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griffin
Jun 26th, 2006, 09:27 PM
Ok, I'm about ready to take a small step into the 21st century and purchase a digital camera. Anyone have any advice?

It would need to be light enough for me to take hiking, fairly sturdy since I'm taking it hiking - and I'm a klutz - and obviously take decent pics outside. That said, I don't need National Geographic-quality photos. What's worth the extra money? What's a waste of time?

(yeah, yeah, I know there have been threads on this, but the search function doesn't work for me either)

gentenaire
Jun 26th, 2006, 09:32 PM
I've always been told the real camera brands are the best: Canon and Nikon.
Sony is pretty good too, has good lenses. Panasonic now has a nice digital camera with a decent lens as well. I forgot the name of their camera brand. My sister's newest digital camera is a Panasonic. They got it because of the large optical zoom (when looking at zoom, pay no attention to digital zoom, it's the optical zoom that counts).
I have a Canon Powershot S50 and am very happy with it. It's fairly sturdy. There are times when I wish it was a little lighter, OTOH, at least I can keep it stable. My brother got a much smaller Canon and it's really tiny. I think they would have preferred something a little bigger.

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 09:38 PM
Ok, I'm about ready to take a small step into the 21st century and purchase a digital camera. Anyone have any advice?

It would need to be light enough for me to take hiking, fairly sturdy since I'm taking it hiking - and I'm a klutz - and obviously take decent pics outside. That said, I don't need National Geographic-quality photos. What's worth the extra money? What's a waste of time?

(yeah, yeah, I know there have been threads on this, but the search function doesn't work for me either)

lol,

ok so let me see if i understand correctly:
small
lightweight
sturdy

maybe
some zoom
weather-proof for hiking.

do you want to take pictures of the view will hiking or just take pictures of family and friends.

what is your price range?

do want manual control override? or would you rather have lots of pre set modes to choose from (party, snow, night time, ect.?

griffin
Jun 26th, 2006, 10:08 PM
I do take pictures of family and friends, but it seems that most of what I want pictures of happens outside. It would be ideal if the thing could handle a variety of situations and lighting conditions - sometimes I'm dealing with things that hold still (plants, sunsets, people posing), sometimes not (the dogs, wildlife). Capacity for panoramic views would be nice.

Manual control is not that important - if I get to the point where I think I have the patience and skill for manual control to matter, I'd invest and upgrade.

If I wind up paying for it myself, I could go as high as $300 - if I can get someone to chip in as a present, who knows. At this stage I don't even know what money buys what features. Obviously, different models are going to have trade-offs. If I had to pick between say more zoom and a panoramic view option, I'd pick the zoom. Light weight vs. storage capacity, I'm going with weight (within reason). I probably won't be printing my own photos in the near future, although my sort-of-step-mom may decide to do it for me now and again.

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 10:19 PM
I do take pictures of family and friends, but it seems that most of what I want pictures of happens outside. It would be ideal if the thing could handle a variety of situations and lighting conditions - sometimes I'm dealing with things that hold still (plants, sunsets, people posing), sometimes not (the dogs, wildlife). Capacity for panoramic views would be nice.

Manual control is not that important - if I get to the point where I think I have the patience and skill for manual control to matter, I'd invest and upgrade.

If I wind up paying for it myself, I could go as high as $300 - if I can get someone to chip in as a present, who knows. At this stage I don't even know what money buys what features. Obviously, different models are going to have trade-offs. If I had to pick between say more zoom and a panoramic view option, I'd pick the zoom. Light weight vs. storage capacity, I'm going with weight (within reason). I probably won't be printing my own photos in the near future, although my sort-of-step-mom may decide to do it for me now and again.

Kodak EasyShare V570 5MP Digital Camera with 5x Optical Zoom
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000CD6B3A.01._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

this is a good bet. its pana is GREAT, it is very small and at amazon for $308 you might be able to find it cheaper but amazon is a great place to ready reviews

from the Manufacturer
With the Kodak EasyShare V570 zoom digital camera, Kodak has introduced the world's first dual-lens digital still camera. Using proprietary Kodak RETINA Dual Lens technology, the elegant V570 camera wraps an ultrawide angle lens (23 mm) and an optical zoom lens (39-117 mm) into a small, sleek package less than an inch thin.

The Kodak Easyshare Z570's dual-lens system
The innovative EasyShare V570 camera's ultrawide angle lens coupled with its optical zoom lens produces a total 5x optical zoom range, providing more options to help today's picture takers capture the perfect shot--group photos, scenic landscapes, dramatic portraits, and close-ups. No other consumer digital camera offers such a wide angle of view, nor the unique, sophisticated design of this model, whose all-glass, stacked Schneider-Kreuznach C-Variogon prism lenses never extend from the camera body.

