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View Full Version : Where is Natalee Holloway?


VeNuS#1LoVa
Jun 28th, 2005, 02:13 AM
:sad: :sad: :sad: :sad:

Your thoughts...

SelesFan70
Jun 28th, 2005, 02:51 AM
By this time, I suspect she's fish and shark feces. :(

Lita's Ex
Jun 28th, 2005, 11:29 AM
:sad: :sad: :sad: :sad:

Your thoughts...

I don't know. There's obviously some foul play involved (unless she just doesn't want to be found). If Holloway wasn't white this story wouldn't have made the news.

CooCooCachoo
Jun 28th, 2005, 12:23 PM
It's a sad story :sad: :(

Helen Lawson
Jun 28th, 2005, 02:06 PM
Sadly, I think she's probably dead. I don't know whether she got dumped in the ocean and they'll never be a body, or she's in a ditch somewhere rotting. Just awful!

I don't think it's because she's white that this got all the press, she's American and her parents made a huge stink and she was 18. Aruba can kiss goodbye any American tourism business they had going.

Nicjac
Jun 28th, 2005, 02:39 PM
I agree.

And if they ever find a body it's going to be the next Scott Peterson case - concerning publicity.

Dana Marcy
Jun 28th, 2005, 10:12 PM
I don't think it's because she's white that this got all the press, she's American and her parents made a huge stink and she was 18. Aruba can kiss goodbye any American tourism business they had going.

I disagree. This happens way too often. Some white young person goes missing and the whole country knows about it. If Natalie was black, Hispanic or Asian there would NOT be the same amount of media coverage e.g. Katie Couric, etc wouldn't be devoting so much time to it.

DolceVuitton
Jun 29th, 2005, 06:08 AM
I'm pissed wtf is going on down there that bastard they just let go knows something they are making so many mistakes I say until they actually fucking make an effort into solving this case ban Aruba from your travels.

apoet29
Jun 29th, 2005, 12:44 PM
Guys, does the race issue really matter right now in the grand scheme of things? A young girl is missing. God knows what happened to her and everyone keeps making it a racial issue.

I think this girl is dead. That teenager she was with probably tried to have sex with her and things got out of control. I think his family and friends knew it and tried to cover for him.

Helen Lawson
Jun 29th, 2005, 12:46 PM
The Enquirer, for what it's worth, is saying they drugged her with a date rape drug and she od'ed on the beach so they tossed her in the ocean in a row boat.

SelesFan70
Jun 29th, 2005, 12:55 PM
The Enquirer, for what it's worth, is saying they drugged her with a date rape drug and she od'ed on the beach so they tossed her in the ocean in a row boat.

Helen, you should buy some land on the island and glam it up as only you can. You could open a store and sell Joan's fabulous jewelry, and Sally could open a restaurant or 4 (to feed the children of course).

Helen Lawson
Jun 29th, 2005, 01:07 PM
Helen, you should buy some land on the island and glam it up as only you can. You could open a store and sell Joan's fabulous jewelry, and Sally could open a restaurant or 4 (to feed the children of course).

I'm sure land's cheap there now that American tourism will come to screaching halt!
I could open like a gambling resort with drag queens doing all the shows, which will be scenes from my movies and songs I sang in them of course. Joan will do anything for a buck, so she's on board. Have you seen some of the shit they peddle as jewelry to tourists down there? Joan could hike her QVC prices up 2-3 times and sell out down there. Sally could open up like a chain of restaurants and say that a portion of all sales go to starving children--like 1 cent!!

VeeDaQueen
Jun 29th, 2005, 03:41 PM
in the ocean

VeNuS#1LoVa
Jun 30th, 2005, 03:09 AM
Someone told me she is dead or got sold into slavery. She said that there is still some sort of slavery going on down there...?

sixfeetfree
Jun 30th, 2005, 10:25 AM
I disagree. This happens way too often. Some white young person goes missing and the whole country knows about it. If Natalie was black, Hispanic or Asian there would NOT be the same amount of media coverage e.g. Katie Couric, etc wouldn't be devoting so much time to it.

So you contend that the media is racist or just Katie Couric for devoting coverage to a young "white" person gone missing in paradise? Would you prefer it if the media covered this story less? The fact is, it's an international story, thus the intense coverage. And if the young lady were black, hispanic or asian, the coverage would be the same and I would feel just as bad for her family as I do the Holloway's. This has nothing to do with race, or being racist.

