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PointBlank
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:06 PM
Ive always wondered that. People bring up race all the time, but I live in the middle of no where, Tennessee and I never hear race as such an issue as it is on the board, and Im in the South where most people think the N-word is the most used word for white people.

Dana Marcy
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:09 PM
Ive always wondered that. People bring up race all the time, but I live in the middle of no where, Tennessee and I never hear race as such an issue as it is on the board, and Im in the South where most people think the N-word is the most used word for white people.

Maybe people are more open to talk about race online because they can be anonymous. It's much tougher to do it face to face without folks getting emotional.

CJ07
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:12 PM
Two issues dominate this board, race and sexuality. And I agree I hardly ever hear either come up in conversation all that frequently where I'm from.

But I mean in the context of these posts, people are probably more inclined to say what they normally wouldn't and since there are a lot of minorities and gays on the board, thats what you get.

SJW
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:13 PM
Maybe people are more open to talk about race online because they can be anonymous. It's much tougher to do it face to face without folks getting emotional.

i agree.
people won't show their prejudice in public :)

jmd
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:14 PM
Not only on this board

PointBlank
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:21 PM
Maybe people are more open to talk about race online because they can be anonymous. It's much tougher to do it face to face without folks getting emotional.

Yea. I was just thinking maybe the age difference also. Maybe teens now, my age, dont really see race as big as an issue as some of the people did as they were growing up.

Summer Snow
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:23 PM
Race will always be an issue. I am a black male, and I am called the N word several times. To be racist or prejudice clearly illustrates ignorance :)

Volcana
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:28 PM
Because ...

a) a lot of people on this board reside in the USA, where race is a big issue.

b) tennis is traditionally a wite-dominated sport, and some people had ... extreme reactions to a couple of Black girls coming in and dominating

c) a

GracefulVenus
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:36 PM
I wish we lived in a perfect world, where race would never be an issue. But we don't live a perfect world :sad: Especially here in America, the land of discrimination...whether you like it or not.

CJ07
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:39 PM
Yea. I was just thinking maybe the age difference also. Maybe teens now, my age, dont really see race as big as an issue as some of the people did as they were growing up.
Age definitely has a lot to do with it. I don't really see race as a big day-to-day issue (meaning I don't have to deal with race on a daily basis) but it is an issue.

But if you ask someone even 10 and certainly 20 years my senior they'll probably tell you otherwise.

Stamp Paid
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:44 PM
Because its reflective of the real life racial tension that bubbles underneath the surface of American society.

Kart
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:45 PM
This place has a lot of issues :tape:.

Rocketta
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:46 PM
I have an issue....with you Kart....get thee to the song dedication thread. :fiery:

Kart
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:53 PM
:eek: :bolt:

*JR*
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:56 PM
Because ...

a) a lot of people on this board reside in the USA, where race is a big issue.

b) tennis is traditionally a wite-dominated sport, and some people had ... extreme reactions to a couple of Black girls coming in and dominating

c) a
Its a big issue in Europe too, mainly regarding immigrants from the Arab countries (and sub-Saharan Africa). Even in Russia (re. blacks, and those from places in the south of Russia or non-Russian republics of the old USSR).

Do the names Jean-Marie LePen of France, Joerg Haider of Austria, or Vladimir Zhirinovsky of Russia ring a bell? How about the British National Party, the Vlaams bloc in Belgium, or the Party LPF (List Pim Fortuyn) in the Netherlands?

The US is far from ova racial issues (now expressed most vocally re. Latin American immigration via Mexico) but we're far from alone. In fact to many Western Europeans, the new EU countries in the old Soviet bloc are only "good for" cheap labor, and indentured sex slaves.

Kirt12255
Apr 26th, 2006, 01:22 AM
Maybe people are more open to talk about race online because they can be anonymous. It's much tougher to do it face to face without folks getting emotional.

:worship: Spot on the mark there Dana.:worship:

Reguardless of how we think or act in society, racism is always simmering around the dining table in many houses. The internet unforntunately is a vessel for alot of biggots to air their intollereance without having the clappers beaten out of them.

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 01:34 AM
Not only on this board :worship: That was gonna be my answer. ;)

It's constantly in conversations I'm involved in at the schools. :shrug:
No big deal as long as everyone is honest about their feelings and beliefs.
I also find this board to be an accurate microcosm of the worldwide view of race. :cool:

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 01:36 AM
:worship: Spot on the mark there Dana.:worship:

Reguardless of how we think or act in society, racism is always simmering around the dining table in many houses. The internet unforntunately is a vessel for alot of biggots to air their intollereance without having the clappers beaten out of them.:haha:

Infiniti2001
Apr 26th, 2006, 01:42 AM
Ive always wondered that. People bring up race all the time, but I live in the middle of no where, Tennessee and I never hear race as such an issue as it is on the board, and Im in the South where most people think the N-word is the most used word for white people.

You should have been around for the posts on the original board .This one is a picnic compared to back then. :tape:

dementieva's fan
Apr 26th, 2006, 01:44 AM
To be honest some people here give race more importance than it deserves.

Gonzo Hates Me!
Apr 26th, 2006, 01:46 AM
i think it's because, there is a lot of non-white posters here, and they are open and proud of their race/ethnicity/religion here, and don't think talking about race is taboo, b/c it shouldn't be, unlike menstennisforums where everyone is the exact same person :o

Volcana
Apr 26th, 2006, 02:01 AM
Its a big issue in Europe too, mainly regarding immigrants from the Arab countries (and sub-Saharan Africa). Even in Russia (re. blacks, and those from places in the south of Russia or non-Russian republics of the old USSR).

Do the names Jean-Marie LePen of France, Joerg Haider of Austria, or Vladimir Zhirinovsky of Russia ring a bell? How about the British National Party, the Vlaams bloc in Belgium, or the Party LPF (List Pim Fortuyn) in the Netherlands? All those names ring a bell, and a loud one. But since I've never lived in those countries, I didn't feel qualified to make sweeping statements about race relations there.

John A Roark
Apr 26th, 2006, 02:04 AM
Maybe people are more open to talk about race online because they can be anonymous. It's much tougher to do it face to face without folks getting emotional.
Perfect example: I saw a bit of a dispute here in Omaha where a farmer called a black storekeeper a ni--er after refusing to special order something... he got run out of the store with a meat cleaver :lol:
Mind you, violence is always inexcusable, from either side; it's almost always understandable.

