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Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 06:23 PM
hello yall,

i wanna get a dog in the next 3 years and am doing research.

i want a dog that is friendly, has some coat care but not more than 2 hours a weeks worth. long lived, but not to small, so a medium sized dog. water friendly, great with kids, people (as we know kids are not people :lol: j/k), other dogs, friendly with cats, very easy going, ok with being petted alot (so not something that is aloof). must BE very, very, very friendly (i can not stress the need for friendly enough). (if it looks less than friendly thats ok as long as it is the friendliest dog ever)

ok, anyway, from what i have learned, golden retrievers seem like the best match. also poodles, and labradors, newfoundlands, and Neapolitan mastiffs. as well as any mix of the above named dogs.

my questions are this do you think this is correct?

if want to insure that i getting something that is in these breeds with golden retriever as a first choice, but i dont want to go to a breeder (aka puppy mill :fiery: ), what are my options?

rebel_ffighter
Jun 26th, 2006, 06:28 PM
find a stray dog,a newborn puppy.They are the smartest and the best dogs,plus you would offer it a home and do some good.And they come on all shape and colorslol

mapaliey
Jun 26th, 2006, 06:30 PM
i have 2 dog and 4 puppy..and so dirty here.....

griffin
Jun 26th, 2006, 06:36 PM
I think if you've found Newfies and Neapolitan Mastiffs to fit your description of "medium sized" you're either a) a size queen or b) doing research on Wikipedia again ;) (kidding, I'm kidding: lol: )

fyi, I have heard - from breeders/fans of Goldens - that Goldend retrieviers CAN be dog-aggressive. But whatever breed/cross you decide on, remember that how well they deal with kids/dogs/people/cats/chickens will have as much to do with how you socialize and train them as it will with breeding. Pups is going to have to meet as many and as many different kinds of people as you can manage in a controled way (introducing them to kids by letting get mugged is not a good idea, for example).

If you don't want to spend the kind of money serious breeders want for their animals, but don't (bless you) want to buy from or support puppy mills, you can still look in the paper for people selling puppies - just make sure you visit them before buying. One look at the conditions the dogs are in should tell you if you're dealing with a responsible person or a mill. There are also a number of books that will give you advice on what to look for when you meet a puppy in terms of evaluating its temperment (The Monks of New Skeet books come to mind, but I'm sure their are others)

You might also consider breed-specific rescue (we got Oliver from a Keeshond rescue group), or any respectable rescue agency (Augie came from Great Dog New England). Petfinder.com lists dogs available from agencies acrros the country. It may take a little longer to find a puppy/young dog that way, especially if you want a very specific breed, but since you're on a 3-year plan anyway, it sounds like you're willing to be patient.

Look for agencies that give you the 3rd degree before letting you have one of their dogs. Sounds crazy at first, but if they don't care enough about the dogs to make sure they're going to a good home, they probably won't care enough about YOU to be honest about the dog's temperment and background.

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 06:42 PM
find a stray dog,a newborn puppy.They are the smartest and the best dogs,plus you would offer it a home and do some good.And they come on all shape and colorslol
no, the thing is i want some sort of awareness about what kind of adult dog i am going to get, so the best way to know this if one is got going to a breeder is, i think, i could be wrong, to stick to certain breeds where i you have a pretty clear picture about what you are going to get (most likely).

griffin
Jun 26th, 2006, 06:55 PM
Are you dead set on getting a puppy? Or are you open to getting a slightly older dog (say 4 months to a year old)?

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 06:59 PM
I think if you've found Newfies and Neapolitan Mastiffs to fit your description of "medium sized" you're either a) a size queen or b) doing research on Wikipedia again ;) (kidding, I'm kidding: lol: )

fyi, I have heard - from breeders/fans of Goldens - that Goldend retrieviers CAN be dog-aggressive. But whatever breed/cross you decide on, remember that how well they deal with kids/dogs/people/cats/chickens will have as much to do with how you socialize and train them as it will with breeding. Pups is going to have to meet as many and as many different kinds of people as you can manage in a controled way (introducing them to kids by letting get mugged is not a good idea, for example).

If you don't want to spend the kind of money serious breeders want for their animals, but don't (bless you) want to buy from or support puppy mills, you can still look in the paper for people selling puppies - just make sure you visit them before buying. One look at the conditions the dogs are in should tell you if you're dealing with a responsible person or a mill. There are also a number of books that will give you advice on what to look for when you meet a puppy in terms of evaluating its temperment (The Monks of New Skeet books come to mind, but I'm sure their are others)

You might also consider breed-specific rescue (we got Oliver from a Keeshond rescue group), or any respectable rescue agency (Augie came from Great Dog New England). Petfinder.com lists dogs available from agencies acrros the country. It may take a little longer to find a puppy/young dog that way, especially if you want a very specific breed, but since you're on a 3-year plan anyway, it sounds like you're willing to be patient.

Look for agencies that give you the 3rd degree before letting you have one of their dogs. Sounds crazy at first, but if they don't care enough about the dogs to make sure they're going to a good home, they probably won't care enough about YOU to be honest about the dog's temperment and background.
thank you!! that was really helpful!

lol, :haha: yeah neos and newfoundlands are on the "large" side of medium, but if the temperament of the puppy is what i want in a puppy i am willing to accept a little "extra" to love.

i think that thats why i want a puppy, not so much because they are cuter (which they are) but because i want to take him or her to puppy school and want to do everything that i can to train and socialize a good puppy so that both my dog and myself are happier together and friendlier too. so thats why i was looking into a puppy as opposed to an older dog, plus this would be my first dog, i want to know to as much as i can about what i am getting it. having a dog (golden or otherwise) that is dog-agressive is NOT something that i want!

a rescue seems like a great idea. plus i have 3 years so i can wait for my puppy. after seeing your post i went to a few sites and it seems like a golden poodle mix, might have everything that i want. (but then i would have to try to get the puppy as young as possible because i KNOW poodles can get nasty if not trained right early).

the thought of a forever happy dog like a golden and a coat with less care and shedding is MUCHO exciting!!