The Kodak Easyshare Z570's panoramic possibilities
Use the Z570's ultrawide view to take 180-degree vistas in just three shots.

Wide-Angle Panorama Stitching and Advanced Video Performance
In addition to its dual-lens design, the 5-megapixel V570 camera boasts a variety of notable features to enhance the photography experience, including in-camera panorama stitching, which automatically combines three pictures into a panorama photograph. Using the ultrawide view in panorama scene mode, people can take in a 180-degree vista with just three shots--an industry exclusive.

Packing advanced video performance, the camera makes it easier for users to shoot all types of action in the way that many filmmakers prefer--with an ultrawide angle to capture more of the scene. The EasyShare V570 camera records TV-quality video, up to 30 frames per second (fps) using advanced MPEG-4 compression. Built-in image-stabilization technology reduces on-screen shaking from unintentional hand and camera movement. The camera also offers an optical zoom feature for video including autofocus. It's simple to select any frame in a video, then save and print it as a "freeze frame" still picture in just seconds.

The Kodak Easyshare Z570's Photo Frame 2 dock
The multipurpose Photo Frame 2 dock also turns the camera into a stylish photo viewer.
Other notable features of the V570 camera include:

* A big, brilliant 2.5-inch, high-resolution LCD screen
* The exclusive Kodak Color Science image processing chip for phenomenal image quality with rich color, accurate skin tones, low noise, and precise exposure
* Automatic red-eye reduction, on-camera cropping, picture blur alert, and auto picture rotation;
* In-camera distortion correction to compensate for ultrawide angle fish-eye effects, which can be turned on or off
* Twenty-two scene modes plus three color modes, helping snap shooters capture the best possible shot with the least possible effort
* The Photo Frame Dock 2, which provides one-touch picture transfer to a connected computer while keeping the camera's high-capacity lithium-ion battery charged and ready to go, and which can play video and photo slideshows on the camera's high-resolution LCD screen
* 32 megabytes of internal memory, plus a SD card slot for additional storage

EasyShare Software
The Kodak EasyShare V570 camera includes Kodak EasyShare software for Windows and Macintosh systems, providing effortless digital picture organization, editing, sharing, and printing--and even CD and DVD burning. The exclusive One Touch to Better Pictures feature takes advantage of proprietary color technologies developed by Kodak to help users get vibrant, true-to-life prints from inkjet printers, while the enhanced favorites feature helps you always have your best shots at hand, whether on your camera, on your computer, or online via the Kodak EasyShare Gallery.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000CD6B3A/sr=8-1/qid=1151356311/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-0860964-0746414?ie=UTF8

Rocketta
Jun 26th, 2006, 11:48 PM
Griff, I was going to recommend the Easyshare as well because it's affordable and it doesn't seem like you are planning to use it an insane amount of time. All my pics that I've taken at Charleston and posted were with easy shares.

No matter what brand you buy try to get the highest optical Zoom and MegaPixel that you can.

Min. - 3x Optical Zoom ( but really look for at least 10 )
Min. - 5 MP (but if you can find higher for under $300 go for it)

Optical zoom tells you the film camera lens equivalent. Here's some rough breakdowns

3x 37-114mm
4x 35-140mm
12x 36-432mm

Happy Shopping! :wavey:

partbrit
Jun 27th, 2006, 12:24 AM
I am very pleased with my Canon Powershot A80 (4 megapixels). The only criticism that has been made of it is that the LED screen is a bit small. It is, but I have learned to deal with it. The camera supports every mechanism of a good 35 mm camera, if you are a very serious photographer. It also supports black and white, sepia, photo stitching, and--with a special card--it is also a video camera. It lacks an internal flash, which I wish it had; I don't know if any digital camera has one, though.

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 01:25 AM
I had the cannon a85 (the update to the a80) and it had major problems with focus. I heard the a80 didn't have those issues but its been out of production for about 2 years and it will be very hard to find.

the rest in the a8* series had problems with focus. but otherwise are good cameras. like with whichever one you choose its good to read reviews and see what others experienced.

Fingon
Jun 27th, 2006, 03:42 AM
Ok, I'm about ready to take a small step into the 21st century and purchase a digital camera. Anyone have any advice?



go to a store, pick one, and pay for it.

Rocketta
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:24 AM
ohhh, someone just asked me a question that made me think. I would go with a camera that uses a sd card....then when you get hooked on technology and buy a palm pilot or something you can use the same card. :yeah:

Jeff
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:35 AM
I would personally go with a reliable brand, particularly Canon. I would also suggest a camera with at least 10x optical zoom and minimum 4 MP (if you plan on printing photos rarely and if so, no more than like 5x7) otherwise I would suggest 5 or 6 MP. Also, since light weight is important to you, I would suggest searching for cameras with the minimum features I just suggested and narrow down your choices to those that meet your maximum weight preference. I would suggest you use sites like amazon.com and dpreview.com to look at professional reviews and customer reviews of your narrowed down choices to help you figure out what seems to be the best camera for you.

