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TennisSTUD
Apr 23rd, 2006, 05:52 PM
If you could only recommend one book to someone and that would be the only book they ever read....what book would it be and why?


I read all types of books, seeing that I have over 276 now on my book shelves...last one read being the Piano Tuner....

I would have to chose a book that I remember totally being eveloped by...I called out of work to read it....skipped watching tv....playing tennis even to finish it

a Density of Souls by Christopher Rice

It is not the most emotional book, nor most life changing...what it did though was make me forget about the stress of college and everything else in my life for that one week...

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 23rd, 2006, 05:58 PM
When Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand

Vacant
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:00 PM
Stephen King, IT.

Dahveed
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:03 PM
Patrick Süskind - Perfume

Genius book.

John A Roark
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:24 PM
My first thought was the Gospel of Mark--but I'm sure no one wants to hear that.

Then I thought, "From the Little Bighorn to the Last Cavalry Charge," but that's actually ten books (a series), and besides, they're not published yet.

I finally narrowed the crapshoot down a tie:
'Zorba the Greek,' by Nikos Kazantzakis...
or 'Lonesome Dove,' by Larry McMurtry.

wally1
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:27 PM
Patrick Süskind - Perfume

Genius book.Yep, Perfume is excellent. But I'd go for Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (it's short as well!)

Brooklyn90
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:30 PM
Rome and Juliet

CooCooCachoo
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:30 PM
Finding Myself - Toby Litt.

It's funny and well-written and contemporary.

CooCooCachoo
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:31 PM
Rome and Juliet

We are talking books here ;)

PointBlank
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:31 PM
Boy 2 Girl by Terrence Blacker.

Haute
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:36 PM
One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez :yeah: Absolutely brilliant :)

TennisSTUD
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:39 PM
My first thought was the Gospel of Mark--but I'm sure no one wants to hear that.

Then I thought, "From the Little Bighorn to the Last Cavalry Charge," but that's actually ten books (a series), and besides, they're not published yet.

I finally narrowed the crapshoot down a tie:
'Zorba the Greek,' by Nikos Kazantzakis...
or 'Lonesome Dove,' by Larry McMurtry.

Remember it is the first and last book someone will ever read.....without judgement or knowledge of what the book will mean....

John A Roark
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:43 PM
Remember it is the first and last book someone will ever read.....without judgement or knowledge of what the book will mean....
In which case, I'll stick with Mark, although Luke has his strong points, too.

TennisSTUD
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:51 PM
An array of choices....hmmm

TennisSTUD
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:51 PM
Finding Myself - Toby Litt.

It's funny and well-written and contemporary.




What is this book about?

Grohl
Apr 23rd, 2006, 06:52 PM
it's in dutch, but it's amazing:
'phileine zegt sorry' by Ronald Giphart!
love the movie aswell :p

Kirt12255
Apr 23rd, 2006, 07:05 PM
The Bible :angel:

skanky~skanketta
Apr 23rd, 2006, 08:07 PM
Master of the Game - Sydney Sheldon

TennisSTUD
Apr 23rd, 2006, 08:33 PM
But there are too many books!! For various occasions. One should not read only one book in a lifetime...

The Dispossessed, Sillmarillion, The Stranger, Perfume,The Fountainhead, Midnight's Children, I Never Promised You A Rose Garden.....

But you must recommend just one.....if you were only allowed one book to give....what would it be

meyerpl
Apr 23rd, 2006, 09:16 PM
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Twain treats his characters with humor and compassion. This book has something for all readers, both young and old. When I read this book as a boy, it was a fast moving story filled with adventures and facinating places from a different era. When I re-read it as an adult, I found humor and moral lessons that had gone over my head as a child. I believe Twain's masterpiece is nearly perfect and is the greatest American novel. Ironically, Twain nearly destroyed the manuscript after he finished it because he thought it was terribly flawed.

John A Roark
Apr 23rd, 2006, 09:27 PM
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Twain treats his characters with humor and compassion. This book has something for all readers, both young and old. When I read this book as a boy, it was a fast moving story filled with adventures and facinating places from a different era. When I re-read it as an adult, I found humor and moral lessons that had gone over my head as a child. I believe Twain's masterpiece is nearly perfect and is the greatest American novel. Ironically, Twain nearly destroyed the manuscript after he finished it because he thought it was terribly flawed.
"All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn."
--Ernest Hemingway.

CooCooCachoo
Apr 23rd, 2006, 10:11 PM
What is this book about?

Here is an excerpt:

(Opening Chapter of 'Finding Myself')



This morning, after long discussions with my Agent, I finally sent my Editor, Simona Princip, the following:


I can't write this in neat, organised sections - you know how I am. So I'm just going to blather it out whichwise-whatever, and let you on that basis make up your mind.


