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rebel_ffighter
Jun 24th, 2006, 06:32 AM
Find it here:http://www.behindthename.com/ :bounce:

mine:Greek feminine form of NICHOLAS

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is also known as Santa Claus (from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, and Greece and Russia. Nicholas was also the name of two czars of Russia and five popes.

oakkao
Jun 24th, 2006, 07:16 AM
My name is Indian :o

My dad is Indian :rolleyes:


My name means "light, bright" in Persian :shrug:

JDLover
Jun 24th, 2006, 07:22 AM
MARK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Russian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/rus.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php) Other Scripts: Марк (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=RU&target=Mark) (Russian) Pronounced: MAHRK [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Familiar form of MARCUS (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=marcus). Saint Mark was the author of the second Gospel in the New Testament. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Another famous bearer of this name was Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius), the Roman triumvir who was the lover of Cleopatra. Shakespeare tells this story in his tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra'. Yet another famous bearer was the American author Mark Twain, real name Samuel Clemens, author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn' (he actually took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms).


I know in latin it means war like

Maryamator
Jun 24th, 2006, 09:06 AM
MARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MER-ee [key]
Usual English form of Maria, which was the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) or Μαρια (Maria) (the spellings are interchangeable), which were from the Hebrew name מִרְיָם (Miryam). The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love". This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the virgin mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene. Two queens of England have had this name, as well as a Queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots.

my real name is maryam... :p

Craigy
Jun 24th, 2006, 09:23 AM
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag" or "rocks". The surname originally belonged to a person who lived near a crag.
:haha: I hate my name :(
I already knew this anyway...

James
Jun 24th, 2006, 10:10 AM
EDDY

Gender: Masculine Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php) Pronounced: ED-ee [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Pet form of EDWARD (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=edward), EDMUND (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=edmund) and other names beginning with ed.

EDWARD

Gender: Masculine Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Polish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/pol.php) Pronounced: ED-wurd [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman Conquest. Because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest (most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones), and was even the name of eight subsequent kings of England. Edward is also one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe.

EDMUND

Gender: Masculine Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), German (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger.php), Polish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/pol.php) Pronounced: ED-mund [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Means "rich protector" from Old English ead "rich, blessed" and mund "protector". Saint Edmund was a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest.

Bart
Jun 24th, 2006, 10:28 AM
BART
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: BAHRT [key]

Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.

:rolleyes:


BARTHOLOMEW
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: bahr-THAHL-o-myoo [key]

From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of תַלְמַי (Talmai)". Talmai is a Hebrew name meaning "furrowed". In the New Testament Bartholomew was an apostle also known as Nathaniel.

JuchuKai
Jun 24th, 2006, 11:11 AM
KAI (1) Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scandinavian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sca.php), Finnish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fin.php), Frisian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fri.php), Dutch (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/dut.php), German (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/ger.php)

Possibly a pet form of either GAIUS (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=gaius) or GERHARD (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=gerhard).


KAI (2) Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/swe.php)

Variant of KAJA (1) (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=kaja-1)



KAI (3) Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hawaiian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/haw.php)

Means "sea" in Hawaiian.

pla
Jun 24th, 2006, 11:17 AM
They don't have the female version of my name- Plamena

PLAMEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Bulgarian

Other Scripts: Пламен (Bulgarian)
Derived from Slavic plam meaning "flame, fire".

fnuf7
Jun 24th, 2006, 03:07 PM
Mine:

GEMMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English

Pronounced: JEM-ma

Means "precious stone" in Italian.

Belmont Lad
Jun 24th, 2006, 04:42 PM
CRAIG
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: KRAYG [key]

From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag" or "rocks". The surname originally belonged to a person who lived near a crag

PointBlank
Jun 24th, 2006, 04:46 PM
JORDAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php) Pronounced: JOR-dan [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From the name of a river flowing between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Ya%5Er%3Aden) (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=yara%5Ed) (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". John the Baptist baptized Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name after crusaders brought back water from the river to baptize their children.

smiler
Jun 24th, 2006, 04:50 PM
smiler = :)

Veeko
Jun 24th, 2006, 04:59 PM
Mine
Veeko
Feminine
English
[vi:cEu]
the name is from a dress name,when i saw it,i think it was interesting and special,so i use it as my name:lol:

^bibi^
Jun 24th, 2006, 05:29 PM
GREGORY
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GREG-or-ee [key]

From the Latin Gregorius, which was from the late Greek name Γρηγοριος (Gregorios), which was derived from γρηγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This was the name of several saints including three Fathers of the Church: Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa, and Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (both 4th century). This was also the name of 16 popes, including Gregory I, who was known as Gregory the Great.

