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View Full Version : What is Qatar Like ??


drake3781
Feb 25th, 2006, 02:32 AM
I have no idea about Qatar... what's it like there? Not the tournament but the place itself...... please give some descriptions!

jharen17
Feb 25th, 2006, 06:07 AM
qatar is a small country that is fastly developing..it was said on the news that it is already the richest of the arab countries(have to confirm it 1st)..many buildings are under construction but they will be done before the asian games..doha is eye-catching..especially at night..

drake3781
Feb 25th, 2006, 09:52 PM
What is life like for women... they are second-class citizens, or are equal?

polishprodigy
Feb 26th, 2006, 03:31 AM
Qatar, U.A.E., Kuwait and Bahrain are considered to be the most "progressive" or "moderate" Islamic nations, however, in comparison to Western societies, the rights of women are not the same. Islamic fundamentalism is well founded in middle eastern countries like Qatar, meaning women's rights can only go so far.

polishprodigy
Feb 26th, 2006, 03:33 AM
From wikipedia:

To Western (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_culture) eyes, the Qatari authorities seem to keep a relatively tight rein on freedom of expression and moves for equality; but when compared to neighbors like Saudi Arabia, Qatar boasts one of the best standards-of-living and quality-of-life in its region.

In Qatar, the ruling Al Thani (الثاني) family continued to hold power following the declaration of independence in 1971. The Emir functions as head of state, and the right to rule Qatar resides within the Al Thani family. Politically, Qatar has started to evolve from a traditional society in the direction of a traditional modern welfare state. In order to meet the requirements of social and economic progress, the authorities have established Government departments.

The Basic Law of Qatar (1970) institutionalized local customs rooted in Qatar's conservative Wahhabi heritage, granting the Emir pre-eminent power. Continuing traditions of consultation, rule by consensus, and the citizen's right to appeal personally to the Emir all influence the Emir's role. The Emir, while directly accountable to no one, cannot violate the Shari’a (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharia) (Islamic law) and, in practice, must consider the opinions of leading notables and of the religious establishment. The Advisory Council, an appointed body that assists the Emir in formulating policy, has institutionalized the position of such influential groups. Qatar has no electoral system, and imposes a ban on political parties.

The influx of expatriate Arabs has introduced ideas that call into question the tenets of Qatar's traditional society, but no serious challenge to Al Thani rule has emerged.

In February 1972, the Deputy Ruler and Prime Minister, Sheikh Khalifa bin Hamad, deposed his cousin, Emir Ahmad, and assumed power. The key members of Al Thani supported this move, which took place without violence or signs of political unrest.

On June 27 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_27), 1995 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995), the Deputy Ruler, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa, deposed his father Emir Khalifa in a bloodless coup. Emir Hamad and his father reconciled in 1996. Increased freedom of the press followed, and the Qatar-based Al-Jazeera (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Jazeera) television channel (founded in late 1996) has acquired a unique reputation as a free and uncensored source of news in Arab countries.

Other facts:
Almost all Qatari women wear the black abaya (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abaya) (also donned in Saudi Arabia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudi_Arabia)) - however, Qataris do not universally impose the style on foreigners.

The country has undergone a period of liberalization and modernization after the current Emir of Qatar, Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani, came to power after overthrowing his father. For example, women can dress pretty much as they please in public (although in practice local Qatari women generally don the black abaya (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abaya)). The laws of Qatar tolerate alcohol (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcoholic_beverage) to a certain extent. However, public bars in Qatar operate only in expensive hotels (whereas the emirates of Dubai (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubai) and Bahrain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahrain) allow the establishment of nightclubs and other venues). A further liberalization may take place in order to accommodate the 15th Asian Games (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_Games) in 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006).

drake3781
Feb 26th, 2006, 05:32 AM
Interesting, thank you.



Putting myself in the place of a tennis player on the court there, what would I be seeing in the audience?

Can only Men attend the tennis matches? (since I don't think in muslim societies women and men are allowed to mix.)

Or do the women attend too? And the women if they attend, are all wearing the black abbaya? Does it include the head cover or just the body cover?

And do the women have to sit on one side of the court and the men on the other?

jharen17
Feb 26th, 2006, 01:31 PM
they treat the qatari women 'extra' special..on watching tennis..most of them are in an a room(its like a vip room) where the glass is tinted so that no one can see them...the wearing of their abayas depends on how strict their husband is and their family values..most qatari women covers everything..of course there are plenty of men at the women's tournament=)..for the tennis player..everything else is normal except that there are guards behind the player's seat all the time..the famous players are watched by the royal family..

drake3781
Mar 1st, 2006, 04:51 AM
they treat the qatari women 'extra' special..on watching tennis..most of them are in an a room(its like a vip room) where the glass is tinted so that no one can see them...the wearing of their abayas depends on how strict their husband is and their family values..most qatari women covers everything..of course there are plenty of men at the women's tournament=)..for the tennis player..everything else is normal except that there are guards behind the player's seat all the time..the famous players are watched by the royal family..


Wow, thank you!

So the players will only see MEN in the stands.

And these MEN are mostly used to seeing women covered up completely all the time, so these PLAYERS in their tennis outfits will be showing a lot of SKIN and CURVES compared to what these MEN are used to day to day.

And the PLAYERS will not see any WOMEN because the women need to be separated from the men, according to Islamic law.

Sounds right?

jharen17
Mar 1st, 2006, 08:32 AM
no..only the qatari women are seperated..the other nationalities of any gender can seat wherever they like..i think the men are really enjoying watching the players=)..but in this place..you just have to get used to people staring to those who do not wear abbayas..