FROM THE LIGHTHOUSE


What I'm proposing to write won’t be a novel per se (not like my previous ones, anyway). Instead, it will be a novelisation of something that really happened. Not something that has already happened, but something that will - because I make it - one day, one month, August most likely - happen. Half my job in writing it (the docu-novel, the true-life story, call it whatever you like) will be to control the actual events.


My idea: You pay me a sizeable advance, with part of which I rent a large house by the sea (within sight of a lighthouse, preferably). I then contact a number of my friends - hereafter referred to as 'characters'. What I propose to them, roughly, is this:


You can come and stay, completely free, for a month, in this lovely seaside house I've rented. (Good food and plenty of alcohol will also be provided, gratis.) But you must allow me to write up the events of the month (yes, August, I think) in a semi-fictionalised form, afterwards. (In other words: you promise not to sue.) My publisher's lawyers have sorted all this out. Disclaimers and that sort of thing. Copyright issues. However, at the end of the proposed book, you will get three full pages (approx. 1,000 words) to say exactly what you like. If you think I've distorted things, told outright lies, etc., you can contradict me. And I, for my part, promise not to interfere editorially with your text in any way. Even if it is, as I suspect some of it might be, libellous of me. I am inviting ten other people along, as well. Some of them you know; some of them you don't.


I would select my characters very carefully: a couple of couples, a quartet of single bisexuals, an egoist or two, the odd drama queen, someone suicidal, someone eccentric, someone older, at least one other professional writer (less successful than me). Mix together. Slosh in the alcohol. Sprinkle a pinch or two of magic dust on top. And - voilà - cocktail time.


Plus, once everybody has confirmed, I will sit down and write a Synopsis. This will be a ten or so page prediction of exactly what I think will happen when all my characters get together. When finished, it will be sealed, notarised, given to you, and published at an appropriate point in the book. Then people, by which I mean readers, can see: How wrong or right was I? Do I know my friends as well as I think I do?


Of course, I won't be able to change a comma of the Synopsis - once it's in your hands. (I may need to add an addendum, however.)


Finally, if you're worrying that nothing at all will happen and you'll be left with a no-goer, I can promise that at least one major thing definitely will. Unfortunately, I can’t say what. You'll just have to trust me.


The cost to you? Well, I'd usually say make me an offer of the sort that my agent would call 'quite interesting'; but with an idea this good, I think you might even have to stretch to 'very'.


*


This afternoon, Simona replied:


Victoria, you are such a genuis!
Count me in, as publisher and participant.
(Can William come, too? Please. He's dying to.)
'Very' is a lot, but let me see what I can do.


*


I think I deserve a treat, don't you?





____________

It is really witty ;) Not the usual kind of literature, but very good!

Scotso
Apr 23rd, 2006, 10:17 PM
Number the Stars - Lois Lowry

Goai
Apr 23rd, 2006, 10:24 PM
To The Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf
Great book, brain food.

propi
Apr 23rd, 2006, 10:26 PM
Forgotten King Gudú, from Ana María Matute

vw.
Apr 23rd, 2006, 11:20 PM
To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee

For my life, its been probably the best book I've read. But Im only 15, so I have a few moer years to read some great books.

Wannabeknowitall
Apr 23rd, 2006, 11:29 PM
Well since I'm pretty much a science fiction/horror fiction lover and can find meanings for life in anything I pick:
Necroscope by Brian Lumley.

wta_zuperfann
Apr 23rd, 2006, 11:34 PM
The Broken Commandment by Toson Shimazaki because it attacks prejudice and religious hypocrisy.

Mr_Molik
Apr 23rd, 2006, 11:36 PM
Dead Famous by Ben Elton
its hilarious

tommyk75
Apr 24th, 2006, 02:21 AM
Boy, this is hard because everyone is so different. For a book that has something to say to everyone, I'd also go with "To Kill a Mockingbird." (Vwrules, you have excellent taste, especially for your young age!)

Reuchlin
Apr 24th, 2006, 03:52 AM
A Fine Balance- R. Mistry.

meyerpl
Apr 24th, 2006, 04:09 AM
To Kill A Mockingbird -Harper Lee

For my life, its been probably the best book I've read. But Im only 15, so I have a few moer years to read some great books.
Excellent choice! I love this book. It's a masterpice and a wonderful read. I wanted to name my second son Atticus, but my wife wouldn't have it, so we named him Gregory. (After Gregory Peck, who played Atticus Finch in the fine screen adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird.) Gregory Peck and Harper Lee remained good friends until Mr. Peck died.
Keep reading vwrules, you're off to a great start!

