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View Full Version : UPDATE: New Orleans Hospitals, Shelters To Be Evacuated, Water Still Rising


Mother_Marjorie
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:00 AM
New Orleans Mayor has called for the evacuation of New Orleans Shelters (Superdome included, 30,000 people) hospitals (patients and staff) as waters continue to rise in the Central Business District and French Quarter due to a two-block long levy break at the 17th Street Canal. Water from Lake Ponchartrain has been pouring into the city since early this morning. There is current 4+ feet of water surrounding the Superdome, which was not flooding directly after being hit.

Because basic services such as utilities, water, gas and food are depleting, the decision was made because conditions in New Orleans aren't compatible with "sustaining life".

Tulane University Hospital and Charity (University Hospital) have begun airlifting its most critical patients since losing backup generator power earlier today. The water around those structures began rising at the rate of an inch every five minutes earlier today according the Tulane's VP of Patient Services. Its since slowed to an inch per hour, however, the hospitals back-up generators were overwhelmed by the rising waters. Charity Hospital was forced to move its services to the central most portion of the hospital because Katrina blew out windows, etc.

Once the entire New Orleans population is evacuated, the mobilized National Guard and Disaster Services can begin repairs of the levy system and begin the clean-up process, first collecting the hundreds of dead bodies floating on water.

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:11 AM
oh my god thats horrible, this is just getting worse and a worse :sad: :sad:

BigB08822
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:12 AM
I've been wondering how that would happen. I can't imagine how they can take out 30,000 people from the Superdome! I guess by the boatload since there is water?

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:30 AM
I've been wondering how that would happen. I can't imagine how they can take out 30,000 people from the Superdome! I guess by the boatload since there is water?

Doubt it.. Not enough water for bigger boats..

But they have no choice.. If, as they say, the most of city is located below sea level, and pumps can not be operated because there is no power, the water is not going anywhere.. Meaning that in such a warm weather the sanitary and epidemic situation will deteriorate very quickly..

Just unbelievable.. Incredible irresponsibility. That Mayor should be prosecuted for this..

BigB08822
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:44 AM
Well I meant in small boatloads. LIke small boats that can take maybe 5-10 people at a time. If they can get a bunch of those rounded up they could get them out in a day or two? Lets say a small boat that carries 5 people at a time. We have 20 of these boats. That would be 100 people a trip and would take, what, 300 tripls total if 30,000 people are there. Its a lot but can be done.

Sharapova's_Boy
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:58 AM
:sad:

jbone_0307
Aug 31st, 2005, 05:06 AM
Doubt it.. Not enough water for bigger boats..

But they have no choice.. If, as they say, the most of city is located below sea level, and pumps can not be operated because there is no power, the water is not going anywhere.. Meaning that in such a warm weather the sanitary and epidemic situation will deteriorate very quickly..

Just unbelievable.. Incredible irresponsibility. That Mayor should be prosecuted for this..



Listen, Shut the fuck up! You know absolutely nothing about the situation and I do, coming from Louisiana. We don't need you negative ass comments and attitudes toward the situation. So just shut the fuck up, its happened and nobody can do anything about it.

Infiniti2001
Aug 31st, 2005, 05:21 AM
Doubt it.. Not enough water for bigger boats..

But they have no choice.. If, as they say, the most of city is located below sea level, and pumps can not be operated because there is no power, the water is not going anywhere.. Meaning that in such a warm weather the sanitary and epidemic situation will deteriorate very quickly..

Just unbelievable.. Incredible irresponsibility. That Mayor should be prosecuted for this..

Blaming the mayor for the wrath of Mother Nature?? :rolleyes: Tu bahut bak bak karti hai :fiery:

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 05:35 AM
Blaming the mayor for the wrath of Mother Nature?? :rolleyes: Tu bahut bak bak karti hai :fiery:

No, blaming the mayor for being totally unprepared. He had everything to be prepared. People, money, time. And he has what he has - a monumental failure.

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 31st, 2005, 07:34 AM
No, blaming the mayor for being totally unprepared. He had everything to be prepared. People, money, time. And he has what he has - a monumental failure.

Now I know where the word "fucktard" originated. :rolleyes:

BigB08822
Aug 31st, 2005, 07:51 AM
LOL! I am glad people learned the use of my word, fucktard.

Jarrett
Aug 31st, 2005, 07:13 PM
Brian, that is not your word. I have heard it before. Not directed at me though. :lol:

Everyone is going to be moved from the Saddledome to Astrodome in Houston. :)

Maryamator
Aug 31st, 2005, 07:36 PM
its getting worse and worse :sad:

Barrie_Dude
Aug 31st, 2005, 07:43 PM
New Orleans Mayor has called for the evacuation of New Orleans Shelters (Superdome included, 30,000 people) hospitals (patients and staff) as waters continue to rise in the Central Business District and French Quarter due to a two-block long levy break at the 17th Street Canal. Water from Lake Ponchartrain has been pouring into the city since early this morning. There is current 4+ feet of water surrounding the Superdome, which was not flooding directly after being hit.

Because basic services such as utilities, water, gas and food are depleting, the decision was made because conditions in New Orleans aren't compatible with "sustaining life".

Tulane University Hospital and Charity (University Hospital) have begun airlifting its most critical patients since losing backup generator power earlier today. The water around those structures began rising at the rate of an inch every five minutes earlier today according the Tulane's VP of Patient Services. Its since slowed to an inch per hour, however, the hospitals back-up generators were overwhelmed by the rising waters. Charity Hospital was forced to move its services to the central most portion of the hospital because Katrina blew out windows, etc.

Once the entire New Orleans population is evacuated, the mobilized National Guard and Disaster Services can begin repairs of the levy system and begin the clean-up process, first collecting the hundreds of dead bodies floating on water.God! Please spare New Orleans! Please!