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drake3781
May 10th, 2006, 04:24 AM
Looking at the OOP for Prague, for the first time I saw all the marks that some players have above the letters in their names. It's kind of like finding out a little secret that the player has kept hidden. :eek: :p .


I suppose only people with those marks in their keyboards can post the names here, but please do post more. And if you can give the name of the marks it would be good to know.

Here are some of the ones listed.

Ondrášková, Zuzana
Strýcová, Barbora
Voráčová, Renata
Husárová, Janette
Šafářová, Lucie (4 marks :eek: :eek: )
Rybáriková, Magdalena
Navrátilová, Martina
Blahotová, Olga
Paštiková, Michaela
Hradecká, Lucie
Uhlířová, Vladimíra
Fraňková, Nikola
Vaňková, Kateřina

They are mostly "ova"s ... and they seem to be mostly Czechs and a Slovakian... what else?

alwayshingis
May 10th, 2006, 04:30 AM
"little marks" :lol: :lol: :rolleyes:

drake3781
May 10th, 2006, 04:42 AM
"little marks" :lol: :lol: :rolleyes:

:lol: What is the correct word?

treufreund
May 10th, 2006, 04:54 AM
aren't they called diacritical marks?

drake3781
May 10th, 2006, 05:01 AM
aren't they called diacritical marks?
I thought so but didn't want to misuse it, decided to go with simple. :p

Joana
May 10th, 2006, 07:05 AM
Any Serbian and Croatian players whose name ends in "ic" - actually it's "ić".

Karolina Šprem
Maja Matevžič

Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Conchita Martínez
Paola Suárez

Hayato
May 10th, 2006, 07:07 AM
Catalina Castaño :yeah:

Joana
May 10th, 2006, 07:12 AM
Magüi Serna

Anna Lena Grönefeld
Martina Müller

Pszczelny
May 10th, 2006, 07:18 AM
Radwańska sisters
Karolina Kosińska
Olga Brózda
Natalia Kołat
Magda Kiszczyńska

and many others ;)

CooCooCachoo
May 10th, 2006, 07:41 AM
All French Stéphanies :p

frenchie
May 10th, 2006, 07:43 AM
Amélie Mauresmo
Sébastien Grosjean

CooCooCachoo
May 10th, 2006, 07:44 AM
Nicolas Escudé :p
Noëmi Scharle
Michaëlla Krajicek

There are so many :p

frenchie
May 10th, 2006, 07:50 AM
Nicolas Escudé :p
Noëmi Scharle
Michaëlla Krajicek

There are so many :p

Noémie Scharle (Scharlé?) ;)

chuCKnorris
May 10th, 2006, 07:50 AM
Iveta Benešová
Daniela Hantuchová
Lucie Hradecká

LH2HBH
May 10th, 2006, 08:25 AM
Hilarious, yet educational!

azdaja
May 10th, 2006, 01:51 PM
the diacritical marks above letters like 'c', 's' or 'z' are called hachek (haček). they should be considered separate letters and are pronounced differently. a good clue about the pronounciation is that a hachek modifies the letter in the same way that a 'h' next to it does in english - č = ch, š = sh, ž = zh. it's not necessarily the same in all languages, but for the most part it is.

i have no idea what the diacritical mark on 'ć' as in 'ivanović', 'dokić' etc. is called, but this letter is a palatalised 'č'. it can be pronounced in the same way if you can't do any better.

CooCooCachoo
May 10th, 2006, 01:53 PM
Noémie Scharle (Scharlé?) ;)

Yes :)

And you had Noëlle van Lottum :p I was mixing the two up :lol:

Slumpsova
May 10th, 2006, 02:06 PM
are Strýcová and Voráčová the same pronounciation?
i mean apparently they have different "c".

azdaja
May 10th, 2006, 02:11 PM
are Strýcová and Voráčová the same pronounciation?
i mean apparently they have different "c".
no. a 'c' without a hachek is pronounsed 'ts', the other one is 'ch' - stritsova and vorachova.

controlfreak
May 10th, 2006, 02:29 PM
Šeřeñá Wiłłiamš

Jan Hachek from the ATP... :scared:

Andy T
May 10th, 2006, 02:58 PM
åsa carlsson-svensson

Swedish å = British "or" (silent 'r') or "aw", as in "law"

drake3781
May 10th, 2006, 11:06 PM
Fascinating. :eek:

Wiggly
May 10th, 2006, 11:27 PM
Amélie Mauresmo
Émilie LOit

Iveta and Daniela as well :)

Randy John Andy
May 10th, 2006, 11:36 PM
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario; Paola Suárez; Conchita Martínez; María Antonia Sánchez Lorenzo – In all these cases, the symbol is called “tilde”, in Spanish. It is used to show the stressed syllable, although sometimes it is used to differentiate words spelled the same way.