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:02 PM
Are you dead set on getting a puppy? Or are you open to getting a slightly older dog (say 4 months to a year old)?
well anything less than a year is still a puppy, i thought. i am ok with something up to a year, but if i end up with a poodle or poodle mix, or a neo or neo mix than i would like to stick to something less than 5 months. i mean regardless if its 5 months or a year its going to puppy school. and then dog school when he/she gets older.

but yeah i am dead set on something that is less than a year.

Ryan
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:18 PM
A Newfie dog hardly qualifies as medium. :tape: ;) I was going to suggest a Cairn terrier, but if you think the Newfie dog is medium, a Cairn will be a weiner dog next to it. Anyway, we've had a Cairn for 5 years now, and it immediately came to my mind after reading your post. A grown Cairn isn't that large, maybe 15-20 pounda depending on the food it has and it's exercise routine. They LOVE people (cannot stress that enough), and are great with dogs for the most part. They require almost no coat care at all, unless you get them cut/stripped for the summer so they dont swelter in the heat. :p They are a very active dog, so I wouldn't suggest it unless you dont mind walking it several times a day. They do best in an environment where they can be let off their leash at times, to sniff around and dig. Also, they are definately owner friendly (cuddling, chasing, playing with toys etc.), but it's always on their schedule, so if you want to play and they dont, tough luck. ;)

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:28 PM
A Newfie dog hardly qualifies as medium. :tape: ;) I was going to suggest a Cairn terrier, but if you think the Newfie dog is medium, a Cairn will be a weiner dog next to it. Anyway, we've had a Cairn for 5 years now, and it immediately came to my mind after reading your post. A grown Cairn isn't that large, maybe 15-20 pounda depending on the food it has and it's exercise routine. They LOVE people (cannot stress that enough), and are great with dogs for the most part. They require almost no coat care at all, unless you get them cut/stripped for the summer so they dont swelter in the heat. :p They are a very active dog, so I wouldn't suggest it unless you dont mind walking it several times a day. They do best in an environment where they can be let off their leash at times, to sniff around and dig. Also, they are definately owner friendly (cuddling, chasing, playing with toys etc.), but it's always on their schedule, so if you want to play and they dont, tough luck. ;)
cool. i never thought about a cairn, seem kind of small. :lol:

griffin
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:31 PM
well anything less than a year is still a puppy, i thought. i am ok with something up to a year, but if i end up with a poodle or poodle mix, or a neo or neo mix than i would like to stick to something less than 5 months. i mean regardless if its 5 months or a year its going to puppy school. and then dog school when he/she gets older.

but yeah i am dead set on something that is less than a year.

Cool. I ask because "puppy" means different things to different people. Something to think about with slightly older pups is that you'd be able to see a little more of their personality - since that seems to be your main concern. You're also more likely to get a pup that's already house broken, which may mean you have more time to focus on other kinds of training, and may also be easier to deal with depending on your schedule.

Our first baby, Griffin, we got as a 9-week old puppy. And it was special. It also meant she got away with murder because she was so damn cute (it took all of 4 days before my partner's "no dogs on the furniture" edict went out the window :lol: ), and our schedules were such that she was never alone for more than a few hours.

Augie came to us at 9 months (we think). We are having to focus a bit more on getting him socialized, but I think that has more to do with him being a herding dog mix (herding breeds tend to be a bit reactive). Between the two of them, though, I don't think I can say that one was easier to socialize than the other. I think the key in both cases - aside from our willingness or work with them, of course - was that we met them first and got a sense of how they reacted to new people (us), and in Augie's case, learned about his background from the people that were fostering him.

You could argue that with Augie - Oliver, too, who we got at 3 years - we had a better idea what to expect than we did with Griffin, depite knowing eactly what breed Griffin was.

Like I said, just something to think about :)

griffin
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:35 PM
cool. i never thought about a cairn, seem kind of small. :lol:

"It's not the size of the dog in the fight..."

Ryan, Cairn's were our second choice when we were first looking for a dog! I don't think I've ever met at Cairn Terrier I didn't like.

le bon vivant
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:46 PM
Jiggly, would a shih tzu be too small for you?
Thats a nice breed for all the personality traits you described.

Helen Lawson
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:48 PM
Don't you live in NYC? You might want to check how much exercise and activity the breeds you're after need and whether you can do it. One of the fags I'm usually stuck with has a golden retriever, and it's a sweet, beautiful animal, everything you appear to be looking for, but he says it has a lot of energy and they have to take it out a lot and it likes to run around and has a lot of energy, which might not be the best thing for NYC. They have an Irish Setter also that appears to be less high-energy, but it likes the retriever better than people, I'm not sure how friendly they are, this one is obviously a lot better than a cat, but it's not one of the most friendly dogs I've ever been around.

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:49 PM
Cool. I ask because "puppy" means different things to different people. Something to think about with slightly older pups is that you'd be able to see a little more of their personality - since that seems to be your main concern. You're also more likely to get a pup that's already house broken, which may mean you have more time to focus on other kinds of training, and may also be easier to deal with depending on your schedule.

Our first baby, Griffin, we got as a 9-week old puppy. And it was special. It also meant she got away with murder because she was so damn cute (it took all of 4 days before my partner's "no dogs on the furniture" edict went out the window :lol: ), and our schedules were such that she was never alone for more than a few hours.

Augie came to us at 9 months (we think). We are having to focus a bit more on getting him socialized, but I think that has more to do with him being a herding dog mix (herding breeds tend to be a bit reactive). Between the two of them, though, I don't think I can say that one was easier to socialize than the other. I think the key in both cases - aside from our willingness or work with them, of course - was that we met them first and got a sense of how they reacted to new people (us), and in Augie's case, learned about his background from the people that were fostering him.

You could argue that with Augie - Oliver, too, who we got at 3 years - we had a better idea what to expect than we did with Griffin, depite knowing eactly what breed Griffin was.

