dry. Following the noisy, uncompromising follow-up, Rid of Me, the trio fell apart, and PJ Harvey became the sole property of Polly Harvey. Her next record, 1995's To Bring You My Love, became her mainstream critical breakthrough, confirming her status as one of the cornerstone figures of '90s alternative rock.


Harvey was raised on a sheep farm in Yeovil, England, where she was raised by her quarryman father and her mother, who was an artist. As a child, she learned how to play guitar and saxophone, and when she was a teenager, she played in a variety of bands as a sideman. In 1991, she formed PJ Harvey with bassist Steve Vaughn and drummer Robert Ellis, and the trio recorded its debut record for under 5,000 dollars. The band signed with the British indie label Too Pure and released "Dress" that fall. "Dress" became a indie rock sensation, as did its follow-up, "Sheela-Na-Gig," with both singles receiving lavish praise in the U.K. music press. Although Harvey was a reluctant interviewee, she cannily used the press to her advantage, whether it was through her candid interviews or startling, occasionally disturbingly sexy photo sessions, which subverted traditional concepts of female sexuality.


PJ Harvey's debut, Dry, was released in spring 1992 to considerable praise; it was distributed in America by Island Records. The trio followed it with an extensive tour, culminating with an appearance at that summer's Reading Festival. Shortly after the tour, Harvey moved to London, where she nearly suffered a nervous breakdown due to the extraordinary pressure and expectation surrounding her second album. The group hired former Big Black frontman Steve Albini (Pixies, Breeders) as the producer of their second album, Rid of Me. Albini imposed his trademark noisy, guitar-heavy sound on the record, which mirrored its harder-edged themes. Rid of Me was a major critical success and expanded Harvey's cult greatly. She supported the album with a tour featuring herself in a fake leopard-skin coat and a feather boa, signaling her developing interest in theatricality. At the end of the year, Harvey released 4-Track Demos, a collection of her original versions of the songs on Rid of Me.


Following the Rid of Me tour, Ellis and Vaughn parted ways with Harvey, and she recorded her third album as a solo artist, augmented by producer Flood, bassist Mick Harvey, and guitarists John Parish and Joe Gore. Harvey developed a richer, bluesier sound with the expanded band, and the resulting record, To Bring You My Love, was hailed as a masterpiece by many critics upon its February 1995 release. Thanks to considerable press attention, as well as strong support from MTV and modern rock radio for the single "Down by the Water," To Bring You My Love became a moderate hit, entering the U.S. charts at number 40. Harvey spent all of 1995 touring the album, and spent the following year in relative seclusion. During 1996 she was relatively quiet, only appearing twice on record: once in a duet with Nick Cave on his Murder Ballads album -- the pair were reportedly romantically involved -- and singing on John Parish's Dance Hall at Louse Point. Is This Desire? followed in 1998. Two years later, Harvey reunited with Ellis and Mick Harvey for Stories From the City, Stories From the Sea, which returned to her earlier, more aggressive style and was inspired by her six-month stay in New York City in 1999.

The album won the 2001 Mercury Prize, making Harvey the first female winner of that award. After extensive touring in support of the album, Harvey split her time over the next two years working on new material and collaborating with likeminded friends and contemporaries. Appearing on Gordon Gano's Hitting the Ground, Giant Sand's Cover Magazine, and John Parish's How Animals Move, Harvey's most prominent collaboration was with the Queens of the Stone Age side project the Desert Sessions. She performed on more than half of 2003's Desert Sessions, Vol. 9-10, including the single Crawl Home. That summer, she also performed at the V Festival, previewing tracks from her new album, which she said was close to being finished. The album, Uh Huh Her, appeared in summer 2004, coinciding with another string of tour dates, including British and European festival appearances at Glastonbury, T in the Park, the Montreux Jazz Festival, and Spain's La Primavera festival. Stateside, Harvey was scheduled to join the revived Lollapalooza festival for select dates, joining Morrissey and Sonic Youth on the main stage. Upon the cancellation of that festival, however, she mounted a solo tour of the States with select opening acts. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

Danči Dementia
Aug 2nd, 2006, 04:31 PM
I guess I'm the first in mentioning:

Maja Ivarsson(from the sounds :worship: ) I like her style and her attitude very much I went to see them in Mexico City like 2 years ago and that girl rocks :bounce: :bounce: .
Its not exactly very very rock but if Avril Lavigne is here :rolleyes:
http://ause.org/ezine/0003/002/images/warped-tour/the-sounds.jpg
http://dailytitan.fullerton.edu/issues/summer04/7-07/warped2.jpg
http://web.comhem.se/~u18800220/bilder02/thesounds02.jpg
http://666kb.com/i/114nvf7adsg75.jpg


IMOGEN HEAP :) :worship:
http://www.aidinvaziri.com/uploaded_images/imogen-746336.jpg


Anekke from The Gathering :worship: :worship: :worship:
Janis :worship: :worship: :worship:
Pj Harvey :worship: :worship: :worship: .

Becool
Aug 2nd, 2006, 06:56 PM
Dolores O'Riordan! :)

Pheobo
Aug 2nd, 2006, 07:15 PM
LIZ PHAIR

Growing out of the American underground of the late '80s, Liz Phair fused lo-fi indie rock production techniques and styles with the sensibility and structure of classic


singer/songwriters. Exile in Guyville, Phair's debut album, was enthusiastically praised upon its 1993 release and spawned a rash of imitators, particularly American female singer/songwriters, over the following years. For her part, Phair wasn't able to break into the mainstream, even with the support of the press and MTV. Whip-Smart, her second album, was heavily promoted upon its 1994 release, yet despite its relatively strong chart positions, it was viewed as a disappointment and Phair's momentum declined steadily during the mid-'90s, as she took several years to record her third album.


Phair (born April 17, 1967) was born in New Haven, CT, and adopted by wealthy parents, who raised her in the Chicago suburb Winnetka. After high school, she studied art at Oberlin College in Ohio. At Oberlin, she became fascinated with underground indie rock and eventually became friends with guitarist Chris Brokaw, who later joined Come. Following their college graduation, Phair and Brokaw moved to San Francisco, where she tried to become an artist.


Eventually, Brokaw moved out east and Phair moved back to Chicago, where she began writing songs. Soon, she began releasing homemade tapes of these songs under the name Girlysound. While she supported herself by selling her charcoal drawings on the streets of Wicker Park, she was becoming involved in various portions of the Chicago alternative music scene; in particular, she became friends with Urge Overkill, a drummer named Brad Wood, and John Henderson, the head of the Chicago-based indie label Feel Good All Over. Henderson and Phair tried to re-record some of the Girlysound tapes with Wood, yet the pair had a falling out during the sessions, leaving Wood as Phair's only collaborator. Brokaw, who had by then joined Come, was still receiving Girlysound tapes and he gave a copy to Gerard Cosley, the head of Come's record label, Matador. By the summer of 1992, Matador had signed Phair and she began recording her debut album in earnest.


Adapting its title from an Urge Overkill song, Exile in Guyville, her debut album, was released to strong reviews in the summer of 1993. Many articles focused on Phair's claim that the double album was structured as a response to the Rolling Stones' classic Exile on Main St. Over the course of the year, the record slowly built a dedicated following in America, both among critics and alternative rock fans. At the end of the year, it topped many Best of the Year critics polls, including The Village Voice and Spin. With all the attention focused on Phair, many indie rock figures -- particularly members of the Chicago noise rock scene such as Steve Albini -- were developing a resentment toward her and launching an attack at the singer and the heavy media attention Exile in Guyville received. The criticism couldn't halt the progress of Phair and Exile, and in early 1994 she launched her first tour, which was plagued by her stage fright. Around the same time, MTV began airing "Never Said" and, as a result of all the hype, the album briefly appeared in the charts in February. By the spring of 1994 it had sold over 200,000 copies -- a remarkable number for an independent release.


By that time, Phair had begun work on her follow-up record. Matador had signed a distribution deal with Atlantic Records in 1994, and her second album was going to be one of the first to be heavily promoted by the alliance. Indeed, Whip-Smart was released to a whirlwind of media attention -- including Phair, dressed only in negligee, on the cover of Rolling Stone -- and debuted at number 27 upon its fall 1994 release. "Supernova," the first single from the album, received heavy airplay on MTV and alternative rock radio, becoming a Top Ten modern rock hit. However, Whip-Smart received mediocre reviews and never developed into the hit that it was expected to be. Phair didn't tour to support the album and was slow to deliver a second single. By the time the title track was released as a single in the spring of 1995, the album had disappeared from the charts.

Phair quietly retreated from the spotlight during 1995, marrying Jim Staskausas, a Chicago-based film editor who had previously worked on Phair's videos. Later in the summer of 1995, she released the Juvenilia EP, which was essentially the "Jealousy" single amplified with the first official release of Girlysound material. During the summer of 1996, she released "Rocket Boy," a single pulled from the Stealing Beauty soundtrack that received little attention. For much of 1996, Phair worked on her third album with producer Scott Litt, yet by the fall, she decided to scrap the sessions, unsatisfied with their sound. Toward the end of 1996, Staskausas and Phair announced she was several months pregnant. On December 21, 1996, Phair gave birth to her first child, James Nicholas Staskausas. Her long-delayed, much-anticipated third LP, whitechocolatespaceegg, finally appeared in mid-1998. Five years later, Phair returned with a self-titled effort. Liz Phair, which appeared in June 2003, found singer/songwriter Michael Penn and the Matrix in the production seat as well as Phair herself. Jimmy Chamberlin, Wendy Melvoin, and Pete Yorn also contributed to Phair's newly slick sound. When Liz Phair finally appeared in June 2003, it was panned by purist rock critics and militant Liz nerds who felt she'd sold them out with the record's pop star sensibilities. But Phair stood up for her work in typcally brash fashion - sometimes it seemed like she even invited the fan boy ridicule - and the album was a decent hit for her behind its single "Why Can't I", peaking at #27 on the Billboard 200. The quieter Somebody's Miracle appeared in fall 2005.


I find it amazing that we never would have had Liz if some dude didn't push her into shopping around Girlysounds and the Exile demos more. She had terrible stagefright too.

Too bad Somebody's Miracle was such an embarassing flop. I think Capitol records dropped her. She said that she was going to be touring all this year, but after the record became an obvious disapointment she just stopped. I hope she signs to another indie label like Matador and starts recording good music again.

LegionArgentina
Aug 2nd, 2006, 11:04 PM
:yeah:

LegionArgentina
Aug 2nd, 2006, 11:05 PM
Soon more bios and pics

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 02:04 AM
JONI MITCHELL

When the dust settles, Joni Mitchell may stand as the most important and influential female recording artist of the late 20th century. Uncompromising and iconoclastic,


Mitchell confounded expectations at every turn; restlessly innovative, her music evolved from deeply personal folk stylings into pop, jazz, avant-garde, and even world music, presaging the multicultural experimentation of the 1980s and 1990s by over a decade. Fiercely independent, her work steadfastly resisted the whims of both mainstream audiences and the male-dominated recording industry. While Mitchell's records never sold in the same numbers enjoyed by contemporaries like Carole King, Janis Joplin, or Aretha Franklin, none experimented so recklessly with their artistic identities or so bravely explored territory outside of the accepted confines of pop music, resulting in a creative legacy which paved the way for performers ranging from Patti Smith and Chrissie Hynde to Madonna and Courtney Love.


Born Roberta Joan Anderson in Fort McLeod, Alberta, Canada, on November 7, 1943, she was stricken with polio at the age of nine; while recovering in a children's hospital, she began her performing career by singing to the other patients. After later teaching herself to play guitar with the aid of a Pete Seeger instruction book, she went off to art college, and became a fixture on the folk music scene around Alberta. After relocating to Toronto, she married folksinger Chuck Mitchell in 1965, and began performing under the name Joni Mitchell.


A year later the couple moved to Detroit, MI, but separated soon after; Joni remained in the Motor City, however, and won significant press acclaim for her burgeoning songwriting skills and smoky, distinctive vocals, leading to a string of high-profile performances in New York City. There she became a cause célèbre among the media and other performers; after she signed to Reprise in 1967, David Crosby offered to produce her debut record, a self-titled acoustic effort that appeared the following year. Her songs also found great success with other singers: in 1968, Judy Collins scored a major hit with the Mitchell-penned "Both Sides Now," while Fairport Convention covered "Eastern Rain" and Tom Rush recorded "The Circle Game."


Thanks to all of the outside exposure, Mitchell began to earn a strong cult following; her 1969 sophomore effort, Clouds, reached the Top 40, while 1970's Ladies of the Canyon sold even better on the strength of the single "Big Yellow Taxi." It also included her anthemic composition "Woodstock," a major hit for Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Still, the commercial and critical approval awarded her landmark 1971 record Blue was unprecedented: a luminous, starkly confessional set written primarily during a European vacation, the album firmly established Mitchell as one of pop music's most remarkable and insightful talents.


