PDA

View Full Version : Murtha & 9/11 Comm. - NY Times - Please Don't Print Story on Banking


samsung101
Jun 27th, 2006, 03:27 PM
Murtha, Kean, and Hamiltion - the Congressman, and the
two 9/11 Commission heads - none of whom are big
Bush lovers - asked Keller and the NY Times not to
print the banking surveillance done to fight terrorism
in the USA by the Bush Administration.

But, they did it anyway.

Detail after detail. Handing over the information for
circulation and publicity.

If even three men who disdain Bush and Cheney in general, who have bashed their every move on 9/11,
and who regularly speak out against any terrorist
fighting misstep...asked Keller to hold off on the story
because it endangered American efforts to fight off
terrorism, isn't it worth thinking...maybe the NY Times
put itself above the safety of a nation.

The people in the security departments who leak this
information on purpose because they have a personal
agenda, should be prosecuted. It's illegal to give away
the classified information, and it's illegal to break the
confidentiality agreements almost all sign on to for
employment. Go after them the same way the powers
that be demanded a special prosecution in the Plame-
Wilson-Libby non-scandal scandal. Reporters are not
above the law, and as we saw with Miller and Cooper.

Gonzales should convene an investigation into the NSA
and the Banking leaks immediately.

SelesFan70
Jun 27th, 2006, 03:35 PM
At the very least they should yank the press credentials for the NYT from the White House.

Why doesn't the NYT get it about the terrorists? :shrug: Their Bush derangement syndrome is consuming (and dooming) them.

Philbo
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:02 PM
Murtha, Kean, and Hamiltion - the Congressman, and the
two 9/11 Commission heads - none of whom are big
Bush lovers - asked Keller and the NY Times not to
print the banking surveillance done to fight terrorism
in the USA by the Bush Administration.

But, they did it anyway.

Detail after detail. Handing over the information for
circulation and publicity.

If even three men who disdain Bush and Cheney in general, who have bashed their every move on 9/11,
and who regularly speak out against any terrorist
fighting misstep...asked Keller to hold off on the story
because it endangered American efforts to fight off
terrorism, isn't it worth thinking...maybe the NY Times
put itself above the safety of a nation.

The people in the security departments who leak this
information on purpose because they have a personal
agenda, should be prosecuted. It's illegal to give away
the classified information, and it's illegal to break the
confidentiality agreements almost all sign on to for
employment. Go after them the same way the powers
that be demanded a special prosecution in the Plame-
Wilson-Libby non-scandal scandal. Reporters are not
above the law, and as we saw with Miller and Cooper.

Gonzales should convene an investigation into the NSA
and the Banking leaks immediately.

Whether the they right to publish or not is open to debate. Im not sure where I stand on that - need to read up more.

But my first impression is one of relief that the press in the USA looks to be starting to do their job again. The role of the press in a free, democratic society is to challenge the government and bring out truth from the spin the government puts out there.

We all know in the lead up to the Iraqi Invasion the press completely dropped the bundle and almost acted as a cheerleader to Bush and the other Neocons in the lead up to a war fought on blatant lies.

I think the press have awoken to the fact, thanks in part to Bush's disastrous effort in dealing with katrina - they have realised to challenge the president is not unpatriotic, standing by and not doing their ordained job is whats unpatriotic.

So whether or not publising those details will help the terrorists is debatable, however I applaud the fact that the press in America are no longer imitating Fox news and cheering the president in whatever mistake he decides to make next...

samsung101
Jun 27th, 2006, 08:14 PM
The 9/11 Commission (which did not do a very good
job in terms of thoroughness) repeatedly wanted the
Administration (this one and future ones) to be more
pro-active, more robust in investigation.

When it is, and when it regularly consults with Congress
(as has been the case all along), it is now cited as being
too robust and aggressive. Well, make up your mind.

What is it we want?

The NY Times did not need to report this in such detail.
It chose to.

The same paper that gave us Judith Miller, who was hailed
as a hero, then pushed away as a lapdog for Bush, and
Jayson Blair, and others in recent years, is now giving
us this.

My feeling is that if we take terrorism seriously, and
Congress is consulted (as it was and has been), and
members of both parties are aware, then, it is something
we should keep track of.

In our high tech, 24/7, instant communication world,
there isn't much that is secret anyway anymore. Strangers
can get our personal info pretty easily. Check your junk
mail today, that's all because someone knows what you like,
where you shop, what you eat, how much you make, and
where you vacation, and they never had to ask you. They
buy your information.

Get rid of the leakers and prosecute them if they broke
the law. This isn't about Bush or Cheney, it's about our
national security, and the lives of soldiers are on the
line. If they don't like the Bush policy, the leakers should
quit, and then, free of their legal obligation to conceal
secret information, tell what they want and do it upfront.
Not via the NY Times and Bill Keller.

*JR*
Jun 27th, 2006, 08:27 PM
Get rid of the leakers and prosecute them if they broke
the law. This isn't about Bush or Cheney, it's about our
national security, and the lives of soldiers are on the
line. If they don't like the Bush policy, the leakers should
quit, and then, free of their legal obligation to conceal
secret information, tell what they want and do it upfront.
Not via the NY Times and Bill Keller.
Wouldn't that publicize the information anyway? :confused:

Helen Lawson
Jun 27th, 2006, 08:54 PM
I don't know why people are so outraged at snooping in bank accounts. Banks are awful, you could send a chimp into the lobby with a fake subpoena on a piece of toilet paper and the bank would produce it. You wouldn't believe the stuff I've gotten from banks that I didn't even ask for.