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 02:07 AM
Perfect example: I saw a bit of a dispute here in Omaha where a farmer called a black storekeeper a ni--er after refusing to special order something... he got run out of the store with a meat cleaver :lol:
Mind you, violence is always inexcusable, from either side; it's almost always understandable.:haha: :lol:

I'm sorta like the guy with the cleaver. If I think discrimination is 'in-effect', I call the other party on it. Minus the meat cleaver though. ;)

John A Roark
Apr 26th, 2006, 03:11 AM
:haha: :lol:

I'm sorta like the guy with the cleaver. If I think discrimination is 'in-effect', I call the other party on it. Minus the meat cleaver though. ;)
I guess the point is, why bother?
Spong talks about 'enhancing being' and this race issue just does not enhance being; it degrades being. *deep sigh*
I finally understand the saying, "where's the love?" The world needs more love.
Even in here: and yes, love is possible, even in here. Tho' there are some that insist that love is impossible without personal contact. I disagree--there are several in here I love, and some of them are black. But there are some blacks on this board, as there are whites, whom are very trying and very difficult to love. I would no longer consider inflicting my fu--ed-up middle-Nebraska insular background on them by making their race an issue.
That's for people who haven't been around the corner away from the farmhouse.
Or around the corner away from the rowhouse.
The more I think about this, the more I think that social issues, the kind involving groups and crowds and mobs, are increasingly irrelevant. It's more honest to relate one-on-one, and it's so much harder to be an asshole face-to-face.

meyerpl
Apr 26th, 2006, 04:58 AM
Maybe people are more open to talk about race online because they can be anonymous. It's much tougher to do it face to face without folks getting emotional.
I agree, people feel safe saying things here they would never say in a room full of people. Maybe because I'm older and didn't grow up with the internet, I don't really feel anonymous when I post here. I feel just as responsible for what I write here and how my words may affect someone as I would in any situation. There have been times when I was a bit brash in stating an opinion, later learned that I offended someone and felt genuinely sorry. There are some folks around here who's feelings I especially care about. I welcome the opportunity offered here to discuss issues like race and politics with people from other countries, races, religions, attitudes etc. I live in a pretty sparsely populated area with little racial or cultural diversity.

DunkMachine
Apr 26th, 2006, 05:34 AM
Yea it's definately because of the anonimity. I like watching shirt-ripping chickfights. For instance: I'd never tell people I masturbate to those clips (and come shortly after). That'd be perverted.

Solitaire
Apr 26th, 2006, 05:48 AM
Its a big issue in Europe too, mainly regarding immigrants from the Arab countries (and sub-Saharan Africa). Even in Russia (re. blacks, and those from places in the south of Russia or non-Russian republics of the old USSR).

Do the names Jean-Marie LePen of France, Joerg Haider of Austria, or Vladimir Zhirinovsky of Russia ring a bell? How about the British National Party, the Vlaams bloc in Belgium, or the Party LPF (List Pim Fortuyn) in the Netherlands?

The US is far from ova racial issues (now expressed most vocally re. Latin American immigration via Mexico) but we're far from alone. In fact to many Western Europeans, the new EU countries in the old Soviet bloc are only "good for" cheap labor, and indentured sex slaves.


Agreed.

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:03 AM
I guess the point is, why bother?That's actually a very complex question, to which I'll try to provide a short and concise answer for...

As a man of color, I wish that I could enjoy the privileges that most whites enjoy. For example being able to walk into, and out of, any neighborhood in the continental U.S.A. without it's residents thinking I'm gonna rob them, or drive the price of their homes down. But I can't.

As a man of color, I wish that I could be charged based on fair market value for my home mortgage, insurance policy, car note or maintenance and repair, hair wash or cut, without having a representative tell me that I live in a high-risk area, am a high-risk client, am a member of a 'race' that has high-risk health histories, etc...

As a man of color, I wish that I could have received the same level of education that the privilege in this country receive without having to fight everyday to for it [or for my kids---which after great research, compromise, and sacrifice, I was fortunate enough to locate] :)

The point is, I have to 'bother' because I'm forced to, since it's constantly shoved in my face. I don't have the luxury of being anything other than Black. :shrug: And I truly wouldn't have a problem with what people think of me if they didn't affect my quality of life, as well as that of my family's. But they do. And since this country operates purely on 'fear' [and hatred] to sell its products [TV, movies, newspaper, insurance, security systems, politics, law enforcement— just to name a few], I can't seem to catch a freak'n break. :( But like everything we humans consider an stressful or an inconvenience, we learn to deal with it and tolerate and adapt to these conditions and the boneheads out there. :lol:
And believe me when I say that there will be those who read this and scoff at my message...disregard it and continue being 'the greatest of discriminators' here on this board and in their every day lives. *sigh*

So I consider it as a personal duty and obligation to serve as somewhat of a representative/ambassador for the many millions who can relate to me [racially], to educate those whom I come into contact with; whether they be school children, teachers, district officials, internet acquaintances, or the casual grocery shopper. :cool:
Spong talks about 'enhancing being' and this race issue just does not enhance being; it degrades being. *deep sigh*
I finally understand the saying, "where's the love?" The world needs more love.Is Spong a person of the cloth? I'm not entirely familiar with the name, but the words are wise. And the idea is admirable! :worship:
However, I'd imagine that it would take all parties pursuing the same peaceful goals in 'enhancing being' for it to work. Just my opinion however.
Even in here: and yes, love is possible, even in here. Tho' there are some that insist that love is impossible without personal contact. I disagree--there are several in here I love, and some of them are black. But there are some blacks on this board, as there are whites, whom are very trying and very difficult to love. I would no longer consider inflicting my fu--ed-up middle-Nebraska insular background on them by making their race an issue.And I agree with you wholeheartedly. Love is certainly possible without direct contact, for the mind makes all reality possible, right? It all begins in our head. ;)
My mind can act as a shield against the 'discriminatory' or the 'ignorant'. Or it can be a galvanizing tool with which I use to accept those different from myself...in order to teach them through visual, verbal, or tactile contact that I'm no different from them. The problem I constantly face is that not enough people are willing to open their eyes or their minds enough to see beyond the superficial [or skin color].
That's for people who haven't been around the corner away from the farmhouse.
Or around the corner away from the rowhouse.
The more I think about this, the more I think that social issues, the kind involving groups and crowds and mobs, are increasingly irrelevant. It's more honest to relate one-on-one, and it's so much harder to be an asshole face-to-face.All of which 'positively' separates you and I from the overt racists on this board and outside of it. :cool: You and I have both witnessed the racism on this board from both sides John. We also know that it exists, to a great degree, around us at all times. I've read where you've done your share, or more than, to be a fair and balanced poster. And though you are an exceptional representative, you could not possibly make the difference alone; in the same way that I cannot be a lone ambassador.

Race is a complex issue simply because of all the minds [differing realities] involved, from all races, of all the cultural variances, representing all people everywhere.

Race, in my eyes, matters because as an American citizen I'm forced to acknowledge it.

I apologize for the length of this post. But 'race' is such a difficult topic to cover without darn near composing a dissertation. :lol:

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:08 AM
I agree, people feel safe saying things here they would never say in a room full of people. Maybe because I'm older and didn't grow up with the internet, I don't really feel anonymous when I post here. I feel just as responsible for what I write here and how my words may affect someone as I would in any situation. There have been times when I was a bit brash in stating an opinion, later learned that I offended someone and felt genuinely sorry. There are some folks around here who's feelings I especially care about. I welcome the opportunity offered here to discuss issues like race and politics with people from other countries, races, religions, attitudes etc. I live in a pretty sparsely populated area with little racial or cultural diversity.Another exceptional representative whose posts I admire. :worship: ;)

John A Roark
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:41 AM
It takes a great deal of reason and logic and refutation to sometimes get through to the muddleheaded ones roundabout--
But after a while, you look at this, all sides of it, and eventually you mature to the point that there is only one race you can recognize with justice:
The Human Race.