Like I said, just something to think about :)

cool hotness. definitely something to think about.

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:52 PM
Don't you live in NYC? You might want to check how much exercise and activity the breeds you're after need and whether you can do it. One of the fags I'm usually stuck with has a golden retriever, and it's a sweet, beautiful animal, everything you appear to be looking for, but he says it has a lot of energy and they have to take it out a lot and it likes to run around and has a lot of energy, which might not be the best thing for NYC. They have an Irish Setter also that appears to be less high-energy, but it likes the retriever better than people, I'm not sure how friendly they are, this one is obviously a lot better than a cat, but it's not one of the most friendly dogs I've ever been around.
yeah i do. we have a house, though, with a big front yard and a big back yard. :) plus i am kind of high energy myself, and so walking around and giving the dog a place to play will not be big issue. :).

Edit, both the yards are fenced in, depending on the breed the fence will need to be made taller.

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:55 PM
Jiggly, would a shih tzu be too small for you?
Thats a nice breed for all the personality traits you described.
my neighbor has a shih tzu and its very nice dog. but its soo small. i know its not the size of the dog, in the fight... but still. :o

Helen Lawson
Jun 26th, 2006, 07:55 PM
yeah i do. we have a house, though, with a big front yard and a big back yard. :) plus i am kind of high energy myself, and so walking around and giving the dog a place to play will not be big issue. :).

Well, based on my limited experience, that retriever would probably be wonderful for you!

Of course, you could gamble, I grew up with a mutt we got off the side of the road, a black lab/beagle mix. It was jet black and a little bigger than a beagle had a lab face but beagle ears. It was great with kids, cats, loved people and attention, you never know what you're going to get.

le bon vivant
Jun 26th, 2006, 08:02 PM
my neighbor has a shih tzu and its very nice dog. but its soo small. i know its not the size of the dog, in the fight... but still. :o

LOLOL, OK. They are the nicest dogs tho, and wonderful with kids and love to be petted and all that stuff. I hope you find what you want tho, I had to give mine up to my family because my apartment doesnt allow pets. :sad:

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 08:06 PM
Well, based on my limited experience, that retriever would probably be wonderful for you!

Of course, you could gamble, I grew up with a mutt we got off the side of the road, a black lab/beagle mix. It was jet black and a little bigger than a beagle had a lab face but beagle ears. It was great with kids, cats, loved people and attention, you never know what you're going to get.
yeah thats what i am hearing that a golden retriever would be great. :) and they are sooo cute and fluffy

Wigglytuff
Jun 26th, 2006, 08:09 PM
LOLOL, OK. They are the nicest dogs tho, and wonderful with kids and love to be petted and all that stuff. I hope you find what you want tho, I had to give mine up to my family because my apartment doesnt allow pets. :sad:
that fucking sucks. :sad: :sad:

myxomatosis
Jun 27th, 2006, 01:07 AM
When I first read the title, I thought it said "questions about abducting a puppy" :lol:

By grandparents' dog was a lab and it was the best dog ever.

Hawk
Jun 27th, 2006, 01:44 AM
fyi, I have heard - from breeders/fans of Goldens - that Goldend retrieviers CAN be dog-aggressive. But whatever breed/cross you decide on, remember that how well they deal with kids/dogs/people/cats/chickens will have as much to do with how you socialize and train them as it will with breeding. Pups is going to have to meet as many and as many different kinds of people as you can manage in a controled way (introducing them to kids by letting get mugged is not a good idea, for example).

This is pretty much the key. As long as you socialize your dog well when he's young it'll be good.

As for natural breed traits your choice of a Golden Retriever is a very good one. Naturally very friendly and upbeat.

You might want to take into consideration that Golden's need exercise and having a yard is a big plus. They are sporting dogs with lots of energy so they need to move around ;)

If it wasn't for the large coat my extreme bias :p would have suggested a Keeshond :hearts: (Had to put ours down in February :sad: )Very much a people (children included) dog that's medium sized and good with other animals plus they don't need a lot of exercise which is a bonus :p

Ryan
Jun 27th, 2006, 01:44 AM
"It's not the size of the dog in the fight..."

Ryan, Cairn's were our second choice when we were first looking for a dog! I don't think I've ever met at Cairn Terrier I didn't like.


I know. Whenever she puts her ears back and looks sad, I give in to anything, and so do my parents. Cairns can vary in size too Jiggly - nothing too big, honestly - but none are super small. They're perfect for a house, they don't shed at all, and they're so damn cute.

RatedR Superstar
Jun 27th, 2006, 01:58 AM
hello yall,

i wanna get a dog in the next 3 years and am doing research.

i want a dog that is friendly, has some coat care but not more than 2 hours a weeks worth. long lived, but not to small, so a medium sized dog. water friendly, great with kids, people (as we know kids are not people :lol: j/k), other dogs, friendly with cats, very easy going, ok with being petted alot (so not something that is aloof). must BE very, very, very friendly (i can not stress the need for friendly enough). (if it looks less than friendly thats ok as long as it is the friendliest dog ever)

ok, anyway, from what i have learned, golden retrievers seem like the best match. also poodles, and labradors, newfoundlands, and Neapolitan mastiffs. as well as any mix of the above named dogs.

my questions are this do you think this is correct?

if want to insure that i getting something that is in these breeds with golden retriever as a first choice, but i dont want to go to a breeder (aka puppy mill :fiery: ), what are my options?

try buying a pug, its medium size, very friendly and very playful, good with kids..when my dad died, i bought one for my mom so that she wont go to depression, it worked :D

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 02:29 AM
pugs are VERY nice. but so tiny. I was thinking maybe getting two puppies and the famous Dermit the pug and Koko the norfolk terrier definitely make me want something that small. but I don't know. am I a size queen after all?

