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View Full Version : What I noticed about Fake Ass "BUD COLLINS"


Foot_Fault
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:19 AM
During the French Open, he ripped the Sisters and especially Venus, calling them Done, Tired, Over, Mistique Gone...Everything in the Book.

Venus has won Wimbledon and he hasn't wrote ONE commentary as he is so quick to do so.

WHY? LOL

selking
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:20 AM
please venus just lose first round of the us so these threads will go away

JenFan75
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:25 AM
Do you really need an answer? -_-

Jakeev
Jul 8th, 2005, 05:22 AM
During the French Open, he ripped the Sisters and especially Venus, calling them Done, Tired, Over, Mistique Gone...Everything in the Book.

Venus has won Wimbledon and he hasn't wrote ONE commentary as he is so quick to do so.

WHY? LOL

He was definitely sucking up to Venus in the off-court interview after the awards ceremony.

AjdeNate!
Jul 8th, 2005, 05:25 AM
If someone says something = hater.
If someone says nothing = hater.

I'm just confused.

StarDuvallGrant
Jul 8th, 2005, 05:28 AM
I've never understand the wanting of validation from writers or commentators for your faves.

Foot_Fault
Jul 8th, 2005, 07:30 AM
I've never understand the wanting of validation from writers or commentators for your faves.

It's not the Validation Factor what I think is... If you're gonna be quick to Pawn, Be quick to Praise.

icequeen
Jul 8th, 2005, 11:12 AM
It's not the Validation Factor what I think is... If you're gonna be quick to Pawn, Be quick to Praise.

Exactly.

tennnisfannn
Jul 8th, 2005, 12:28 PM
Boy you should have heard him tearing into the sisters at the AO, he was convinced the russians (esp) maria was gonna win the title! It was most satisfying to see serena win the title!

Foot_Fault
Jul 8th, 2005, 02:33 PM
Boy you should have heard him tearing into the sisters at the AO, he was convinced the russians (esp) maria was gonna win the title! It was most satisfying to see serena win the title!
I know, they have very little to write about now. Now it's all about how bad Serena looked trying to outshine Venus' accomplishment. Oh the nerve. But Bud Collins...............FAKE! Have no commentary on the sisters unless it's tearing them down.

Someone in the thread talked about being a HATER? LOL

alexusjonesfan
Jul 8th, 2005, 03:00 PM
say what you will about Bud, but his grammar remains intact throughout :tape:

but seriously, you should be thanking him. His disparaging remarks made Serena and Venus both win slams this year :p

partbrit
Jul 8th, 2005, 03:15 PM
A couple of years ago, Collins made a veiled reference to Sharapova, Hantuchova, and Dokic as "players who can't play." This was right about the time that Hantuchova and Dokic were establishing themselves as top ten players. Then Maria went on to win Wimbledon, and I kind of wanted him to eat his plaid pants.

Actually, I was quite sympathetic to Collins' basic complaint--that becoming a cover girl has become part of women's tennis--but to say that Sharapova et al "can't play" was outrageous.

Veenut
Jul 8th, 2005, 03:15 PM
I don't believe Bud is a fake at all. In previous years when all the others were constantly writing negative things he was the one along with Billie Jean who defended them the most. The main reason why I still respect Bud is due to his unflappable response to Richard's fixing of matches. He was the lone voice at the time stating that he doesn't believe it for one second. He also stated that Richard loved his children too much to even consider such a thing as to favour one over the other. I guess he might have his "moments" but he was one of the few who defended them constantly against the mob. That is one of the reasons they don't mind talking to Bud. Anyway Serena did put a stop to that and now Venus.

Maybe Bud was acting out of fraustration at AO. Cut him some slack because I've also read surprising posts from even fans of the sisters. Currently just revel in their confusion as they ponder what to say now. IMO Bud is still one of the few objective ones left. Don't be too harsh on him.

Volcana
Jul 8th, 2005, 03:41 PM
During the French Open, he ripped the Sisters and especially Venus, calling them Done, Tired, Over, Mistique Gone...Everything in the Book.

Venus has won Wimbledon and he hasn't wrote ONE commentary as he is so quick to do so.

WHY? LOLI do wonder about that, if it's true. Tracy Austin was quick to write that she hadn't given Venus ANY chance of winning, and that she was surprised and impressed with how well Venus played. So it's not like 'I was wrong' is all that tough to write.