SloKid
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:56 AM
Because it determines, who will reach the YEC :)

-Ph51-
Apr 26th, 2006, 07:16 AM
In fact to many Western Europeans, the new EU countries in the old Soviet bloc are only "good for" cheap labor, and indentured sex slaves.
:confused: :cuckoo:

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 07:16 AM
It takes a great deal of reason and logic and refutation to sometimes get through to the muddleheaded ones roundabout--
But after a while, you look at this, all sides of it, and eventually you mature to the point that there is only one race you can recognize with justice:
The Human Race. :worship: :worship: :cool:

Grohl
Apr 26th, 2006, 07:23 AM
race is an issue everywhere

darrinbaker00
Apr 26th, 2006, 07:30 AM
It takes a great deal of reason and logic and refutation to sometimes get through to the muddleheaded ones roundabout--
But after a while, you look at this, all sides of it, and eventually you mature to the point that there is only one race you can recognize with justice:
The Human Race.
True enough, but like RVD said, it's an issue some of us have to deal with from the day we're born until the day we die, whether we want to or not.

fifiricci
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:02 AM
Because ...

a) a lot of people on this board reside in the USA, where race is a big issue.

b) tennis is traditionally a wite-dominated sport, and some people had ... extreme reactions to a couple of Black girls coming in and dominating

c) a

Don't kid yourself its just an issue in the USA my dear!! For an idea of how big an issue it can be in the rest of the world ;) go and visit the MP3 player/Brussels thread, which has been raging for over a week now.

fifiricci
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:04 AM
:worship: Spot on the mark there Dana.:worship:

Reguardless of how we think or act in society, racism is always simmering around the dining table in many houses. The internet unforntunately is a vessel for alot of biggots to air their intollereance without having the clappers beaten out of them.

:lol: How true!!

meyerpl
Apr 26th, 2006, 12:59 PM
That's actually a very complex question, to which I'll try to provide a short and concise answer for...

As a man of color, I wish that I could enjoy the privileges that most whites enjoy. For example being able to walk into, and out of, any neighborhood in the continental U.S.A. without it's residents thinking I'm gonna rob them, or drive the price of their homes down. But I can't.

As a man of color, I wish that I could be charged based on fair market value for my home mortgage, insurance policy, car note or maintenance and repair, hair wash or cut, without having a representative tell me that I live in a high-risk area, am a high-risk client, am a member of a 'race' that has high-risk health histories, etc...

As a man of color, I wish that I could have received the same level of education that the privilege in this country receive without having to fight everyday to for it [or for my kids---which after great research, compromise, and sacrifice, I was fortunate enough to locate] :)

The point is, I have to 'bother' because I'm forced to, since it's constantly shoved in my face. I don't have the luxury of being anything other than Black. :shrug: And I truly wouldn't have a problem with what people think of me if they didn't affect my quality of life, as well as that of my family's. But they do. :
Excellent post!
I have a very good friend, a white man around my age, who told me he was sick and tired of hearing, talking and thinking about racial issues and wasn't interested in pursuing the subject. My reaction to that is: That's easy for him to say! That's like the cat saying he doesn't want to discuss what happened to the canary any longer. The subject has grown tiresome.

Lord Nelson
Apr 26th, 2006, 01:44 PM
:confused: :cuckoo:
He is right. Sex slaves as in the many prostitutes of East European origin and a lot of companies are looking for Eastern European who can now work legally in EU nations for less than the locals.

M2k
Apr 26th, 2006, 02:12 PM
I wish we lived in a perfect world, where race would never be an issue. But we don't live a perfect world :sad: Especially here in America, the land of discrimination...whether you like it or not.

aww...well we can hope for a better tomorrow ;) sometime change is slow, but it happens... :kiss:

John A Roark
Apr 26th, 2006, 03:07 PM
aww...well we can hope for a better tomorrow ;) sometime change is slow, but it happens... :kiss:
Note the sig:
Those kinds of changes are what a "Sapiential Eschatologist" strives for.
I would say I'm recruiting, but there are far better recruiters than I, and besides, I'm getting a late start, and still need much practice.

PointBlank
Apr 26th, 2006, 04:05 PM
Im not sure if Gypsies and Roma are considered there own race, but I had to do a speech on them, and they are treated very poorly in Europe still, atleast from all the articles I looked up.

SloKid
Apr 26th, 2006, 04:08 PM
Im not sure if Gypsies and Roma are considered there own race, but I had to do a speech on them, and they are treated very poorly in Europe still, atleast from all the articles I looked up.
In Slovenia they are actually mentioned in the constitution, but they still have problems "blending in" and are treated differently.

Aquanetta
Apr 26th, 2006, 04:25 PM
Ive always wondered that. People bring up race all the time, but I live in the middle of no where, Tennessee and I never hear race as such an issue as it is on the board, and Im in the South where most people think the N-word is the most used word for white people.

Speaking solely on my own behalf, I think race is oft-discussed on the board because people thoroughly enjoy the topic. I know I do and I get the feel that so do many others. It’s not anything I pursue in real life because if I did, I would be embroiled in countless fights. There are instances where I speak up but the circumstances have to be ideal (away from work, family/friends’ residences, church) for me to do so.

Aquanetta
Apr 26th, 2006, 04:28 PM
To be honest some people here give race more importance than it deserves.

And some people give race less examination than they really should, leading to naive thinking.

SelesFan70
Apr 26th, 2006, 04:32 PM
Especially here in America, the land of discrimination...whether you like it or not.

There is a lot of work to do in America, but don't make it seem we are the only country in the world with race problems. :wavey:

*JR*
Apr 26th, 2006, 04:54 PM
:confused: :cuckoo:
Don't play the fucking "victim" here. I didn't deny that the US has major problems with race (hell, I even added another example, re. Latin Americans entering via Mexico being a hot issue now). I only said that Europe has plenty, too. Now do you deny the ppl trafficking to Western Europe, including for forced prostitution? Or those vibrant racist parties? So either say where my post was wrong, or STFU. :retard:

BTW, I said "many" Western Europeans, not "most".

Kunal
Apr 26th, 2006, 05:05 PM
true talkin bout race online is a totally diff ballgame

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 05:43 PM
I have always been curious to know, how many of the non-blacks on this board actually know any Blacks in real life? Some of the countries represented here, I am sure have a very limited amount of Blacks, thus some of the attitudes exhibited here.

Aquanetta
Apr 26th, 2006, 05:48 PM
I have always been curious to know, how many of the non-blacks on this board actually know any Blacks in real life? Some of the countries represented here, I am sure have a very limited amount of Blacks, thus some of the attitudes exhibited here.

Those are some of the people who endorse the “We Are The World…” mantra. They mean well but in many ways they are naive.