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 03:23 AM
http://www.eleanore.net/pug/pugs.sized.jpg
http://www.calendarclub.co.uk/images/005/525/9780763190248_hs.jpg
pugs

Erika_Angel
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:26 AM
Try a Cavalier King Charles. They are a medium sized dog, so if you have a decent backyard you won't have to walk them every day (as you would have to a dog of the size of a retriever). They are also very friendly, love attention and love company, very cute too. They eat alot though, and you have to be careful to make sure they don't get too fat. Their ears also require a little extra time, just a quick clean once a week or so I would assume (They have big ears ;) )

http://www.yourdogs.info/images/breeds/cavalier_king_charles_spaniel.jpg

Bacardi
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:42 AM
I have a ShihTzu.. he's adorable. Just a puppy thou and I bought him $350 :tape: He's got major up keep thou. I still wouldn't trade anything this side of hell for Anakin. A dog shows you unconditional love... so much so you figure out you don't need a partner to be happy.

I'd say get a lab, or maybe some kinda terrier. :wavey:

Good luck!

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:42 AM
Try a Cavalier King Charles. They are a medium sized dog, so if you have a decent backyard you won't have to walk them every day (as you would have to a dog of the size of a retriever). They are also very friendly, love attention and love company, very cute too. They eat alot though, and you have to be careful to make sure they don't get too fat. Their ears also require a little extra time, just a quick clean once a week or so I would assume (They have big ears ;) )

http://www.yourdogs.info/images/breeds/cavalier_king_charles_spaniel.jpg
they are cute and i have friend who has one, hers at least was a very fast learner. i was able to teach her a trick in 10 minutes i have never owned a dog before. kc was the dogs name. i taught her "over" which is her lying on down with her belly exposed. so i that me and her mothers could pet her. so its not the hardest trick in the world, but she learned it fast.

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:45 AM
http://www.dog.com/breed/docgrafx/goldretr.jpg
http://www.favorite-puppy-names.com/images/golden_retriever_puppy_picture.jpg

but goldens dont look at you, they smile at you!! soooo cute!!!

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:45 AM
but thats a LOT of hair.... hmmm

Bacardi
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:49 AM
This is my ShihTzu... maybe consider one of these. Get a chick one Jiggly and we can breed them and get RICH ;) :D
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v354/bolty13gal/anakin1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v354/bolty13gal/anakin2.jpg

It only took me like 4 days to paper train him. He knows his name good, barks at me when I say "talk to me", lets me dress him in clothes, and knows "ball" when I say go get one he brings one, and also knows bone. :D

RatedR Superstar
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:57 AM
This is my ShihTzu... maybe consider one of these. Get a chick one Jiggly and we can breed them and get RICH ;) :D
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v354/bolty13gal/anakin1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v354/bolty13gal/anakin2.jpg

It only took me like 4 days to paper train him. He knows his name good, barks at me when I say "talk to me", lets me dress him in clothes, and knows "ball" when I say go get one he brings one, and also knows bone. :D

try crossbreading it with a bulldog :)

it would be great to see the 1st ever bull-shiht :lol:

Bacardi
Jun 27th, 2006, 05:15 AM
:haha: Bull-Shit.
That dog would be at the top of every naughty boy and girls Christmas list

Kenny
Jun 27th, 2006, 05:20 AM
Jiggly.. you live in NYC right? You have a big front yard and back yard with a fence.. Pardon me for asking hun, but WHAT EXACTLY DO YOU DO? lol You sound uber rich. :D

(Of course you don't have to answer me.. I just wanted to point it out. hehe.)

;-)

hingisGOAT
Jun 27th, 2006, 05:22 AM
huskies are very friendly, intelligent, strong
http://www.giftking.com/DOGS/siberian_husky_puppies_01052003%20014.jpg

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:08 AM
Jiggly.. you live in NYC right? You have a big front yard and back yard with a fence.. Pardon me for asking hun, but WHAT EXACTLY DO YOU DO? lol You sound uber rich. :D

(Of course you don't have to answer me.. I just wanted to point it out. hehe.)

;-)
i am a poor unemployed grad student. when i was about 12, when NYC property values were 6 feet below 6 feet under, my parents bought a house. a big house with a big front and back yards. now 14 years later the house is worth quite a bit more than what we paid (or could have dreamt of affording). but rich far from it, great timing.

yay :bounce: :bounce: for luck!!!!

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:11 AM
huskies are very friendly, intelligent, strong
http://www.giftking.com/DOGS/siberian_husky_puppies_01052003%20014.jpg
so cute!!! but i am afraid the summers here are far to hot for them. i know some people have them in the city, but they get such evil looks in the summer because it is just to hot. most long coat dogs get serious cuts for the summer here.

Bacardi
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:12 AM
Just please don't get a German Shepard. Those dogs are evil, I swear to God I think they are EVIL. First and foremost one killed my lil dog a few years ago, that evil bastard crushed her treating her like some stuffed toy, then they are asshole police dogs. Evil dogs all around, I know some people like them, but everytime I see one I just think "DIE", because they all look like that sorry piece of shit that killed my doggie that I'd had for 8 years.

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:13 AM
:haha: Bull-Shit.
That dog would be at the top of every naughty boy and girls Christmas list
dude thats hot!!! you should do it. selling Bull-Shit might be big business.
:haha: :haha:

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 06:16 AM
Just please don't get a German Shepard. Those dogs are evil, I swear to God I think they are EVIL. First and foremost one killed my lil dog a few years ago, that evil bastard crushed her treating her like some stuffed toy, then they are asshole police dogs. Evil dogs all around, I know some people like them, but everytime I see one I just think "DIE", because they all look like that sorry piece of shit that killed my doggie that I'd had for 8 years.
:sad: :sad: i am sorry to hear that.

but i wasnt considering a herding dog anyway, as they have been known to herd children and adults if they have nothing else to herd.