Predictably, she turned away from Blue's incandescent folk with 1972's For the Roses, the first of the many major stylistic turns she would take over the course of her daring career. Backed by rock-jazz performer Tom Scott, Mitchell's music began moving into more pop-oriented territory, a change typified by the single "You Turn Me On (I'm a Radio)," her first significant hit. The follow-up, 1974's classic Court and Spark, was her most commercially successful outing: a sparkling, jazz-accented set, it reached the number two spot on the U.S. album charts and launched three hit singles -- "Help Me," "Free Man in Paris," and "Raised on Robbery."


After the 1974 live collection Miles of Aisles, Mitchell emerged in 1975 with The Hissing of Summer Lawns, a bold, almost avant-garde record that housed her increasingly complex songs in experimental, jazz-inspired settings; "The Jungle Line" introduced the rhythms of African Burundi drums, placing her far ahead of the pop world's mid-'80s fascination with world music. 1976's Hejira, recorded with Weather Report bassist Jaco Pastorius, smoothed out the music's more difficult edges while employing minimalist techniques; Mitchell later performed the album's first single, "Coyote," at the Band's Last Waltz concert that Thanksgiving.


Her next effort, 1977's two-record set Don Juan's Reckless Daughter, was another ambitious move, a collection of long, largely improvisational pieces recorded with jazz players Larry Carlton and Wayne Shorter, Chaka Khan, and a battery of Latin percussionists. Shortly after the record's release, Mitchell was contacted by the legendary jazz bassist Charles Mingus, who invited her to work with him on a musical interpretation of T.S. Eliot's Four Quartets. Mingus, who was suffering from Lou Gehrig's disease, sketched out a series of melodies to which Mitchell added lyrics; however, Mingus died on January 5, 1979, before the record was completed. After Mitchell finished their collaboration on her own, she recorded the songs under the title Mingus, which was released the summer after the jazz titan's passing.


Following her second live collection, 1980's Shadows and Light, Mitchell returned to pop territory for 1982's Wild Things Run Fast; the first single, a cover of the Elvis Presley hit "(You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care," became her first chart single in eight years. Shortly after the album's release, she married bassist/sound engineer Larry Klein, who became a frequent collaborator on much of her subsequent material, including 1985's synth-driven Dog Eat Dog, co-produced by Thomas Dolby. Mitchell's move into electronics continued with 1988's Chalk Mark in a Rain Storm, featuring guests Peter Gabriel, Willie Nelson, Tom Petty, and Billy Idol.


Mitchell returned to her roots with 1991's Night Ride Home, a spare, stripped-down collection spotlighting little more than her voice and acoustic guitar. Prior to recording 1994's Turbulent Indigo, she and Klein separated, although he still co-produced the record, which was her most acclaimed work in years. In 1996, she compiled a pair of anthologies, Hits and Misses, which collected her chart successes as well as underappreciated favorites. A new studio album, Taming the Tiger, followed in 1998. Both Sides Now, a collection of standards, followed in early 2000.

Two years later, Mitchell resurfaced with the double-disc release Travelogue. She announced in October 2002 that this would be her last album ever, for she'd grown tired of the industry. She told W magazine that she intended to retire. She also claimed she would never sign another corporate label deal and in Rolling Stone blasted the recording industry for being "a cesspool." By the time Travelogue appeared a month later, Mitchell had simmered down and her plans to call it quits had been axed. ~ Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide

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Aug 5th, 2006, 02:06 AM
TRACY CHAPMAN

Tracy Chapman helped restore singer/songwriters to the spotlight in the '80s. The multi-platinum success of


Chapman's eponymous 1988 debut was unexpected, and it had lasting impact. Although Chapman was working from the same confessional singer/songwriter foundation that had been popularized in the '70s, her songs were fresh and powerful, driven by simple melodies and affecting lyrics. At the time of her first album, there were only a handful of artists performing such a style successfully, and her success ushered in a new era of singer/songwriters that lasted well into the '90s. Furthermore, her album helped usher in the era of political correctness -- along with 10,000 Maniacs and R.E.M., Chapman's liberal politics proved enormously influential on American college campuses in the late '80s. Of course, such implications meant that Chapman's subsequent recordings were greeted with mixed reactions, but after several years out of the spotlight, she managed to make a very successful comeback in 1996 with her fourth album, New Beginning, thanks to the Top Ten single "Give Me One Reason."


Raised in a working class neighborhood in Cleveland, OH, Chapman learned how to play guitar as a child, and began to write her own songs shortly afterward. Following high school, she won a minority placement scholarship and decided to attend Tufts University, where she studied anthropology and African studies. While at Tufts, she became fascinated with folk-rock and singer/songwriters, and began performing her own songs at coffeehouses. Eventually, she recorded a set of demos at the college radio station. One of her fellow students, Brian Koppelman, heard Chapman play and recommended her to his father, Charles Koppelman, who ran SBK Publishing. In 1986, she signed with SBK and Koppelman secured a management contract with Elliot Roberts, who had worked with Neil Young and Joni Mitchell. Roberts and Koppelman helped Chapman sign to Elektra in 1987.


Chapman recorded her debut album with David Kershenbaum, and the resulting eponymous record was released in the spring of 1988. Tracy Chapman was greeted with enthusiastic reviews, and she set out on the road supporting 10,000 Maniacs. Within a few months, she played at the internationally televised concert for Nelson Mandela's 70th birthday party, where her performance was greeted with thunderous applause. Soon, the single "Fast Car" began climbing the charts, eventually peaking at number six. The album's sales soared along with the single, and by the end of the year, the record had gone multi-platinum. Early the following year, the record won four Grammys, including Best New Artist.

It was an auspicious beginning to Chapman's career, and it was perhaps inevitable that her second album, 1989's darker, more political Crossroads, wasn't as successful. Although it was well-reviewed, the album wasn't as commercially successful, peaking at number nine and quickly falling down the charts. Following Crossroads, Chapman spent a few years in seclusion, returning in 1992 with Matters of the Heart. The album was greeted with mixed reviews and weak sales, and Chapman had fallen into cult status. Three years later, she returned with New Beginning, which received stronger reviews than its predecessor. The bluesy "Give Me One Reason" was pulled as the first single, and it slowly became a hit, sending the album into the U.S. Top Ten in early 1996. It was a quiet, successful comeback from an artist most observers had already consigned to forever languish in cult status. Telling Stories followed in early 2000. Let It Rain followed two years later. For 2005's Where You Live, Chapman co-produced the album with Tchad Blake. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

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Aug 5th, 2006, 02:08 AM
Lucinda Williams

The object of cultish adoration for years, singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams was universally hailed as a major talent by both critics and fellow musicians, but it took


quite some time for her to parlay that respect into a measure of attention from the general public. Part of the reason was her legendary perfectionism: Williams released records only infrequently, often taking years to hone both the material and the recordings thereof. Plus, her early catalog was issued on smaller labels that agreed to her insistence on creative control but didn't have the resources or staying power to fully promote her music. Yet her meticulous attention to detail and staunch adherence to her own vision were exactly what helped build her reputation. When Williams was at her best (and she often was), even her simplest songs were rich in literary detail, from her poetic imagery to her flawed, conflicted characters. Her singing voice, whose limitations she readily acknowledged, nonetheless developed into an evocative instrument that seemed entirely appropriate to her material. So if some critics described Williams as "the female Bob Dylan," they may have been oversimplifying things (Townes Van Zandt might be more apt), but the parallels were certainly too strong to ignore.


Williams was born in Lake Charles, LA, on January 26, 1953. Her father was Miller Williams, a literature professor and published poet who passed on not only his love of language, but also of Delta blues and Hank Williams. The family moved frequently, as Miller took teaching posts at colleges around Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia, Arkansas, and even Mexico City and Santiago, Chile. Meanwhile, Lucinda discovered folk music (especially Joan Baez) through her mother and was galvanized into trying her own hand at singing and writing songs after hearing Dylan's Highway 61 Revisited. Immersed in a college environment, she was also exposed to '60s rock and more challenging singer/songwriters like Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell. She started performing folk songs publicly in New Orleans and during the family's sojourn in Mexico City. In 1969, she was ejected from high school for refusing to say the Pledge of Allegiance, and she spent a year working her way through a reading list supplied by her father before leaving home.


Williams performed around New Orleans as a folk artist who mixed covers with traditional-styled originals. In 1974, she relocated to Austin, TX, and became part of that city's burgeoning roots music scene; she later split time between Austin and Houston, and then moved to New York. A demo tape got her the chance to record for the Smithsonian's Folkways label, and she went to Jackson, MS, to lay down her first album at the Malaco studios. Ramblin' on My Mind (later retitled simply Ramblin') was released in 1979 and featured a selection of traditional blues, country, folk, and Cajun songs. Williams returned to Houston to record the follow-up, 1980's Happy Woman Blues. As her first album of original compositions, it was an important step forward, and although it was much more bound by the dictates of tradition than her genre-hopping later work, her talent was already in evidence.


However, it would be some time before that talent was fully realized. Williams flitted between Austin and Houston during the early '80s, then moved to Los Angeles in 1984, where she started to attract some major-label interest. CBS signed her to a development deal in the mid-'80s but wound up passing since neither its rock nor its country divisions knew how to market her; around the same time, a short-lived marriage to drummer Greg Sowders dissolved. Williams eventually caught on with an unlikely partner -- the British indie label Rough Trade, which was historically better known for its punk output. The simply titled Lucinda Williams was released in 1988, and although it didn't make any waves in the mainstream, it received glowing reviews from those who did hear it. With help from guitarist/co-producer Gurf Morlix, Williams' sound had evolved into a seamless blend of country, blues, folk, and rock; while it made perfect sense to roots music enthusiasts, it didn't fit into the rigid tastes of radio programmers. But it was clear that she had found her songwriting voice -- the album brimmed with confidence, and so did its assertive female characters, who seemed to answer only to their own passions.


Many critics hailed Lucinda Williams as a major statement by a major new talent. Rough Trade issued a couple of EPs that featured live performances and material from Lucinda Williams, and Patty Loveless covered "The Night's Too Long" for a Top 20 country hit. However, it would be four years before Williams completed her official follow-up. She signed with RCA for a time but left when she felt that the label was pressuring her to release material she didn't deem ready for public consumption. Instead, she went to the small Elektra-distributed label Chameleon, which finally released Sweet Old World in 1992. A folkier outing than Lucinda Williams, Sweet Old World was an unflinching meditation on death, loss, and regret. Even its upbeat moments were colored by songs like the title track and "Pineola," two stunning, heartbreaking accounts of a family friend's suicide (poet Frank Stanford, not, as many listeners assumed, Williams' own brother). Needless to say, the record won rave reviews once again, and Williams toured Australia with Rosanne Cash and Mary Chapin Carpenter.


On that tour, Carpenter decided to record "Passionate Kisses," the key track and statement of purpose from Lucinda Williams. It shot into the country Top Five in 1993 and won its writer a Grammy for Country Song of the Year. Other artists soon started mining Williams' back catalog for material: avowed fan Emmylou Harris recorded "Crescent City" on 1993's Cowgirl's Prayer and cut "Sweet Old World" for her 1995 alternative country landmark Wrecking Ball; plus, Tom Petty covered "Changed the Locks" for 1996's movie-related She's the One. As the buzz around Williams grew, so did anticipation for her next album. With Chameleon having gone under, she signed with Rick Rubin's American Recordings label and began sessions with Morlix again co-producing. Dissatisfied with the results, Williams' rigorous retouchings led to Morlix's departure from the project and her backing band. In 1995, she moved into Harris' neighborhood in Nashville and through Harris hired Steve Earle and his production partner Ray Kennedy. At first, she was so enamored with their work that she re-recorded the entire album from scratch. When it was finished, she decided that the results sounded too produced, and took the record to Los Angeles, where she enlisted Roy Bittan (onetime E Street Band keyboardist) to co-produce a series of overdub sessions that bordered on obsessive. During the long wait for the album, the media began to pay more attention to Williams; some of the coverage was fairly unflattering, painting her as a neurotic control freak, but she always countered that it was unfair to criticize the process if the results were worthwhile.


Rubin mixed the final tracks, but the album was further delayed when he entered into negotiations to sell the American label. Mercury stepped in to purchase the rights to the album, which was finally released in 1998 under the title Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. Boasting a bright, contemporary roots rock sound with strong country and blues flavors, not to mention major-label promotional power, the album won universal acclaim, making many critics' year-end Top Ten lists and winning The Village Voice's prestigious Pazz & Jop survey. It also won Williams a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album (despite being the least folk-oriented record in her catalog) and became her first to go gold, proving to doubters that she was not just a songwriter, but a full-fledged recording artist in her own right. After a merger shakeup at Mercury, Williams wound up on the Universal-distributed roots imprint Lost Highway. She was the subject of an extensive, widely acclaimed profile in The New Yorker in 2000, written by Bill Buford, who was nominated for a National Magazine Award for his work; however, Williams and some of her supporters took issue with some of his more objective-minded analysis.