-Ph51-
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:08 PM
Don't play the fucking "victim" here. I didn't deny that the US has major problems with race (hell, I even added another example, re. Latin Americans entering via Mexico being a hot issue now). I only said that Europe has plenty, too. Now do you deny the ppl trafficking to Western Europe, including for forced prostitution? Or those vibrant racist parties? So either say where my post was wrong, or STFU. :retard:

BTW, I said "many" Western Europeans, not "most".
1) prostitutes are from Russia mostlly.
2) People from the eastern countries part of the EU are able to work over here and their salary is legally calculated.
3) Try to be polite :)

*JR*
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:29 PM
1) prostitutes are from Russia mostlly.
2) People from the eastern countries part of the EU are able to work over here and their salary is legally calculated.
3) Try to be polite :)
1) Probably many are from the Balkans and other troubled economies in Eastern Europe, too. Doesn't change the basic point (and while not in the EU, most of Russia's population lives in Europe).
2) A lot of Western Europe's work is outsourced to Eastern Europe, where wages are far lower.
3) You expect ppl 2B polite 2U, don't answer someone's (non-confrontational) initial post on a subject with an insulting smilie.

That is all.

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:31 PM
It seems like (American) Blacks feel so disenfranchised that they feel that a tennis message board is a more appropriate place to complain about their government than their local council, political party etc.

-Ph51-
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:37 PM
[QUOTE=*JR*]
2) A lot of Western Europe's work is outsourced to Eastern Europe, where wages are far lower.

And so is life.

Avec des "si" et des "mais" l'on met Paris et Rome dans la même bouteille. :angel:

Aquanetta
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:37 PM
']It seems like (American) Blacks feel so disenfranchised that they feel that a tennis message board is a more appropriate place to complain about their government than their local council, political party etc.

Who says that we aren’t doing that already? The reason that some of the black posters are so vocal on this board is because some non-blacks make comments (comments that they appear to make frequently) that go unchallenged because they have little to no contact with black people.

Lord Nelson
Apr 26th, 2006, 06:50 PM
1) prostitutes are from Russia mostlly.
2) People from the eastern countries part of the EU are able to work over here and their salary is legally calculated.
3) Try to be polite :)
How do you know that prostitutes are from Russia mostly, are you familiar with them? ;)
In any case I think that most Eastern European whores are not jt from Russia but also from Ukraine, Moldova which are not part of the EU. I do not use their services but I read newspapers. :)

By the way, Eastern European nations in the EU can for now only work in some EU ations without restrictions such as Britain. In France for instance Poles cannot work there without a permit. But that will not be the case in a few years from now.

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 07:20 PM
Note the sig:
Those kinds of changes are what a "Sapiential Eschatologist" strives for.
I would say I'm recruiting, but there are far better recruiters than I, and besides, I'm getting a late start, and still need much practice.WORK = TIME x ENERGY = LOVE.

I like that. :)

RVD
Apr 26th, 2006, 07:34 PM
']It seems like (American) Blacks feel so disenfranchised that they feel that a tennis message board is a more appropriate place to complain about their government than their local council, political party etc.Is that what you honestly think we do? Complain? :lol:

I prefer to view it as 'educating' others. Or 'lifting awareness'. Or maybe even 'constructing a bridge of knowledge' for people who are unfamiliar with 'the struggle' and who believe that I'm simply complaining. :lol:

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:05 PM
Is that what you honestly think we do? Complain? :lol:

I prefer to view it as 'educating' others. Or 'lifting awareness'. Or maybe even 'constructing a bridge of knowledge' for people who are unfamiliar with 'the struggle' and who believe that I'm simply complaining. :lol:

First of all I'd like to say that I studied the Civil Rights movement as one of my modules for GCSE History (which is a low level qualification albeit enough to know what I'm talking about). The CRM was one of, if not the most heroic and admirable events of the 21st century, and learning about was for me incredibly inspirational.

Things like sit-ins, freedom rides and marches (in particular march on Washington) were simply poignant, however the level of 'constructing a bridge of knowledge' on the board shown by a tiny minority of the Blacks on the board goes beyond 'education', into an area of 'whinging'.

Accusing people of racism here there and everwhere does not allow for open debate, which is necessary for 'reeducation'; after all if you're called something or 'labelled' as something often enough you end up becoming more and more like that label.

What ends up happening is it makes a spiral of problems where genuine racists come in and defend the person who said something supposedly 'racist', and that person ends up feeling isolated from Blacks and symapthetic towards the racists.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:32 PM
']First of all I'd like to say that I studied the Civil Rights movement as one of my modules for GCSE History (which is a low level qualification albeit enough to know what I'm talking about). The CRM was one of, if not the most heroic and admirable events of the 21st century, and learning about was for me incredibly inspirational.

Things like sit-ins, freedom rides and marches (in particular march on Washington) were simply poignant, however the level of 'constructing a bridge of knowledge' on the board shown by a tiny minority of the Blacks on the board goes beyond 'education', into an area of 'whinging'.

Accusing people of racism here there and everwhere does not allow for open debate, which is necessary for 'reeducation'; after all if you're called something or 'labelled' as something often enough you end up becoming more and more like that label.

What ends up happening is it makes a spiral of problems where genuine racists come in and defend the person who said something supposedly 'racist', and that person ends up feeling isolated from Blacks and symapthetic towards the racists.

Is that how you feel, then sir, you could not have been too inspired by your studies.

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:37 PM
[/B]

Is that how you feel, then sir, you could not have been too inspired by your studies.

I will tell you now that was something a friend of mine on the board who is now banned said to me, it is not just a piece of crap.

No Name Face
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:39 PM
']It seems like (American) Blacks feel so disenfranchised that they feel that a tennis message board is a more appropriate place to complain about their government than their local council, political party etc.

this is the same blanket statement i would find rational a few months ago.
but if you look at it, it's almost always the usual suspects talking about race. not to single anyone out, but reevee makes some of the most amazing, articulate, and pertinent posts about race. it doesn't come from a hateful or bigoted place (eg. aquanetta, although she's not as bad as usual recently) and unless his rep page is filled with good reps about his posts, they go widely unnoticed. i've learned so much from people on the boards...it's DEFINITELY made me ask more questions outside of the board and try and understand who i am, despite my individual personality. while my fundamentals are the same, if this board didn't exist, i'd have very limited experience on some very pertinent issues that affect the black community every day. that surely can't be taken for granted. sure i'm 1 in thousands, but i'm sure if many people came into this situation wanting to learn, then they could.

but you know, to address your concern, there's not really many outlets where you can speak to an audience. considering a vast majority of those political parties and local councils are run by white people, then all of a sudden, you have to talk to those who don't inherently understand your struggle. they might feel pity or they may try to back it up with unfounded evidence. if you talk to solely black people, it's just recycling the same issues over and over again. but this is why the workforce is seeking to diversify. hopefully by the time i'm 35-40, so many more of these venues will be more diversified. they should be, considering the amount of blacks and hispanics (and other ethnic minorities) now going to college.

normally when a black person complains, it's met with a "...but you guys do this, or that," like every black person acts the same. my logic has always been, "if a white person murders 30 people," most people don't assume that "white people are serial killers." but try this logic on for size, "...black people are all inarticulate and will steal the clothes off your back," and you'll be shocked (or not) at how many people will BELIEVE THAT about most if not all black people. and if you're not that way, then you're "white-washed" or "color-struck" (or have to defend against that opinion WAY too often). i don't think there's a productive place where we can discuss these issues because not all blacks feel the same about any given subject. and also, i don't think the average person wants to come off extremist like al sharpton (IMO), but you also can't be passive and be heard. it's quite a dilemma.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:44 PM
']I will tell you now that was something a friend of mine on the board who is now banned said to me, it is not just a piece of crap.