Mitch01
Jun 27th, 2006, 07:33 AM
I've had golden retrievers for as long as I can remember and I've rarely come across a smarter or more easy-natured breed. Of course, much of that does come with the breeders or owners, but overall they are an extremely friendly breed. Only once have I seen any of my goldens show aggression towards anything, and that was when my nephew was being threatened by another dog, so she went to his protection.
As for the shedding issue, a lot of that depends on the climate you live in. I've heard it's a non-issue with retrievers with a constant climate; however where I live in Canada it's 40C in the summer and -10 in the winter so the dogs do shed a lot periodically.
One thing to note about retrievers is that they can have problems with hip dysplasia, which seems to be largely genetic. Therefore if buying a puppy, it's advisable to make sure the breeders have registered the parents, as they are required to have their hips (and eyes) cleared before registration in an effort to get rid of this condition in the breed. Of course, 'registered' puppies are a bit more expensive, and even if you buy a pup that hasn't been, you're probably not going to see this problem - but it is devastating to both dog and owner if this condition pops up.
One thing..no matter how well you train a golden retriever, if you take them for a car ride they refuse to sit in the back seat. It's kinda tough driving down the road with a 60-lb dog in your lap...Also don't leave dirty clothes lying about when you're expecting company, as most likely the golden retriever will grab your dirty underwear and bring them out into full view of everyone to lay upon. :devil:
We've bred one of our dogs twice, which was both rewarding and a lot of work. There's nothing as fun as having 12 cute pups running around but it's like having 12 kids at the same time...you're up at all hours looking after them. Whatever breed you do get, ensure that you visit the breeder's home if possible and look at how clean and well-kept the area is as well as the condition of the dogs (both pups and parent(s)) themselves, spend some time there socializing with the pups, and make sure that the breeders have kept up to date with the puppie's first shots, vet checks, registration (if you're looking for that) and such.

pla
Jun 27th, 2006, 09:24 AM
Jiggly, when I red your thread immediately, one bread poped up in my head:

Border Collies. They seem perfect for your wishes.

Btw, don't take a husky- they are PERFECT but not as a first dog. The heat is not a problem for them- it's a problem for ALL dogs.

But no matter what breed you take, the most important thing is to know you take responsability for a living being for 10-15 YAERS. So you have to think, when you work, when you have children, when you move elsewhere what are your options conserning the dog.

I can write a whole book on the subject but there are internet sites with tons of information that you MUST know before even considering the breed :)

Elske
Jun 27th, 2006, 10:58 AM
Jiggly, would a shih tzu be too small for you?
Thats a nice breed for all the personality traits you described.
:worship: :D

forever_rafter
Jun 27th, 2006, 11:11 AM
Just please don't get a German Shepard. Those dogs are evil, I swear to God I think they are EVIL. First and foremost one killed my lil dog a few years ago, that evil bastard crushed her treating her like some stuffed toy, then they are asshole police dogs. Evil dogs all around, I know some people like them, but everytime I see one I just think "DIE", because they all look like that sorry piece of shit that killed my doggie that I'd had for 8 years.

Absolutely can't agree. In Poland German Shepard is very popular and it's a very intelligent dog, used by police for example. I'd go for Collie or golden retriver though

griffin
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:25 PM
but thats a LOT of hair.... hmmm

Don't let hair length/poofiness itself fool you. Not all long haired dogs require huge amounts of grooming, and some shorter-haired dogs require constant brushing to keep up with shedding.

I don't know about Goldens, but this is Keeshond Oliver in full furry glory:

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid208/p2a863b564f55276ec490685cc2ad03ce/ee4dfe2e.jpg

Looks like a lot of brushing, yes? In fact, he sheds far less than the akitas and huskies I know, and even when he's blowing his coat (happens twice a year) a couple of 15-20 minute sessions per week with a coat rake and he's fine. Granted, we're not taking him to Westminster. We give him a buzz cut in the summer to keep him cool (not so short his skin is exposed - sunburn ya know - but short enought to make him look like a puppy so that people fuss over him, which he loves), and everybody's happy.

So if you find a breed or a mix that you love, don't let coat length alone put you off.

As pure-breds go, I'm a huge fan of Keeshonds, by the way. But as you are capable of doing your own research, I will spare you my "why Keeshonds are the best dogs ever" speech unless you ask for it ;)

MinnyGophers
Jun 27th, 2006, 04:36 PM
Btw, don't take a husky- they are PERFECT but not as a first dog. The heat is not a problem for them- it's a problem for ALL dogs.



What exactly is the problem with Huskies as first dog?
I'm wondering, since I'm really thinking of getting one.

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 05:38 PM
Jiggly, when I red your thread immediately, one bread poped up in my head:

Border Collies. They seem perfect for your wishes.

Btw, don't take a husky- they are PERFECT but not as a first dog. The heat is not a problem for them- it's a problem for ALL dogs.

But no matter what breed you take, the most important thing is to know you take responsability for a living being for 10-15 YAERS. So you have to think, when you work, when you have children, when you move elsewhere what are your options conserning the dog.

I can write a whole book on the subject but there are internet sites with tons of information that you MUST know before even considering the breed :)
no no border collie sorry. they are smart and all, but they would be unhappy left alone and they need much more training. (not in the not smart sense but in the it takes to sec. to master a trick and they need constant mental stimulation.

Wigglytuff
Jun 27th, 2006, 05:42 PM
I've had golden retrievers for as long as I can remember and I've rarely come across a smarter or more easy-natured breed. Of course, much of that does come with the breeders or owners, but overall they are an extremely friendly breed. Only once have I seen any of my goldens show aggression towards anything, and that was when my nephew was being threatened by another dog, so she went to his protection.
As for the shedding issue, a lot of that depends on the climate you live in. I've heard it's a non-issue with retrievers with a constant climate; however where I live in Canada it's 40C in the summer and -10 in the winter so the dogs do shed a lot periodically.
One thing to note about retrievers is that they can have problems with hip dysplasia, which seems to be largely genetic. Therefore if buying a puppy, it's advisable to make sure the breeders have registered the parents, as they are required to have their hips (and eyes) cleared before registration in an effort to get rid of this condition in the breed. Of course, 'registered' puppies are a bit more expensive, and even if you buy a pup that hasn't been, you're probably not going to see this problem - but it is devastating to both dog and owner if this condition pops up.
One thing..no matter how well you train a golden retriever, if you take them for a car ride they refuse to sit in the back seat. It's kinda tough driving down the road with a 60-lb dog in your lap...Also don't leave dirty clothes lying about when you're expecting company, as most likely the golden retriever will grab your dirty underwear and bring them out into full view of everyone to lay upon. :devil:
We've bred one of our dogs twice, which was both rewarding and a lot of work. There's nothing as fun as having 12 cute pups running around but it's like having 12 kids at the same time...you're up at all hours looking after them. Whatever breed you do get, ensure that you visit the breeder's home if possible and look at how clean and well-kept the area is as well as the condition of the dogs (both pups and parent(s)) themselves, spend some time there socializing with the pups, and make sure that the breeders have kept up to date with the puppie's first shots, vet checks, registration (if you're looking for that) and such.