No Name Face
Apr 24th, 2006, 04:11 AM
the stranger

AjdeNate!
Apr 24th, 2006, 04:20 AM
`Giovanni's Room` - James Baldwin

The most amazing and poignant book I've read. At the time in my life I read this, I was dealing with some shit, and totally found myself immersed in the characters and the story. I wanted to be in the story.

I also was moved by `Tuesday's With Morrie` - Mitch Albom. Very quick read. One of the 2-3 books I've ever actually cried after reading.

Reuchlin
Apr 24th, 2006, 05:26 AM
the stranger
by Camus?
I LOVED THAT BOOK!

Reuchlin
Apr 24th, 2006, 05:27 AM
`Giovanni's Room` - James Baldwin

The most amazing and poignant book I've read. At the time in my life I read this, I was dealing with some shit, and totally found myself immersed in the characters and the story. I wanted to be in the story.

I also was moved by `Tuesday's With Morrie` - Mitch Albom. Very quick read. One of the 2-3 books I've ever actually cried after reading.

my high school teacher back in the day loved T.w.M---always used to read us parts.

Beefy
Apr 24th, 2006, 05:39 AM
American Psycho and Less Than Zero, both by Brett Easton Ellis
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Crash and pretty much anything by JG Ballard

switz
Apr 24th, 2006, 05:48 AM
probably Herzog by Saul Bellow or Catch 22

No Name Face
Apr 24th, 2006, 06:16 AM
by Camus?
I LOVED THAT BOOK!

yes. that's my joint.
also a lesson before dying by ernest gaines, but i can only recommend one.

matthias
Apr 24th, 2006, 06:46 AM
Patrick Süskind - Perfume

Genius book.

i recommend this book too
just great

rebel_ffighter
Apr 24th, 2006, 08:15 AM
Mrs Dalloway-Virginia Woolf->A glimpse in the life and mind of a woman
or
Nana-Emil Zola->the life of a woman searching for love and acceptance

CooCooCachoo
Apr 24th, 2006, 08:23 AM
Dead Famous by Ben Elton
its hilarious

Is still on the bookshelf here!

Goai
Apr 24th, 2006, 08:44 AM
I'm definitely going to read some of the books here. Always nice to read books which mean a lot to people.

mandy7
Apr 24th, 2006, 08:59 AM
American Psycho and Less Than Zero, both by Brett Easton Ellis
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Crash and pretty much anything by JG Ballard

only ONE book david :rolleyes:

anyways,
The Historian - Elizabeth Kostova
:p

jojoseph
Apr 24th, 2006, 09:14 AM
I don't do much reading but I read this book by Tom Grace called Spyder Web that was pretty good.

Philbo
Apr 24th, 2006, 09:30 AM
Conversations with God by Neal Donald Walsch..

moby
Apr 24th, 2006, 09:36 AM
It would be a pity if he/she could only read one book.

But right now, I'll go with...
Antoine de Saint-Exupery - Le Petit Prince
In the language of his/her choice, of course.

Wendy Williams
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:55 AM
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/076792486X.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_V57220659_.jpg

Drama Is Her Middle Name : The Ritz Harper Chronicles Vol. 1

In bookstores June 20th. :cool:

Beefy
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:57 AM
only ONE book david :rolleyes:

anyways,
The Historian - Elizabeth Kostova
:p

:o oops, mis-read it

OK, American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis

Xanadu11
Apr 24th, 2006, 11:12 AM
One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez :yeah: Absolutely brilliant :)

I am reading that book now and it has to be the most amazing book ever.

But I think if I had to recommend only one book for the entire human race it would be Night by Elie Wiesel. Chilling, Amazing book

Libertango
Apr 24th, 2006, 11:18 AM
Wild Swans by Jung Chang.

It's so much more than an historical memoir, or Chinese history read......it addresses the value of life, human relationships, and offers a realisation of how cruel the human race can be....but how we can overcome that as individuals and a society. This is an AMAZING book :worship:

LefandePatty
Apr 24th, 2006, 04:09 PM
The white mile

Pengwin
Apr 24th, 2006, 04:11 PM
Wild Swans by Jung Chang.

It's so much more than an historical memoir, or Chinese history read......it addresses the value of life, human relationships, and offers a realisation of how cruel the human race can be....but how we can overcome that as individuals and a society. This is an AMAZING book :worship:

:bowdown:

I loved that book :hearts:

I read it during my last trip to China :lol:

Nicjac
Apr 24th, 2006, 04:11 PM
The white mile

Post of the week :haha:

John A Roark
Apr 24th, 2006, 06:03 PM
It would be a pity if he/she could only read one book.

But right now, I'll go with...
Antoine de Saint-Exupery - Le Petit Prince
In the language of his/her choice, of course.
:worship:
A deeper book than most realize.

