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tennis aus
Dec 15th, 2005, 07:12 AM
Who are the 3 FOREMOST AUTHORITIES on the subject of the first 100 years of tennis?

1. ?
2. ?
3. ?


These foremost experts made a ranking on the All Time Top 10 players of the first 100 years of tennis in the 1970s.

CrossCourt~Rally
Dec 15th, 2005, 07:15 AM
Navtratilova, Frazier and Conchita... :lol: :lol: KIDDING! I know one of the 3 has to be BUD COLLINS..he seems to know everything tennis :D :bounce:

tennis aus
Dec 15th, 2005, 07:20 AM
Navtratilova, Frazier and Conchita... :lol: :lol: KIDDING! I know one of the 3 has to be BUD COLLINS..he seems to know everything tennis :D :bounce:


Good answer Frazier Force.:)... but the highly respected Bud Collins is not one of them.

CrossCourt~Rally
Dec 15th, 2005, 07:30 AM
Good answer Frazier Force.:)... but the highly respected Bud Collins is not one of them.

Hmm...Give me a hint... ;)

tennis aus
Dec 15th, 2005, 07:41 AM
Hmm...Give me a hint... ;)


All three of them had already passed away.

2 males 1 female. ;)

I don't think they were as widely known as Bud Collins among tennis fans.

CrossCourt~Rally
Dec 15th, 2005, 08:04 AM
All three of them had already passed away.

2 males 1 female. ;)

I don't think they were as widely known as Bud Collins among tennis fans.

:scratch: Maybe i should look in my TOTAL TENNIS book :angel:

tennis aus
Dec 15th, 2005, 08:18 AM
:scratch: Maybe i should look in my TOTAL TENNIS book :angel:

LOL. I made error on one the clues that I gave you. ALL three experts are men but ONE them has a female sounding first name.

My apologies. LOL.

tennis aus
Dec 15th, 2005, 08:25 AM
:scratch: Maybe i should look in my TOTAL TENNIS book :angel:

Okay FRAZER FORCE here it is......

The 3 foremost authorities on the subject of the first 100 years of tennis are (Harry Hopman, Lance Tingay and Alison Danzig)..ranked the top 10 players of the first 100 years of tennis in the 1970s.

They had a lot of the same players in the top 10 players of the first 100 years .. they had some players a little higher than others and they had a few of the marginal players mixed -- they may have had 15 players total among the men and maybe 12 or 13 players total among the women in their 3 individual top 10 rankings.

However, 1 thing they were unanimous on .. Bill Tilden was the #1 man and the top 2 women were Wills Moody and Lenglen (keeping in mind that these rankings were put together after Laver and Court were essentially finished with their careers).


------------------------------------------------------------------------
(excerpts from an archive article)

Harry Hopman (died on December 27, 1985)

A fine player, particularly in doubles, at which he won seven major titles, Henry Christian Hopman made his name as the most successful of all Davis Cup captains, piloting Australia to 16 Cups between l939 and 1967. His was the era of perhaps the greatest Cup players of all, the Hall of Fame Aussies from Frank Sedgman through Lew Hoad, Ken Rosewall, Ashley Cooper, Mervyn Rose, Rex Hartwig, Mal Anderson, Neale Fraser, Roy Emerson, Rod Laver, John Newcombe, Fred Stolle and Tony Roche.

Emphasizing super fitness, he drove and inspired them, and built pride in their underpopulated country's beating the rest of the world. The first of his 22 teams, 1938, the challenge round final, losing to the U.S. But he was back with the same pair, Adrian Quist and Jack Bromwich, to win a singular victory the U.S. in l939, from 0-2 down after the first day in Philadelphia.

Hop concentrated on his job as a newspaperman after World War II. But after Australia lost the Cup to the U.S. in 1946, and three more finales through l949, there was a clamor for him to return to the captain's chair. With two youngsters Sedgman and Ken McGregor, he won the Cup in New York in 1950, and the Down Under-takers were in business for a glorious near-quarter century. His teams compiled a 38-6 record.

As a player--a trim 5-foot-7, 133 pounds--he won the Australian doubles with Jack Crawford in 1929 and 1930 and four mixed titles his first wife, the former Nell Hall, a record for married couples. In singles his high point was the U.S. Championships of 1938 when he beat fifth-seeded Elwood Cooke 6-2, 4-6, 6-4, 10-8,and future U.S. and French champ Don McNeill, 6-4, 6-3, 7-5, to reach the quarters, where he was an historic footnote in Don Budge's original Grand Slam, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3.