:confused: I am confused by your answer, but no matter. My reason for saying that was because, you don't seem very patient and tolerant of the opinion of others, if you were indeed inspired by CRM, you would realize that, that was one of the biggest problems we faced during the movement, along with ignorance, now if you also feel that I just called you ignorant, I will end this discussion comfortable in the fact that your friend got banned for unjust reasons.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:51 PM
this is the same blanket statement i would find rational a few months ago.
but if you look at it, it's almost always the usual suspects talking about race. not to single anyone out, but reevee makes some of the most amazing, articulate, and pertinent posts about race. it doesn't come from a hateful or bigoted place (eg. aquanetta, although she's not as bad as usual recently) and unless his rep page is filled with good reps about his posts, they go widely unnoticed. i've learned so much from people on the boards...it's DEFINITELY made me ask more questions outside of the board and try and understand who i am, despite my individual personality. while my fundamentals are the same, if this board didn't exist, i'd have very limited experience on some very pertinent issues that affect the black community every day. that surely can't be taken for granted. sure i'm 1 in thousands, but i'm sure if many people came into this situation wanting to learn, then they could.

but you know, to address your concern, there's not really many outlets where you can speak to an audience. considering a vast majority of those political parties and local councils are run by white people, then all of a sudden, you have to talk to those who don't inherently understand your struggle. they might feel pity or they may try to back it up with unfounded evidence. if you talk to solely black people, it's just recycling the same issues over and over again. but this is why the workforce is seeking to diversify. hopefully by the time i'm 35-40, so many more of these venues will be more diversified. they should be, considering the amount of blacks and hispanics (and other ethnic minorities) now going to college.

normally when a black person complains, it's met with a "...but you guys do this, or that," like every black person acts the same. my logic has always been, "if a white person murders 30 people," most people don't assume that "white people are serial killers." but try this logic on for size, "...black people are all inarticulate and will steal the clothes off your back," and you'll be shocked (or not) at how many people will BELIEVE THAT about most if not all black people. and if you're not that way, then you're "white-washed" or "color-struck" (or have to defend against that opinion WAY too often). i don't think there's a productive place where we can discuss these issues because not all blacks feel the same about any given subject. and also, i don't think the average person wants to come off extremist like al sharpton (IMO), but you also can't be passive and be heard. it's quite a dilemma.


:worship: :worship: Well met, from these purely human feelings and curiosities, understanding and sometimes genuine friendship is born. You have learned a lot, and just taught me something, thank you.

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:53 PM
:confused: I am confused by your answer, but no matter. My reason for saying that was becaused, you don't seem very patient and tolerant of the opinion of others yourself, if you were indeed inspired by CRM, you would realize that, that was one of the biggest problems we faced during the movement, along with ignorance, now if you also feel that I just called you ignorant, I will end this discussion comfortable in the fact that your friend got banned for unjust reasons.

And yes I am bitter for the fact he is banned, and I attribute that to Blacks leading him on by 'whinging' and him almost 'getting addicted' to annoying you. And no, he is not a racist because he had no problems with me - a visible ethnic minority.

I will relate it to the CRM, as you question what I drew from being educated about it. One of the topics from what I learned, was a direct comparison between the approach towards achieving equality taken by Martin Luther King, and Malcom X (or Stokely Carmichael/Black Panthers).

Martin Luther King chose not to, in a sense 'whinge' about the situation, rather sought to reeducate through intergration, taking the approach of choosing not to confront racism head-on, but to resist passively. Not to condem racists, but to make others sympathise and appreciate the struggle and pligt of his people, which at the end of the day was exhorbitantly more succesful. It encouraged intergration and discouraged isolation.

I would suggest, rather than claiming racism here and there, set an example by not being racist, and suggesting alternative viewpoints.

I will add that the people I refer to are a tiny minority, and the approach which I think is best is that taken by the poster SJW, who clearly is not apathetic about the world like many are, which makes whatever she says more credible

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 08:56 PM
That's actually a very complex question, to which I'll try to provide a short and concise answer for...

As a man of color, I wish that I could enjoy the privileges that most whites enjoy. For example being able to walk into, and out of, any neighborhood in the continental U.S.A. without it's residents thinking I'm gonna rob them, or drive the price of their homes down. But I can't.

As a man of color, I wish that I could be charged based on fair market value for my home mortgage, insurance policy, car note or maintenance and repair, hair wash or cut, without having a representative tell me that I live in a high-risk area, am a high-risk client, am a member of a 'race' that has high-risk health histories, etc...

As a man of color, I wish that I could have received the same level of education that the privilege in this country receive without having to fight everyday to for it [or for my kids---which after great research, compromise, and sacrifice, I was fortunate enough to locate] :)

The point is, I have to 'bother' because I'm forced to, since it's constantly shoved in my face. I don't have the luxury of being anything other than Black. :shrug: And I truly wouldn't have a problem with what people think of me if they didn't affect my quality of life, as well as that of my family's. But they do. And since this country operates purely on 'fear' [and hatred] to sell its products [TV, movies, newspaper, insurance, security systems, politics, law enforcement— just to name a few], I can't seem to catch a freak'n break. :( But like everything we humans consider an stressful or an inconvenience, we learn to deal with it and tolerate and adapt to these conditions and the boneheads out there. :lol:
And believe me when I say that there will be those who read this and scoff at my message...disregard it and continue being 'the greatest of discriminators' here on this board and in their every day lives. *sigh*

So I consider it as a personal duty and obligation to serve as somewhat of a representative/ambassador for the many millions who can relate to me [racially], to educate those whom I come into contact with; whether they be school children, teachers, district officials, internet acquaintances, or the casual grocery shopper. :cool:

Race is a complex issue simply because of all the minds [differing realities] involved, from all races, of all the cultural variances, representing all people everywhere.

Race, in my eyes, matters because as an American citizen I'm forced to acknowledge it.

I apologize for the length of this post. But 'race' is such a difficult topic to cover without darn near composing a dissertation. :lol:
Thank you for so eloquently and honestly answering the thread starter's question. It doesn't get any truer than this. :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:01 PM
It takes a great deal of reason and logic and refutation to sometimes get through to the muddleheaded ones roundabout--
But after a while, you look at this, all sides of it, and eventually you mature to the point that there is only one race you can recognize with justice:
The Human Race.
This is nirvana.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:03 PM
']And yes I am bitter for the fact he is banned, and I attribute that to Blacks leading him on by 'whinging' and him almost 'getting addicted' to annoying you. And no, he is not a racist because he had no problems with me - a visible ethnic minority.

