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View Full Version : What's the matter with injuries ???


Sharapower
Sep 26th, 2005, 08:18 AM
A few years ago, the main explanation for injuries was that players played too many tournaments, singles and doubles and so on.

Currently, it seems that they stopped doing so but, yet, the tour is still plagued by injuries (the 4 top seed of Beijing were out of the tournament for health reasons).

My question is "Has the game become too hard to stand for female bodies ?" (and maybe for male as well, btw)...

What's your opinion ?

terjw
Sep 26th, 2005, 11:00 AM
My question is "Has the game become too hard to stand for female bodies ?"

Yes - I think it has. It really is getting ridiculous and I feel very sorry for the players right now. Kim has announced she is retiring in 2 years time because she wants to protect her body.

I really don't know what the answer is - and neither it seems do the WTA. This ought to be top priority with the WTA but I don't know whether it is.

Sooner or later the WTA will start to lose sponsers since it is quite clear with the injury situation that the guarantees the WTA makes about numbers of top players in tier 1, tier 2 events etc. aren't worth a penny. Look ar every competition lately except the slams. Toronto - a tier 1 - decimated by injuries. Ironic that Kim was there and won - and it wasn't on her original schedule - she'd been hard designated.

Chrissie-fan
Sep 26th, 2005, 03:00 PM
I really don't know what the answer is - and neither it seems do the WTA.


Return to standard sized racquets and 90% of the problem will be solved. Will never happen of course. :smoke:

TeamUSA#1
Sep 26th, 2005, 06:11 PM
OFF SEASON CALLING!!!

No other major sport has such a short off season--- in fact most have 6 to 8 months of an off-season, while tennis has barely 2 months with no tournaments! Athletes need time to recover and train and condition--- Tennis should be off for 4 months or so.......

lindsayno1
Sep 26th, 2005, 08:26 PM
yeh arent the lightness of the rackets something do do with injuries in the upper body? Theyre too light and allow the player to hit the ball even harder.??

Sharapower
Sep 29th, 2005, 08:41 AM
yeh arent the lightness of the rackets something do do with injuries in the upper body? Theyre too light and allow the player to hit the ball even harder.??

I don't buy that theory that the rackets technology has something to do with the problem. Firstly, the injuries are located in various parts of the body : wrists of course, but also very often, back, ankles, knees, thighs. Secondly, I believe that heavier rackets would harm even much more.

What I think is that the training (both physical and technical) rhythm and methods are not enough studied about. (For example, I believe that the idea of endlessly repeating the same movement is the best way to master it is a stupid and harmful prejudice).

Anyway... I'm feared that the YEC will be a fiasco (again) this year :sad: .

furrykitten
Sep 29th, 2005, 08:50 AM
I read Maria's injuries are more due to her spurt in height, her body is finding it hard to adjust and cope with especially with her demanding physical schedule.

Sharapower
Sep 29th, 2005, 08:57 AM
I read Maria's injuries are more due to her spurt in height, her body is finding it hard to adjust and cope with especially with her demanding physical schedule.

Well, that's possible, but I also think she needs more physical improvement (muscular), on the other hand I think people like Kim, Serena or Venus used to do too much of that earlier and that is why they have those recurring problems. Never easy to find the right balance. That's precisely my point about the lack of real scientific approach about the global issue of training.

martinailuv
Sep 29th, 2005, 02:45 PM
the answer is that the season is too long. :(

AsGoodAsNew
Sep 29th, 2005, 03:02 PM
And how about more softer court tournaments? The Aussie Open has plagued many players - feet sticking to the rubber in the heat. And the US Hard courts. I'm not calling for the grassing over of everything (though it would be exciting and return tennis to lawn tennis!). But softer courts in some way may help.

Sharapower
Sep 29th, 2005, 03:09 PM
the answer is that the season is too long. :(

That is not really an issue, the players choose their own schedule, whatever the pressure of the WTA to make them play such or such tournament.

Sharapower
Sep 29th, 2005, 03:13 PM
And how about more softer court tournaments? The Aussie Open has plagued many players - feet sticking to the rubber in the heat. And the US Hard courts. I'm not calling for the grassing over of everything (though it would be exciting and return tennis to lawn tennis!). But softer courts in some way may help.

That is a very good point, diminishing the number of decoturf events in favor of other surfaces could be a good decision to dicrease the risk of injuries in the lower part of the body.

And it's totally illogical that there is not even one Tier I on Grass and that the grass season lasts barely one month.

Club_Fed
Sep 29th, 2005, 03:22 PM
it is combination of many factors, playing too many tournaments---traveling all over the world, fatigue and jetlag, not having a super strict nutrition program, not warming up enough, trying to play or train through minor injuries which just leads to other injuries.

Carmen Mairena
Sep 29th, 2005, 03:25 PM
I agree that the schedule is too long, but it's always the player's decision on how many tournaments to play every year. So if there are 40+ weeks of tennis season and you're a workaholic player you'll probably play 30+ events which is crazy (mostly for top players that get deeper in the draws). If you're a smart player you'll make a schedule that fills your needs. But even playing few tournaments there are also injuries (see Venus i.e.). So this might not be a good argument in the end.

There has to be a way to slow down the game, maybe changing courts, rackets or balls. And of course trying to play a smarter tennis, not basing it always on smacking the ball again and again. There's something called net play, maybe people forgot this? :tape:

It's obvious that tennis promises aren't well teached at all. They may triumph one day but what's the trade for it? A destroyed body at age 30? Please! :rolleyes: Maybe not making clones could help. But then you have Martina Hingis who retired too early. So you never know.

It's really a difficult problem to solve, but maybe some looking back could help a bit. Just my 2 cents! ;)

tennisbum79
Sep 29th, 2005, 03:30 PM
Maybe palyers taking shortcut to what they should be doing as athletes to keep their body in shape.

Not enough streching before and after training sessions or lack of other injury prevention exercises
Maybe poor eating habit.
Coaches not well rounded enough to advise players on good habits
Some court types are just more likely to cause injury to some players
Of course this does not explain all of the injuries.
Length of season as already mentioned could be another factor