Williams delivered her next album, Essence, in 2001, after a relatively scant wait of just three years. An introspective collection, it often found Williams taking a simpler, more minimalistic lyrical approach and was greeted with rapturous reviews in most quarters. The track "Get Right With God" won Williams her third Grammy, this time for Best Female Rock Vocal, which further consolidated her credibility as a singer, not just a songwriter. Paring down the time between album releases even further, Williams returned in 2003 with World Without Tears, which became her highest-charting effort to date when it debuted in the Top 20. 2005 saw the release of two live recordings, one (Live @ The Fillmore) for Lost Highway and the other (Live from Austin, TX) for New West. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide

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Aug 5th, 2006, 02:10 AM
JANIS JOPLIN

The greatest white female rock singer of the 1960s, Janis Joplin was also a great blues singer, making her material her own with her wailing, raspy, supercharged emotional


delivery. First rising to stardom as the frontwoman for San Francisco psychedelic band Big Brother & the Holding Company, she left the group in the late '60s for a brief and uneven (though commercially successful) career as a solo artist. Although she wasn't always supplied with the best material or most sympathetic musicians, her best recordings, with both Big Brother and on her own, are some of the most exciting performances of her era. She also did much to redefine the role of women in rock with her assertive, sexually forthright persona and raunchy, electrifying on-stage presence.


Joplin was raised in the small town of Port Arthur, TX, and much of her subsequent personal difficulties and unhappiness has been attributed to her inability to fit in with the expectations of the conservative community. She'd been singing blues and folk music since her teens, playing on occasion in the mid-'60s with future Jefferson Airplane guitarist Jorma Kaukonen. There are a few live pre-Big Brother recordings (not issued until after her death), reflecting the inspiration of early blues singers like Bessie Smith, that demonstrate she was well on her way to developing a personal style before hooking up with the band. She had already been to California before moving there permanently in 1966, when she joined a struggling early San Francisco psychedelic group, Big Brother & the Holding Company. Although their loose, occasionally sloppy brand of bluesy psychedelia had some charm, there can be no doubt that Joplin -- who initially didn't even sing lead on all of the material -- was primarily responsible for lifting them out of the ranks of the ordinary. She made them a hit at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, where her stunning version of "Ball and Chain" (perhaps her very best performance) was captured on film. After a debut on the Mainstream label, Big Brother signed a management deal with Albert Grossman and moved on to Columbia. Their second album, Cheap Thrills, topped the charts in 1968, but Joplin left the band shortly afterward, enticed by the prospects of stardom as a solo act.


Joplin's first album, I Got Dem Ol' Kozmic Blues Again Mama!, was recorded with the Kozmic Blues Band, a unit that included horns and retained just one of the musicians that had played with her in Big Brother (guitarist Sam Andrew). Although it was a hit, it wasn't her best work; the new band, though more polished musically, was not nearly as sympathetic accompanists as Big Brother, purveying a soul-rock groove that could sound forced. That's not to say it was totally unsuccessful, boasting one of her signature tunes in "Try (Just a Little Bit Harder)."

For years, Joplin's life had been a roller coaster of drug addiction, alcoholism, and volatile personal relationships, documented in several biographies. Musically, however, things were on the upswing shortly before her death, as she assembled a better, more versatile backing outfit, the Full Tilt Boogie Band, for her final album, Pearl (ably produced by Paul Rothchild). Joplin was sometimes criticized for screeching at the expense of subtlety, but Pearl was solid evidence of her growth as a mature, diverse stylist who could handle blues, soul, and folk-rock. "Mercedes Benz," "Get It While You Can," and Kris Kristofferson's "Me and Bobby McGee" are some of her very best tracks. Tragically, she died before the album's release, overdosing on heroin in a Hollywood hotel in October 1970. "Me and Bobby McGee" became a posthumous number one single in 1971, and thus the song with which she is most frequently identified. ~ Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide

:worship: :worship:

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 02:11 AM
Grace Slick

Grace Slick is best known as the powerful-voiced female singer in Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, and Starship, rock bands with which she performed in the 1960s, '70s, and '80s. She was born to well-to-do parents and grew up in Palo Alto,


California. She became a model and married Jerry Slick. After seeing Jefferson Airplane perform in 1965, she, her husband, and her brother-in-law, Darby Slick, formed the Great Society. The group released a single, "Somebody to Love" (written by Darby Slick) on local North Beach Records in 1966, but broke up soon after. (Columbia Records later culled two albums from the group's live recordings.) Slick was asked to replace Jefferson Airplane singer Signe Anderson and joined the group in time for the recording of its second album, Surrealistic Pillow. She brought with her both "Somebody to Love" and her own composition, the bolero-paced "White Rabbit," with its references to drug-taking and Alice in Wonderland. Both songs were included on the album with her lead vocals. Both became Top Ten hits in 1967, as did the album, and Slick became the focal point of Jefferson Airplane, participating in seven more albums by the group -- After Bathing at Baxter's (1967), Crown of Creation (1968), Bless Its Pointed Little Head (1969), Volunteers (1969), Bark (1971), Long John Silver (1972), and Thirty Seconds Over Winterland (1973). By 1971, with the formation of the group's own custom label, Grunt Records, various bandmembers began to make albums on their own, and Slick combined with guitarist Paul Kantner, on Sunfighter (1971). Baron Von Tollbooth & the Chrome Nun (1973) was credited to Kantner, Slick, and David Freiberg. 1974 saw the release of Slick's debut solo album, Manhole. With the departure of Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, Jefferson Airplane had ceased to exist after 1972. Kantner and Slick re-organized the band under the name Jefferson Starship and released Dragon Fly in 1974. In 1975 came Red Octopus, which topped the charts and sold two million copies. Spitfire (1976) was also a million-seller, as was Earth (1978). Slick left the group and released two solo albums, Dreams (1980) and Welcome to the Wrecking Ball (1981), then rejoined as a guest on Modern Times (1981) and participated fully on Winds of Change (1982) and Nuclear Furniture (1984). She also recorded a fourth solo album, Software (1984). Kantner's departure from the group led to a truncation of its name to Starship. Slick remained through the million-selling Knee Deep in the Hoopla (1985) and No Protection (1987), sharing lead vocals with Mickey Thomas on the #1 hits "We Built This City" and "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now." She left the group in 1988. In 1989, she joined a reunion of Jefferson Airplane that resulted in a tour and a self-titled album. She retired from performing in the 1990s and wrote her autobiography, Somebody to Love?, published in 1998. In 1999, RCA. ~ William Ruhlmann, All Music Guide

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Aug 5th, 2006, 02:12 AM
CELESTE CARBALLO

Argentinean rock singer Celeste Carballo was born in September 21, 1956. At the age of 19, Carballo formed her first band, called Alter Ego. In 1982, the artist recorded



her first album, Me Vuelvo Cada Día Más Loca, followed by 1983's Mi Voz Renacerá, which was presented live at Buenos Aires' Obras Sanitarias. After releasing 1985's Celeste y la Generación, Carballo started singing along with Sandra Mihanovic, and the duo recorded Somos Mucho Mas Qe Dos and Mujer Contra Mujer together. While her popularity was growing, Celeste Carballo started being considered as an opening act to international established artists such as Santana and Bob Dylan. In August of 1991, Chocolate Inglés was released. That record included an acclaimed cover of Carlos Gardel's "El Día Que Me Quieras." In 1995, Carballo decided to pay tribute to one of her favorites, releasing a Janis Joplin-inspired album called Live at the Roxy. Two years later, Celeste Carballo extended her career to acting, getting a role in a TV series called Poliladron. By the end of 1998, Tercer Infinito was released. In May of 1999, Carballo participated at Miami's First Argentinean Festival, later touring the U.S. West Coast and Mexico. ~ Drago Bonacich, All Music Guide

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Aug 5th, 2006, 02:14 AM
The Donnas

Aspiring to nothing more than a good old-fashioned rock & roll party, the Donnas won a cult following and considerable media attention in the late '90s after scoring a record deal


right out of high school. Early on, they were invariably described as "the Ramones meet the Runaways," with a definite emphasis on the former (they'd even adopted identical first names as a tribute). But their bratty high-school-delinquent image was clearly indebted to the latter, as their songs concerned themselves mostly with boys, booze, drugs, and hated classmates. As the Donnas grew up and polished their technical abilities, their music evolved into a distinctly female take on cock-rock metal, drawing more from AC/DC, Kiss, and Mötley Crüe than from punk. Some critics praised their cheerfully crude adoption of male sexual bravado; others complained that the band's music never transcended its vintage influences, and remained suspicious that their naughty-girl packaging was a bigger part of their appeal.


The Donnas were originally formed in May 1993, when all four members (all born in 1979) were still in the eighth grade together in Palo Alto, CA. Calling themselves Ragady Anne at first, they played covers of groups like R.E.M., L7, the Muffs, and Shonen Knife, and entered a junior-high battle of the bands just one month after forming. During high school, they kept practicing virtually every afternoon, and soon moved into riot grrrl territory with inspiration from bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile (though it was more musical than political). In early 1995, Ragady Anne released a 7" EP on the local Radio Trash label, but soon changed their name to the Electrocutes and adopted a trashy jailbait image and a loud-fast-rules aesthetic. They gigged around the Bay Area that year and were spotted by Darin Raffaelli, a onetime member of trash-punkers Supercharger and head of the small Radio X label. Raffaelli had written a cache of Ramones-style songs for a hypothetical girl band, and approached the Electrocutes about recording them.


Deciding that the songs didn't fit the Electrocutes' metal-queen style, the girls created Ramones-worshipping alter egos known as the Donnas, even going so far as to mock them in Electrocutes interviews as though they were different people. Thus, vocalist Brett Anderson, guitarist Allison Robertson, bassist Maya Ford, and drummer Torry Castellano became Donna A., Donna R., Donna F., and Donna C. Before 1995 was out, they played their first gig as the Donnas, and released their first single under that name on Radio X. Two more followed in 1996, the last one on Raffaelli's new imprint, Super*teem. Meanwhile, they hadn't yet abandoned their identity as the Electrocutes, and in fact recorded an album called Steal Yer Lunch Money during 1996; however, it wasn't released until three years later, when Sympathy for the Record Industry acquired the rights in the wake of the Donnas' eventual success.


In 1997, the Donnas recorded a self-titled debut album for Super*teem, using songs ghostwritten by Raffaelli. Critics charged that Raffaelli was acting as the band's Svengali, likening their relationship to that of Kim Fowley and the Runaways; both sides vehemently denied that that was the case, and eventually severed their professional relationship to avoid fueling more speculation. Following the release of The Donnas, the group took a week off from its senior year of high school to tour Japan. After graduation, they postponed plans for college and accepted an offer to sign with Bay Area indie Lookout, the original home of Green Day. Their label debut, American Teenage Rock 'n' Roll Machine, was released in early 1998, and did feature some uncredited songwriting input from Raffaelli. The Donnas quickly became underground punk favorites, and even landed some attention from mainstream media like MTV.


The Donnas' third album, Get Skintight, appeared in 1999 and marked the first time the band composed its material with no outside assistance. A distinct hard rock influence began to creep into their compositions, underlined by their cover of Mötley Crüe's "Too Fast for Love"; they even opened a show for Cinderella. That year, they also appeared in the teen comedies Jawbreaker and Drive Me Crazy, the latter as the Electrocutes. In early 2001, the band issued The Donnas Turn 21, which continued their move away from punk and toward the hard rock mainstream of 15-20 years previous (this time the cover was Judas Priest's "Living After Midnight"). The album received some of their weakest reviews to date, generally from critics who felt that their party-hardy subject matter was starting to feel forced.

Nonetheless, the Donnas caught the attention of major label Atlantic, who signed them up in late 2001. Launched with a new wave of publicity, the Donnas' label debut, Spend the Night, arrived in 2002 and became their first album to break into the Top 100 of the pop charts. It also earned them their biggest radio hit to date in the single "Take It Off," whose video also got some MTV airplay. In the summer of 2003, the Donnas played the main stage on the revived Lollapalooza tour. ~ Steve Huey, All Music

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 02:16 AM
THE RUNAWAYS :rocker2:

ismissed during their existence as a crass marketing gimmick, the Runaways have grown in stature over the years as the first all-female band to make a substantial impression


on the public by playing loud, straight-up, guitar-driven rock & roll. Since all of the members were teenagers (some of whom were still learning to play their instruments when they passed their auditions), their music was frequently raw and amateurish, but it neatly combined American heavy metal (think Aerosmith and Kiss) with the newly emerging sound of punk rock. In the media, the Runaways were victims of their own hype, supplied by maverick promoter/manager Kim Fowley. Fowley's insistence on a sleazy jailbait image for the group made it easy for the press to dismiss them as nothing but a tasteless adolescent fantasy -- an impression bolstered at the time by the admittedly erratic quality of their music. But in the end, the Runaways' sound and attitude proved crucially important in paving the way for female artists to crank up the volume on their guitars and rock as hard as the boys; plus, they produced one undeniably classic single in the rebel-girl manifesto "Cherry Bomb."


