PDA

View Full Version : Nick Bolitieri's interview about Sesil's case


coool
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:09 PM
http://focus-sport.net/news.php?news_id=1135131172980&group_id=21

- Mr Bolitieri today a french newspaper blamed Sesil Karatantcheva of taking doping and she might recieve a 2- year punishment.

NB: Excuse me?! Are you really talking about Sesil? She has had positive test results, has she?

- Yes, according to the newspaper. The test was taked after the 1/4 final of Roland Garros this year. Did you expect that kind of development in her career?

NB: If she stayed in my academy, under my control, I am sure it wouldn't happen. I am really sad to hear that because i have always believed that she has the talent to be among tennis stars but only if she works in the proper surroundings. She came to me and achieved a great progress. If she didn't come she wouldn't developed so much.

-Do you think that after eventual 2-year punishment she would return in teniss elite again?

NB: It's difficult to say. She's still very young and needs a patronage. Obviously, the patronage she is working under now is bad for her. I can't comment that case because i was her coach before she gets in tennis elite and i can just talk about that time.

- Earlier this year you refused to work with her anymore. Did you sespect anything and was that the reason to stop working with Sesil?

NB: Oh no, no. It's not like that. Then I explained that the reason to stop working with her is the outside pressure i had to work under. The "tips" about how i should work with her became too many and it's not the way i want to do my job. I am really sad because if I continued to work with Sesil nothing like that would happen.

- According to the newspapers, Sesil is the third tennis player in Roland Garros this year who had positive doping result. Why it happens so often in France?

NB: Frankly, I even don't visit Roland Garros. I was there a few years ago but it was exception. I guess the tournament is too hard and the organizers should deal firmly with this.

*******
I translated it myself and i hope u get what they r talking about :)

PaulHopkins
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:24 PM
Jesus! Is this true? Id have never thought Sesil would have taken any banned substances she is so young and doesnt seem the type? I hope this isn't true?

rararasputin
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:34 PM
so PaulHopkins, who on the WTA does seem 'the type'??

coool
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:35 PM
she even doesn't look like someone who takes doping...she's so small and so weak...even if it is true- the drug doesn't have big effect :P

coool
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:36 PM
so PaulHopkins, who on the WTA does seem 'the type'??

there are a few..i dont wanna mention them coz their fans wouldn't be too happy to hear that

PaulHopkins
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:36 PM
so PaulHopkins, who on the WTA does seem 'the type'??

Certainly not such a young and inexperienced up and coming player such as Sesil!

rararasputin
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:38 PM
is anybody here old enough to remember this case : (c+p sorry)

*******************

A tragic example of what can go wrong when drug use is unabated came to light a few months before the 1988 Seoul Olympics. The story, first documented in Der Spiegel magazine, is worth repeating.

At 26, Birgit Dressel was the picture of health and considered to be on the cusp of greatness in the seven-event heptathlon. In reality, the statuesque West German had been on a regimen of performance-enhancing drugs for years -- various steroids and preparations, including injections of animal cells. At a time when she seemed ready to break through on the world scene, Dressel was, in fact, already dying. Her bodily functions, her organs, had begun shutting off. Her last two days were horrible.

On April 8, 1987, while practising the shot put, Dressel felt pain in the left hip and buttocks. She consulted the first more than 20 specialists who tried, in vain, to save her life. First, Dr. A, an orthopedic surgeon, injected her with Xylonest, a local anesthetic, and Voltaren, a pain killer. A few hours later, he injected Dressel with MyoMelcain, a combination of local anesthetic and honey.

The next afternoon, the pain was agonizing and Dr. A prescribed an "intensified drug treatment." Dressel was given two injections, more Voltaren and Baralgin, and sent home with the tablets of Godamed and Tranquase-5, and suppositories of Optipyrin, drugs that contained acetylsalicylic acid, ethenyamide, diazepam, barbituric acid and codeine.

A police investigation into her death determined Dressel, desperate for pain relief, swallowed at least 10-15 Godamed tablets at home. A neurologist, Dr. B, was called and diagnosed lumbago. He suggested ice packs. When Dressel's agony continued through the night, Dr. C advised aspirin and heparin cream.

The next morning, Dr. A visited Dressel at home and found her to be tortured with "labour-like" pain. He suspected renal colic, the first of many misdiagnoses that day. Dr. A injected Meta Attritin (described as a mixed preparation). But the pain persisted and she was taken to a hospital. There, Dr. C, in consultation with Drs. D and E, confirmed there was "no disease in the urological sector" and she was given Buscopan intravenously for her pain.

That afternoon, Dressel was transferred to the accident-surgery ward, where four surgeons took over -- Drs. F, G, H, and I. Dr. F attached a venous drop and infused two ampoules of Buscopan diluted in Sterofundin. The surgeons suspected "disease of the vertebral discs or spinal cord."

Three more physicians appeared -- Drs. J, K and L. By now, the woman complained of a great thirst. Her lips and fingernails turned blue. Soon, she lost consciousness. Two nerve specialists, Drs. M and N, were contacted. Dressel's heart raced, her breathing quickened. A trauma team was called, including Drs. O, P, Q, R, S, T and U.