I just googled "Bud Collins" "Venus Williams" "Wimbledon" "2005" "finals" and "by Bud Collins" "Venus Williams" "Wimbledon" "2005" "finals", checking the first three pages of links. I also checked the bostonglobe website. As near as I can find, he really HASN'T written anything about the women's final. Further, he had been doing radio interviews on NPR about Wimbledon, but after the women's final, NPR had Jon Wertheim on.

Bud's not my favorite, but this makes me a little ashamed of him. See viggen's post below.

alexusjonesfan
Jul 8th, 2005, 03:43 PM
btw, this is what he had to say about the final:

Honored to be gazing at a classic

By Bud Collins, Globe Staff | July 3, 2005

LONDON -- Any visitor to Florence has to see Botticelli's glorious 15th-century painting, ''The Birth of Venus," at the Uffizi Gallery.

If Sandro Botticelli had been among the screaming 13,802 onlookers squeezed into the madhouse that Centre Court became yesterday, he would have been inspired to run for his brushes, oils, and canvas to create ''The Rebirth of Venus."

How he would have loved the lithe and long-limbed Venus of our day -- the one whose birth certificate identifies her as Venus Ebone Starr Williams. The ''I just keep fighting" Venus, who spent the afternoon coming back, and even reprieved herself from tennis doom -- match point.

Botticelli's ''Venus" is a classic, and so is this creation of Oracene Price and Richard Williams. Botticelli's rises from a seashell. The American Venus rose from a patch of scuffed-up grass in Southwest London to breathe again as a great champion.

Four years had passed since her last major triumph, the US Open, which came soon after her second Wimbledon. But frequently it looked as though this Wimbledon title was beyond her because the magnificent opposition -- Lindsay Davenport -- was as iron-willed, as big a hitter. Together they assembled an epic that lasted 2 hours 45 minutes (the house record for a women's final), and had so many twists and turns that it might have been modeled on the street plan of downtown Boston.

When it was over, 4-6, 7-6 (7-4), 9-7, they hugged at the net like a couple of prizefighters, knowing they had given everything, sensing their championship battle was one for the ages.

Venus practically lifted off into orbit, giddily excited and pleased with a title no one outside the Williams family thought feasible. Up and down she leaped, almost unable to stop. Ding-dong the title drought was broken.

The two ladies in white were red-hot blasters. Witnesses, driven to joy and frenzy by the conflict, would treasure what they'd seen. During a chill, glum afternoon their go-for-broke shotmaking illuminated the gray sky.

How deep was the adrenaline flow? A few fathoms at least. How could they run and gun so superbly for so long? It was punch and counterpunch over and over. Digging each other's drives out of the scarred turf, they sent balls back with interest, loaded with mustard and angling out of reach -- unless they returned again. This was a pageant of anything-you-can-do-I-can-do-better, anything-you-can-hit-I-can-hit-harder, any-weakness-you-can-find-I'll-probe-for-one-weaker.

Carrying the planetary No. 1 rating and the 1999 title, Davenport came so close to winning that she had a fingernail on the championship platter, could feel and taste the prize. Not for 70 years had any woman found a way past a match point to seize the title. Williams did it, joining the illustrious eight-time champ, Helen Wills Moody, who wriggled out of one to beat archrival Helen Jacobs in 1935, a Californian showdown. Little sister Serena had done it a couple of times in winning majors (the Australian of 2003 and this year) but not in a final.


A half-hour before closing time, Venus was on the verge of being bounced, double faulting to 4-5, 30-40. ''I told myself to get the first serve in, keep my head down, stay down, and keep fighting," she said. Then she crashed a backhand winner.

Davenport sighed, ''The point went by so fast. A good serve. First serve, and one shot. I think a winner. It wasn't like I had an easy shot or an opportunity to build a point. It was wham-bam. It was over.

''I had opportunities, but I don't feel like hanging my head."

She shouldn't. It wasn't like her blowing a healthy lead in the Australian Open final to Serena. ''Venus just took it away from me every time I got up," Davenport said. ''But I played great. Just didn't get the 1 or 2 points that I needed to win.

''I'm disappointed, but it was fun to play, exhilarating. I felt like, 'God, this is a good match.' "

A superlative match, in which Williams's edge was her superior speed, keeping so many points from dying on her side.

And yet it looked dramatically over early, in two sets, little over an hour. A knockdown victim, there was Williams on her back, in the dust, tumbling while vainly pursuing a backhand drive. That shot broke her, and Davenport was to serve for the match at 6-5.