how long do they live? what should i look for in a rescue puppy? what are my chances of getting a purebreed golden puppy? (time is no issue, but chance is)

griffin
Jun 27th, 2006, 05:52 PM
Some Golden rescue links (I made a donation to the Long Island group a while back in memory of a friend's dog):

Long Island Golden Retriever Rescue
http://www.ligrr.org/

http://adopt-a-golden-retriever.1-800-save-a-pet.com/

http://www.grca-nrc.org/Localrescues.htm

They could probably give you a better idea of how hard it wold be to get a puppy. Or look at Petfinder if you're interested in Golden mixes.

Hawk
Jun 27th, 2006, 08:19 PM
As pure-breds go, I'm a huge fan of Keeshonds, by the way. But as you are capable of doing your own research, I will spare you my "why Keeshonds are the best dogs ever" speech unless you ask for it ;)

I think I already started that speech :o

Your kees is a real cutie :D

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 04:32 AM
i dont know anything about keeshonds... can you tell me about them?

rebel_ffighter
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:27 AM
I think keeshonds are too hairy for what u are looking for,have u considered a pit bull?..I know,I know,they say that they are wild and stuff but that is only rumours,they are like every other dog and the plus is that they are security dogs,they never let anyone stranger get into their "territory"(which is the place where u raised them:yard,house etc).I have one 2 years now and I must say I have never seen such a loyal dog in the world and the feeling of security it provides is magnificent.She has never bitten or attacked me or any member of my family since she is only playful and sweet with us but she is very dangerous for strangers(she believes that her duty is to protect us and the house).Think about it,they are not hairy and they are lovely dogs

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:44 AM
I think keeshonds are too hairy for what u are looking for,have u considered a pit bull?..I know,I know,they say that they are wild and stuff but that is only rumours,they are like every other dog and the plus is that they are security dogs,they never let anyone stranger get into their "territory"(which is the place where u raised them:yard,house etc).I have one 2 years now and I must say I have never seen such a loyal dog in the world and the feeling of security it provides is magnificent.She has never bitten or attacked me or any member of my family since she is only playful and sweet with us but she is very dangerous for strangers(she believes that her duty is to protect us and the house).Think about it,they are not hairy and they are lovely dogs
yeah no, nothing with the word "dangerous" anywhere in the description, particularly not "very dangerous" . plus i said, i wanted something that is friendly with EVERYONE, not just people it knows. so yeah, no pits, no korean jindos, no chihuahuas (these little buggers are well know for their "issues", people loving call it, "a big dog in a little package" i call it, "small, cute and pure evil" :devil: .), i wont even consider anything that has known problems with friendliness. can not stress the importance of friendly enough, even with strangers. (yeah, i know "my loss" "blame the deed not the breed" but hey what can i tell you. :shrug: :shrug: :dog: :shrug: )

rebel_ffighter
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:49 AM
yeah no, nothing with the word "dangerous" anywhere in the description, particularly not "very dangerous" . plus i said, i wanted something that is friendly with EVERYONE, not just people it knows. so yeah, no pits, no korean jindos, no chihuahuas (these little buggers are well know for their "issues", people loving call it, "a big dog in a little package" i call it, "small, cute and pure evil" :devil: .), i wont even consider anything that has known problems with friendliness. can not stress the importance of friendly enough, even with strangers. (yeah, i know "my loss" "blame the deed not the breed" but hey what can i tell you. :shrug: :shrug: :dog: :shrug: )


well yeah they are not suitable for u if u want it to be friendly with everyone,I like the fact she isnt friendly with people she doesnt recognise(matches my character heh).Then I think a Labrador or a boxer(nice breed indeed) would suit you,or maybe a big griffon would be nice(I have one of them too-nice dogs,playful and loyal as well).

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 07:03 AM
http://www.akc.org/images/breeds/golden_retriever/photos/lg_golden_retriever13.jpg
aww look at the cute puppies. i love how the whole family is smiling...

i have never looked griffons. let me do so now!

rebel_ffighter
Jun 28th, 2006, 07:10 AM
some griffon dogs' pictures:

http://img163.imageshack.us/img163/1292/1215176345yq.jpg
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/8821/19221408274tp.jpg

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 07:28 AM
the griffons are cute, but i dont know if the needs of the dog match what i can give (i.e. this need to be the boss)... hmmm i will read more about this.

pla
Jun 28th, 2006, 08:40 AM
What exactly is the problem with Huskies as first dog?
I'm wondering, since I'm really thinking of getting one.

Huskies are not only quite a challenge for a newbie dog-owner, they are a challenege for everyone. So even for experienced people huskies can be a problem to look after. It's worth a book why huskies are between the most abandoned breeds outthere but I'll paste you some links where it's explained quite well.

http://www.shca.org/shcahp2b.htm
http://www.siberianrescue.com/seneca.htm - especially this one but there are many, many sites with useful information, PLEASE for the sake of your future dog, read them ALL ;)

pla
Jun 28th, 2006, 08:51 AM
A little add ^

Temperament

Popular as family pets and as show dogs due to their striking appearance and gentle temperament, Siberians have certain drawbacks. Huskies are extremely affectionate, curious, and welcoming to people, which means they rarely hurt humans and so are not good guard dogs. Properly socialized Siberians are often quite gentle with children, although no dog, including Siberians, should be left unsupervised with small children. Normally quite tractable, affectionate, and docile with people, they nonetheless have a strong hunting drive and are known to kill (and even eat) cats, rabbits, chickens, squirrels, and other small animals. They have even been known to savage sheep on occasion, which is one of the many reasons why they are believed to be closely related to the wolf. If the Husky is raised with a small animal such as a cat, it is less likely to hurt that animal.