Catalina Castaño – This is not a mark. This is, actually, a letter in the Spanish abecedary. It sounds pretty much like “ni”. ¡Un saludo!

drake3781
May 11th, 2006, 12:09 AM
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario; Paola Suárez; Conchita Martínez; María Antonia Sánchez Lorenzo – In all these cases, the symbol is called “tilde”, in Spanish. It is used to show the stressed syllable, although sometimes it is used to differentiate words spelled the same way.

Catalina Castaño – This is not a mark. This is, actually, a letter in the Spanish abecedary. It sounds pretty much like “ni”. ¡Un saludo!

Hmmm... well it sounds like you know what you are saying, but think from my college Spanish the ~ is the tilde and the ' is the accent. The other parts are correct to me, including the separate letter with a different pronunciation.

Tilde

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The tilde (~) is a grapheme (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grapheme) with several uses. The name of the character comes from Spanish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_language), from the Latin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin) titulus meaning a title or superscription, and is pronounced "TILL-duh" (IPA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet) /'tɪl.də/) in English or "TEAL-dey" /'til.ðe/ in Spanish. It was originally written over a letter as a mark of abbreviation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbreviation) (see below), but has since acquired a number of other uses as a diacritic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacritic) mark or a character in its own right. In the latter capacity (especially in lexicography (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lexicography)) it is also sometimes known as the swung dash (usually lengthened to ⁓).

In Spanish and Galician (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galician_language) tilde over n (ñ) is a separate letter (called eñe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%91)) and is a palatal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palatal_consonant) n (IPA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet) [ɲ]). This phoneme is written nh in Portuguese, gn in French and Italian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_language), ny in Catalan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalan_language), Hungarian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_language) and Swahili (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swahili), ň in Czech (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czech_language) and ń in Polish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_language). The sound is that of the "gn" in "lasagna" and the "ni" sound in "onion" and "union" in many dialects of English. The Spanish word tilde refers to any accent mark (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accent_mark) placed over a vowel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vowel). For example, the acute accent in the word Olé is also called a tilde.

Randy John Andy
May 11th, 2006, 12:58 AM
I’m sure you know what you are saying, and although I don’t want to sound pretentious, Spanish is my mother tongue, and I think what Wilkipedia says is not correct.

The tilde is this symbol (´), like in the words “cajón, tráfico, Sánchez, etc”. It shows which one is the stressed syllable. But the thing is, a lot of times, the stressed syllable does not use a tilde. It depends on how the words are spelled, the numbers of syllables, the position of the stressed syllable, etc. It is rather abstruse, by the way, even for native people like me.

As they used to tell me when I was in school: the accent is one thing, the tilde is something different. A syllable with a tilde above is always accentuated, but an accentuated syllable may not use a tilde. ¡Un saludo!

PS: Isn’t it great to speak a second language?

Reckoner
May 11th, 2006, 01:41 AM
How do you get all those symbols. If its one thing I can't figure out, it would be those symbols.

go hingis
May 11th, 2006, 01:58 AM
In Greek the little mark on top of the letter is called a tono (hard to write in english)
and means you stress/exentuate (carry on) that letter.

drake3781
May 11th, 2006, 02:34 AM
I’m sure you know what you are saying, and although I don’t want to sound pretentious, Spanish is my mother tongue, and I think what Wilkipedia says is not correct.

The tilde is this symbol (´), like in the words “cajón, tráfico, Sánchez, etc”. It shows which one is the stressed syllable. But the thing is, a lot of times, the stressed syllable does not use a tilde. It depends on how the words are spelled, the numbers of syllables, the position of the stressed syllable, etc. It is rather abstruse, by the way, even for native people like me.