The genesis of the Runaways can be traced to a 1975 Alice Cooper party at which Fowley met teenage lyricist Kari Krome. Fowley was impressed with Krome's streetwise perspective and set about putting together a band. Krome's friend, guitarist Joan Jett (born Joan Larkin), had been putting together a band with drummer Sandy West (born Sandy Pesavento), and Fowley quickly had a trio on his hands. However, it soon became apparent that Krome was not much of a singer, and she was replaced by vocalist Michael "Micki" Steele (born Sue Thomas), who also began learning the bass. As a trio, this lineup recorded a demo titled Born to Be Bad in late 1975; shortly thereafter, guitarist Lita Ford successfully auditioned through a trade-paper ad, and Steele left the group (she would later join the Bangles). Cherie Currie became the new lead vocalist, and after an extremely brief stint with a bass player known only as Peggy (which lasted just a few weeks), the band settled on Jackie Fox (born Jacqueline Fuchs), who switched to bass from guitar in order to join the band.


Thus constituted as an entirely teenaged quintet, it didn't take long for the Runaways to score a record deal; Currie's stage wardrobe (lingerie) and Fowley's well-established contacts made sure of that. After signing with Mercury in February 1976, the band began recording their self-titled debut album, which was released just a few months later. However, it was not greeted well. Fowley was preceded by his reputation for overhyping gimmicky acts, and the sheer number of roles he played in guiding the Runaways' career made him appear a manipulative, Svengali-like figure. Moreover, regardless of whether or not the Runaways were simply a cheap exploitation act (an endlessly debatable question), the entire concept of the band -- teenage girls playing their own instruments and singing frankly and enthusiastically about sex, booze, and life on the streets -- was simply too discomforting for much of America. Fowley's extensive involvement (some called it near-total control) made it easy for journalists and radio programmers to dismiss the group out of hand as a male-concocted sham; it was also a convenient way to ignore the myriad cultural buttons the Runaways were pushing.


Despite a wave of publicity on Fowley's part, The Runaways just barely scraped the bottom of the charts in the early fall of 1976, around the same time the band played their first gig at the legendary New York punk club CBGB's. The second Runaways album, Queens of Noise, was released in early 1977 and fared little better on the charts than its predecessor, thanks to radio's continued reluctance to program the group's music. However, when the Runaways mounted a tour of Japan in June of that year, they were greeted with sold-out arena gigs and rabidly enthusiastic audiences who didn't consider them a joke ("Cherry Bomb" had, in fact, topped the Japanese charts). A concert record, Live in Japan, was culled from the tour, but wasn't released in the U.S.


Despite this taste of success, relationships between some of the group members had begun to fray, thanks partly to substance abuse problems and partly to unconcerned negligence on the management's part. Upon their return to Los Angeles in July 1977, Jackie Fox departed the group; a story circulated that she had attempted suicide on the Japanese tour, though it was later discredited. Before the year was out, Currie too had left, spurred in part by consistent disagreements with Fowley. Jett took over as lead vocalist, and new bassist Vicki Blue was hired for the group's third album. Waiting for the Night was released at the end of the year, and failed to even hit the U.S. charts. By this point, Fowley had lost interest in the band, and quit as manager early the next year. Jett's unofficial leadership role within the group became more serious, but unfortunately, musical differences were beginning to arise (Jett's punk and glam rock influences clashed with West and Ford's love of straight-up hard rock and heavy metal). One more album, And Now...The Runaways, appeared toward the end of 1978, but it was released only in the group's core markets of Europe and Japan (it later appeared in America with a different running order under the title Little Lost Girls). Blue quit the band after their New Year's gig and was replaced by Laurie McAllister, but to no avail; Jett left the group in April 1979, and the Runaways officially disbanded not long after.

Currie released a solo album in 1978 titled Beauty's Only Skin Deep, and then teamed up with her twin sister Marie for 1980's Messin' With the Boys. Jackie Fox went to law school and became an attorney. West and Ford formed a short-lived outfit of their own, after which Ford went solo and scored several hits as a pop-metal artist during the '80s. But an even better indicator that there was more to the Runaways' music than met the eye was the success of Joan Jett's solo career. Jett formed her own band and record label, landed an enormous number one smash with 1982's "I Love Rock n' Roll," and continued to produce albums of tough hard rock into the '90s. The heavily feminist riot grrrl punk movement claimed Jett as a major inspiration, prompting a re-examination of the Runaways' output divorced from Kim Fowley's marketing tactics. Rumors of a full-band reunion surfaced periodically through the rest of the '90s, though none has yet materialized. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 02:20 AM
Soon more bios

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 07:08 PM
Kim Gordon

While some of the basic facts about Kim Gordon's life are a little fuzzy, there's nothing fuzzy about her influence on the music scene. Sources differ concerning the date and place of her birth, with some claiming she was born in 1953 in Rochester,


NY, while others state that she entered the world in 1958 in Los Angeles, CA. None, however, deny her influence over rock, or the varied activities that have led some to describe her as a renaissance woman. Interestingly, she didn't start out as a musician and didn't even study music. Gordon, who plays bass for Sonic Youth, records as a solo artist, leads the band Free Kitten, and also is part of the band Harry Crews, earned a degree in fine arts from Los Angeles' Otis College of Art and Design during the early '70s. She headed to New York a decade later. There she established a group called CKM, contributed to Artforum magazine, and participated in the Anover Art Festival. There she met Thurston Moore, the man who would join her and Lee Ranaldo to form Sonic Youth. She and Moore wed in 1984, and a decade later had a child, Coco Hayley Moore. In 1991, Gordon helped produce the album Pretty on the Inside for Hole. She headed to Lollapalooza with her band Free Kitten two years later, and branched out into directing in 1994 with music videos for "Divine Hammer" and "Cannonball" by the Breeders. She expanded her talents again a year later in New York when she launched a line of clothing she dubbed X-Girl, which she sold in 1997. Rolling Stone acknowledged her influence that same year when the magazine included Gordon in a feature titled Women in Rock. By 1999, the renaissance woman of rock began crafting a solo album and modeling in advertisements for Calvin Klein. VH1 acknowledged her influence by including her in its list of 100 Greatest Women of Rock. Although in interviews she has seemed leery of giving herself wholeheartedly to the cause of feminism, her songs often have decidedly pro-feminist themes when she addresses such issues as sexual harassment, rape, and the casting couch. She also addressed anorexia in a number titled "Tunic (Song for Karen)," which refers to the ordeal endured by Karen Carpenter, a woman who was just as prominent in the music world in her day as Gordon is now. ~ Linda Seida, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 07:15 PM
Veruca Salt

Veruca Salt reshaped the jagged, abrasive punk-pop of the Pixies and


Breeders into a more accessible, riff-driven power pop formula that also borrowed from pop/hard rockers like Cheap Trick. It was a successful formula, both musically and commercially, yet it didn't ensure them indie rock credibility; in fact, they became one of the most harshly criticized bands of the post-Nirvana alternative rock era.


Led by guitarist/vocalists Louise Post and Nina Gordon, and also featuring bassist Steve Lack and drummer Jim Shapiro (Gordon's brother), Veruca Salt released their debut single, "Seether"/"All Hail Me," in 1994 on a Chicago-based independent label, Minty Fresh. Produced by Brad Wood (Liz Phair), the record became a word-of-mouth sensation, working its way to alternative and college radio stations. While supporting Hole on their fall tour, Veruca Salt released their debut album, American Thighs, on Minty Fresh, yet they soon cut a deal with Geffen, who re-released the album. "Seether" became an MTV hit as well, and soon the single was an across-the-board success. However, the group received scathing criticism from magazines and fanzines, claiming the band was nothing but rip-off artists, using Minty Fresh as a way to gain credibility. Nevertheless, the group's popularity didn't suffer, and American Thighs went gold, even though their next two singles -- "Number One Blind" and "All Hail Me" -- didn't attract half the attention of "Seether."

After releasing the stopgap, Steve Albini-produced EP Blow It Out Your Ass It's Veruca Salt in 1996, the band returned in early 1997 with Eight Arms to Hold You, which found the band moving toward hard rock and heavy metal; although critical reaction was even more mixed, the album still reached gold sales status. Shortly after the album was completed, Shapiro left the band, and was replaced by former Letters to Cleo drummer Stacy Jones. Meanwhile, in the wake of rumors that Gordon and Post had been considering solo projects, it was confirmed in early 1998 that Gordon had also decided to leave the band and pursue a separate solo career. Undeterred, Post regrouped Veruca Salt as her own project, with a new lineup of guitarist Stephen Fitzpatrick, bassist Suzanne Sokol, and drummer Jimmy Madla; in the wake of the corporate merger that swallowed Geffen Records, Post also elected to jump ship, signing a new deal with Beyond. After taking time to craft new material, Post entered the studio with her new band and recorded Resolver, which was released in the spring of 2000. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

Bette_Midler
Aug 5th, 2006, 07:57 PM
THE RUNAWAYS :rocker2:

Rumors of a full-band reunion surfaced periodically through the rest of the '90s, though none has yet materialized. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide

I wish a full band reunion soon because Sandy is very illness :sad: Sandy was diagnosed with lung cancer and a brain tumor. :sad: Runaways, reunite for Sandy at least :sad:

delicatecutter
Aug 5th, 2006, 08:00 PM
Kristin Hersh! She's the friggin godmother of alternative music.

Martian Willow
Aug 5th, 2006, 08:06 PM
Wow there are a lot

Its amazing, isn't it.

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 11:33 PM
Yeah

Before this thread i known a few but now i know a lot of women in rock and also there are some of them that i didnt heard any song before and now i enjoy listening some rocker

LegionArgentina
Aug 5th, 2006, 11:33 PM
Soon more bios and pics

Wintermute
Aug 6th, 2006, 01:48 AM
Kristin Hersh! She's the friggin godmother of alternative music.

If you have Kristin Hersh then you must also have her half-sis Tanya Donelly of Belly.

delicatecutter
Aug 6th, 2006, 04:29 AM
If you have Kristin Hersh then you must also have her half-sis Tanya Donelly of Belly.

Of course. She's actually her former step-sister though. :)

Wintermute
Aug 6th, 2006, 12:45 PM
Of course. She's actually her former step-sister though. :)

I stand corrected. ;)

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 07:02 PM
Who is Kristin ?

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 08:51 PM
NINA GORDON

Nina Gordon, former singer/songwriter/guitarist for Veruca Salt began getting ready for her first solo release soon after leaving the band in early 1998. Tonight and the Rest of


My Life, her first album without the Veruca Salt gang, was filled with the hard guitar sounds and mad lyrics that made Veruca Salt popular with such songs as "Seether" and "Volcano Girls." The album was produced by Bob Rock, who also handled production duties on Veruca Salt's 1997 album, Eight Arms to Hold You. After a five-year hiatus, Gordon reunited with Rock for her second album, Bleeding Heart Graffiti. A concept album about the beginning, middle and end of a relationship, Bleeding Heart Graffiti arrived in summer 2006. ~ Amanda Nusbaum, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 08:56 PM
ALANIS

Alanis Morissette was one of the most unlikely stars of the mid-'90s. A former child actress turned dance-pop diva,


Morissette transformed herself into a confessional alternative singer/songwriter, in the vein of Liz Phair and Tori Amos. However, she added enough pop sensibility, slight hip-hop flourishes, and marketing savvy to that formula to become a superstar with her third album, Jagged Little Pill.


Morissette was born and raised in Ottawa, Canada. In her childhood, she began playing piano and writing songs. At the age of ten, she joined the cast of You Can't Do That on Television, a children's television program. Using money that she earned on the show, Morissette recorded an independent single, "Fate Stay With Me," which was released when she was ten. After leaving the show, she concentrated on a musical career, signing a music publishing contract when she was 14. The publishing contract led to a record deal with MCA Canada. In 1991, she moved to Toronto and released her debut album, Alanis.


Alanis was a collection of pop-oriented dance numbers and ballads that was successful in Canada, selling over 100,000 copies, and leading to a Juno Award for Most Promising Female Artist. However, no other country paid any attention to the record. In 1992, she released Now Is the Time, an album that closely resembled her debut. Like its predecessor, it was a success in Canada, even if it sold half of what Alanis did. Following the release of Now Is the Time, Morissette relocated to Los Angeles, where she met Glen Ballard in early 1994. Ballard had previously written Michael Jackson's hit "Man in the Mirror," produced Wilson Phillips' hit debut album, and worked with David Hasselhoff. Despite the duo's mainstream pop pedigree, they decided to pursue an edgier, alternative rock-oriented direction. The result was Jagged Little Pill, which was released on Maverick Records, Madonna's label.


On the strength of the single "You Oughta Know," Jagged Little Pill gained attention upon its release in the summer of 1995. Soon, the single received heavy airplay from both alternative radio and MTV, sending the album into the Top Ten and multi-platinum status. The second and third singles from Jagged Little Pill, "Hand in My Pocket" and "All I Really Want," kept the album in the Top Ten. In early 1996, she was nominated for six Grammys. Shortly after the nominations, Morissette released her fourth single, "Ironic," which proved to be her biggest crossover success. Morissette won several Grammy awards in 1996, including Album of the Year and Song of the Year.