Siberian Huskies should be kept in secure fenced enclosures at least six feet in height as they will not always come to call and will often disappear on long hunting trips. Thus, they cannot be allowed to run loose. They should (I'd say they MUST) be kept leashed. Siberians are also accomplished escape artists, so enclosures should be checked frequently for any potential escape routes. The dogs are good diggers, able to tunnel under fences with shallow foundations. Huskies are trainable to a certain degree, but require patience. They are independent in nature and not given to blind obedience to every command.

Everything in bold must be taken very seriously ;)

If any questions, you can always PM me or ask here MinnyGophers. As I said, those dogs are perfect but only for those how to live with them ;)

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 08:58 AM
A little add ^



Everything in bold must be taken very seriously ;)

If any questions, you can always PM me or ask here MinnyGophers. As I said, those dogs are perfect but only for those how to live with them ;)
ah! i see.

griffin
Jun 28th, 2006, 01:41 PM
You might find this book helpful: "The Right Dog for You" by Daniel F. Tortora
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/067147247X/sr=8-1/qid=1151501236/ref=sr_1_1/102-4039032-6842537?ie=UTF8
if you can't find it in the library. It literally has charts/graphs rating breeds for a variety of criteria, from activity level to whether they're good watch dogs or get along with other animals to trainability. We used it when we got our first dog (the late, best dog ever Griffin). It just made it easier to compare breeds than talking to partisans, who obviously are prone to hyping a dog's good points, and what mades a dog great for one person may not work for you. (of course, you can take a Keeshond owner's word for it that they're the best because they're right ;) )

This is fun - I feel like I'm adopting a dog vicariously :lol:

MinnyGophers
Jun 28th, 2006, 02:40 PM
A little add ^



Everything in bold must be taken very seriously ;)

If any questions, you can always PM me or ask here MinnyGophers. As I said, those dogs are perfect but only for those how to live with them ;)

Thanks so much for the information!
The thing I'm scared the most of is for the dog to go loose and get killed. And of course that they need a larger space to live in that I can provide right now, since I live in an apartment and am in school. But otherwise, you are right, those dogs seem perfect. But of course, I'm going to make an informed decision as to whether or not I'm ready yet. :lol:

pla
Jun 28th, 2006, 03:05 PM
Thanks so much for the information!
The thing I'm scared the most of is for the dog to go loose and get killed. And of course that they need a larger space to live in that I can provide right now, since I live in an apartment and am in school. But otherwise, you are right, those dogs seem perfect. But of course, I'm going to make an informed decision as to whether or not I'm ready yet. :lol:

It's always better to give a bigger space to your dog but it's not impossible to live in an appartment and a husky to live very well in it. I do it. The only thing you'll have to be more careful about is the physical excercies ;) Otherwise, a dog- as a pack, social, animal, feels the best where his Alpha is (i.e. the boss, the chief, if you do your job correctly- YOU) ;)

And yeah, you can be scared of loosing your dog. That's why you have to walk with a husky on a leash and leave him free only in very protected closed space. Certain people leave their huskies run free and it never happens anything bad but those are the exceptions which confirm the rule.

I am sure you'll be a great husky owner (or the husky will just own you :lol: ) :yeah:

MinnyGophers
Jun 28th, 2006, 03:11 PM
I am sure you'll be a great husky owner (or the husky will just own you :lol: ) :yeah:

Yeah sometimes I wonder :lol:

The physical part will probably not be a problem since I run quite a lot. The trick is to be lucky enough to end up with a dog that is not mischievous enough to escape and who doesn't dig hole inside my apartment.

pla
Jun 28th, 2006, 03:20 PM
Yeah sometimes I wonder :lol:

The physical part will probably not be a problem since I run quite a lot. The trick is to be lucky enough to end up with a dog that is not mischievous enough to escape and who doesn't dig hole inside my apartment.

It's not about luck, or let's say luck is a small part in it. If you tire him up nicely in the morning, the dog won't dig wholes in your sofas and won't eat your woden doors :lol: Well, while it's very young, you'll have some damage, it's inevitable.

The luck will be more to find a silent husky, myone is like this, thank god ;). He only "talks" (that's how people call some of the sounds huskies make) when he's exceptionally excited.

Jiggly, sorry for high-jacking your thread :wavey:

Hawk
Jun 28th, 2006, 05:19 PM
i dont know anything about keeshonds... can you tell me about them?

Sure..here's the Canadian Keeshond club descriptions.

Size: It is medium sized, ranging in weight from 30 to 50 lbs. and standing about knee high – 17” (43 cm.) being the prefered height for females and 18” (46 cm.) for males, when measuring from the withers (shoulder blades) to the ground.

Coat: Double coated with long, full outer coat, plus soft, wooly undercoat. In North America the Keeshond most commonly comes in a mixture of black, cream and grey colours.

Griffin pretty much answered the grooming side of it. We gave our guy a brushing only every once and awhile as he didn't need any more, however he was a house dog and didn't get muddy or wet in our backyard or indoors :p

Suitability to Children: Excellent. Parents must insure that young children do not play too roughly with the dogs, because they generally will take a lot of abuse, without retaliating. Do not let children ride on their backs, poke at their eyes, pull their hair or their tails. This is not only cruel, but can cause permanent, physical damage to the dog.