Racism does still exist, unfortunately, but to apply racism to every single event that involves anyone but a white child and comparing whatever attention comes along, has become tedious and obtuse.

Erika_Angel
Jun 30th, 2005, 12:25 PM
It is usually the circumstances rather than the person that draws the media attention. The fact that this was on the small island of Aruba and that she was graduating and that she just dissapeared and didnt turn up for the flight home was why it is so big.
I remember back a few years to that poor asian girl who went missing. That was a pretty big story, girl returns from halloween party wearing a bunny suit .... dropped off by friends late at night out front of her apartment .... then just disappears. That was a relatively big news story and that girl was asian.
So yeh, it is the circumstances rather than the person in most cases.

AkademiQ
Jun 30th, 2005, 01:07 PM
Where is Natalee and so many other missing for that matter who haven't this same coverage? We may never know or it will be too late by the time we do.

AkademiQ
Jun 30th, 2005, 01:11 PM
I disagree. This happens way too often. Some white young person goes missing and the whole country knows about it. If Natalie was black, Hispanic or Asian there would NOT be the same amount of media coverage e.g. Katie Couric, etc wouldn't be devoting so much time to it.

Agree on your point, Lacy Peterson received national daily attention and a Hispanic woman in the same area, 9 months pregnant with a 4 year old went missing, found dead, son is still missing, you don't remember her name, story. That's how things are. The girl next door with the beautiful smile didn't work for her.

SelesFan70
Jun 30th, 2005, 02:03 PM
Where is Natalee and so many other missing for that matter who haven't this same coverage? We may never know or it will be too late by the time we do.

Well, FoxNews and especially Greta Van Susteren are making a CAREER out of this case! :eek:

Dana Marcy
Jun 30th, 2005, 10:05 PM
So you contend that the media is racist or just Katie Couric for devoting coverage to a young "white" person gone missing in paradise? Would you prefer it if the media covered this story less? The fact is, it's an international story, thus the intense coverage. And if the young lady were black, hispanic or asian, the coverage would be the same and I would feel just as bad for her family as I do the Holloway's. This has nothing to do with race, or being racist.

Racism does still exist, unfortunately, but to apply racism to every single event that involves anyone but a white child and comparing whatever attention comes along, has become tedious and obtuse.

If I were to completely follow what the mainstream media covers, then I would get the impression that all missing kids are white.

Here's an example of the white bias I made reference to:

http://wwwimage.cbsnews.com/images/2002/06/20/image512854l.jpg

(CBS) CBSNews.com's David Hancock examines the widely divergent media coverage of the kidnapping of Elizabeth Smart and the abduction of Alexis Patterson, a 7-year-old black girl from Milwaukee.

In Milwaukee, callers to a popular African-American radio station have the same question. Why is the media giving so much attention to a kidnapped white girl in Utah, when Milwaukee has an equally horrible situation involving a missing black girl?

"On the radio talk shows, people are saying 'Who is this white girl getting all this coverage,?'" said Beverly Williams, a Milwaukee NAACP leader involved in the effort to find Alexis Patterson. "The national media has been heavily criticized. People are saying the media is somewhat racist and one-sided."

Alexis' disappearance on May 3 raised questions about what exactly makes a story enticing to the national media. Is the disappearance of a middle-class white girl more significant than the kidnapping of a black girl from a poor neighborhood? Williams, who has taken on the task of focusing media on Alexis Patterson's case, said it has been a difficult experience.

"It has been extremely frustrating trying to get national attention. For the last two to three weeks, I have a notebook full of numbers, people who I have called," says Williams. "People say, 'I'll make sure our editor gets this.' And then nothing happens."

"Both children are helpless," said Williams. "All missing children are important."

Alexis disappeared about a block from her home while walking to school in the central, mostly black part of Milwaukee. Some children report having seen her on the school playground, but Milwaukee police have said they believe she disappeared before reaching school.

In the days just after her disappearance, there was a lot of community involvement in searching for her, and media attention was strong. Local press interest is still strong, but the case has largely been a non-starter with the national media.

That isn't the case with Elizabeth Smart, who was reportedly abducted from her family's million-dollar home in Salt Lake City on June 5. National and international media attention on the case has mushroomed since Elizabeth's disappearance was reported.

The circumstances of Elizabeth's apparent abduction were disturbing and dramatic. She was reportedly taken from the bedroom of her home in the dead of night by a well-dressed, soft-spoken man who brandished a small gun.

But Alexis' fate was also a parents' worst nightmare: An innocent little girl apparently kidnapped while walking to school.

While race and class undoubtedly play a role in media coverage of such cases, other factors also contribute to the scope and intensity of the coverage.

Sympathy for the family, and a feeling that the parents were blameless in the child's disappearance is a key ingredient for media attention to a story, says Gayle McBride, a missing children's liaison in Phoenix, Ariz.

There is no evidence to suggest that either set of parents played any role in the disappearance of their children, and Elizabeth's Smart's parents have emerged as innocent victims in media accounts.

That hasn't necessarily been the case in Milwaukee, where some news accounts have reported that Alexis Patterson's stepfather has a criminal record that includes serving as the getaway driver in a bank robbery that resulted in the killing of a police officer.

"In my experience, the media tends to be attracted to cases that indicate a potential stranger abduction type situation," said McBride, with the Criminal Investigations Research Unit of the Arizona Department of Public Safety.

"It's going to pique people's interest. Someone coming to your home and abducting your kid while you're sleeping. That could happen to any of us," said McBride. She notes that the public is less involved in the case if they feel there was some "lapse" in the parent's care of the child.

"I haven't seen a problem connected to race," said McBride. "In Arizona, we have huge Hispanic population, and we have had Hispanic kids go missing and the media goes all out."

Bob Steele, a journalism ethics expert with the Poynter Institute, a journalism training organization in St. Petersburg, Fla., says a variety of factors determine which stories the media covers. In an article posted Thursday at the Poynter Web site, Steele cites several factors that determine the publicity that a missing person case might get in the media:


<LI>Whether it's a slow or busy news day
<LI>Whether media outlets are competing with each other to break new elements of the case
<LI>The extent of cooperation of the police department
<LI>The aggressiveness of the parents in giving interviews, providing photos, working with media deadlines
<LI>Whether there are unusual elements to the case

Steele concludes that race and class are unavoidable factors in the journalism decision.

"A look at the demographics of American news organizations tells us that the majority of journalists are white. And, while socio-economic statistics are harder to come by, it's safe to say that the majority of journalists are at least middle class," he said in his article. "Compare those factors -- race and class -- to the communities the journalists cover and you will find a disconnect in many cases."

One thing is certain. The media can be a powerful tool in finding missing children.

"The media can play a huge role in locating children," said McBride. Arizona and many other states have non-profit groups that work with families to help them deal with the media during the chaotic days after a child's disappearance.

"The family really isn't in the appropriate state of mind to be giving interviews. They may say things that police might not want regarding the investigation," McBride said. "Let's face it, they're emotionally attached to the situation."

Beverly Williams of the Milwaukee NAACP said she's learning everyday about how the media works. And in recent days, the case has finally gotten attention from national news organizations like CBS, CNN and the Washington Post. But Williams she said she is troubled by a feeling that there isn't the same interest in a missing black girl from a poor neighborhood.

"There seems to be something going on. Be it bias, racial preference. The information is not getting out to the appropriate people," she said. "I don't know who is in charge of getting national attention to a story. Maybe Elizabeth Smart's family had a good PR department, I don't know."

©MMII, CBS Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Dana Marcy
Jun 30th, 2005, 10:55 PM
Here's another one:

Posted 6/15/2005 10:39 PM Updated 6/16/2005 6:42 AM

Spotlight skips cases of missing minorities
By Mark Memmott, USA TODAY
Tamika Huston's family reported her missing a year ago this week.

Tamika Huston has not been seen since June 2004. She disappeared from the Spartanburg, S.C., area.


When police in Spartanburg, S.C., began investigating the 24-year-old woman's disappearance, her loved ones swung into action. They distributed fliers, held news conferences and set up a Web site. Huston's story became a cause célèbre in the local media. (Related story: Aruban police search home of Dutch teen)

Huston lived alone and obviously hadn't been home for days, if not a week or two. Her dog, Macy, had given birth to puppies.

Rebkah Howard, Huston's aunt and a public relations professional in Miami, tried to get the national media interested in the case. "I spent three weeks calling the cable networks, calling newspapers — even yours," Howard said this week.

Not much happened.

Last August, Fox News Channel's On the Record with Greta Van Susteren briefly noted Huston's disappearance. Fox network's America's Most Wanted did a story about the case in March (it will be repeated this Saturday). National Public Radio did a report last month that, like this story, focused on the lack of interest in Huston's case.

Now, the disappearance of Alabama high school student Natalee Holloway, 18, in Aruba is getting lots of airtime on the cable news networks and morning news shows. Those networks, which drive such stories, are being asked a tough question: Do they care only about missing white women?

Holloway, like "runaway bride" Jennifer Wilbanks, murder victims Laci Peterson and Lori Hacking, kidnap victim Elizabeth Smart and several other girls and women whose stories got significant airtime in recent years, is white.

Tamika Huston is black.

Cable news executives say they don't pick stories based on the race of the victims. "The stories that 'go national' all have a twist or an emotional aspect to them that make them interesting," said Bill Shine, senior vice president of programming at Fox News.

"When the Aruba story broke, I didn't know if she (Holloway) was white," said Mark Effron, vice president of news/daytime programming at MSNBC.

He said he saw a story about "a parent's worst nightmare."

'Victims of a certain type'

Others say race has to be at least a subconscious factor:

• "Something is at work here, at a conscious or at least subconscious level, that leads them to choose victims of a certain type" to report about, said Eugene Robinson, syndicated columnist and associate editor at The Washington Post, who recently wrote about the issue.

• "Sometimes we become advocates for their families," said Philip Lerman, co-executive producer of America's Most Wanted and a former editor at USA TODAY. "It's stunning sometimes how hard it is to get the national media interested when it's a minority."

Why would national media ignore minorities? Among the most important reasons is a lack of diversity in newsrooms, say Robinson, Lerman and Keith Woods, dean of faculty at the Poynter Institute, a school for journalists.

"I'm not complaining about the story out of Aruba. I'm complaining about the stories that don't get told" because many reporters, editors and news producers identify more with people like them, who are white, Woods said.

The American Society of Newspaper Editors estimates 13% of journalists at newspapers are minorities (including Hispanics). In TV newsrooms, minorities make up about 22% of the workforce, according to the Radio-Television News Directors Association. About 32% of the U.S. population is non-white or Hispanic.

Woods and others say the media mislead the public about "typical" victims. FBI statistics show that men are slightly more likely than women to be reported as missing, and that blacks make up a disproportionately large segment of the victims. As of May 1, there were 25,389 men in the FBI's database of active missing persons cases, and 22,200 cases of women. Blacks accounted for 13,860 cases, vs. 29,383 whites.

The media spotlight can distort news in other ways, too. Other international destinations are more dangerous than Aruba. The State Department warned in April that 30 U.S. citizens had recently been kidnapped or murdered in Mexico.

Media influence

Media attention can affect how local authorities handle a case.

Detective Dwayne Baird, spokesman for the Salt Lake City police, has been through two rounds with the national media. Local teenager Elizabeth Smart, missing since November 2001, was found alive in March 2003. Last year, Lori Hacking, 27, was murdered by her husband. Both stories brought hundreds of journalists to the city.

Did the attention spur local police to request help from the FBI?

"Probably," Baird said. "We typically would ask for help from the FBI if they have resources that we don't have access to. But national attention can drive that issue. You can't stand before the public on a national story and say, 'We've got three guys dedicated to this, and sooner or later, we'll figure it out.' "

The FBI does not offer to get involved in missing persons probes because they're getting national attention, said spokesman Joe Parris, a supervisory special agent. The bureau "will get involved only if we have original jurisdiction or if we're invited in by a state, local or international partner," he said.

Howard conceded it's unlikely her niece is alive. This year, Huston's blood was found in an acquaintance's apartment. No suspect has been charged. National attention might generate clues, however. What Huston's family is asking for, Howard said, is balance.

"If you were dropped on to this planet you'd think there's a strange thing going on, where only young white women are missing," Howard said. "That's not true."

Dana Marcy
Jun 30th, 2005, 10:56 PM
And one more:

http://www.geocities.com/murderedbabies/WhyBlackKids.html