Down and out? ''I was sometimes out and sometimes in, all along," said Williams. However, she got up, pumped up, and flashed through 7 straight points to 3-0 in the tiebreaker -- six of them winners -- foghorning ''Ma-uhhh!" with every stroke.

''I didn't want to be finished in an hour," she said with a grin.

Removing two champions, the defender Maria Sharapova and Davenport, a rare accomplishment, Venus closed the gap in the longest current rivalry to 14-13, Davenport. She said she never lost faith in herself and ''my destiny -- to win big titles. I wasn't supposed to win this, but . . ."

She hoped somebody made money on her at the 12-1 starting price.

With this, her fifth major, and least expected, Venus supplanted Sharapova as the longest shot ever to go all the way at the Big W. Ranked No. 16, she was seeded 14th; Sharapova was seeded 13th last year.

''I'd like to win without a heart attack," she said. ''This was cardiac arrest. But, if that's what it takes . . ."

She had what it takes, all right, climbing out of that dreaded crevasse -- match point -- and making the summit. Pity that Botticelli wasn't around to paint ''The Rebirth of Venus," but she worked up a powerful, unforgettable self-portrait.




http://www.boston.com/sports/other_sports/tennis/articles/2005/07/03/honored_to_begazing_at_a_classic/?page=1

that's grade A hate fooor suure

Lachrymarum
Jul 8th, 2005, 03:51 PM
Bud Collins is just an old perv in my opinion.
:hehehe:

Volcana
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:00 PM
viggen - Thanx. I feel better about Bud now.

spartanfan
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:05 PM
That was actually a nice article. My heart started racing again, reliving that match. I think Bud gets frustrated sometimes with the sisters for what he sees as the two BEST women in tennis, approaching it as a part time proposition, like fashion and acting, when they belong in the same fold, if not beyond, the likes of King, Graf, Martina and the other "greats".

StarDuvallGrant
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:08 PM
Well look at that, Bud and his praise. Looks quick enough to me.

alexusjonesfan
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:15 PM
viggen - Thanx. I feel better about Bud now.

no prob. To be honest, I think Venus is his favourite player. I remember his clips for NBC a couple years ago when she first came on tour and how genuinely excited he was about how she took the game to a new level. His comments in the past few years I think have been more disappointment than anything else about how Venus wasn't always making tennis her no.1 priority. And in Australia, he was the only journo with the guts to ask Serena the question that was on everyone's minds.

Veenut
Jul 8th, 2005, 04:30 PM
btw, this is what he had to say about the final:

Honored to be gazing at a classic

By Bud Collins, Globe Staff | July 3, 2005

LONDON -- Any visitor to Florence has to see Botticelli's glorious 15th-century painting, ''The Birth of Venus," at the Uffizi Gallery.

If Sandro Botticelli had been among the screaming 13,802 onlookers squeezed into the madhouse that Centre Court became yesterday, he would have been inspired to run for his brushes, oils, and canvas to create ''The Rebirth of Venus."

How he would have loved the lithe and long-limbed Venus of our day -- the one whose birth certificate identifies her as Venus Ebone Starr Williams. The ''I just keep fighting" Venus, who spent the afternoon coming back, and even reprieved herself from tennis doom -- match point.

Botticelli's ''Venus" is a classic, and so is this creation of Oracene Price and Richard Williams. Botticelli's rises from a seashell. The American Venus rose from a patch of scuffed-up grass in Southwest London to breathe again as a great champion.

Four years had passed since her last major triumph, the US Open, which came soon after her second Wimbledon. But frequently it looked as though this Wimbledon title was beyond her because the magnificent opposition -- Lindsay Davenport -- was as iron-willed, as big a hitter. Together they assembled an epic that lasted 2 hours 45 minutes (the house record for a women's final), and had so many twists and turns that it might have been modeled on the street plan of downtown Boston.

When it was over, 4-6, 7-6 (7-4), 9-7, they hugged at the net like a couple of prizefighters, knowing they had given everything, sensing their championship battle was one for the ages.

Venus practically lifted off into orbit, giddily excited and pleased with a title no one outside the Williams family thought feasible. Up and down she leaped, almost unable to stop. Ding-dong the title drought was broken.

The two ladies in white were red-hot blasters. Witnesses, driven to joy and frenzy by the conflict, would treasure what they'd seen. During a chill, glum afternoon their go-for-broke shotmaking illuminated the gray sky.