Picture time! :D

Grown up

http://www.geocities.com/Canadakeeshond/cruise2.jpg

Puppies! :angel:

http://www.members.shaw.ca/backney/_private/6of7.jpg

http://www.geocities.com/fyreburst/BLitterAtPlay6wks.jpg

griffin
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:09 PM
i dont know anything about keeshonds... can you tell me about them?

How did I miss this? Unlike Hawk's dog, Griffin did get herself in mud/muddy water fairly often - Griff was big on wading - and for a long-haired dog, she always cleaned up pretty well. Their fur seems to resist mud (something to do with the oils in the coat, I think), so mostly we'd just towel her off and maybe give her a quick brush and she'd be suitable for company.

What we liked about them was that they're big enough/sturdy enough to go hiking with me, but small enough for to pick up and carry up stairs; and that they tend to be energetic and playful, but not so energetic that I was going to have to take up jogging. They seem pretty adaptable, and happy whether they're in an apartment in the city or out in the woods, so long as they're with their owner/families - the flip side of that is that they don't like being left out. Even if all we're going is watching TV, Oliver wants to be nearby (Griffin used to sit on the ottoman in the middle of the room and watch with us). If you ignore them too much they can get destructive.

Most keeshonds are very friendly with dogs and people (and like Hawk said, good with kids - both Griffin and Ollie were always very patient with kids, which is fortunate because children seem drawn to them), but some can be shy so good socialization is important. Also, they can be noisy. They were originally bred as watch dogs, so they'll let you know if someone's around - but they can be trained not to bark, or to be quiet on command.

Kees are reasonably easy to train, but they are SCARY cute as puppies, so you might find it a little hard to be stern with them. Or maybe that was just me because I'm a sucker.

And I know I"m biased, but I think they're very good looking dogs, too.

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:28 PM
Sure..here's the Canadian Keeshond club descriptions.

Size: It is medium sized, ranging in weight from 30 to 50 lbs. and standing about knee high – 17” (43 cm.) being the prefered height for females and 18” (46 cm.) for males, when measuring from the withers (shoulder blades) to the ground.

Coat: Double coated with long, full outer coat, plus soft, wooly undercoat. In North America the Keeshond most commonly comes in a mixture of black, cream and grey colours.

Griffin pretty much answered the grooming side of it. We gave our guy a brushing only every once and awhile as he didn't need any more, however he was a house dog and didn't get muddy or wet in our backyard or indoors :p

Suitability to Children: Excellent. Parents must insure that young children do not play too roughly with the dogs, because they generally will take a lot of abuse, without retaliating. Do not let children ride on their backs, poke at their eyes, pull their hair or their tails. This is not only cruel, but can cause permanent, physical damage to the dog.

Picture time! :D

Grown up

http://www.geocities.com/Canadakeeshond/cruise2.jpg

Puppies! :angel:

http://www.members.shaw.ca/backney/_private/6of7.jpg

http://www.geocities.com/fyreburst/BLitterAtPlay6wks.jpg
hotness!!!

awwwwwwwww look at the liddle puppies!!! sooo cute!!! (and such big teeth)!!!

sooo cute... but should i be worried about the coat? as it gets very very hot in the summer... also, i HOPE to be able to bring my dog to work, (which is why something with a "bad rep" is not really an option)?

Wigglytuff
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:32 PM
How did I miss this? Unlike Hawk's dog, Griffin did get herself in mud/muddy water fairly often - Griff was big on wading - and for a long-haired dog, she always cleaned up pretty well. Their fur seems to resist mud (something to do with the oils in the coat, I think), so mostly we'd just towel her off and maybe give her a quick brush and she'd be suitable for company.

What we liked about them was that they're big enough/sturdy enough to go hiking with me, but small enough for to pick up and carry up stairs; and that they tend to be energetic and playful, but not so energetic that I was going to have to take up jogging. They seem pretty adaptable, and happy whether they're in an apartment in the city or out in the woods, so long as they're with their owner/families - the flip side of that is that they don't like being left out. Even if all we're going is watching TV, Oliver wants to be nearby (Griffin used to sit on the ottoman in the middle of the room and watch with us). If you ignore them too much they can get destructive.

Most keeshonds are very friendly with dogs and people (and like Hawk said, good with kids - both Griffin and Ollie were always very patient with kids, which is fortunate because children seem drawn to them), but some can be shy so good socialization is important. Also, they can be noisy. They were originally bred as watch dogs, so they'll let you know if someone's around - but they can be trained not to bark, or to be quiet on command.

Kees are reasonably easy to train, but they are SCARY cute as puppies, so you might find it a little hard to be stern with them. Or maybe that was just me because I'm a sucker.

And I know I"m biased, but I think they're very good looking dogs, too.

they are soooo cute as puppyies!! so cute and fluffy!!

lol, me is not a fan of barking but training to be quite on command seems very doable (maybe even a must).

griffin
Jun 28th, 2006, 06:48 PM
they are soooo cute as puppyies!! so cute and fluffy!!

lol, me is not a fan of barking but training to be quite on command seems very doable (maybe even a must).

People used to stop me on the street and ask what Griffin was when she was a puppy - not what breed, what animal. She looked like a walking teddy bear.

The barking isn't inevitable - you just need to be forewarned and train them.

As for the fur and getting hot in the summer, this is Ollie with his summer 'do:

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid174/p2d83317823dcb1d30b81bb5d9b51eca6/f395cb9e.jpg

We get him buzzed to about a quarter inch in June, which keeps him cool but doesn't expose him to sunburn, and by fall he's back to puff-ballness. Don't EVER buy that nonsense about how a dog's long hair "protects" them from heat. Long hair doesn't protect them from heat anymore than a heavy wool sweater will protect you from it. The first time we buzzed Ollie and Griff, they were immediatly more comfortable and had more energy throught the summer (more playing, less lying on the floor panting).

Hawk
Jun 28th, 2006, 08:42 PM
People used to stop me on the street and ask what Griffin was when she was a puppy - not what breed, what animal. She looked like a walking teddy bear.

I know! :hearts:

A couple of times we got friends mention their face resembles an ewok (star wars) hehe :p