Also, I should add that LCD screen isn't the most important thing in my opinion, but if you get down to a few choices that you are having a tough time choosing from...go with the one with the larger LCD. Although not a major issue, it is nicer to have a larger viewing area.

Kenny
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:41 AM
ohhh, someone just asked me a question that made me think. I would go with a camera that uses a sd card....then when you get hooked on technology and buy a palm pilot or something you can use the same card. :yeah:

Plus it's easy to buy good size of them (1-5gb) relatively cheap.. and you can use them in expandable MP3 players. (Non-iPod)

griffin
Jun 27th, 2006, 03:39 PM
go to a store, pick one, and pay for it.

Wow. Really? I never would have thought of that.

Thanks for the helpful input gang :wavey:

Cariaoke
Jun 27th, 2006, 03:47 PM
I have a Canon powershot a400 and it takes excellent pics, even outside. It's lightweight and uses SD cards and runs on two double a's. It cost me about $70 after rebate and came with a photo printer. gotta love compusa.

here's a photo I took at the airport in Honolulu using it:

http://shad0wb0xer.com/media/honairport.jpg

if you need more samples, let me know.

Rocketta
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:45 PM
how many pics can you take with the double A's Cari? 10, 20? :lol: I made the mistake of thinking I could actually use them in my camera....I hurried up quick and bought a pack of lithium batteries. :lol:

Helen Lawson
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:48 PM
If you do buy a Canon, post some of the pics, but most importantly, when you take the first photo with it, say, "Make every shot a power shot." :D

I thought I was the last person in the US without a digital camera.

Cariaoke
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:51 PM
how many pics can you take with the double A's Cari? 10, 20? :lol: I made the mistake of thinking I could actually use them in my camera....I hurried up quick and bought a pack of lithium batteries. :lol:
oh I use rechargeables... they last a long time but then again I'm more into natural light and not flash.

griffin
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:57 PM
If you do buy a Canon, post some of the pics, but most importantly, when you take the first photo with it, say, "Make every shot a power shot." :D



Kodak and Olympus should give you a commision for saying this to me :P

Batteries - almost forgot about that issue. Part of how I've talked myself into spending this kind of money is adding up how much I spend on buying and developing whole rolls of film for the 4-5 pictures I decide to keep. If I wind up spending buckets on batteries...

Hel, you may soon be the last person in the US without a digital, but I'll still be the last person on the planet with out a cell phone (and I plan to stay that way :armed: )

Williamsser
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:58 PM
I go to epinions, amazon, and shopping.yahoo for camera reviews. I bought a Samsung Digimax one. It got good reviews.

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 07:02 PM
oh i just noticed.

i paid $409 for my camera about 6.5 months ago. it is AMAZING!!!, it came out a year before and retailed at $699. now because it is finanlly going out of production (a sad day) it can be got for far less $300 new from a good seller like amazon.

this is she:
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0002R2838.01._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20K 5MP Digital Camera with 12x Image Stabilized Optical Zoom (Black)

she has a 4.7 star rating at amazon with 80 reviews.

this is the image that i saw taken with this camera that made me decided to buy it
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/df/b3/76afb220dca055dc774e6010.L.jpg

i have not uploaded any of my favorite images to flickr but here are some of the few that i have, all taken with this camera...

http://web.mac.com/kariasolano/iWeb/Site/Fluffy%20Animals_files/P1010480.jpg
http://web.mac.com/kariasolano/iWeb/Site/Fluffy%20Animals_files/IMG_2632.jpg
http://web.mac.com/kariasolano/iWeb/Site/Scaly%20Animals_files/IMG_0483.jpg
http://web.mac.com/kariasolano/iWeb/Site/Sepia_files/P1010009.jpg
http://static.flickr.com/37/83287083_3322cee3a3.jpg

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 07:04 PM
lol, i like taking pictures of animals more than people, so thats why its no people pictures, but the people pictures come out great, check out the sample images on amazon.com

Rocketta
Jun 27th, 2006, 07:07 PM
Kodak and Olympus should give you a commision for saying this to me :P

Batteries - almost forgot about that issue. Part of how I've talked myself into spending this kind of money is adding up how much I spend on buying and developing whole rolls of film for the 4-5 pictures I decide to keep. If I wind up spending buckets on batteries...

Hel, you may soon be the last person in the US without a digital, but I'll still be the last person on the planet with out a cell phone (and I plan to stay that way :armed: )

well now that you can buy Lithium batteries in multiple packs just like regular batteries it's not that expensive? Also, Kodak usually provides a rechargable battery with their cameras. You get many more shots out of the Lithium though....on the Kodak at least.