^bibi^
Jun 24th, 2006, 05:30 PM
Btw i hate my name lol... I can live with Greg, but never call me "Gregory" unless you don't want me to answer lol

~Carsten~
Jun 24th, 2006, 05:37 PM
CARSTEN
Gender: Masculine

Usage: German
Variant of KARSTEN (http://http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=karsten)


KARSTEN
Gender: Masculine

Usage: German
Low German form of CHRISTIAN (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=christian)


CHRISTIAN
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German

Pronounced: KRIS-chen (English), KRISH-chen (English), krees-TYAWN (French) [key]
From a medieval Latin name that meant "Christian". This was the name of ten kings of Denmark. Another famous bearer of the name was Hans Christian Andersen, the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'. In medieval England this was also a feminine name.


btw. :wavey: Gregory :lol:

sorry I had to do this stupid joke!

LefandePatty
Jun 24th, 2006, 07:02 PM
MATTHEW
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: MATH-yoo [key]

English form of Ματθαιος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) which meant "gift of YAHWEH". Saint Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles (a tax collector). He was supposedly the author of the first Gospel in the New Testament.

Martian Jeza
Jun 24th, 2006, 07:20 PM
JEREMIAH Gender: Masculine

Usage: Jewish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/jew.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php)

Pronounced: jer-e-MIE-a [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Yir%3Am%3Ayahwu) (Yirmiyahu) which meant "YAHWEH (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=yahweh) has uplifted". This was the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, author of the Book of Jeremiah and (supposedly) the Book of Lamentations. He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.

jenny161185
Jun 24th, 2006, 07:49 PM
Paul
Male
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Saint Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church, his story told in Acts in the New Testament. He was originally named Saul, but changed his name after converting to Christianity. Most of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him. This was also the name of six popes. Famous bearers of this name in the art world include Paul Cezanne and Paul Gauguin, both 19th-century impressionist painters from France.

RunDown
Jun 24th, 2006, 09:12 PM
ROSALYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-a-lin [key]
Medieval form of ROSALIND

Means "soft horse", derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and linde "soft, tender". This name was brought to England by the Normans. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". This is the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It'.

¤CharlDa¤
Jun 24th, 2006, 09:19 PM
CHARLES

Gender: Masculine Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php) Pronounced: CHAHR-ulz (English), SHARL (French) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word which meant "man". However, an alternative theory states that the name is derived from the common Germanic element heri meaning "army, warrior". The most noteworthy bearer of this name was Charles the Great, commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. Several Holy Roman Emperors bore this name, as well as kings of England, France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary. Other famous bearers include naturalist Charles Darwin who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, and novelist Charles Dickens who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities'.


and



DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Jewish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/jew.php), French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php), Spanish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/spa.php), Portuguese (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/por.php), Russian (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/rus.php), Czech (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php), Slovene (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/sln.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php) Other Scripts: דָוִד (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Dawid) (Hebrew), Давид (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=RU&target=David) (Russian) Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), da-VEED (French) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Possibly derived from Hebrew דוד (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=dwd) (dvd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. Jesus was supposedly descended from him. Other famous bearers of this name include the 5th-century patron saint of Wales, two kings of Scotland, empiricist philosopher David Hume, and explorer David Livingstone. This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semiautobiographical novel 'David Copperfield'

Vincey!
Jun 24th, 2006, 09:43 PM
VINCENT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak

Pronounced: VIN-sent (English), ven-SAWN (French) [key]
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This was the name of several saints. The postimpressionist painter Vincent van Gogh was a famous bearer of this name.

I knew it..I'm a saint :angel: ... :lol:

SvetaPleaseWin.
Jun 24th, 2006, 09:45 PM
JENNIFER
Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JEN-i-fur [key]

From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has been popular only since the beginning of the 20th century, when it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma'.

Giuliano
Jun 24th, 2006, 09:49 PM
Juliaen Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: JOO-lee-an, JOOL-yan

From the Roman name Julianus, which was derived from Julius. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints. In medieval England this was also a feminine name.

-cata-
Jun 24th, 2006, 10:05 PM
CATALINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/spa.php) Pronounced: kah-tah-LEE-nah [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

Spanish form of KATHERINE (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=katherine)



KATHERINE Gender: Feminine Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php) Pronounced: KATH-u-rin, KATH-rin [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From the Greek name Αικατερινη (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=Aikaterinh) (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=%27Ekaterinh) (Hekaterine), which came from ‘εκατερος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=%27ekateros) (Hekateros) "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=hecate); it could be related to Greek αικια (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=aikia) (aikia) "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". The Romans associated it with Greek καθαρος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=kat%5Earos) (katharos) "pure" and changed their spelling from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this. The name belonged to a 4th-century saint and martyr from Alexandria who was tortured on the famous Catherine wheel. Another saint by this name was Catherine of Siena, a 14th-century mystic. This name was also borne by two empresses of Russia, including Catherine the Great, and by three of Henry VIII's wives.

ivan88
Jun 24th, 2006, 10:08 PM
I'm Ivan
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Ukrainian

Other Scripts: Иван (Russian, Bulgarian), Іван (Ukrainian)

Pronounced: ee-VAHN (Russian), IE-van (English) [key]

Russian, Czech, Croatian, Slovene and Bulgarian form of JOHN. This was the name of several rulers of Moscow, including Ivan the Great and Ivan the Terrible, the first czar of Russia. Other notable bearers include Ivan Turgenev, a Russian author who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and Ivan Pavlov, a scientist and physiologist best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.

QuicKyMonSter
Jun 24th, 2006, 10:20 PM
Find it here:http://www.behindthename.com/ :bounce:

mine:NICHOLAS

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is also known as Santa Claus (from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, and Greece and Russia. Nicholas was also the name of two czars of Russia and five popes.

same but masculine here :wavey::p

fnuf7
Jun 25th, 2006, 12:01 AM
I decided to do it again to include my middle name as well to get my full name meaning :)

First name:
GEMMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English

Pronounced: JEM-ma

Means "precious stone" in Italian.

Middle name:
RHIAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: hri-AN (Welsh), ree-AN (English)

Derived from Welsh rhiain meaning "maiden".

Il Primo!
Jun 25th, 2006, 12:06 AM
FRANK (1)
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: FRANGK [key]

From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used.

Actually I'm Franck with a "c" but they just don't care :mad:

Ceze
Jun 25th, 2006, 12:08 AM
CYRILLE

Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php)
Pronounced: see-REEL

French masculine and feminine form of CYRIL (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=cyril)

CYRIL

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Czech (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php), Slovak (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php)
Pronounced: SEER-il

From the Greek name Κυριλλος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=Kurillos) (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=kurios) (kyrios) "lord". Saint Cyril of Jerusalem was a 4th-century bishop and a Doctor of the Church. Saint Cyril of Alexandria was a 5th-century theologian. Another Saint Cyril was a 9th-century linguist and a Greek missionary to the Slavs. The Cyrillic alphabet, which is still used today, was created by him and his brother Methodius in order to translate the Bible into Slavic.


Call me Lord Ceze now :lol:

Il Primo!
Jun 25th, 2006, 12:39 AM
CYRILLE

Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php)
Pronounced: see-REEL

French masculine and feminine form of CYRIL (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=cyril)

CYRIL

Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Czech (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php), Slovak (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/cze.php)
Pronounced: SEER-il

From the Greek name Κυριλλος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=Kurillos) (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=kurios) (kyrios) "lord". Saint Cyril of Jerusalem was a 4th-century bishop and a Doctor of the Church. Saint Cyril of Alexandria was a 5th-century theologian. Another Saint Cyril was a 9th-century linguist and a Greek missionary to the Slavs. The Cyrillic alphabet, which is still used today, was created by him and his brother Methodius in order to translate the Bible into Slavic.


Call me Lord Ceze now :lol:

...So you are Cyrille or Cyril?:scratch:

Ceze
Jun 25th, 2006, 01:12 AM
...So you are Cyrille or Cyril?:scratch:I'm Cyrille, not Cyril, just like you're Franck, not Frank :p

strawberry.babou
Jun 25th, 2006, 01:14 AM
BARBARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene

Pronounced: BAHR-bahr-a (English), BAHR-bra (English) [key]
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen.

BÁRBARA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese
Portuguese form of BARBARA

Barrie_Dude
Jun 25th, 2006, 02:05 AM
First Name: Phillip-Greek-Lover of Horses
Middle Nmae-Michael-Hebrew-Godlike

dav abu
Jun 25th, 2006, 02:40 AM
Aoife - a Gaelic Irish name pronounced Eefah, it means of radiant beauty.

UDACHi
Jun 25th, 2006, 05:28 AM
JORDAN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php) Pronounced: JOR-dan [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From the name of a river flowing between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Ya%5Er%3Aden) (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=yara%5Ed) (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". John the Baptist baptized Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name after crusaders brought back water from the river to baptize their children.