Her much-anticipated follow-up, Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, was released in the autumn of 1998. An Unplugged set appeared a year later, and in 2002 Morissette released Under Rug Swept. So-Called Chaos followed in 2004, and a year later she took Jagged Little Pill on the road as an acoustic tour. That tour became Jagged Little Pill Acoustic, an album originally -- and tellingly -- sold exclusively through Starbucks outlets. Morissette and her fans had grown up. Collection, an 18-track retrospective of her work, followed in November 2005. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:00 PM
SHERYL CROW

Sheryl Crow's fresh, updated spin on classic roots rock made her one of the most popular mainstream rockers of the '90s. Her albums were loose and eclectic on the surface,


yet were generally tied together by polished, professional songcraft. Crow's sunny, good-time rockers and world-weary ballads were radio staples for much of the '90s, and she was a perennial favorite at Grammy time. Although her songwriting style was firmly anchored to the rock tradition, she wasn't a slave to it -- her free-associative, reference-laden poetry could hardly have been the product of any era but the '90s. Her production not only kept pace with contemporary trends, but sometimes even pushed the envelope of what sounds could be heard on a classicist rock album, especially on her self-titled sophomore effort. All of this made Crow one of the most dependable stars of the decade, and she showed no signs of relinquishing her hard-won success in the new millennium.


Sheryl Suzanne Crow was born February 11, 1962, in Kennett, MO. Her parents had both performed in swing orchestras, her father on trumpet and her mother as a singer; her mother was also a piano teacher, and ensured that all her daughters learned the instrument starting in grade school. Crow wrote her first song at age 13, and majored in music at the University of Missouri, where she also played keyboards in a cover band called Cashmere. After graduating, she spent a couple of years in St. Louis working as a music teacher for autistic children. She sang with another cover band, P.M., by night, and also recorded local advertising jingles on the side. In 1986, Crow packed up and moved to Los Angeles to try her luck in the music business. She was able to land some more jingle-singing assignments, and got her first big break when she successfully auditioned to be a backup singer on Michael Jackson's international Bad tour. In concert, she often sang the female duet part on "I Just Can't Stop Loving You," and was inaccurately rumored by the tabloids to have been Jackson's lover. After spending two years on the road with Jackson, Crow resumed her search for a record deal, but found that record companies were only interested in making her a dance-pop singer, which was not at all to her taste.


Frustrated, Crow suffered a bout of severe depression that lasted around six months. She revived her career as a session vocalist, however, and performed with the likes of Sting, Rod Stewart, Stevie Wonder, Foreigner, Joe Cocker, Sinead O'Connor, and Don Henley, the latter of whom she toured with behind The End of the Innocence. She also developed her songwriting skills enough to have her compositions recorded by the likes of Wynonna Judd, Celine Dion, and Eric Clapton. Thanks to her session work, she made a connection with producer Hugh Padgham, who got her signed to A&M. Padgham and Crow went into the studio in 1991 to record her debut album, but Padgham's pop leanings resulted in a slick, ballad-laden record that didn't reflect the sound Crow wanted. The album was shelved, and fearing that she'd let her best opportunity slip through her fingers, Crow sank into another near-crippling depression that lingered for nearly a year and a half. However, thanks to boyfriend Kevin Gilbert, an engineer who'd attempted to remix her ill-fated album, Crow fell in with a loose group of industry pros that included Gilbert, Bill Bottrell, David Baerwald, David Ricketts, Brian MacLeod, and Dan Schwartz. Dubbed the Tuesday Night Music Club, this collective met once a week at Bottrell's Pasadena recording studio to drink, jam, and work out material. In this informal, collaborative setting, Crow was able to get her creative juices flowing again, and the group agreed to make its newest member -- the only one with a recording contract -- the focal point.


Crow and the collective worked out enough material for an album, and with Bottrell serving as producer, she recorded her new official debut, titled Tuesday Night Music Club in tribute. The record was released in August 1993 and proved slow to take off. Lead single "Run Baby Run" made little impact, and while "Leaving Las Vegas" attracted some attention through its inclusion in the acclaimed film of the same name, it reached only the lower half of the charts. A&M took one last shot by releasing "All I Wanna Do," a song partly written by poet Wyn Cooper, as a single. With its breezy, carefree outlook, "All I Wanna Do" became one of the biggest summer singles of 1994, falling just one position short of number one. Suddenly, Tuesday Night Music Club started flying out of stores, and spawned a Top Five follow-up hit in "Strong Enough" (plus another minor single in "Can't Cry Anymore"). Crow was a big winner at the Grammys in early 1995, taking home honors for Best New Artist, Best Female Rock Vocal, and Record of the Year (the latter two for "All I Wanna Do"). Her surprising sweep pushed Tuesday Night Music Club into the realm of genuine blockbuster, as its sales swept past the seven million mark. After close to a decade of dues-paying, Crow was a star.


Unfortunately, success came at a price. In 1994, Crow had been invited to perform "Leaving Las Vegas" on Late Night With David Letterman. In a brief interview segment, Letterman asked if the song was autobiographical, and Crow offhandedly agreed that it was. In actuality, the song was mostly written by David Baerwald, based on the book by his good friend John O'Brien (which had also inspired the film). Having been burned by the industry already, some of the Tuesday Night Music Club took Crow's comment as a refusal to give proper credit for their contributions. Baerwald in particular felt betrayed, and things only got worse when O'Brien committed suicide not long after Crow's Letterman appearance. Although O'Brien's family stepped forward to affirm that Crow had nothing to do with the tragedy, the rift with Baerwald was already irreparable. Some Club members bitterly charged that Crow's role in the collaborative process was rather small, and that the talent on display actually had little to do with her. Tragedy struck again in 1996 when Crow's ex-boyfriend, Kevin Gilbert, was found dead of autoerotic asphyxiation.


Stung by the charges, Crow set out to prove her legitimacy with her second album when the heavy touring for Tuesday Night Music Club finally ended. Bill Bottrell was originally slated to produce the record, but fell out with Crow very early on, and the singer ended up taking over production duties herself. However, she did bring in the noted team of Mitchell Froom and Tchad Blake as assistant producer and engineer, respectively. Froom and Blake were known for the strange sonic experimentation they brought to projects by roots rockers (the Latin Playboys) and singer/songwriters (Richard Thompson, Suzanne Vega), and they helped Crow craft a similarly non-traditional record. Released in the fall of 1996, Sheryl Crow definitely bore the stamp of the singer's personality and songwriting voice, especially in the idiosyncratic lyrics; plus, she was now writing mostly with her guitarist, Jeff Trott, proving that she could cut it without her estranged collaborators. The singles "If It Makes You Happy," "Everyday Is a Winding Road," and "A Change Would Do You Good" were all radio smashes, and "Home" also became a minor hit. Sheryl Crow went triple platinum, and Crow brought home Grammys for Best Rock Album and another Best Female Rock Vocal (for "If It Makes You Happy").


Crow toured with the Lilith Fair package during the summer of 1997 (the first of several times), and subsequently wrote and performed the title theme to the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies. In the fall of 1998, she returned with her third album, The Globe Sessions. A more straightforward, traditionalist rock record than Sheryl Crow, The Globe Sessions didn't dominate the airwaves in quite the same fashion, but it did become her third straight platinum-selling, Top Ten LP, and it won her another Grammy for Best Rock Album. It also spawned two mid-sized hits in the Top 20: "My Favorite Mistake" and "Anything but Down." In 1999, she contributed a Grammy-winning cover of Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child o' Mine" to the soundtrack of the Adam Sandler comedy Big Daddy. She also performed a special free concert in New York's Central Park, with an array of guest stars including Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, Chrissie Hynde, the Dixie Chicks, Stevie Nicks, and Sarah McLachlan. The show was broadcast on Fox and later released as the album Live in Central Park, just in time for the holidays. "There Goes the Neighborhood" won her another Grammy for Best Female Rock Vocal; however, partly because of some shaky performances, the album flopped badly, not even going gold.

Hit with a case of writer's block, Crow took some time to deliver her fourth studio LP. In the meantime, she produced several tracks on Stevie Nicks' 2001 album, Trouble in Shangri-La, and also recorded a duet with Kid Rock, "Picture," for his album Cocky. Finally, in the spring of 2002, Crow released C'mon C'mon, which entered the LP charts at number two for her highest positioning yet. It quickly went platinum, and the lead single, "Soak up the Sun," was a Top 20 hit and another ubiquitous radio smash. The follow-up, "Steve McQueen," was also a lesser hit. At the beginning of 2005 it was announced that there would be two simultaneously released new albums available by the end of the year. The project was then scaled back to the single disc Wildflower which saw release at the end of September. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:03 PM
JOAN JETT

By playing pure and simple rock & roll without making an explicit issue of her gender, Joan Jett became a figurehead for several generations of female rockers.


Jett's brand of rock & roll is loud and stripped-down, yet with overpowering hooks -- a combination of the Stones' tough, sinewy image and beat, AC/DC chords, and glam rock hooks. As the numerous covers she has recorded show, she adheres both to rock tradition and breaks with it -- she plays classic three-chord rock & roll, yet she also loves the trashy elements (in particular, Gary Glitter) of it as well, and she plays with a defiant sneer. From her first band, the Runaways, through her hit-making days in the '80s with the Blackhearts right until her unexpected revival in the '90s, she hasn't changed her music, yet she's kept her quality control high, making one classic single ("I Love Rock 'n Roll") along the way.


Jett was born in Philadelphia, PA; her family moved to Los Angeles when she was 12 years old. By the time she was 15, she had formed her first band and was performing around town. Kim Fowley, a Los Angeles record producer, discovered the band at one of their gigs and became their manager; soon, he renamed the all-female group the Runaways and secured them a contract with Mercury Records. The band released three albums that never had much commercial success in America, yet were very popular in Japan; the group was popular in both the Los Angeles hard rock and punk scenes, which led to Jett's production of the Germs' first record, (GI). The Runaways group broke up in 1980 and Jett moved to New York to begin a solo career.


Teaming up with producer/manager Kenny Laguna, Jett independently released her self-titled debut album in 1980 in America, since no labels were interested in signing her. The record was a more traditional rock & roll record than the punky Runaways, yet it retained her previous band's defiant attitude. The record sold very well for an independent release, leading to a contract with Boardwalk Records, who reissued the album under the title Bad Reputation; it soon climbed to number 51 on the American charts.


Jett formed the Blackhearts between Bad Reputation and her second album, 1981's I Love Rock-n-Roll; the group included guitarist Ricky Byrd, bassist Gary Ryan, and drummer Lee Crystal. Released at the end of 1981, I Love Rock-n-Roll became her greatest success, sending her into the Top Ten. Originally the B-side of an Arrows single, the title track was an enormous success, spending seven weeks at number one in the spring of 1982. The follow-up single, a version of Tommy James & the Shondells' "Crimson and Clover," went Top Ten as well; a single of Gary Glitter's "Do You Wanna Touch Me (Oh Yeah)," taken from the Bad Reputation album, reached number 20 in the summer of 1982. Album, released in 1983, went gold yet had no hits that compared with either "I Love Rock 'n Roll" or "Crimson and Clover."

Jett starred in Paul Schrader's 1987 film Light of Day, which featured the Top 40 title song, yet she didn't have another Top Ten hit until 1988, when "I Hate Myself for Loving You," taken from the Up Your Alley album, hit number eight; the album became her second platinum record. After the album's success, her career had another slow period, with 1990's all-covers album The Hit List making it to number 36 and 1991's Notorious failing to chart. Between Notorious and 1994's Pure and Simple, a new generation of female rockers came of age and everyone from hard alternative rockers like L7 to the minimalist, riot grrrl punk rockers like Bikini Kill claimed Jett and the Runaways as an influence. As a consequence, Pure and Simple received more press and positive reviews than any of her albums since the mid-'80s. In 1995, Jett recorded the live album Evilstig with the remaining members of the Gits, a Seattle punk rock band whose lead singer, Mia Zapata, was raped and murdered in 1993. Jett reunited with the Blackhearts for the 1999 album Fetish, and in 2006 Sinner, a return to her punk roots (and ten of whose 14 songs were found on the 2004 Japanese-only record Naked), came out. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:07 PM
BIKINI KILL

The point band of the early-'90s riot grrrl movement, Olympia, WA's Bikini Kill exploded onto the male-dominated indie rock scene by fusing the visceral power of punk with

the impassioned ideals of feminism. Calling for "Revolution Girl Style Now," the group's fiercely polemical and anthemic music helped give rise to a newly empowered generation of women in rock, presaging the dominance female artists would enjoy throughout the decade.


Bikini Kill formed in the late '80s at Olympia's liberal Evergreen College, where students Kathleen Hanna, Tobi Vail, and Kathi Wilcox first teamed to publish a feminist fanzine, also dubbed Bikini Kill. Seeking to bring the publication's agenda to life, they decided to form a band, enlisting guitarist Billy Boredom (born William Karren) to round out the lineup. Led by singer/songwriter Hanna, a former stripper, the group laced its incendiary live performances with aggressive political stances that challenged the accepted hierarchy of the underground music community; slam dancers were forced to mosh at the fringes of the stage so that women could remain at the front of the crowd, for example, and female audience members were often invited to take control of the microphone to openly discuss issues of sexual abuse and misconduct.