Mother_Marjorie
Jun 27th, 2006, 07:09 PM
I have an Olympus 5 MP that works wonderfully well. I posted a few Mardi Gras pictures in this forum a few weeks ago and its the camera I used. You can get panorama views and adjustments for different lighting.

I think most digital camera's are similar, so I would suggest purchasing a high megapixel (at least 5), and one that is marked down at least 40%. Use the money you've saved to purchase photo paper for your computer and accessories.

drake3781
Jun 28th, 2006, 01:19 AM
I love my digital camera. It's a Sony. I chose it because it has a huge viewing screen and is ultra small and lightweight. (and all the talk about batteries above.......... I just recharge what's included and don't need to worry about batteries.)


If you are interested in details about my camera, let me know and I will post them. (I've posted in other threads but the OP never seemed to care.)

:wavey:

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 05:15 AM
I have an Olympus 5 MP that works wonderfully well. I posted a few Mardi Gras pictures in this forum a few weeks ago and its the camera I used. You can get panorama views and adjustments for different lighting.

I think most digital camera's are similar, so I would suggest purchasing a high megapixel (at least 5), and one that is marked down at least 40%. Use the money you've saved to purchase photo paper for your computer and accessories.
well megapixel is not as important as the size and quality of the ccd. my 5mega can be blown up to 16x20 and still look good, but the 8megapixel that replaced has the same size ccd so it cant be blow up any bigger and is still more expensive.

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 05:20 AM
info on ccds from wikipedia :scared: :haha: :tape:

A charge-coupled device (CCD) is an image sensor, consisting of an integrated circuit containing an array of linked, or coupled, capacitors sensitive to the light. Under the control of an external circuit, each capacitor can transfer its electric charge to one or other of its neighbours. CCDs are used in digital photography and astronomy (particularly in photometry, optical and UV spectroscopy and high speed techniques such as lucky imaging).
Contents
[hide]
1 History
2 Architecture
3 Applications
4 Color cameras
5 Competing technologies
6 References
7 See also
[edit]
History

The CCD was invented in 1969 by Willard Boyle and George Smith at AT&T Bell Labs. The lab was working on the Picture-phone and on the development of semiconductor bubble memory. Merging these two initiatives, Boyle and Smith conceived of the design of what they termed 'Charge "Bubble" Devices'. The essence of the design was the ability to transfer charge along the surface of a semiconductor. As the CCD started its life as a memory device, one could only "inject" charge into the device at an input register. However, it was immediately clear that the CCD could receive charge via the photoelectric effect and electronic images could be created. By 1970 Bell researchers were able to capture images with simple linear devices; thus the CCD was born. Several companies, including Fairchild Semiconductor, RCA and Texas Instruments, picked up on the invention and began development programs. Fairchild was the first with commercial devices and by 1974 had a linear 500 element device and a 2-D 100 x 100 pixel device.
In January 2006, Boyle and Smith received the Charles Stark Draper Prize which is presented by the National Academy of Engineering for their work on the CCD.
[edit]
Architecture

CCD image sensors can be implemented in several different architectures. The most common are full-frame, frame-transfer and interline. The distinguishing characteristic of each of these architectures is their approach to the problem of shuttering.
In a full-frame device, all of the image area is active and there is no electronic shutter. A mechanical shutter must be added to this type of sensor or the image will smear as the device is clocked or read out.
With a frame transfer CCD, half of the silicon area is covered by an opaque mask (typically aluminum). The image can be quickly transferred from the image area to the opaque area or storage region with acceptable smear of a few percent. That image can then be read out slowly from the storage region while a new image is integrating or exposing in the active area. Frame-transfer devices typically do not require a mechanical shutter and were a common architecture for early solid-state broadcast cameras. The downside to the frame-transfer architecture is that it requires twice the silicon real estate of an equivalent full-frame device; hence, it costs roughly twice as much.
The interline architecture extends this concept one step further and masks every other column of the image sensor for storage. In this device, only one pixel shift has to occur to transfer from image area to storage area; thus, shutter times can be less than a microsecond and smear is essentially eliminated. The advantage is not free, however, as the imaging area is now covered by opaque strips dropping the "fill factor" to approximately 50% and the effective quantum efficiency by an equivalent amount. Modern designs have addressed this deleterious characteristic by adding microlenses on the surface of the device to direct light away from the opaque regions and on the active area. Microlenses can bring the fill factor back up to 90% or more depending on pixel size and the overall system's optical design.
The choice of architecture comes down to one of utility. If the application cannot tolerate an expensive, failure prone, power hungry mechanical shutter, then an interline device is the right choice. Consumer snap-shot cameras have used interline devices. On the other hand, for those applications that require the best possible light collection and issues of money, power and time are less important, the full-frame device will be the right choice. Astronomers tend to prefer full-frame devices. The frame-transfer falls in between and was a common choice before the fill-factor issue of interline devices was addressed. Today, the choice of frame-transfer is usually made when an interline architecture is not available, such as in a back-illuminated device.
[edit]
Applications

CCDs containing grids of pixels are used in digital cameras, optical scanners and video cameras as light-sensing devices. They commonly respond to 70% of the incident light (meaning a quantum efficiency of about 70%) making them more efficient than photographic film, which captures only about 2% of the incident light. As a result CCDs were rapidly adopted by astronomers.