Pureracket
Apr 24th, 2006, 06:24 PM
Sula by Nobel Prize for Literature author, Toni Morrison. On the surface, the story is about the friendship of two little girls/women, but it's really so much more.

Rocketta
Apr 24th, 2006, 06:36 PM
I couldn't possibly just recommend just one book. :shrug:

meyerpl
Apr 24th, 2006, 06:42 PM
I couldn't possibly just recommend just one book. :shrug:
Alright, you can recommend two. :)

Rocketta
Apr 24th, 2006, 06:57 PM
Alright, you can recommend two. :)

do you mean 2 per genre or just two total? eh, I can't just recommend two either...:sad:

I'm going to try.... "A Lesson before Dying", "Sandy and the Rock Star", "My Brother Fine with Me", eh, "Dreyfus Affair", & "Song of Soloman" & many more :D

Aquanetta
Apr 24th, 2006, 07:01 PM
The Autobiography of Malcolm X.

^bibi^
Apr 24th, 2006, 07:04 PM
The Pilars of earth, by Ken Follet, big Historical history, really one of my favorite book :p

Quack
Apr 24th, 2006, 07:07 PM
Wilkie Collins - The Moonstone :worship:

Mitzi
Apr 24th, 2006, 07:42 PM
The Little Prince- Antoine de Saint Exupery

CJ07
Apr 24th, 2006, 08:43 PM
The Bible

No Name Face
Apr 24th, 2006, 08:45 PM
book titles are supposed to be underlined, not quoted :tape: :tape:

Rocketta
Apr 24th, 2006, 09:10 PM
book titles are supposed to be underlined, not quoted :tape: :tape:

don't take too many points off our papers, english professor... :shrug:

TennisSTUD
Apr 24th, 2006, 09:27 PM
I am surprised no one has put DaVinci Code...maybe that book and then the Bible....hmmm two interesting choices together to give.....has anyone read it?


THANKS for all that has posted....I don't post too many threads, so if I get over 25 replies I get excited!

:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

wally1
Apr 24th, 2006, 09:59 PM
Wilkie Collins - The Moonstone :worship:Very good choice! have you read his The Woman in White? Even better I think, a great page turner...

beauty_is_pink
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:09 PM
Perks of Being a Wallflower

READ IT!!!! pronto! vamos!

Spunky83
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:11 PM
Patrick Süskind - Perfume

Genius book.

We have read that in school...it was massacre :eek: (in the literal sense)

Personally I would recommend ´A dangerous fortune´ by Ken Follett, read it about 6 times already

Spunky83
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:18 PM
Dead Famous by Ben Elton
its hilarious

If you haven´t read it yet, try ´Popcorn´ by Elton. Awesome!

Stamp Paid
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:49 PM
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens

Stamp Paid
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:51 PM
No, Things Fall apart, by Chinua Achebe

Stamp Paid
Apr 24th, 2006, 10:53 PM
Either that or Go Tell It On the Mountain by James Baldwin

IceHock
Apr 25th, 2006, 12:48 AM
to kill a mockingbird is really good.so is roll of thunder hear my cry and the harry potter books.

IceHock
Apr 25th, 2006, 12:53 AM
lol i can't pick just one i forgot:the great gatsby,really nice book about the early 1930's and a rich guy of course named gatsby.

i'm also reading the crucible right now in english class and it's really good about the salem switch trials.

Sally Struthers
Apr 25th, 2006, 01:02 AM
American English speakers need to read Elements of Style by Strunk and White

pav
Apr 25th, 2006, 01:14 AM
The Bible

so I gather the choice includes fiction?

CJ07
Apr 25th, 2006, 01:28 AM
so I gather the choice includes fiction?
Whether you want to accept it or not, the Bible is the most studied, most influential, most read piece of literature of all time.

And that won't ever change; deal with it.

TennisSTUD
Apr 25th, 2006, 11:43 AM
Whether you want to accept it or not, the Bible is the most studied, most influential, most read piece of literature of all time.

And that won't ever change; deal with it.

doesn't make it all true though

CooCooCachoo
Apr 25th, 2006, 12:59 PM
Whether you want to accept it or not, the Bible is the most studied, most influential, most read piece of literature of all time.

And that won't ever change; deal with it.

Many people would argue it is not literature ;) Especially those who cling to the work most :)

~ The Leopard ~
Apr 25th, 2006, 02:11 PM
My choice for the day is:

The Sot-Weed Factor - John Barth.

I'll offer a different one tomorrow, maybe.

Quack
Apr 25th, 2006, 02:31 PM
Very good choice! have you read his The Woman in White? Even better I think, a great page turner...
Absolutely, both are great page turners, both books are recommended :worship:!

marmite1
Apr 25th, 2006, 02:44 PM
Christopher Rice is a great author.