Following his last Davis Cup match as captain, a loss to Mexico at Mexico City in 1969, he emigrated to the U.S. to become a highly successful teaching pro, counseling such champions-to-be as Vitas Gerulaitis and John McEnroe at the Port Washington (NY) Tennis Academy. He later opened his own Hopman Tennis Academy with his wife, Lucy, at Largo, FL. Hop was born August l2, l906, in Sydney and died December 27, 1985 in Largo, FL. He entered the Hall of Fame in 1978.

Allison Danzig (died on January 27, 1987)

The familiar and authoritative identification that topped "New York" Times stories for 45 years--By Allison Danzig--was reassuring to readers until his retirement in 1967. Before that he was a sportswriter for the "Brooklyn Eagle", developing an incisive, perceptive style that made him the widest regarded literary voice of the game in the U.S. Al Danzig, the first journalist to enter the Hall of Fame (1968), was a thorough going gentleman respected throughout the game and his profession. He covered the game from its first great impact during the Tilden, Wills and Lenglen days of the 1920s to the dawn of the open era, and also was a nationally known college football, rowing and the Olympic Games.

He was one of the few who could write knowledgeably about court tennis, ancestor of lawn tennis. Born in Waco, Texas, February 27, 1898, he graduated from Cornell, where he played football despite a diminutive stature, and serve in the U.S. Army during World War I. He became a New Yorker following college, but kept Texas in his speech, and in the kitchen. This soft-spoken man was celebrated for his torrid chili. Always immaculately turned out--coat and tie whatever the summer temperature on the Eastern grass circuit--he was generous in helping young reporters and had the respect of generations of players. He wrote books on tennis, football, the Olympics and court tennis. Danzig died January 27, 1987, in Ridgewood, NJ. The Danzig Award, established by Longwood Cricket Club in Boston--he was the first recipient in 1963--honors leading tennis writers, and is presented periodically during the U.S. Pro Championships.


Lance Tingay (died on March 10, 1990)

As the dean of a sizeable platoon of British tennis writers of his time, Lance Tingay, friendly, erudite, helpful to colleagues, covered the game for a half-century, present as it evolved from amateur into the open and highly professional era. He covered his first Wimbledon in 1932 and was the thorough, informed and informative tennis correspondent for "The Daily Telegraph" of London from 1950 to 1980, writing his dispatches from across the world.

Ever good humored, even while pounding his typewriter on deadline, he was a leading historian of the game, the author of "History of Lawn Tennis in Pictures", "One Hundred Years of Wimbledon", and "Royalty and Lawn Tennis", and he wrote for numerous tennis publications and yearbooks. Tingay was born in London July 15, 1915 and died there March 10, l990. He was named to the Hall of Fame in 1982.

CrossCourt~Rally
Dec 15th, 2005, 10:48 AM
I have heard of Harry Hopman..but the other 2 are new to me. Thanks for psoting info about them though. Now i can say i learned somthing today and it is only 7am in the morning :lol: ;) :wavey:

Andy T
Dec 15th, 2005, 12:49 PM
Allison Danzig was a man.

Lance Tingay was tennis correspondant for "The Daily Telegraph", a UK newspaper which traditionally had the most extensive coverage of tennis. He also edited the World of Tennis Annuals, which were published every year from 1969 to 2001 and gave reviews, reports, results of the previous season. Every year, he compiled and published his world top 10 rankings, and these were considered by many to be the nearest thing to official rankings before the computer came along.

hingis-seles
Dec 15th, 2005, 01:59 PM
I'd have to say Ted Tinling was quite an authority on women's tennis.

Pheobo
Dec 15th, 2005, 02:18 PM
Well if they're all dead than I would assume they aren't very knowledgable on recent tennis :p

tennis aus
Dec 15th, 2005, 06:52 PM
Allison Danzig was a man.

Lance Tingay was tennis correspondant for "The Daily Telegraph", a UK newspaper which traditionally had the most extensive coverage of tennis. He also edited the World of Tennis Annuals, which were published every year from 1969 to 2001 and gave reviews, reports, results of the previous season. Every year, he compiled and published his world top 10 rankings, and these were considered by many to be the nearest thing to official rankings before the computer came along.

True mate.

TheBoiledEgg
Dec 15th, 2005, 06:57 PM
the Daily Telegraph's ranking was widely used by the tennis authorities before the Official lists became computerised.

the Daily Telegraph did an end of season list of Top 10 and still do so today.

from Lance to the late John Parsons
Mark Hodgkinson has a LOT to do before he gets to their standard.