One-dimensional CCD from a fax machine.
An image is projected by a lens on the capacitor array, causing each capacitor to accumulate an electric charge proportional to the light intensity at that location. A one-dimensional array, used in line-scan cameras, captures a single slice of the image, while a two-dimensional array, used in video and still cameras, captures the whole image or a rectangular portion of it. Once the array has been exposed to the image, a control circuit causes each capacitor to transfer its contents to its neighbour. The last capacitor in the array dumps its charge into an amplifier that converts the charge into a voltage. By repeating this process, the control circuit converts the entire contents of the array to a varying voltage, which it samples, digitizes and stores in memory. Stored images can be transferred to a printer, storage device or video display. CCDs are also widely used as sensors for astronomical telescopes, and night vision devices.
An interesting astronomical application is to use a CCD to make a fixed telescope behave like a tracking telescope and follow the motion of the sky. The charges in the CCD are transferred and read in a direction parallel to the motion of the sky, and at the same speed. In this way, the telescope can image a larger region of the sky than its normal field of view.
CCDs are typically sensitive to infrared light, which allows infrared photography, night-vision devices, and zero lux (or near zero lux) video-recording/photography. Because of their sensitivity to infrared, CCDs used in astronomy are usually cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures, because infrared black body radiation is emitted from room-temperature sources. One other consequence of their sensitivity to infrared is that infrared from remote controls will often appear on CCD-based digital cameras or camcorders if they don't have infrared blockers. Cooling also reduces the array's dark current, improving the sensitivity of the CCD to low light intensities, even for ultraviolet and visible wavelengths.
Thermal noise, dark current, and cosmic rays may alter the pixels in the CCD array. To counter such effects, astronomers take an average of several exposures with the CCD shutter closed and opened. The average of images taken with the shutter closed is necessary to lower the random noise. Once developed, the "dark frame" average image is then subtracted from the open-shutter image to remove the dark current and other systematic defects in the CCD (dead pixels, hot pixels, etc).
CCD cameras used in astrophotography often require very sturdy mounts to cope with vibrations and breezes, along with the tremendous weight that most imaging platforms inherently cause. To take long CCD exposures of galaxies and nebulae, many astronomers use a technique known as auto-guiding. Most autoguiders use off-axis CCD chips to monitor any deviation from the imaging, however, some have the autoguider CCD and the imaging CCD in the same camera. Auto-guiders use a second CCD chip which can rapidly detect period errors in tracking and command the mount's motors to correct for them.
[edit]
Color cameras

Digital color cameras generally use a Bayer mask over the CCD. Each square of four pixels has one filtered red, one blue, and two green (the human eye is more sensitive to green than either red or blue). The result of this is that luminance information is collected at every pixel, but the color resolution is lower than the luminance resolution.
Better color separation can be reached by three-CCD devices (3CCD) and a dichroic beam splitter prism, that splits the image into red, green and blue components. Each of the three CCDs is arranged to respond to a particular color. Some semi-professional digital video camcorders (and all professionals) use this technique.
Since a very-high-resolution CCD chip is very expensive as of 2005, a 3CCD high-resolution still camera would be beyond the price range even of many professional photographers. There are some high-end still cameras that use a rotating color filter to achieve both color-fidelity and high-resolution. These multi-shot cameras are rare and can only photograph objects that are not moving.
[edit]
Competing technologies

Recently it has become practical to create an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) using the CMOS manufacturing process. Since this is the dominant technology for all chip-making, CMOS image sensors are cheap to make and signal conditioning circuitry can be incorporated into the same device. The latter advantage helps mitigate their greater susceptibility to noise, which is still an issue, though a diminishing one. This is due to the use of low grade amplifiers in each pixel instead of one high-grade amplifier for the entire array in the CCD. CMOS sensors also have the advantage of lower power consumption than CCDs. At present time there is however not a clear-cut winner of the competing technologies. CCDs still boast higher sensitivity, and higher dynamic range than CMOS sensors, and for these reasons CCDs are preferred in astronomical imaging where these factors are of prime importance.