I will relate it to the CRM, as you question what I drew from being educated about it. One of the topics from what I learned, was a direct comparison between the approach towards achieving equality taken by Martin Luther King, and Malcom X (or Stokely Carmichael/Black Panthers).

Martin Luther King chose not to, in a sense 'whinge' about the situation, rather sought to reeducate through intergration, taking the approach of choosing not to confront racism head-on, but to resist passively. Not to condem racists, but to make others sympathise and appreciate the struggle and pligt of his people, which at the end of the day was exhorbitantly more succesful. It encouraged intergration and discouraged isolation.

I would suggest, rather than claiming racism here and there, set an example by not being racist, and suggesting alternative viewpoints.


Now you are approaching that gray area, who have I accused of being a racist?? Anyway, what may not have been in your studies is the geographical and economic difference between the followers of MLK and Malcolm Shabazz. MLK could never succeed with the nonviolent approach in the teaming and crowded Northern cities where the majority of the oppression was coming from Government agencies and the police, in the South MLK's movement boasted members from churches and other institutions, while Malcoms enveloped the man on the street.

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:04 PM
Excellent post!
I have a very good friend, a white man around my age, who told me he was sick and tired of hearing, talking and thinking about racial issues and wasn't interested in pursuing the subject. My reaction to that is: That's easy for him to say! That's like the cat saying he doesn't want to discuss what happened to the canary any longer. The subject has grown tiresome.
:lol: That's what I think when I hear, "why is race an issue?" and when I hear, "why do you always play the race card?" :rollleyes: Or, when I'm told I'm overly sensitive or overreacting or I shouldn't be offended by something someone said that had to do with my race.

kiwifan
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:08 PM
']And yes I am bitter for the fact he is banned, and I attribute that to Blacks leading him on by 'whinging' and him almost 'getting addicted' to annoying you. And no, he is not a racist because he had no problems with me - a visible ethnic minority.

I will relate it to the CRM, as you question what I drew from being educated about it. One of the topics from what I learned, was a direct comparison between the approach towards achieving equality taken by Martin Luther King, and Malcom X (or Stokely Carmichael/Black Panthers).

Martin Luther King chose not to, in a sense 'whinge' about the situation, rather sought to reeducate through intergration, taking the approach of choosing not to confront racism head-on, but to resist passively. Not to condem racists, but to make others sympathise and appreciate the struggle and pligt of his people, which at the end of the day was exhorbitantly more succesful. It encouraged intergration and discouraged isolation.

I would suggest, rather than claiming racism here and there, set an example by not being racist, and suggesting alternative viewpoints.

Actually the majority considered MLK Jr. quite the whinger at the time. ;)

The Panthers and Malcolm X on the other hand were viewed in slightly more threatening terms. ;)

Perhaps you need to re-review your history books, you're conclusions are a little off. :p

Its a little scary that you could catagorize your banned friend as a victim when he's "almost 'getting addicted' to annoying" black posters. :lol: :lol: :tape:

Infiniti2001
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:10 PM
Actually the majority considered MLK Jr. quite the whinger at the time. ;)

The Panthers and Malcolm X on the other hand were viewed in slightly more threatening terms. ;)

Perhaps you need to re-review your history books, you're conclusions are a little off. :p

Its a little scary that you could catagorize your banned friend as a victim when he "almost 'getting addicted' to annoying" black posters. :lol: :lol: :tape:

:worship: :worship: :lol:

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:13 PM
']It seems like (American) Blacks feel so disenfranchised that they feel that a tennis message board is a more appropriate place to complain about their government than their local council, political party etc.
I don't think you know what you're talking about, hon. Most of the blacks here are probably very politically outspoken or we wouldn't even be posting on a tennis message board. And, it's only ignorance that accuses us of complaining.

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:14 PM
Now you are approaching that gray area, who have I accused of being a racist?? Anyway, what may not have been in your studies is the geographical and economic difference between the followers of MLK and Malcolm Shabazz. MLK could never succeed with the nonviolent approach in the teaming and crowded Northern cities where the majority of the oppression was coming from Government agencies and the police, in the South MLK's movement boasted members from churches and other institutions, while Malcoms enveloped the man on the street.

Sorry I added a line to the end of the last post. I am not speaking directly to you.

WTAWorld has no classes. WTAWorld has no money (well it does now :rolleyes: ). Everyone is in effect equal.

I realise that racism was prevalant in those areas, however there was a point where 25% of the population was in the KKK (I have no idea where this source comes from, I was simply taught it). Racism CAN be beaten.

At the end of the day, however; what exactly did Malcom X achieve as far as legislation? His approach may have been the only conceivabvle at the time, however there is no national holiday for him, and there's a reason why he can never be held on the same level as MLK jr.

He had the famous quote 'being a lawyer is no goal for a ******' (or sth to that effect). I think for this reason he is a destructive role model, and it is clear that it is possible, contrary to what has already been said in this thread.

Condaleeza Rice (I don't like that woman, however she is a genius), is not only Black, but also a woman, who is being tipped (by some) to run for President in 2008. Clearly there are glass ceilings in society, however the only way to change it is to not get bogged down by it and constantly remind yourself of it, and actually break the ceilings through hard work.

Condi didn't get there by luck or by being white.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:16 PM
Actually the majority considered MLK Jr. quite the whinger at the time. ;)

The Panthers and Malcolm X on the other hand were viewed in slightly more threatening terms. ;)

Perhaps you need to re-review your history books, you're conclusions are a little off. :p

Its a little scary that you could catagorize your banned friend as a victim when he "almost 'getting addicted' to annoying" black posters. :lol: :lol: :tape:

:wavey: The poster to whom you are responding, does indeed sport the South African flag as his Icon, and should be teaching us about the struggles of his own people along with the sufferings of the Kwa-Zulu.

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:18 PM
:wavey: The poster to whom you are responding, does indeed sport the South African flag as his Icon, and should be teaching us about the struggles of his own people along with the sufferings of the Kwa-Zulu.

I am in fact ethnic Chinese born in Britain, not South African, however I am fascinated by its history; and I will reiterate that I am not ignorant towards the history of Blacks in America. I just feel that on WTAWorld the attitude taken by many is completely unnecessary, which is the answer to the initial question: Why is race such an issue on the board?

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:21 PM
']Sorry I added a line to the end of the last post. I am not speaking directly to you.

WTAWorld has no classes. WTAWorld has no money (well it does now :rolleyes: ). Everyone is in effect equal.

I realise that racism was prevalant in those areas, however there was a point where 25% of the population was in the KKK (I have no idea where this source comes from, I was simply taught it). Racism CAN be beaten.

At the end of the day, however; what exactly did Malcom X achieve as far as legislation? His approach may have been the only conceivabvle at the time, however there is no national holiday for him, and there's a reason why he can never be held on the same level as MLK jr.