In 1991, Bikini Kill issued their first recording, Revolution Girl Style Now, an independently distributed demo cassette. For their first official release, the quartet signed with the aggressively independent Olympia-based label Kill Rock Stars; the Bikini Kill EP, produced by Fugazi's Ian Mackaye, consisted largely of reworked versions of material from the first cassette. In 1992, the band issued Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, a split 12" released with the British group Huggy Bear's Our Troubled Youth on its flip side; a subsequent U.K. tour with Huggy Bear in early 1993 raised the visibility of the riot grrrl groundswell to unprecedented heights, and the movement became the focus of many media outlets on both sides of the Atlantic. When Bikini Kill returned to the U.S., they joined forces with Joan Jett, whom the band held up as an early paragon of riot grrrl aesthetics. Jett produced the group's next single, the bracing "New Radio"/"Rebel Girl," and Hanna returned the favor by co-writing the song "Spinster" for the Jett album Pure and Simple. In 1994, Bikini Kill released Pussy Whipped; their most potent effort to date, it featured the songwriting emergence of both Vail and Wilcox, a trend continued on 1996's Reject All American. The group quietly disbanded in early 1998. ~ Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:12 PM
KATE BUSH

One of the most successful and popular solo female acts of the past 20 years to come out of England, Kate Bush is also one of the most unusual, with her keening vocals and


unusually literate and complex body of songs. As a girl, Catherine Bush amused herself playing an organ in the barn behind her parents' house. By the time she was a teenager, Bush was writing songs of her own. A family friend, Ricky Hopper, heard her music and arranged for a demo to be recorded, which brought Bush to the attention of Pink Floyd lead guitarist David Gilmour. By the time Bush was 16, she had signed to EMI Records, though the company made the decision to bring her along slowly. She studied dance, mime, and voice, and continued writing. By 1977, she was ready to enter the recording studio and begin her formal career, which she did with an original song, "Wuthering Heights," based on material from Emily Brontë's novel.


"Wuthering Heights" rose to number one on the British charts. Bush became an overnight sensation at the age of 17 and was obligated to turn in an accompanying album in short order. This she did with The Kick Inside, a collection of material she had written over the previous three years; the album reached number three and sold over a million copies in the U.K.


Bush's second album, Lionheart, reached number six but didn't achieve anything like the sales totals or critical acclaim of its predecessor. In England during the spring of 1979, Bush embarked on what proved to be the only concert tour of her career to date, playing a series of shows highlighted by 17 costume changes, lots of dancing, and complex lighting. The tour proved both exhausting and financially disastrous, and Bush has avoided any but the most limited live concert appearances since, primarily in support of certain charitable causes.


By this time, Bush was established as one of the most challenging and eccentric artists ever to have achieved success in rock music, with a range of sounds and interests that constantly challenged listeners. "Babooshka" (1980) became her first Top Five single since "Wuthering Heights," and her subsequent album Never for Ever entered the British charts at number one in September of 1980. During this period, Bush began co-producing her own work, a decisive step toward refining her sound and also establishing her independence from her record company. Although 1982's The Dreaming reached number three, the single "There Goes a Tenner" failed to reach the charts, and most observers felt that Bush had lost her audience. Bush was unfazed by the criticism, and even began taking steps to make herself more independent of her record company by establishing a home studio.

After two years' absence, Bush re-emerged in August of 1985 with "Running Up That Hill," which reached number three on the English charts and became her second biggest-selling single. The accompanying album, Hounds of Love, the first record made at her 48-track home studio, debuted on the British charts at the number one position in September of 1985 and remained there for a full month, and soon after "Running Up That Hill" gave Bush her long-awaited American breakthrough, reaching number 30 on Billboard's charts. The changes in her sound and her development as a writer/performer were showcased in the January 1987 best-of collection The Whole Story. That same year, Bush won the Best British Female Artist award at the sixth annual BRIT Awards in London. In October of 1989, Bush's first new album in almost four years, The Sensual World, reached the British number two spot. Bush's next album, The Red Shoes (1993), debuted in the American Top 30, the first time one of her albums had ever charted that high. It would be another 12 years before Bush would resume her recording career. Rumors of a new album began circulating in the late '90s. During this time, Bush became a mother and quietly retreated to her countryside home on Berkshire, Reading, England. In 2005, Bush finally released her follow-up to The Red Shoes, the double-disc set Aerial. ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:17 PM
Melissa Etheridge

Melissa Etheridge became one of the '90s most popular recording artists due to her mixture of confessional lyrics; pop-based folk-rock; and raspy,
Janis Joplin/Rod Stewart-esque vocals. But the road to stardom was not all smooth sailing for Etheridge as she debated behind the scenes whether or not to disclose to the public that she was gay early on in her career. Born May 29, 1961, in Leavenworth, KS, Etheridge first picked up the guitar at the age of eight and began penning her own songs shortly thereafter. Playing in local bands throughout her teens, Etheridge then attended the renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA. The up-and-coming singer/songwriter and guitarist dropped out after a year before making her way to Los Angeles in the early '80s to give a shot at a career in music. Etheridge's music at this point was slightly more bluesy than her subsequently renowned folk-pop style, as a demo of original compositions caught the attention of Bill Leopold, who signed on as Etheridge's manager. Soon after, steady gigs began coming her way, including a five-night-a-week residency at the Executive Suite in Long Beach, which led to a bidding war between such major record labels as A&M, Capitol, EMI, and Warner Bros., but it was Island Records that Etheridge decided to go with.


Etheridge's first recorded work appeared on the forgotten soundtrack to the Nick Nolte prison movie Weeds before her self-titled debut was issued in 1988. The album quickly drew comparisons to such heavyweights as Bruce Springsteen and John Mellencamp, as it spawned the hit single "Bring Me Some Water" and earned gold certification. In the wake of the album's success, Etheridge performed at the Grammy Awards the following year and contributed vocals to Don Henley's The End of the Innocence. Etheridge managed to avoid the dreaded sophomore slump with 1989's Brave and Crazy, which followed the same musical formula as its predecessor and proved to be another gold-certified success. It would be nearly three years before Etheridge's next studio album appeared, however, and 1992 signaled the arrival of Never Enough, an album that proved to be more musically varied.

But it was Etheridge's fourth release that would prove to be her massive commercial breakthrough. Tired of rumors and questions regarding her sexuality, Etheridge decided to put the speculation to rest once and for all, titling the album Yes I Am. Ex-Police producer Hugh Padgham guided the album, which spawned two major MTV/radio hits with "I'm the Only One" and "Come to My Window" (the latter of which featured a video with movie actress Juliette Lewis); the album would sell a staggering six million copies in the U.S. during a single-year period and earned a 1995 Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocalist. But subsequent releases failed to match the success of Yes I Am, including 1995's Your Little Secret, 1999's Breakdown, and 2001's Skin, the latter of which dealt with her separation from Julie Cypher. (Cypher had birthed the couple's two children via artificial insemination; CSN&Y's David Crosby was the father). 2002 saw the release of Etheridge's autobiography The Truth Is: My Life in Love and Music, and 2004's Lucky was her celebration of a new romance. Later that same year Etheridge revealed that she'd been diagnosed with breast cancer. But early detection allowed for recovery, and she gave strength to many of those stricken by the disease with a powerful performance of Janis Joplin's "Piece of My Heart" at the 47th Annual Grammys, held in February 2005. That September Etheridge released Greatest Hits The Road Less Traveled, a compilation of career highlights and new material. It featured a cover of Tom Petty's "Refugee" as well as "Piece of My Heart" and a new song dedicated to breast cancer survivors. ~ Greg Prato, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:20 PM
THE DONNAS

Aspiring to nothing more than a good old-fashioned rock & roll party, the Donnas won a cult following and considerable media attention in the late '90s after scoring a record deal
right out of high school. Early on, they were invariably described as "the Ramones meet the Runaways," with a definite emphasis on the former (they'd even adopted identical first names as a tribute). But their bratty high-school-delinquent image was clearly indebted to the latter, as their songs concerned themselves mostly with boys, booze, drugs, and hated classmates. As the Donnas grew up and polished their technical abilities, their music evolved into a distinctly female take on cock-rock metal, drawing more from AC/DC, Kiss, and Mötley Crüe than from punk. Some critics praised their cheerfully crude adoption of male sexual bravado; others complained that the band's music never transcended its vintage influences, and remained suspicious that their naughty-girl packaging was a bigger part of their appeal.


The Donnas were originally formed in May 1993, when all four members (all born in 1979) were still in the eighth grade together in Palo Alto, CA. Calling themselves Ragady Anne at first, they played covers of groups like R.E.M., L7, the Muffs, and Shonen Knife, and entered a junior-high battle of the bands just one month after forming. During high school, they kept practicing virtually every afternoon, and soon moved into riot grrrl territory with inspiration from bands like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile (though it was more musical than political). In early 1995, Ragady Anne released a 7" EP on the local Radio Trash label, but soon changed their name to the Electrocutes and adopted a trashy jailbait image and a loud-fast-rules aesthetic. They gigged around the Bay Area that year and were spotted by Darin Raffaelli, a onetime member of trash-punkers Supercharger and head of the small Radio X label. Raffaelli had written a cache of Ramones-style songs for a hypothetical girl band, and approached the Electrocutes about recording them.


Deciding that the songs didn't fit the Electrocutes' metal-queen style, the girls created Ramones-worshipping alter egos known as the Donnas, even going so far as to mock them in Electrocutes interviews as though they were different people. Thus, vocalist Brett Anderson, guitarist Allison Robertson, bassist Maya Ford, and drummer Torry Castellano became Donna A., Donna R., Donna F., and Donna C. Before 1995 was out, they played their first gig as the Donnas, and released their first single under that name on Radio X. Two more followed in 1996, the last one on Raffaelli's new imprint, Super*teem. Meanwhile, they hadn't yet abandoned their identity as the Electrocutes, and in fact recorded an album called Steal Yer Lunch Money during 1996; however, it wasn't released until three years later, when Sympathy for the Record Industry acquired the rights in the wake of the Donnas' eventual success.


In 1997, the Donnas recorded a self-titled debut album for Super*teem, using songs ghostwritten by Raffaelli. Critics charged that Raffaelli was acting as the band's Svengali, likening their relationship to that of Kim Fowley and the Runaways; both sides vehemently denied that that was the case, and eventually severed their professional relationship to avoid fueling more speculation. Following the release of The Donnas, the group took a week off from its senior year of high school to tour Japan. After graduation, they postponed plans for college and accepted an offer to sign with Bay Area indie Lookout, the original home of Green Day. Their label debut, American Teenage Rock 'n' Roll Machine, was released in early 1998, and did feature some uncredited songwriting input from Raffaelli. The Donnas quickly became underground punk favorites, and even landed some attention from mainstream media like MTV.


The Donnas' third album, Get Skintight, appeared in 1999 and marked the first time the band composed its material with no outside assistance. A distinct hard rock influence began to creep into their compositions, underlined by their cover of Mötley Crüe's "Too Fast for Love"; they even opened a show for Cinderella. That year, they also appeared in the teen comedies Jawbreaker and Drive Me Crazy, the latter as the Electrocutes. In early 2001, the band issued The Donnas Turn 21, which continued their move away from punk and toward the hard rock mainstream of 15-20 years previous (this time the cover was Judas Priest's "Living After Midnight"). The album received some of their weakest reviews to date, generally from critics who felt that their party-hardy subject matter was starting to feel forced.

Nonetheless, the Donnas caught the attention of major label Atlantic, who signed them up in late 2001. Launched with a new wave of publicity, the Donnas' label debut, Spend the Night, arrived in 2002 and became their first album to break into the Top 100 of the pop charts. It also earned them their biggest radio hit to date in the single "Take It Off," whose video also got some MTV airplay. In the summer of 2003, the Donnas played the main stage on the revived Lollapalooza tour. ~ Steve Huey, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:22 PM
L7

Although often lumped in with the "Seattle Movement" of the early '90s (due to their sound, look, and attitude), the all-female punk band L7 hailed originally from Los Angeles.
The seeds for L7 (whose name was taken from a slang term in the '50s that meant someone who was a "square") were planted in 1985, when a pair of guitarists/singers, Suzi Gardner and Donita Sparks, decided to start a band. Over the next few years, the group extended its lineup to include bassist Jennifer Finch and drummer Dee Plakas, as their sound grew more and more metallic, yet never losing the attack and simplicity of punk. 1988 saw the group signed by the Epitaph label, which issued their self-titled debut the same year and the group spent the better part of the next few years touring the world. L7 issued Smell the Magic for the Sub Pop label in 1991, and the same year formed the Rock for Choice non-profit organization. Raising money and awareness for pro-rights, the organization put on several benefit shows over the years, featuring such noted performers as Nirvana, Hole, Pearl Jam, and Neil Young, among others.