Jeff
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:40 AM
Lol Jigglypuff :lol:

griffin
Jun 28th, 2006, 10:23 PM
ask a simple question. get a reading assignment ;)

Fingon
Jun 29th, 2006, 02:15 AM
ask a simple question. get a reading assignment ;)

I gave you a simple advise.

Wigglytuff
Jun 29th, 2006, 02:19 AM
ask a simple question. get a reading assignment ;)
lol its not even that much reading its like one tiny paragraph. :lol: :o :cool:

its a shame flickr doesnt let you search by meta data, that way you can see more pictures taken with different cameras you are considering.

Dawn Marie
Jun 29th, 2006, 02:47 AM
Kodak and Olympus should give you a commision for saying this to me :P

Batteries - almost forgot about that issue. Part of how I've talked myself into spending this kind of money is adding up how much I spend on buying and developing whole rolls of film for the 4-5 pictures I decide to keep. If I wind up spending buckets on batteries...

Hel, you may soon be the last person in the US without a digital, but I'll still be the last person on the planet with out a cell phone (and I plan to stay that way :armed: )

Griffin you're not the last.:-) I planned on buying one this week for my vacation and scrapbooking hobby. Yet I am afraid to make a large purchase without really understanding what I'm actually getting. Thanks for the thread as I was going to post the very same one today.

I have a question for the camera people. What is a good camera for shots of the beach and family/friends for scrapbooking? I want something that has a great zoom feature and panaramic. Yet I also want a good photo and something that is user friendly. I do not liek to have to deal with alot of buttons. I plan on spending no more than 200.00 can someone help me too? I plan on buying this in about a few days. A few people told me about the easy share so I was looking at a few of them today at Best Buy. I got frustrated and left. help.

Wigglytuff
Jun 29th, 2006, 04:20 AM
Griffin you're not the last.:-) I planned on buying one this week for my vacation and scrapbooking hobby. Yet I am afraid to make a large purchase without really understanding what I'm actually getting. Thanks for the thread as I was going to post the very same one today.

I have a question for the camera people. What is a good camera for shots of the beach and family/friends for scrapbooking? I want something that has a great zoom feature and panaramic. Yet I also want a good photo and something that is user friendly. I do not liek to have to deal with alot of buttons. I plan on spending no more than 200.00 can someone help me too? I plan on buying this in about a few days. A few people told me about the easy share so I was looking at a few of them today at Best Buy. I got frustrated and left. help.

ok, $200 gives you much less options particularly when it comes to zoom. for $200 you will be hard pressed to find anything new with more than 3x that doesnt suck ass.

however, if you want to go a different route, getting a preowned or discontinued model with as much as 5x maybe 6x, maybe. if you are really lucky.

partbrit
Jun 29th, 2006, 04:31 AM
I also recommend adding extra lenses when you can afford them. I have a wide-angle lens and a telephoto lens, and Canon also makes a closeup lens.

Kunal
Jun 29th, 2006, 08:55 AM
i have a DSC -T33....its slim and sleek and has pretty good pic quality.

5.1 mega pixels

3 X optical zoom....and a really big screen

its really easy to carry around as it can jus slip into your pocket.

http://www.golem.de/0501/35537-dsc_t33-artikel.jpg

controlfreak
Jun 29th, 2006, 12:01 PM
I recommend the Fuji Finepix range, for compactness and picture quality.

The only other brands I have experience of are Sony and Olympus, and I found their cameras to be a bit bulky in comparison. They probably have smaller designs now though.

Failing that I would definitely like to try the dual-lens Kodak model pictured above, simply for its panoramic mode and innovative use of technology.

http://www.imaging-resource.com is a great site for in-depth camera reviews.

Kunal
Jun 29th, 2006, 01:41 PM
i dont know much bout lenses....but carl zeiss are pretty good for me

Rocketta
Jun 29th, 2006, 03:45 PM
I also recommend adding extra lenses when you can afford them. I have a wide-angle lens and a telephoto lens, and Canon also makes a closeup lens.

I don't know of any decent digital cameras in her price range with interchangable lenses.

drake3781
Jun 29th, 2006, 04:14 PM
i have a DSC -T33....its slim and sleek and has pretty good pic quality.

5.1 mega pixels

3 X optical zoom....and a really big screen

its really easy to carry around as it can jus slip into your pocket.

http://www.golem.de/0501/35537-dsc_t33-artikel.jpg


This is my camera too, and I love it, as I posted above!!

For some reason in these camera threads certain people always take over and others with good advice always get ignored, not even an acknowledgement. I don't want to fight to convince you this is a great camera, but you might want to consider it. Want more info, ask me (or Kunal) :wavey: .

griffin
Jun 29th, 2006, 04:44 PM
This is my camera too, and I love it, as I posted above!!

For some reason in these camera threads certain people always take over and others with good advice always get ignored, not even an acknowledgement. I don't want to fight to convince you this is a great camera, but you might want to consider it. Want more info, ask me (or Kunal) :wavey: .