He had the famous quote 'being a lawyer is no goal for a ******' (or sth to that effect). I think for this reason he is a destructive role model, and it is clear that it is possible, contrary to what has already been said in this thread.

Condaleeza Rice (I don't like that woman, however she is a genius), is not only Black, but also a woman, who is being tipped (by some) to run for President in 2008. Clearly there are glass ceilings in society, however the only way to change it is to not get bogged down by it and constantly remind yourself of it, and actually break the ceilings through hard work.

In order to understand brother Malik Shabazz, you must study him from his days of crime, all the way to his pilgrimage to Mecca and back, then you will understand the message of dignity and growth. Another one of his quotes is "DONT BE MISLED" "DONT BE BAMBOOZELED"

kiwifan
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:22 PM
:wavey: The poster to whom you are responding, does indeed sport the South African flag as his Icon, and should be teaching us about the struggles of his own people along with the sufferings of the Kwa-Zulu.

I have close friends from South Africa (rugby is the tie that binds), so I didn't go there. Their problems go waaay deeper than just black/white although they'll only admit it after many Castlerocks :drink: :lol: :tape:

Lets not muddy the waters of this thread with the Springbok Burden. :angel: :angel: :angel:

I officially forgave them for Aparthied back in 2001 when 3 beautiful South African models gave me a wonderful Quadruple Kiss.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:23 PM
']I am in fact ethnic Chinese born in Britain, not South African, however I am fascinated by its history; and I will reiterate that I am not ignorant towards the history of Blacks in America. I just feel that on WTAWorld the attitude taken by many is completely unnecessary, which is the answer to the initial question: Why is race such an issue on the board?

I understand, and can never deny you, your opinion.PEACE

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:28 PM
']First of all I'd like to say that I studied the Civil Rights movement as one of my modules for GCSE History (which is a low level qualification albeit enough to know what I'm talking about). The CRM was one of, if not the most heroic and admirable events of the 21st century, and learning about was for me incredibly inspirational.

Things like sit-ins, freedom rides and marches (in particular march on Washington) were simply poignant, however the level of 'constructing a bridge of knowledge' on the board shown by a tiny minority of the Blacks on the board goes beyond 'education', into an area of 'whinging'.

Accusing people of racism here there and everwhere does not allow for open debate, which is necessary for 'reeducation'; after all if you're called something or 'labelled' as something often enough you end up becoming more and more like that label.

What ends up happening is it makes a spiral of problems where genuine racists come in and defend the person who said something supposedly 'racist', and that person ends up feeling isolated from Blacks and symapthetic towards the racists.
First, the Civil Rights Movement with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was in the 20th century. Second, you need to do more than take a class to become an expert or even somewhat knowledgeable of the struggles of blacks then and now, and what the effects are and were of that era. I admire the fact that you want to learn and know more, but your narrow-mindedness about the subject only hinders your growth. If you want to learn, don't make blanket accusations and insinuations at the group you're trying to learn about and don't blame a whole race for the stupid actions of an ignorant poster who dug his own grave on a message board. My advice to you is, don't dig yourself into the same position.

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:30 PM
In order to understand brother Malik Shabazz, you must study him from his days of crime, all the way to his pilgrimage to Mecca and back, then you will understand the message of dignity and growth. Another one of his quotes is "DONT BE MISLED" "DONT BE BAMBOOZELED"

You are right. The syllabus topic was structued as "direct comparison between MLK and MX" so we glossed over that bit. If you were in the British exam system you'd understand how they do that in every topic subject how GCSEs are a complete joke.

I think we can put this to rest now, I've had my say and I realise first of all that America is a completely different kettle of fish than Britain and that civil rights is a prominent issue in your society, and also that I, nor anyone else apart from Black Americans, cannot appreciate fully what it is like, even if I were to read all the books in the world.

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:31 PM
']Sorry I added a line to the end of the last post. I am not speaking directly to you.

WTAWorld has no classes. WTAWorld has no money (well it does now :rolleyes: ). Everyone is in effect equal.

I realise that racism was prevalant in those areas, however there was a point where 25% of the population was in the KKK (I have no idea where this source comes from, I was simply taught it). Racism CAN be beaten.

At the end of the day, however; what exactly did Malcom X achieve as far as legislation? His approach may have been the only conceivabvle at the time, however there is no national holiday for him, and there's a reason why he can never be held on the same level as MLK jr.

He had the famous quote 'being a lawyer is no goal for a ******' (or sth to that effect). I think for this reason he is a destructive role model, and it is clear that it is possible, contrary to what has already been said in this thread.

Condaleeza Rice (I don't like that woman, however she is a genius), is not only Black, but also a woman, who is being tipped (by some) to run for President in 2008. Clearly there are glass ceilings in society, however the only way to change it is to not get bogged down by it and constantly remind yourself of it, and actually break the ceilings through hard work.

Condi didn't get there by luck or by being white.
Oh my God :eek:

kiwifan
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:31 PM
In order to understand brother Malik Shabazz, you must study him from his days of crime, all the way to his pilgrimage to Mecca and back, then you will understand the message of dignity and growth. Another one of his quotes is "DONT BE MISLED" "DONT BE BAMBOOZELED"

I was going to mention the "Malcolm X" quote issue.

With Malcolm you have to understand that you can find plenty of divisive mean quotes but if you actually finished the chapter on Malcolm you'd know that what makes him just a great a figure in History as Dr. King was not only his ability to serve as the stick (to Dr. King's carrot) in the war for equality; but also his evolution from the proud figurehead of "The Hate That Hate Created" to "Our Shining Black Prince" at the time of his assassination.

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:37 PM
First, the Civil Rights Movement with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was in the 20th century. Second, you need to do more than take a class to become an expert or even somewhat knowledgeable of the struggles of blacks then and now, and what the effects are and were of that era. I admire the fact that you want to learn and know more, but your narrow-mindedness about the subject only hinders your growth. If you want to learn, don't make blanket accusations and insinuations at the group you're trying to learn about and don't blame a whole race for the stupid actions of an ignorant poster who dug his own grave on a message board. My advice to you is, don't dig yourself into the same position.

I'm sorry if I offended you Denise. You know already that you are one of my favourite posters here and that I have nothing but respect for you. I am trying to be as open minded as possible, however I am not the most articulate of people and I am rarely explicit. The CRM was by far my favourite topic for GCSE and what I have realised is that the way they concluded it (Jesse Jackson, various acts, Colin Powell, Will Smith, Condoleeza Rice) was not entirely accurate.