With Nirvana finally bringing punk to the mainstream, bands such as L7 suddenly became "en vogue" as the quartet was signed to Slash/Reprise, issuing their best-known album with the Butch Vig-produced Bricks Are Heavy in April of 1992 (which spawned the popular MTV hit "Pretend We're Dead"). L7's follow-up, 1994's Hungry for Stink, failed to expand the group's following despite being part of the 1994 version of the traveling U.S. alt rock festival Lollapalooza. Bassist Finch left the group shortly thereafter (eventually replaced by former Belly bassist Gail Greenwood) and the group issued such further releases as 1997's The Beauty Process: Triple Platinum, 1998's Live: Omaha to Osaka, and 1999's Slap-Happy, while the group was also the subject of a 1998 concert film made by former Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic, also titled The Beauty Process. In 2000, a 12-track retrospective collection was issued, Best of L7: The Slash Years. ~ Greg Prato, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:24 PM
HOLE

Throughout Hole's career, vocalist/guitarist Courtney Love's notorious public image has overshadowed her band's music. In their original incarnation, Hole was one of the noisiest, most abrasive alternative bands performing in the early '90s. By
the time of their second album, 1994's Live Through This, the band had smoothed out many of their rougher edges, also adding more melodies and hooks to their songwriting. Through both versions of Hole, Love's combative, assaultive persona permeated the group's music and lyrics, giving the band a tense, unpredictable edge even at their quietest moments. Love formed Hole in Los Angeles in 1989, recruiting guitarist Eric Erlandson through a newspaper ad. Love had played with numerous bands before Hole, including early versions of both Babes in Toyland and Faith No More. Erlandson and Love eventually drafted bassist Jill Emery and drummer Caroline Rue into the band, recording their first album with producer Kim Gordon, the bassist for Sonic Youth. The violent and uncompromising Pretty on the Inside, Hole's debut record, was released on Caroline Records in 1991 to numerous positive reviews, especially in the British weekly music press.


In early 1992, Courtney Love married Kurt Cobain, the lead singer/songwriter of Nirvana. For a couple of months, the couple was the king and queen of the new rock world; soon, that world came crashing in. Cobain became addicted to heroin and the couple fought to keep custody of their baby after a piece in Vanity Fair accused Love of shooting heroin while pregnant, charges which she vehemently denied at the time; she would later admit that she had taken small quantities of the drug. By 1993, their private world had settled down somewhat, with Cobain and Love recording new albums with their respective bands.


Halfway through 1993, Love reassembled Hole with Erlandson, adding bassist Kristen M. Pfaff and drummer Patty Schemel. Hole was set to release their first major-label album, the more pop-oriented Live Through This, on DGC Records in April of 1994. Advance word on the album was overwhelmingly positive, with many critics calling it one of the best records of the year. Four days before the album was released, Kurt Cobain's body was discovered in the couple's Seattle home; he had died of a self-inflicted shotgun wound three days before.


Two months after Cobain's death, Kristen M. Pfaff was found dead of a heroin overdose in a Seattle apartment, with rumors swirling that Love (understandably distraught over the recent tragedies) was abusing the drug as well. Two months later, Hole began touring again, with bassist Melissa Auf Der Maur taking Pfaff's place. "Doll Parts" was released as a single late in 1994, climbing into the Top 60 by the beginning of 1995. Live Through This topped many critics' polls at the end of the year, including Rolling Stone and the Village Voice. Shortly thereafter, Hole toured with the fifth Lollapalooza tour, staying on the road for the remainder of the year.


Despite all the hardships, the album became the group's commercial breakthrough, spawning several MTV/radio hits and being certified platinum early the following year. The band went on an extended hiatus afterwards, during which time many assumed the band had broken up when it appeared that Love was focusing more on her burgeoning acting career (Feeling Minnesota, The People vs. Larry Flynt) than music. To satisfy their fans' demand for new music, two rarities collections were issued -- the 1995 EP Ask for It and the 1997 import My Body, the Hand Grenade.


After numerous delays, the band finally regrouped to work on a follow-up to Live Through This, with longtime friend Billy Corgan signed on to be a musical consultant. The album was finally issued in September of 1998 to favorable reviews, but Schemel left the band (for reasons unknown) around the same time. Former drummer for New York City alt-rockers Shift, Samantha Maloney, filled the vacant slot as the group embarked on their first substantial tour in two years. By the tour's completion, Auf Der Maur had left to join the Smashing Pumpkins, while Maloney eventually served as a stand-in drummer for Mötley Crüe. Even though Skin was certified platinum shortly after its release, Love was unhappy with the way the album was handled by her record company and felt stifled by her contract, eventually bringing a lawsuit against the Universal Music Group trying to terminate her contract (she still owes five more albums under her current agreement), so she can release music via the Internet.

The future of Hole became even more uncertain in early 2001, when Love announced plans to launch a new outfit, called Bastard. Signing with Epitaph, the band consisted of Love, former Veruca Salt guitarist Louise Post, former Rockit Girl bassist Gina Crosley, and to the delight of longtime Hole fans, Schemel is back on drums. In typical Love style, this lineup eventually dissolved into only her and Schemel and the group essentially broke up before it even began. Despite the lack of any substancial project, Love finally announced the end of Hole in May of 2002. Unlike her often bitter press situations, she claimed that the situation was friendly and she would still remain friends with the previous members of the band. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine & Greg Prato, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 7th, 2006, 12:02 AM
Soon more bios

Talita Kumi
Aug 7th, 2006, 12:09 AM
CONCRETE BLONDE: JOHNETTE NAPOLITANO:rocker2:

http://starbulletin.com/2002/05/13/features/artb.jpg

http://www.extraheavymarcellus.com/mt/images/conblon1004a.jpg

http://www.concertshots.com/July%20Images/cs-ConcreteBlonde2-Atlanta71202.JPG

LegionArgentina
Aug 7th, 2006, 10:53 PM
PAT BENATER

Pat Benatar's polished mainstream rock made her one of the more popular female vocalists of the early '80s. Although she came on like an arena rocker with her power
chords, tough sexuality, and powerful vocals, her music was straight rock underneath all the bluster. Born Patricia Andrzejewski on January 10, 1953, in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, the singer was raised in the nearby town of Lindenhurst on Long Island, NY. Benatar began singing regularly in the New York City area by the '70s, where she was discovered at the Catch a Rising Star club and signed by Chrysalis Records. Backed by a stellar band led by guitarist Neil Geraldo (who the singer would later marry) that provided the perfect accompaniment that was able to effortlessly alternate between rockers and ballads. Benatar quickly established herself as one of rock's top vocalists, scoring a hit right of the bat with her debut album, 1979's In the Heat of the Night, which spawned such radio favorites as "Heartbreaker" and "I Need a Lover" (the latter of which was written by a then-unknown John Mellencamp).


Benatar's sophomore effort, 1980's Crimes of Passion, more than delivered on the debut's promise and it's often considered to be the finest recording of her career. Spurred on by such classic rock radio standards as "Hit Me With Your Best Shot," "Treat Me Right," and "You Better Run," the album was certified platinum shortly after its release and Benatar became a certified arena headliner in the U.S. Benatar also became one of the most-played artists during MTV's early days, received several Grammy Awards around this time, and continued to enjoy massive hits and sold-out tours throughout the early to mid-'80s, including such albums as 1981's Precious Time, 1982's Get Nervous, 1983's Live from Earth, 1984's Tropico, 1985's Seven the Hard Way, and 1988's Wide Awake in Dreamland, plus the singles "Fire & Ice," "Promises in the Dark," "Shadows of the Night," "Love Is a Battlefield," "We Belong," and "Invincible." But by the end of the decade, it appeared as though Benatar had fallen of the face of the Earth as the hits seemed to dry up.

Benatar opted to shift musical gears and issue an album of blues and R&B, 1991's True Love, which failed to return the singer back to the top of the charts. Benatar returned back to her patented arena rock sound with such further studio releases as 1993's Gravity's Rainbow and 1997's Innamorata (although the latter of which was largely acoustic-based) and while the albums didn't exactly measure up to her earlier releases, both were solid efforts. The late '90s saw a pair of live archival releases hit record store shelves, 1998's 8-15-80 and 1999's The King Biscuit Flower Hour Live, in addition to countless hits collections (although the best of the bunch proved to be 1989's Best Shots, which remains a steady seller to this day). The singer began touring again by the middle of the decade (after taking a five-year hiatus from the road), co-headlining shows with REO Speedwagon, Fleetwood Mac, the Steve Miller Band, and Styx. She also continued to dabble in acting, appearing in the ABC Afterschool Special Torn Between Two Fathers and on various sitcoms. In August 2003, Benatar returned to recording with Go (Vanguard), her first studio LP since 1997's Innamorata. The LP revisited the arena rock/MOR sound that had defined Benatar's career, and was accompanied by an extensive tour. ~ Greg Prato & Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 7th, 2006, 10:56 PM
CAT POWER

Cat Power was the alias of Chan Marshall, a Southern-bred singer/songwriter whose father, Charlie, was an itinerant pianist. After dropping out of high school,


Marshall found herself in New York; performing under the name Cat Power, she was booked as the opening act for Liz Phair, where she met Sonic Youth drummer Steve Shelley and Two Dollar Guitar's Tim Foljahn, who agreed to become her backing band. Following the release of 1995's Dear Sir and 1996's Myra Lee -- both recorded on the same day -- Cat Power signed to Matador for 1996's What Would the Community Think?, which won acclaim for Marshall's unsettling, emotional songs and cathartic vocals.

The superb Moon Pix followed two years later, and in the spring of 2000 Cat Power resurfaced with The Covers Record. Released in 2003, You Are Free featured a lusher, more polished sound as well as cameos by Dave Grohl and Eddie Vedder; 2006's The Greatest was recorded in Memphis, TN, with legendary soul players including guitarist/songwriter Mabon "Teenie" Hodges, bassist Leroy "Flick" Hodges, and drummer Steve Potts. ~ Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 7th, 2006, 11:00 PM
BONNIE RAITT

Long a critic's darling, singer/guitarist Bonnie Raitt did not begin to win the comparable commercial success due her until the release of the aptly titled 1989 blockbuster


Nick of Time; her tenth album, it rocketed her into the mainstream consciousness nearly two decades after she first committed her unique blend of blues, rock, and R&B to vinyl. Born in Burbank, CA, on November 8, 1949, she was the daughter of Broadway star John Raitt, best known for his starring performances in such smashes as Carousel and Pajama Game. After picking up the guitar at the age of 12, Raitt felt an immediate affinity for the blues, and although she went off to attend Radcliffe in 1967, within two years she had dropped out to begin playing the Boston folk and blues club circuit. Signing with noted blues manager Dick Waterman, she was soon performing alongside the likes of idols including Howlin' Wolf, Sippie Wallace, and Mississippi Fred McDowell and in time earned such a strong reputation that she was signed to Warner Bros.


Debuting in 1971 with an eponymously titled effort, Raitt immediately emerged as a critical favorite, applauded not only for her soulful vocals and thoughtful song selection but also for her guitar prowess, turning heads as one of the few women to play bottleneck. Her 1972 follow-up, Give It Up, made better use of her eclectic tastes, featuring material by contemporaries like Jackson Browne and Eric Kaz, in addition to a number of R&B chestnuts and even three Raitt originals. 1973's Takin' My Time was much acclaimed, and throughout the middle of the decade she released an LP annually, returning with Streetlights in 1974 and Home Plate a year later. With 1977's Sweet Forgiveness, Raitt scored her first significant pop airplay with her hit cover of the Del Shannon classic "Runaway"; its follow-up, 1979's The Glow, appeared around the same time as a massive all-star anti-nuclear concert at Madison Square Garden mounted by MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy), an organization she'd co-founded earlier.

Throughout her career, Raitt remained a committed activist, playing hundreds of benefit concerts and working tirelessly on behalf of the Rhythm and Blues Foundation. By the early '80s, however, her own career was in trouble -- 1982's Green Light, while greeted with the usual good reviews, again failed to break her to a wide audience, and while beginning work on the follow-up, Warners unceremoniously dropped her. By this time, Raitt was also battling drug and alcohol problems as well; she worked on a few tracks with Prince, but their schedules never aligned and the material went unreleased. Instead, she finally released the patchwork Nine Lives in 1986, her worst-selling effort since her debut. Many had written Raitt off when she teamed with producer Don Was and recorded Nick of Time; seemingly out of the blue, the LP won a handful of Grammys, including Album of the Year, and overnight she was a superstar. 1991's Luck of the Draw was also a smash, yielding the hits "Something to Talk About" and "I Can't Make You Love Me." After 1994's Longing in Their Hearts, Raitt resurfaced in 1998 with Fundamental. Silver Lining appeared in 2002, followed by Souls Alike in 2005, both on Capitol Records. ~ Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 7th, 2006, 11:04 PM
Soon more bios

K-Dog
Aug 8th, 2006, 08:18 AM
If No Doubt would've never made "Rock Steady," Gwen Stefani would've never lost cred a women of rock. But I think that she was a true woman of rock from about the beginning of No Doubt to "Return of Saturn." I'm listening to ROS and it is a great CD and def. a rock album. She should get more mentions and pics on here. Sure, "Rock Steady" and her solo efforts in "Love. Angel. Music. Baby." were not rock at all, but let's not forget about her rock history before she and her bandmates decided to sell-out because album sales for "Return of Saturn" were down from "Tragic Kingdom." Btw, "Tragic Kingdom" is one the best albums out there that was a mainstream record.