If I wasn't interested in info, I wouldn't have posted the thread - but honestly, I'm not inclined to go begging when other people (like Kunal) are volunteering :shrug: .

I"ve noticed some cameras have longer lag times between each photo, and even between hitting the button and the picture being taken - is there a spec to look for for that, or should I just rely on reviews?

Wigglytuff
Jun 29th, 2006, 07:09 PM
This is my camera too, and I love it, as I posted above!!

For some reason in these camera threads certain people always take over and others with good advice always get ignored, not even an acknowledgement. I don't want to fight to convince you this is a great camera, but you might want to consider it. Want more info, ask me (or Kunal) :wavey: .
you bet. not be taking about me :boxing:

seriously, though if you think its important post it rather than ummm saying that no one pays attention to you. and waiting for someone to say give me more info in this, is blah, just post it dude.

Wigglytuff
Jun 29th, 2006, 07:17 PM
If I wasn't interested in info, I wouldn't have posted the thread - but honestly, I'm not inclined to go begging when other people (like Kunal) are volunteering :shrug: .

I"ve noticed some cameras have longer lag times between each photo, and even between hitting the button and the picture being taken - is there a spec to look for for that, or should I just rely on reviews?
yes there is a spec... i think its called shutter lag.

you should look for it, it will be under "lag" or "delay" of anykind. there are a TON of factors that affect shutter lag.

but if this is a real issue for you, you should avoid anything that does not let you turn off preview mode, like the kodak one i recommended.

Shutter lag
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
When a photographer presses "the button," there is a delay before a photograph is actually recorded. This is called, "shutter lag." This is a common problem in the photography of fast-moving objects, and is usually solved by pressing the button with forethought.
In film cameras, the delay is caused by the mechanism inside the camera, which opens the shutter, exposing the film. Because the process is mechanical, however, shutter lag in film cameras is often noticable (and of any concern) only to professionals.
In digital cameras, the delay results from the charging of the CCD and relatively slow transmission of its capture data to the circuitry of the camera for processing and storage. Recent improvements in technology, however, such as the speed, bandwidth and power consumption of processor chips and memory, as well as CCD technology, have rendered shutter lag nearly insignificant. As of the writing of this article in 2006, however, these advancements have been limited mostly to professional, "prosumer," and high-end consumer-grade digital cameras. Inexpensive and early model digital cameras, however, are still prone to pronounced shutter lag, making them useful mostly for posed or intentionally-styled photography.

Wigglytuff
Jul 3rd, 2006, 12:18 AM
so ermmm. what did you guys decided on???!!!!

:bounce:

Kunal
Jul 3rd, 2006, 10:31 AM
yea now im curious...we need to find out what the threadstarter is gonna buy!

griffin
Jul 3rd, 2006, 03:24 PM
:lol: Dunno, which one are y'all gonna buy me? ;)

I was leaning towards that way-cool looking Kodak (the panorama lens was a big draw) but the lag time concerns me. It'll probably be August before I buy anything, though. I'm about to go on vacatio for 2 weeks, and my schedule is going to be nutty after that, so I won't have time to research and compare obsessively until later. I'm half tempted to give my Tech Advisor (aka my step-mom) my price range and what I'm looking for and have her pick something for me. She loves this stuff, and is less likely to be swayed by stupid shit like how cool it looks, and if it's endorsed by someone who annoys me :lol:

bis2806
Jul 3rd, 2006, 05:06 PM
Just don't buy Canon Powershot!

"Topaz"
Jul 3rd, 2006, 05:44 PM
Just don't buy Canon Powershot!
Which one and why?

nigel - dani fan
Jul 6th, 2006, 07:55 AM
I have an Olympus Camedia 725UZ, which has probably been superceded by now, but it's done OK. I went to my first tournament a few weeks ago (Birmingham), and was worried that the zoom and shutter lag might be a problem, but I'm pleased with the results. It has an 8x optical zoom, and the lens is small enough to poke through the wire netting round some of the courts. It also has a built-in flash, takes XD cards, and runs on 4xAA - I use 2100mAh NiMH. You can also turn off the screen.
here's some of my pics from Birmingham (reduced by about 50%):
http://www.dankajenaj.me.uk/dfs_120606.htm
here's some pages of photos from my trip to Slovakia in March:
http://www.nigelspages.me.uk/bratislava1.htm

thalle
Jul 6th, 2006, 08:24 AM
I dont know much about cameras, BUT I just got this wonderful Nikon digi cam from my parents. It's great pictures, it's slim and easy to handle. I don't know about weatherproof, but maybe you could keep it in a back.
Anyway, check out the link, I love it!!!
http://nikonimaging.com/global/news/2005/0316_01.htm