DIAGNOSIS TOO LATE

At the request of the intensive-care doctors, Dressel bent her arms and opened her eyes one last time. An oxygen mask was put over her head. One hour later, at 7:45 p.m., she was transferred to intensive care. The diagnosis: Suspected toxic reaction, the correct one, finally. But it was too late.

The last two doctors at her death bed, Drs. V and W, administered four jars of whole blood and high doses of endogenous hormones and, finally, bicarbonate, intended to balance the metabolic derailment.

"The tortured body of Birgit Dressel," wrote Der Spiegel, "did not want any more. High-performance sport and thousands of pills had become too much for it." On April 10, two days after she experienced the pain at shot-put practice, Birgit's body gave up.


***********

PaulHopkins
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:41 PM
Nope I haven't heard of that but reading it has deeply shocked me :sad: I think its terrible how so much intense pressure is put on athletes by both medical staff and their trainers. However well they perform, their HEALTH must be primarily safeguarded under any circumstances!

PaulHopkins
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:44 PM
There is currently no information on Sesil's case on a Google News search...

rararasputin
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:47 PM
just type 'sesil' on google news and you will get some.....

PaulHopkins
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:51 PM
just type 'sesil' on google news and you will get some.....

ah yes I've found them now. At the same time I have only just found about Puerta's 8 YEAR BAN! Shocking stuff! Thank god he didnt win the French now!

tennisrox
Dec 21st, 2005, 12:58 PM
is anybody here old enough to remember this case : (c+p sorry)

*******************

A tragic example of what can go wrong when drug use is unabated came to light a few months before the 1988 Seoul Olympics. The story, first documented in Der Spiegel magazine, is worth repeating.

At 26, Birgit Dressel was the picture of health and considered to be on the cusp of greatness in the seven-event heptathlon. In reality, the statuesque West German had been on a regimen of performance-enhancing drugs for years -- various steroids and preparations, including injections of animal cells. At a time when she seemed ready to break through on the world scene, Dressel was, in fact, already dying. Her bodily functions, her organs, had begun shutting off. Her last two days were horrible.

On April 8, 1987, while practising the shot put, Dressel felt pain in the left hip and buttocks. She consulted the first more than 20 specialists who tried, in vain, to save her life. First, Dr. A, an orthopedic surgeon, injected her with Xylonest, a local anesthetic, and Voltaren, a pain killer. A few hours later, he injected Dressel with MyoMelcain, a combination of local anesthetic and honey.

The next afternoon, the pain was agonizing and Dr. A prescribed an "intensified drug treatment." Dressel was given two injections, more Voltaren and Baralgin, and sent home with the tablets of Godamed and Tranquase-5, and suppositories of Optipyrin, drugs that contained acetylsalicylic acid, ethenyamide, diazepam, barbituric acid and codeine.

A police investigation into her death determined Dressel, desperate for pain relief, swallowed at least 10-15 Godamed tablets at home. A neurologist, Dr. B, was called and diagnosed lumbago. He suggested ice packs. When Dressel's agony continued through the night, Dr. C advised aspirin and heparin cream.

The next morning, Dr. A visited Dressel at home and found her to be tortured with "labour-like" pain. He suspected renal colic, the first of many misdiagnoses that day. Dr. A injected Meta Attritin (described as a mixed preparation). But the pain persisted and she was taken to a hospital. There, Dr. C, in consultation with Drs. D and E, confirmed there was "no disease in the urological sector" and she was given Buscopan intravenously for her pain.

That afternoon, Dressel was transferred to the accident-surgery ward, where four surgeons took over -- Drs. F, G, H, and I. Dr. F attached a venous drop and infused two ampoules of Buscopan diluted in Sterofundin. The surgeons suspected "disease of the vertebral discs or spinal cord."

Three more physicians appeared -- Drs. J, K and L. By now, the woman complained of a great thirst. Her lips and fingernails turned blue. Soon, she lost consciousness. Two nerve specialists, Drs. M and N, were contacted. Dressel's heart raced, her breathing quickened. A trauma team was called, including Drs. O, P, Q, R, S, T and U.

DIAGNOSIS TOO LATE

At the request of the intensive-care doctors, Dressel bent her arms and opened her eyes one last time. An oxygen mask was put over her head. One hour later, at 7:45 p.m., she was transferred to intensive care. The diagnosis: Suspected toxic reaction, the correct one, finally. But it was too late.

The last two doctors at her death bed, Drs. V and W, administered four jars of whole blood and high doses of endogenous hormones and, finally, bicarbonate, intended to balance the metabolic derailment.

"The tortured body of Birgit Dressel," wrote Der Spiegel, "did not want any more. High-performance sport and thousands of pills had become too much for it." On April 10, two days after she experienced the pain at shot-put practice, Birgit's body gave up.


***********

:eek:

Horrifying!!A lesson for all those trying to take a short cut to athletic successs. :sad:
I think it is absolutely disgusting the kind of rubbish that people are willinag to fill their bodies with in order to win a race or two.Shocking and apalling.