LegionArgentina
Aug 8th, 2006, 07:24 PM
Yeah i used to listen No Doubt.But her solo album is not rock

K-Dog
Aug 8th, 2006, 08:45 PM
Yeah i used to listen No Doubt.But her solo album is not rock
i know it isn't. she still is a woman of rock though.

Wintermute
Aug 8th, 2006, 09:26 PM
L7

Although often lumped in with the "Seattle Movement" of the early '90s (due to their sound, look, and attitude), the all-female punk band L7 hailed originally from Los Angeles.


How could I forget L7? I was never a fan but they did some pretty memorable stuff.

They played live on notorious late-night British show The Word and I think they ended up naked from the waist down! Also I seem to remember they played a tour in the UK and at one show they had a prize draw where the winner got a one-night-stand with the drummer. And they actually went through with it! :eek:

LegionArgentina
Aug 8th, 2006, 09:46 PM
L7 was an excellent band

Dawn Marie
Aug 9th, 2006, 12:00 AM
Kim Carnes

Lead singer of the cranberries.

Heart

Nancy Sinatra

Crissy from the pretenders.

LegionArgentina
Aug 10th, 2006, 02:06 AM
Kim was named before

LegionArgentina
Aug 10th, 2006, 06:04 PM
Soon more bios

LegionArgentina
Aug 12th, 2006, 01:36 PM
Aterciopelados

ciopelados are one of Columbia's top rock en español groups. The recipients of Grammy award nominations in 1997 and 1998, the band has fused its own sound by combining a





rock-solid approach with a variety of Latin American musical traditions including mariachi, bolero, tropical, and flamenco. Aterciopelados, whose name translates as "the Velvety Ones," was formed by former members of Delia y los Aminoacidos -- Andrea Echeberry, who plays acoustic guitar and sings lead, and Héctor Buitrago, who plays bass. Original drummer Andres Giraldo was replaced by Alejandro Duque in 1995 and original guitar player Charlie Marquez was replaced by Alejandro Gomez Caceras in 1997. ~ Craig Harris, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 12th, 2006, 01:41 PM
Julieta Venegas (solo)

One of the most gifted and accomplished -- and certainly one of the most respected -- artists in the Latin music sphere during the late '90s and into the next century,





Julieta Venegas enjoyed enormous acclaim during her run, and though commercial success took a little while to catch up with her, it eventually did with her third album, Sí. Born and raised in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, Venegas was the daughter of two photographers and was one of five siblings. She embarked on her musical journey at a young age, studying piano from the age of eight. In addition to piano, she also studied musical theory, singing, cello, and violoncello at La Escuela de Música del Noroeste, while she also crossed the border to study at South Western College in San Diego -- all of this before she even graduated from high school.


During her school years Venegas began playing with various bands, including Grupo Chantaje and Tijuana No! (composing one of the latter's more significant hits, "Pobre de Ti"). At the young age of 22 she packed her bags and moved to Mexico City, where she hoped to involve herself with the city's vibrant music scene. Given her talent (and beauty), it didn't take her long to make acquaintances, among them Fratta and Café Tacuba. She began writing music for plays around this time, including Calígula Probablemente by Francisco Franco, and she also took up the accordion. She then started a band called la Milagrosa, enlisting Fratta and Rafael González, but when she was offered a contract with BMG, she dropped the band idea and began work on her solo debut, Aquí, which she recorded in Los Angeles with esteemed producer Gustavo Santaolalla (Café Tacuba, Juanes, the Amores Perros soundtrack).


In addition to writing the songs on Aquí and singing them, Venegas also played the accordion, piano, and guitar; a number of guests also played on the album, among them brothers Joselo and Enrique Rangel (Café Tacuba), Rafael González (Botellita de Jerez), and Patricio Iglesias (Santa Sabina). BMG released the album not only throughout Latin America but also in the United States and Spain, and it won much acclaim for its excellence. She also toured a lot, embarking on the De Viva Voz tour with Ely Guerra and Aurora y la Academia (which stretched across North America) and the Calaveras y Diablitos tour with los Fabulosos Cadillacs and Aterciopelados (which hit the major cities of Spain). During this same late-'90s era, she contributed her in-demand talents to a number of albums by other artists (Enrique Bunbury, Mastretta) and to a number of soundtracks, too (En el País de No Pasa Nada, Amores Perros), and she performed at a number of major festivals.


During roughly this same time Venegas also wrote and recorded her second album, Bueninvento, released in 2000. A bit of a departure from her debut, Bueninvento was a more fully fledged rock en español album and features a backing band of veteran sessionmen: Joe Gore (guitar), Fernando Saunders (bass), Joey Waronker (drums), and Rick Boston (sax, flutes). More tours and soundtrack contributions followed: the Revolución tour with Jaguares, Jumbo, la Gusana Ciega, and Lisa Flores; the Fémina Rock tour with Aterciopelados, Maria Gabriela Epumer, and others; and the films Demasiado Amor, Sueno del Caimán, Asesino en Serio, María Llena Eres de Gracia, and Subterra. She also got her first Latin Grammy nominations: Best Rock Song for "Hoy No Queiro" and Best Rock Album for Bueninvento.


Following all of this activity, Venegas settled down in Madrid and Buenos Aires to record her third album, Sí, this time working with producers Coti Sorokin and Cachorro López rather than Santaolalla. An even bigger departure than Bueninvento was from Aquí, Sí was not only a shift in songwriting and musicianship but also a shift in emotion. In a word, it's happy -- a happy album charged with love and other such emotions, not the sort of serious, somber tones that shaded her past work. In terms of songwriting, Venegas collaborated with Sorokin for half the album, something she'd never done before -- co-write her own songs, that is. And too, she altered her arrangements, going for a poppier approach, and played around with programming different sorts of rhythms like hip-hop and reggae.

Sí ended up being her commercial breakthrough as it spun off one big hit after another. "Andar Conmigo," "Lento," and "Algo Está Cambiando" all charted highly, each successive single doing better than its predecessor. These hits helped drive sales of the album, which charted as high as number four on Billboard's Latin Pop chart, and she earned more Latin Grammy nominations, too, adding to her already too-long-to-list résumé. All of this success elevated the level of expectation preceding her next album, Limón y Sal, released in 2006. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Venegas worked again with Sorokin and López, turning out another sunny, happy, and altogether lovely album much like Sí. ~ Jason Birchmeier, All Music Guide

Tijuana No (band)

Mexican alternative band Tijuana No was formed by the end of the 1980s, playing under the name of No, at the beginning. Combining rock and traditional Mexican music, the act has





been mostly known for compromising itself in the defense of indigenous groups and writing eloquent lyrics about it. That main characteristic was made evident when the band played at a benefit for the Zapatista movement called Rock por Chiapas. Tijuana No's self-titled debut album was released in 1993, followed by 1994's Transgresores de La Ley. During the 1990s, the band had the opportunity to interact with local and U.S. numbers, while touring all around California. Tijuana No's third album, called Contra-Revolución Ave, came out in 1998. ~ Drago Bonacich, All Music Guide

LegionArgentina
Aug 12th, 2006, 07:37 PM
In her new solo cs Julieta have some rock song

Bette_Midler
Aug 18th, 2006, 06:52 PM
http://thehorrorofbeauty.myruin.com/photoplay/20.jpg


Tairrie B


-my ruin-

SpikeyAidanm
Aug 19th, 2006, 02:51 PM
My fav women in rock/alternative...

Kate Bush
Sarah Blasko
Martha Wainwright
Imogen Heap
Holly Throsby
Missy Higgins
Tori Amos
Clare Bowditch (Feeding Set)
Lisa Smith (Pony Up!)
Lisa Mitchell (lol watchout for her in Idol)
Amy Lee (Evanescene)
Katy Steele (Little Birdy)
Deborah Harry (Blondie)
Tarja Turunen (Nightwish)
Brody Dalle (The Distillers)
Lolly Hayes (Johnny Boy)
Adalita Srsen (Magic Dirt)
Meg White (The White Stripes)
Karen O (Yeah Yeah Yeahs)
Shirley Manson (Garbage)
Kori Gardner (Mates of State)
Patience Hodgson (The Grates)
Sarah Martin (Belle & Sebastian)
Kim Gordon (Sonic Youth)
Abi Harding (The Zutons)
Alison Goldfrapp (Goldfrapp)
Gwen Stefani (No Doubt)
Jenny Lewis (Rilo Kiley)
Kim Carnes (The Cranberries)
Zia McCabe (Dandy Warhols)
The Spazzys
Tegan & Sara

LegionArgentina
Aug 19th, 2006, 05:28 PM
Thanks for the pics

dreamgoddess099
Aug 19th, 2006, 05:46 PM
Skin from Skunk Anansie


http://www.skinmusic.net/images/fk_packshot.jpg


:rocker2:
I've got all her albums. She's great.

LegionArgentina
Apr 4th, 2007, 01:14 PM
Skunk Anansie

http://www.newsic.it/assets/images1/fo_in_skin1.jpg

LegionArgentina
Apr 4th, 2007, 01:19 PM
Carina Alfie (ARG)

http://www.katrinaguitar.com/assets/images/Katrinaguitar.jpg

http://www.alfiecarina.com.ar/metalhammer1.jpg

LegionArgentina
Apr 4th, 2007, 01:21 PM
The great Patti Smith

http://www.summerpierre.com/uploaded_images/Patti%20Smith%20-%20Leibovitz-740049.jpg

Martian Jeza
Apr 4th, 2007, 01:22 PM
My woman in rock is Amy Lee :hearts: :hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

sivvy
Apr 4th, 2007, 01:43 PM
from England - the delicious, delicable and very rockin P J Harvey

:worship: :worship: :worship: she is the best!


Sandra Nasic (of Guano Apes) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxPR3te4CGc
http://www.wienweb.at/pictures/pict20/big/wg20503.jpg
http://img74.imageshack.us/img74/4500/1624l0pu.jpg
http://st.blog.cz/a/angel4ever.blog.cz/obrazky/2752742.jpg

LegionArgentina
Apr 4th, 2007, 02:00 PM
Thanks sivvy :kiss:

Amy Lee

http://azilosamambaias.weblogger.terra.com.br/img/amy-lee.jpg

Fiona Apple
http://www.thelosscolumn.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/fiona.gif

mandy7
Apr 4th, 2007, 02:03 PM
The Veronicas

sivvy
Apr 4th, 2007, 02:11 PM
Karen O (of Yeah Yeah Yeahshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UiNr8T2Mrc
http://www.primaverasound.com/fotos/data/media/35/yeahyeahyeahs_m0136.jpg

Lunaris
Apr 4th, 2007, 03:40 PM
Vibeke Stene from norwegian gothic metal band Tristania.


http://z001.ig.com.br/ig/01/52/311412/blig/gothic_cross_666/imagens/tri_chimney046.jpg



Ihriel from norwegian alternative metal project called Peccatum.


http://strefa.rockmetal.art.pl/ankieta/ihriel.jpg



Norwegian doom/gothic metal band Octavia Sperati. Only women and male drummer.
SILJE WERGELAND - vocals
BODIL I. MYKLEBUST - guitar
GYRI S. LOSNEGAARD - guitar
TRINE C. JOHANSE - bass
TONE MIDTGAARD - keyboard


http://strefa.rockmetal.art.pl/sylwetki/octavia.jpg



Folk Metal band Lumsk from Norway with two female members.
Singer Stine Mari Langstrand and violin player Siv Lena Waterloo Laugtug

http://www.bladet-tromso.no/multimedia/archive/00018/stine-inn_18042h.jpg http://www.lumsk.de/bilder/sivlena2.jpg

Beat
Apr 4th, 2007, 05:00 PM
Oh! And Fergie from The Black Eyed Peas!
:lol: yeah, right.

Talita Kumi
Apr 4th, 2007, 07:43 PM
from England - the delicious, delicable and very rockin P J Harvey

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00004YW6I.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg


:rocker2:

Wintermute
Apr 4th, 2007, 10:31 PM
Wow. The Women In Rock thread is resurrected.

Polly Jean rules! :cool:

Martie
Apr 4th, 2007, 10:40 PM
Natalie Maines

LegionArgentina
Apr 5th, 2007, 06:39 PM
Karen O (of Yeah Yeah Yeahshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UiNr8T2Mrc
http://www.primaverasound.com/fotos/data/media/35/yeahyeahyeahs_m0136.jpg

I love her, she is crazy :lol:

*abby*
Apr 5th, 2007, 09:14 PM
sharon den adol- singer from dutch band within temptation

LegionArgentina
Apr 8th, 2007, 05:37 AM
Hilda Lizarazu

http://www.rollingstonela.com/musica/fotos/Pepsi1_2.jpg

Andrea Echeverri
http://photos9.flickr.com/14476583_ed204081ac.jpg

Sherly Crow

http://i.realone.com/assets/rn/img/4/2/4/1/8841424-8841427-slarge.jpg

Patrick S
Apr 8th, 2007, 11:52 AM
Satirnine is another good band. They sound quite a bit like Sahara Hotnights, maybe a bit harder. I don´t think anyone´s mentioned Gunnhild Sundli from norwegian punk/folk band Gåte, she´s amazing.