Kunal
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:05 AM
for me looks matter, obviously it has to be a good camera...but lookin good is an important factor

Wigglytuff
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:13 AM
for me looks matter, obviously it has to be a good camera...but lookin good is an important factor

http://ec3.images-amazon.com/images/P/B0002R2838.01._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg
that one of the reasons i got this.

you know when you walk around with it, its like you have the biggest dick for miles and everyone knows it. people just give you respect. they move out your way when you are taking a picture most times without you even asking.

it looks so good it says "thats right i may not be A man, but i am still THE man!!" :lol: :lol:

forever_rafter
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:34 AM
http://ec3.images-amazon.com/images/P/B0002R2838.01._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg
that one of the reasons i got this.

you know when you walk around with it, its like you have the biggest dick for miles and everyone knows it. people just give you respect. they move out your way when you are taking a picture most times without you even asking.

it looks so good it says "thats right i may not be A man, but i am still THE man!!" :lol: :lol:

Yeah, I bought my Lumix DMC-FZ10 2 years ago for the same reason. I could buy Minolta Z3 but it looked like a toy in comparison to Panasonic. And it takes great photos too

Wigglytuff
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:43 AM
Yeah, I bought my Lumix DMC-FZ10 2 years ago for the same reason. I could buy Minolta Z3 but it looked like a toy in comparison to Panasonic. And it takes great photos too
i saw the pics taken with that camera the dmc-fz10, and they are just stunning. :)

Wigglytuff
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:46 AM
and yea the z3 looks like a toy. me and my friends laff at people with those types of cameras, like why would you pay$500 plus for a camera that is basicly a toy and takes such unprofessional images.

Kunal
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:48 AM
dont know a thing about proffessional pics.....what are the attributes that one thinks of in a proffesional picture...

lighting...
contrast?

thats all i can think of....maybe someone can post prof pictures that they have taken..

Wigglytuff
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:54 AM
dont know a thing about proffessional pics.....what are the attributes that one thinks of in a proffesional picture...

lighting...
contrast?

thats all i can think of....maybe someone can post prof pictures that they have taken..
yes you want all things and more
you want something that when in focus can capture profound detail.
it should understand different kinds of lights and act according.
it should be sturdy and not to light weight and usually something you hold in both hands. (this allows you to hold it right and get the max amount of steadiness so that you can handle lower shutter speeds.)

you want to be able to control the strength of the flash
great color should go with out saying.

Wigglytuff
Jul 6th, 2006, 09:55 AM
oh yeah i forgot the main thing.

you want control. control over EVERYTHING, shutter, aperture, focus, flash, everything.

griffin
Jan 2nd, 2008, 08:00 PM
Good grief, am I that slow? :haha:

Ok, after eons of sporadic research, foot-dragging, and getting distracted/wooed by other toys - I got this:

http://www.usa.canon.com/app/images/PowerShot_2007/PS_S5IS/s5is_586x225.jpg

for my birthday a few days ago. It's way more camera than I really need ("more control"="more opportunity for griffin to fuck things up"), but I'm thrilled with the zoom and that flip-around screen is a really cool feature.

It's not pocket-sized, but it's still small enough to pack/hike with.

Rocketta
Jan 2nd, 2008, 08:32 PM
I have to spread the rep but you deserve a red dot for buying any product that is endorsed by a certain tennis player. :fiery:

griffin
Jan 2nd, 2008, 08:43 PM
I know, I know. Do I get a pass if it was bought FOR me?

Keaka
Jan 2nd, 2008, 08:55 PM
Good camera you have there.

I have Canon Powershot a720 IS :D It's for starters, but it does a good job and amazing photos :D

http://www.letsgodigital.org/images/artikelen/6/canon-powershot-a720.jpg
http://www.letsgodigital.org/images/artikelen/6/canon-a720is.jpg

it has a lot of zoom and I did much research beefore i bought it too :D

CondiLicious
Jan 2nd, 2008, 09:03 PM
My gf has an amazing camera. I dunno what it is though. It was very expensive cos she's a professional photographer.

I have a digital camera and I got it cos it's pink. I know nothing about photography. Pisses my gf off.

Rocketta
Jan 3rd, 2008, 08:29 PM
I know, I know. Do I get a pass if it was bought FOR me?

Just barely. :tape:

b_o_r
Jan 3rd, 2008, 11:53 PM
I just purchased
http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/assets/11771.jpg
for $300 on amazon. Its a major step up from my Kodak DX4530. It a breath of fresh air to be able to take a pic of a moving object without the pic being blurry:worship:

Vegan
Jan 4th, 2008, 07:02 PM
I've always wanted to discard my old canon powershot as well, but I don't necessarily take a lot of pictures so it can wait. The camera pic above looks nice. ;)