As they used to tell me when I was in school: the accent is one thing, the tilde is something different. A syllable with a tilde above is always accentuated, but an accentuated syllable may not use a tilde. ¡Un saludo!

PS: Isn’t it great to speak a second language?

I just read Wikipedia down to the last sentence, and there it does say that tilde is used in Spanish to mean any accent mark. Earlier text in the paragraph focused on the ~ use of it.

Yes, it is great to have a second language! I have spent the past 2 or so years working with people in South America (Brazil, Chile, Argentina), Mexico, and now Puerto Rico. I can read almost anything in Spanish, understand generally what a conversation is about, just don't ask me to speak. (I can get by speaking, but that's about it :tape: .)

Randy John Andy
May 11th, 2006, 02:50 AM
I’m sure you’re good at speaking Spanish. Although, I don’t really know why, it’s difficult to speak another language. You feel sort of lost, unprotected. Anyway, I’ve discovered that, once you feel comfortable and confident, you become less self-conscious, and it flows quite naturally.

And by the way, I think I would suck as a politician. Politicians are supposed to say the right thing at the right time, and therefore, they’re not supposed to think by themselves. ¡Un abrazo!

PS: Si tienes alguna duda en Español, házmelo saber, e intentaré ayudarte. ;)

DutchieGirl
May 11th, 2006, 02:50 AM
Michaëlla Krajicek



Or: Krajíčková when she's in Prague! ;)

andrewbroad
May 13th, 2006, 12:19 AM
Finding a player's accents

Whenever I want to know whether a player has accents on her name, I do an Advanced Google Search (http://www.google.co.uk/advanced_search?hl=en):
1. Type the player's name (without any accents at all) into the "exact phrase" box, e.g. "lucie safarova". You're far more likely to get the accents if you type both names, not just the surname.
2. Select the appropriate language (e.g. Czech).
3. Click "Google Search".

Usually, you will then see the correctly-accented name in the search-results, but sometimes it will fail to match the accented letters to the unaccented ones you give it.

If this happens, you'll have to experiment with the search, e.g. if "lucie safarova" fails to return "Lucie Šafářová", you could try searching for "lucie tenis" (in the "all of the words" box). But Google matches "Šafářová" to "safarova" okay now.

Ova v Ová

And here's a hint: in Czech and Slovak, all female surnames end in á (and most in ová), with the exception of Adriana Gerši (in Slovak there are no such exceptions AFAIK).

This doesn't apply to the Russian-type "ova", which is transliterated from the Cyrillic alphabet, and therefore has no accents in English.

Typing accents

On my PC, I can type á by holding Ctrl+Alt and pressing A, and likewise for é, í, ó and ú. For all the other accents, I copy & paste them from elsewhere.

¡¢£¤¥¦§¨©ª«¬­®¯°±²³´µ¶·¸¹º»¼½¾¿
ÀÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏÐÑÒÓÔÕÖ×ØÙÚÛÜÝÞß
àáâãäåæçèéêëìíîïðñòóôõö÷øùúûüýþÿ

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/ (http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/)
http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/ (http://geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/)

drake3781
May 13th, 2006, 12:24 AM
^^ excellent!! thank you!!

auntie janie
May 13th, 2006, 01:28 AM
All French Stéphanies :p

Plus one who is Québécoise, Stéphanie Dubois. :cool:

And let's not forget another rising young Québécoise, Valérie Tétreault. :)

drake3781
May 13th, 2006, 01:48 AM
Plus one who is Québécoise, Stéphanie Dubois. :cool:

And let's not forget another rising young Québécoise, Valérie Tétreault. :)

Question for a Francophile: what about the c with the little tail under it? Do you use that? Any players have it? Can you type it?

ç Ç

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedilla

It can even be used with S, and even with other letters in Latvian (any Latvian tennis players? ;) ).

auntie janie
May 13th, 2006, 02:08 AM
Well there was once Françoise Durr -- I've also seen it spelled Dürr ; don't know if that's correct or not ...

auntie janie
May 13th, 2006, 02:11 AM
By the way I type these by switching to a "Canadian" keyboard on my Mac(extremely easy to do). But the é is especially easy without even switching the keyboard over; it just takes holding down the option key, then hit the e.

DutchieGirl
May 13th, 2006, 02:15 AM
I can't do the symbols with ALT codes when I'm using Opera - that's very annoying!