How deep was the adrenaline flow? A few fathoms at least. How could they run and gun so superbly for so long? It was punch and counterpunch over and over. Digging each other's drives out of the scarred turf, they sent balls back with interest, loaded with mustard and angling out of reach -- unless they returned again. This was a pageant of anything-you-can-do-I-can-do-better, anything-you-can-hit-I-can-hit-harder, any-weakness-you-can-find-I'll-probe-for-one-weaker.

Carrying the planetary No. 1 rating and the 1999 title, Davenport came so close to winning that she had a fingernail on the championship platter, could feel and taste the prize. Not for 70 years had any woman found a way past a match point to seize the title. Williams did it, joining the illustrious eight-time champ, Helen Wills Moody, who wriggled out of one to beat archrival Helen Jacobs in 1935, a Californian showdown. Little sister Serena had done it a couple of times in winning majors (the Australian of 2003 and this year) but not in a final.


A half-hour before closing time, Venus was on the verge of being bounced, double faulting to 4-5, 30-40. ''I told myself to get the first serve in, keep my head down, stay down, and keep fighting," she said. Then she crashed a backhand winner.

Davenport sighed, ''The point went by so fast. A good serve. First serve, and one shot. I think a winner. It wasn't like I had an easy shot or an opportunity to build a point. It was wham-bam. It was over.

''I had opportunities, but I don't feel like hanging my head."

She shouldn't. It wasn't like her blowing a healthy lead in the Australian Open final to Serena. ''Venus just took it away from me every time I got up," Davenport said. ''But I played great. Just didn't get the 1 or 2 points that I needed to win.

''I'm disappointed, but it was fun to play, exhilarating. I felt like, 'God, this is a good match.' "

A superlative match, in which Williams's edge was her superior speed, keeping so many points from dying on her side.

And yet it looked dramatically over early, in two sets, little over an hour. A knockdown victim, there was Williams on her back, in the dust, tumbling while vainly pursuing a backhand drive. That shot broke her, and Davenport was to serve for the match at 6-5.

Down and out? ''I was sometimes out and sometimes in, all along," said Williams. However, she got up, pumped up, and flashed through 7 straight points to 3-0 in the tiebreaker -- six of them winners -- foghorning ''Ma-uhhh!" with every stroke.

''I didn't want to be finished in an hour," she said with a grin.

Removing two champions, the defender Maria Sharapova and Davenport, a rare accomplishment, Venus closed the gap in the longest current rivalry to 14-13, Davenport. She said she never lost faith in herself and ''my destiny -- to win big titles. I wasn't supposed to win this, but . . ."

She hoped somebody made money on her at the 12-1 starting price.

With this, her fifth major, and least expected, Venus supplanted Sharapova as the longest shot ever to go all the way at the Big W. Ranked No. 16, she was seeded 14th; Sharapova was seeded 13th last year.

''I'd like to win without a heart attack," she said. ''This was cardiac arrest. But, if that's what it takes . . ."

She had what it takes, all right, climbing out of that dreaded crevasse -- match point -- and making the summit. Pity that Botticelli wasn't around to paint ''The Rebirth of Venus," but she worked up a powerful, unforgettable self-portrait.




http://www.boston.com/sports/other_sports/tennis/articles/2005/07/03/honored_to_begazing_at_a_classic/?page=1

that's grade A hate fooor suure

Thanks for providing the article. This just confirms my opinion about Bud. I find him to be a fantastic and objective writer. I wouldn't lump him with the likes of Tacey, Pam and Co. :tape:

I've watched and heard him with my own eyes and ears refute some of the garbage the Chris Evret was spewing when they were working together on NBC. I still maintain my respect for him. We are not perfect and therefore subject err at times. :cool:

treufreund
Jul 8th, 2005, 05:25 PM
a certain number of posters on here really seem to be obsessed with policing what the whole world think of the Williams sisters. Venus played inspired and awesome at Wimbledon and even many of her fans were surprised given her recent erratic results. Let's celebrate her victory! It's called thought police when you try to control everyone else's opinions.

DA FOREHAND
Jul 8th, 2005, 05:28 PM
no prob. To be honest, I think Venus is his favourite player. I remember his clips for NBC a couple years ago when she first came on tour and how genuinely excited he was about how she took the game to a new level. His comments in the past few years I think have been more disappointment than anything else about how Venus wasn't always making tennis her no.1 priority. And in Australia, he was the only journo with the guts to ask Serena the question that was on everyone's minds.


I've met Bud Collins and he is the definition of "A gentleman and a scholar".

I hope those who trashed him in this thread w/rething thier position after reading his Ladies final wrapup.

SelesFan70
Jul 8th, 2005, 05:33 PM
I miss him in the booth!