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:42 PM
']I'm sorry if I offended you Denise. You know already that you are one of my favourite posters here and that I have nothing but respect for you. I am trying to be as open minded as possible, however I am not the most articulate of people and I am rarely explicit. The CRM was by far my favourite topic for GCSE and what I have realised is that the way they concluded it (Jesse Jackson, various acts, Colin Powell, Will Smith, Condoleeza Rice) was not entirely accurate.
The syllabus and the way a class is taught can be very narrow and subjective. Sometimes it's better to do your own research if you are interested in a particular subject to learn what isn't being taught. I think you have some research to do. ;)

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:49 PM
The syllabus and the way a class is taught can be very narrow and subjective. Sometimes it's better to do your own research if you are interested in a particular subject to learn what isn't being taught. I think you have some research to do. ;)

I actually got 99% for GCSE History, and it's necessary to write exactly what they want to hear in order to get the best marks. If there is a question 'How would you summarise the success of progress in civil rights 1930-1990' you would be expected to write:

Originally Jim Crow/lynching -> New Deal caused greater suffering as due to lack of jobs the minimum wage discrimnated against Blacks -> WWII segregated forces however Black earned their way towards breaking this because of good performance -> bus boycott/freedom rides/sitins -> successs of MLK and failures of MX -> education revolutions -> desegregation in general -> Jesse Jackson -> Colin powell ->Blacks assimilated into American culture, especially music

Because of this you can imagine why it's necessary to teach so narrowly.

Denise4925
Apr 26th, 2006, 09:54 PM
']I actually got 99% for GCSE History, and it's necessary to write exactly what they want to hear in order to get the best marks. If there is a question 'How would you summarise the success of progress in civil rights 1930-1990' you would be expected to write:

Originally Jim Crow/lynching -> New Deal caused greater suffering as due to lack of jobs the minimum wage discrimnated against Blacks -> WWII segregated forces however Black earned their way towards breaking this because of good performance -> bus boycott -> successs of MLK and failures of MX -> education revolutions -> desegregation in general -> Jesse Jackson -> Colin powell ->Blacks assimilated completely into American culture, especially music

Because of this you can imagine why it's necessary to teach so narrowly.
I think there was some serious miseducation applied here, just by reading your synopsis and your opinions above. Maybe the instructor wasn't as educated in the subject as he/she should have been.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 10:07 PM
The Royal Court
Lyrical souls loving our faves under the best and worst conditions

:worship: :worship: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :worship: :worship:

Pengwin
Apr 26th, 2006, 10:10 PM
I think there was some serious miseducation applied here, just by reading your synopsis and your opinions above. Maybe the instructor wasn't as educated in the subject as he/she should have been.

I will make a final point if you're not sick of me already :lol: . Here in Britian - people don't talk about race, at least where I live, noone ever talks about racial problems, and IMO it's better like this, because everyone gets along, even if they mutter under their breath to themselves '******' or 'paki' or 'chinky' after they walk past you.

If people don't make a big fuss over racism, it doesn't get in the way of life, and in my opinion it encourages racial minorities to aim higher and in that sense helps destroy barriers. It also encourages intergration and thus acceptance.

PointBlank
Apr 26th, 2006, 10:11 PM
Have any of you been to the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis? Ive been about 5 times, three times on a field trip and twice on my own, and its actually a very nice place. You can see where MLK Jr. was shot and then you can stand where the man who shot him stood and see where he lived.

Staticbeef
Apr 26th, 2006, 10:16 PM
Have any of you been to the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis? Ive been about 5 times, three times on a field trip and twice on my own, and its actually a very nice place. You can see where MLK Jr. was shot and then you can stand where the man who shot him stood and see where he lived.

Not yet, but I been to the memorial in Atlanta, thank you, I will put that on my list of places to go.

kiwifan
Apr 26th, 2006, 10:21 PM
']I will make a final point if you're not sick of me already :lol: . Here in Britian - people don't talk about race, at least where I live, noone ever talks about racial problems, and IMO it's better like this, because everyone gets along, even if they mutter under their breath to themselves '******' or 'paki' or 'chinky' after they walk past you.

If people don't ejaculate racism, it doesn't get in the way of life, and in my opinion it encourages racial minorities to aim higher and in that sense helps destroy barriers. It also encourages intergration and thus acceptance.

If you avoid the doctor you never have to know that you have cancer. ;)

Stamp Paid
Apr 26th, 2006, 10:24 PM
']I will make a final point if you're not sick of me already :lol: . Here in Britian - people don't talk about race, at least where I live, noone ever talks about racial problems, and IMO it's better like this, because everyone gets along, even if they mutter under their breath to themselves '******' or 'paki' or 'chinky' after they walk past you.

If people don't ejaculate racism, it doesn't get in the way of life, and in my opinion it encourages racial minorities to aim higher and in that sense helps destroy barriers. It also encourages intergration and thus acceptance.

LMAO @ 'ejaculate racism'

Dana Marcy
Apr 27th, 2006, 10:02 PM
One thing I really appreciate about the black posters on this board is that they are unapologetic (as they should be) about being "pro-black" in certain situations. Many (not all) are fans of either Venus or Serena or both but nobody trips when we get the occasional "you only root for them because they're black". :lol: And ditto for Non-Tennis. Eventhough we disagree at times which is good, you don't sense any shame from anyone's post if we root for the black contestants on American Idol, Survivor and Top Model for example. :yeah:

Staticbeef
Apr 27th, 2006, 10:07 PM
One thing I really appreciate about the black posters on this board is that they are unapologetic (as they should be) about being "pro-black" in certain situations. Many (not all) are fans of either Venus or Serena or both but nobody trips when we get the occasional "you only root for them because they're black". :lol: And ditto for Non-Tennis. Eventhough we disagree at times which is good, you don't sense any shame from anyone's post if we root for the black contestants on reality shows for example. :yeah:

If we were apologetic, we would be mighty lonely since we would be the only ones doing it.

No Name Face
Apr 27th, 2006, 10:10 PM
the black characters on reality tv shows are always the best :o
except omarosa, but i don't really watch too much tv

Dana Marcy
Apr 27th, 2006, 10:14 PM
If we were apologetic, we would be mighty lonely since we would be the only ones doing it.

I know that's right. ;)

Denise4925
Apr 27th, 2006, 10:45 PM
']I will make a final point if you're not sick of me already :lol: . Here in Britian - people don't talk about race, at least where I live, noone ever talks about racial problems, and IMO it's better like this, because everyone gets along, even if they mutter under their breath to themselves '******' or 'paki' or 'chinky' after they walk past you.

If people don't make a big fuss over racism, it doesn't get in the way of life, and in my opinion it encourages racial minorities to aim higher and in that sense helps destroy barriers. It also encourages intergration and thus acceptance.
No dear, it's bad to turn a blind eye to anything. If that is the case, we will continue to have stereotypes of each other and call each other names, such as "******", "paki" or "chink" after they walk past you. That is never a good thing. We have to open a dialogue so that we will all understand that we all are human and not an anomaly to the human race.

Denise4925
Apr 27th, 2006, 10:45 PM
One thing I really appreciate about the black posters on this board is that they are unapologetic (as they should be) about being "pro-black" in certain situations. Many (not all) are fans of either Venus or Serena or both but nobody trips when we get the occasional "you only root for them because they're black". :lol: And ditto for Non-Tennis. Eventhough we disagree at times which is good, you don't sense any shame from anyone's post if we root for the black contestants on American Idol, Survivor and Top Model for example. :yeah:
Me too girl :yeah: