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View Full Version : Do you speak/Were you taught British or American English?


Pengwin
May 13th, 2006, 11:59 PM
Vote!

Craigy
May 14th, 2006, 12:05 AM
Live in Britain

QuicKyMonSter
May 14th, 2006, 12:05 AM
Taught American English, since my teacher comes from Philly:p

fifiricci
May 14th, 2006, 12:24 AM
Its gotta be British English, I mean, we bloody invented it!

Cor blimey, luvva duck, what is the world coming to! ;)

SJW
May 14th, 2006, 01:13 AM
For part of the year I live in both countries but I speak British English.
Best way. Especially London-English :cool:

The Daviator
May 14th, 2006, 01:16 AM
Irish-English :p

!<blocparty>!
May 14th, 2006, 01:17 AM
All the English second language speakers I know have American accents.

Me = British. Fuck Americans and their shortcuts.

partbrit
May 14th, 2006, 01:27 AM
I was born in America, but my mother was a British war bride. Before I went to school and assimilated, I sounded like a Brit child. I still say some things the way Brits say them.

Joana
May 14th, 2006, 01:50 AM
All the English second language speakers I know have American accents.


That's because you don't know me. :p
But actually, my accent is not as British as it used to be. The influence of mass media and all... :sad:
I still use the British spelling, though.

Pengwin
May 14th, 2006, 01:53 AM
That's because you don't know me. :p
But actually, my accent is not as British as it used to be. The influence of mass media and all... :sad:
I still use the British spelling, though.

I've never noticed any American spelling on here to be honest, it seems that the rest of the world prefers 'traditional English' :shrug:

Chris 84
May 14th, 2006, 01:54 AM
WTF is "British" English? :p

I speak Glasgow-English :angel:

PointBlank
May 14th, 2006, 03:23 AM
The English teacher at my school in Israel was from South Africa. Im not sure what kind of English that is so I put other. :shrug:.

kiwifan
May 14th, 2006, 03:43 AM
All the English second language speakers I know have American accents.

Me = British. Fuck Americans and their shortcuts.

Envy: a feeling of grudging admiration and desire to have something that is possessed by another. :nerner:

Barrie_Dude
May 14th, 2006, 05:55 AM
Well, I live in Canada but I grew up in the States, I speak Southern English!

New
May 14th, 2006, 06:19 AM
Taught British English in school, but due to watching all the TV shows and reading comics..I guess I end up being rather mixed up... and use a mixture of both English...:lol:

TF Chipmunk
May 14th, 2006, 08:28 AM
Well, I live in Canada but I grew up in the States, I speak Southern English!Ewww :nerner:

TF Chipmunk
May 14th, 2006, 08:28 AM
Cor blimey, luvva duck, what is the world coming to! ;)
:cuckoo: :p

TF Chipmunk
May 14th, 2006, 08:29 AM
All the English second language speakers I know have American accents.

Me = British. Fuck Americans and their shortcuts.Shut up. You know you love it.

TF Chipmunk
May 14th, 2006, 08:29 AM
Anyway, I speak Californian English, Hell yeah duuuuuuuuuuude :cool:

Tarlak
May 14th, 2006, 08:33 AM
Now, I don't speak English :tape:

I hope to speak British English soon :wavey:

TF Chipmunk
May 14th, 2006, 08:37 AM
Now, I don't speak English :tape:

I hope to speak British English soon :wavey:
You should learn Californian english :D Just add "Dude" at the end of every sentence ;)

Brαm
May 14th, 2006, 08:42 AM
Received Pronunciation (RP)

:cool:

Tarlak
May 14th, 2006, 08:46 AM
You should learn Californian english :D Just add "Dude" at the end of every sentence ;)

In France, we're learning British English. And I prefer this English, I find it more comprehensible than American English... Sorry but the American stressing is very difficult to understand for me. When I hear actors, sportmen or singers, it's incomprehensible... :eek: British English is a little more easy ;)

(sorry, I did grammar faults...)

DutchieGirl
May 14th, 2006, 10:49 AM
I was taught Australian English - with lots of slang/"Aussie-isms"! ;)

fnuf7
May 14th, 2006, 11:01 AM
Yep, live in Britain so obviously taught British English...the correct English... :tape: ;)

^bibi^
May 14th, 2006, 12:05 PM
learnt "real" english, the british one :p

furrykitten
May 14th, 2006, 12:16 PM
Live in England

hablo
May 14th, 2006, 12:42 PM
I was taught Canadian English and when I did my undergrad in the States I got really confused with spelling words ever since, especially considering the fact that I also know the French language (programme and program, organisation and organization, neighbour and neighbor, etc) :crazy:

tennislover
May 14th, 2006, 02:33 PM
Taught British English


I wonder if Londoners speak English :rolleyes:

Grachka
May 14th, 2006, 02:44 PM
WTF is "British" English? :p

I speak Glasgow-English :angel:
:scared:

tennislover
May 14th, 2006, 02:50 PM
:scared:

chris84 is right: standard Brithish english doesn't exist apart from BBC studios or in Grammar handbooks........

people who live in London, Edimburgh, Glasgow, Liverpool, Birmingham speak English in a way that not-native people don't understand at all.

!<blocparty>!
May 14th, 2006, 03:18 PM
chris84 is right: standard Brithish english doesn't exist apart from BBC studios or in Grammar handbooks........

people who live in London, Edimburgh, Glasgow, Liverpool, Birmingham speak English in a way that not-native people don't understand at all.

:retard:

Grachka
May 14th, 2006, 03:29 PM
chris84 is right: standard Brithish english doesn't exist apart from BBC studios or in Grammar handbooks........

people who live in London, Edimburgh, Glasgow, Liverpool, Birmingham speak English in a way that not-native people don't understand at all.
:eek:

Well, you learn new things every day. :retard:

Andy.
May 14th, 2006, 03:32 PM
I was taught Australian English, but we are really influenced by America these days because of TV shows and pick up a lot from that too.

!<blocparty>!
May 14th, 2006, 03:32 PM
:eek:

Well, you learn new things every day. :retard:

We can give him Liverpool and Glasgow, they do acutally speak like retards. :p:tape:

Grachka
May 14th, 2006, 03:39 PM
We can give him Liverpool and Glasgow, they do acutally speak like retards. :p:tape:
OK, and also I am tempted to throw in Birmingham, as nobody actually wants to understand what they are saying. :p

selking
May 14th, 2006, 03:40 PM
I like the british way of english but their accents are absolutely atrosious

smiler
May 14th, 2006, 03:45 PM
OK, and also I am tempted to throw in Birmingham, as nobody actually wants to understand what they are saying. :p

:haha: I love brummies! You just can't take them seriously with such a comedy accent! :lol:

*JR*
May 14th, 2006, 05:40 PM
Live in Britain
(Great) Britain is an island. Northern Ireland is occupied territory! :p

TF Chipmunk
May 14th, 2006, 07:46 PM
I like the british way of english but their accents are absolutely atrosious
:eek: Best you run out of here...NOW :tape:

CC
May 14th, 2006, 07:50 PM
Taught British, use a mixture of American and Bri.

Infiniti2001
May 14th, 2006, 07:56 PM
Was taught British English . Still speak and write it even though I've been in the US for donkey years :lol: I remember a professor telling me that my spelling of the word labour(English)/labor(American) was wrong-- luckily I had my oxford dictionary with me at the time. I whipped it out and she was like it's okay this time :lol:

tennislover
May 14th, 2006, 08:15 PM
:retard:

:( :p

tennislover
May 14th, 2006, 08:16 PM
:eek:

Well, you learn new things every day. :retard:
:( :p

Dana Marcy
May 14th, 2006, 10:33 PM
Taught American English since that's where I was born and raised. :shrug:

SJW
May 15th, 2006, 12:19 AM
Was taught British English . Still speak and write it even though I've been in the US for donkey years :lol: I remember a professor telling me that my spelling of the word labour(English)/labor(American) was wrong-- luckily I had my oxford dictionary with me at the time. I whipped it out and she was like it's okay this time :lol:

my English professor kept "correcting" my papers :( i figured surely they wouldn't mind proper English being used, being an English professor and all :rolleyes:

swissmisshingis
May 15th, 2006, 12:35 AM
American English.

Pengwin
May 15th, 2006, 12:36 AM
Taught British, use a mixture of American and Bri.

Like Catherine Zeta Jones?

Maajken
May 15th, 2006, 09:49 AM
Received Pronunciation (RP)

:cool:
actually, it's NRP nowadays (non regional pronunciation)

i was taught what you guys call british english and especially at uni they're really strict about pronunciation. in fact, you can't speak american english at exams unless you have a very good reason to.

i just love all the different english accents/dialects. i had a "spoken english around the world" class last year and it was so much fun trying to guess the accents. some of them were totally unintelligible unless you had a transcription :D

mandy7
May 15th, 2006, 09:50 AM
in school i got british english
but i speak both
and i can (but refuse to) speak 'Australian' as well
(and i can actually understand most Scottish and Irish ppl :eek: )

Halardfan
May 15th, 2006, 10:02 AM
I am English, and I speak English. :p ;)

This issue has come up before, and as I mentioned then, calling it British English doesn't quite make sense. You don't really need the first word. ;)

LostGlory
May 15th, 2006, 10:05 AM
BRITISH SCHOOL
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY

I GUESS I SPEAK BOTH, MORE OF AN AMERICAN ACCENT THOUGH.....

SilK
May 15th, 2006, 10:35 AM
I was taught British English, I speak American English.

pla
May 15th, 2006, 11:32 AM
I was taught British English, I try to write and speak British English but I know I just sound as Bulgarian speaking wrong English :lol: ;)

"Sluggy"
May 15th, 2006, 11:43 AM
born in America

Brαm
May 15th, 2006, 11:59 AM
actually, it's NRP nowadays (non regional pronunciation)My professors all call it RP.

Only 13 Google hits for "non regional pronunciation" btw :o

beauty_is_pink
May 15th, 2006, 12:20 PM
Canadian English :cool:

Maajken
May 15th, 2006, 03:34 PM
My professors all call it RP.

Only 13 Google hits for "non regional pronunciation" btw :o
RP is a bit outdated. it was changed to NRP because there's really no one who speaks RP. it's like an ideal accent, whereas NRP is the accent (though there are still different varieties of it) which is used by real people in formal situations and it's what we're taught in school (as opposed to the gazillion of regional accents).

i'm surprised your professors still call it RP. maybe it's for convenience's sake :confused:

Kworb
May 15th, 2006, 04:49 PM
I was taught British English in school but I have an American accent since I became fluent by watching American TV shows and talking to Americans on the internet :p

requiem
May 15th, 2006, 05:33 PM
British English

Tennisballova
May 15th, 2006, 07:26 PM
I was taught British-English in school, but they never really paid attention to whether you pronounced it in a British accent or American.

*Karen*
May 15th, 2006, 08:52 PM
I speak scottish english. It's very strange though american people can't understand it but spanish and chinese people can even though they talk completely different languages

Brαm
May 15th, 2006, 09:00 PM
RP is a bit outdated. it was changed to NRP because there's really no one who speaks RP. it's like an ideal accent, whereas NRP is the accent (though there are still different varieties of it) which is used by real people in formal situations and it's what we're taught in school (as opposed to the gazillion of regional accents).

i'm surprised your professors still call it RP. maybe it's for convenience's sake :confused:I have a friend who's from Reading and she speaks RP...

Anyway, I can't seem to find the term "non regional pronunciation" in any of my reference works. Furthermore, I only found 2 links on scholar google where the term can be found. Although the term NRP may exist, hardly anyone seems to use it (so far) so I'll just stick to RP ;)