You suck. :( :p

^bibi^
Jun 25th, 2006, 08:47 AM
French masculine and feminine form of CYRIL

Cyrille for a girl ?? Never heard that one

Call me Lord Ceze now :lol:

Ok but please don't call me pope bibi :lol:

RatedR Superstar
Jun 25th, 2006, 09:16 AM
REX
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: REKS

A 19th-century name based on Latin rex "king".

i already know the meaning of my name, i just wanted to try this :)

its good to be king! :cool:

Princess Sarah.
Jun 25th, 2006, 09:19 AM
SARAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, German, Jewish, Biblical

Other Scripts: שָׂרָה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: SER-a [key]
Means "lady" or "princess" in Hebrew. This was the name of the wife of Abraham in the Old Testament. She became the mother of Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally שָׂרָי (Sarai), but God changed it (see Genesis 17:15).

jojoseph
Jun 25th, 2006, 09:46 AM
First name

JOHN


Gender: Masculine Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php) Pronounced: JAHN [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

English form of Iohannes, which was the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=Iwannhs) (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Ywoh%5Eanan) (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=yahweh) is gracious". This name owes its consistent popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered as saints. The first was John the Baptist, the forerunner of Jesus Christ and a victim of beheading by Herod Antipas. The second was the apostle John, also supposedly the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation. The name has been borne by 23 popes, as well as kings of England, Hungary, Poland, Portugal and France. It was also borne by the poet John Milton and the philosopher John Locke

Middle name



JOSEPH

Gender: Masculine Usage: English (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng.php), French (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/fre.php), Biblical (http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/bibl.php) Pronounced: JO-sef (English), zho-ZEF (French) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)

From the Latin Iosephus, which was from the Greek Ιωσηφος (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=GR&target=Iwshp%5Eos) (Iosephos), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (http://www.behindthename.com/support/transcribe.php?type=HB&target=Ywosep) (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph was the eleventh son of Jacob. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This is the name of two characters in the New Testament: Joseph the husband of Mary and Joseph of Arimathea. Also, rulers of the Holy Roman Empire have had this name.

**Jelica**
Jun 25th, 2006, 09:53 AM
I'm Jelena, and I'm Serbian so: Јелена

JELENA
Gender: Feminine

Usage: Latvian, Croatian, Serbian

Other Scripts: Јелена (Serbian)

Latvian, Croatian and Serbian form of HELEN

HELEN
Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEL-en [key]

Possibly from either Greek ‘ελενη (Helene) "torch" or "corposant", or Greek σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem. Another famous bearer was Helen Keller, the American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.

kris_85
Jun 25th, 2006, 10:44 AM
CHRISTIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German

Pronounced: KRIS-chen (English), KRISH-chen (English), krees-TYAWN (French) [key]
From a medieval Latin name that meant "Christian". This was the name of ten kings of Denmark. Another famous bearer of the name was Hans Christian Andersen, the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'. In medieval England this was also a feminine name.

marmite1
Jun 25th, 2006, 11:23 AM
VICTORIA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: vik-TOR-ee-a [key]
Feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a long-reigning queen of England. A Canadian city bears this name in her honour, as well as an Australian state and several other geographic areas.

Edward.
Jun 25th, 2006, 01:27 PM
EDWARD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: ED-wurd [key]
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weard "guard". Saint Edward the Confessor was the king of England shortly before the Norman Conquest. Because of his popularity this name remained in use after the conquest (most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones), and was even the name of eight subsequent kings of England. Edward is also one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe.

PETER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Scandinavian, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical

Pronounced: PEE-tur [key]
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the Bible of the name Cephas (meaning "stone" in Aramaic) which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus's ministry and is considered by some to be the first pope. This name was also borne by Peter the Great, the czar of Russia who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War in the 18th century. A famous fictional bearer is Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's play.

:yawn:

Dann
Jun 25th, 2006, 08:16 PM
DAMIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Polish

Pronounced: DAY-mee-an [key]
From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαω (damao) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Another saint by this name was Saint Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.

BARTOSZ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Polish
Polish form of BARTHOLOMEW

honeyke
Jun 25th, 2006, 08:34 PM
JOHANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Scandinavian, Dutch, Hungarian, Finnish
Latinate feminine form of Johannes (see JOHN).

English form of Iohannes, which was the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious".

Cersei
Jun 25th, 2006, 09:50 PM
my name is a short form of HELEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEL-en [key]
Possibly from either Greek Helene "torch" or "corposant", or Greek selene "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem. Another famous bearer was Helen Keller, the American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.