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icequeen
Jul 5th, 2005, 06:13 PM
Venus: A Parting Thought
8:40 P.M. BST (3:20 P.M. EDT)

Okay, itís finally over. Another Wimbledon is now history. And while I may feel differently about this after I decompress, the main revelation for me this fortnight was how deeply I had underestimated Venus Williams. There were half-a-dozen noteworthy elements in her epochal win over Lindsay Davenport on Saturday, but the most striking one to me was the way she demolished the theory that a combination of "technical glitches" in her game (that somewhat unreliable forehand, the sometimes shaky serve) and Big Match pressure would be her undoing should she transcend expectations and get into a shootout with a top player.

So much for second-guessers and naysayers, myself included.

Venus showed on Saturday that she can win any tournament she enters, at any time of, if not exactly her choosing, her making. And thatís just plain extraordinary. Glitches? Serve issues? Forget it. When Venus brings her entire emotional being to the fray, as she did here, the earth trembles with every step she takes.

When I observed in the post-final presser that she seemed far more animated and open than in previous interview encounters, she said it was because she had felt so much negativity in the press room earlier, so much lack of belief in her mission. Turns out her remoteness was justified.

At start of the French Open, I cited what might have been former U.S. President Teddy Rooseveltís most inspiring words Ė words that ring as true now as they did then, despite the sentimental, vulgar tone that must give the refined sensibilities of todayís garden variety intellectual the hee-bee jee-bees. Theyíve come to be known as simply, The Man in the Arena.

It is not the critic who counts, not the one who points out how the strong man stumbled or how the doer of deeds might have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred with sweat and dust and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who, if he wins, knows the triumph of high achievement; and who, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

Sir Stefwhit
Jul 5th, 2005, 06:20 PM
Which critic (commentator / editor) wrote that? Whoever it was it was nice, and I'm glad to here someone admit their simplistic narrow way of previously veiwing Venus was wrong.

V-MAC
Jul 5th, 2005, 06:20 PM
who wrote that article?

TomTennis
Jul 5th, 2005, 06:48 PM
i think he wrote that....

tennisbum79
Jul 5th, 2005, 07:22 PM
I think he did write it. Although the last paragraph may be a quote from President Teddy Roosevelt, I think.

Very nice prose. Venus fans are also literary, contrary to popular beliefs.
And he is not the only ones.

Dana Marcy
Jul 5th, 2005, 10:54 PM
Venus: A Parting Thought
8:40 P.M. BST (3:20 P.M. EDT)

So much for second-guessers and naysayers, myself included.

Another naysayer here. :shrug:

Venus showed on Saturday that she can win any tournament she enters, at any time of, if not exactly her choosing, her making. And thatís just plain extraordinary.

Sorry but this is a little too "convenient". If this was true, why did it take 4 years to win Slam #5?

When I observed in the post-final presser that she seemed far more animated and open than in previous interview encounters, she said it was because she had felt so much negativity in the press room earlier, so much lack of belief in her mission. Turns out her remoteness was justified.

Well, what does Venus expect? She was on remarkable roll between 2000-2002. With success comes more expectations. She was far more animated probably because she was RELIEVED to end the Slam drought.

I LOVE Venus but I know now NOT to get too excited. Can she return to her old form? YES! Does a Wimbledon victory mean a rebirth? Don't know yet.

Haute
Jul 6th, 2005, 12:51 AM
Zina Garrison had said that Venus just needed one big win to reawaken her and bring her game together again. This may at last be that big win. If she follows this up with another US Open, then we'll know for sure that Wimbledon was the turning point. ;)

Diesel
Jul 6th, 2005, 01:30 AM
The credit for this goes to: Peter Bodo's blog at tennis.com

http://www.wtaworld.com/showthread.php?t=177190

Denise4925
Jul 6th, 2005, 01:45 AM
It is not the critic who counts, not the one who points out how the strong man stumbled or how the doer of deeds might have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred with sweat and dust and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who, if he wins, knows the triumph of high achievement; and who, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.
This rings so true of Venus quote, when she said, "You can't win if you're sitting in the stands", or something to that effect.