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Doraemon
Apr 30th, 2005, 01:38 PM
As more Australians come to learn and appreciate Aboriginal culture, they want to compenstate Aborigines for what happened in the past.

I'm not sure of the meaning of "As." What word can we replace the "as" with? Can anyone explain how this "as" is used in this particular sentence?

Andy_
Apr 30th, 2005, 01:44 PM
As more Australians come to learn and appreciate Aboriginal culture, they want to compenstate Aborigines for what happened in the past.

I'm not sure of the meaning of "As." What word can we replace the "as" with? Can anyone explain how this "as" is used in this particular sentence?

I think you could substitute it with a:

Since more Australians...

Now that more Australians...

:wavey:

Lord Nelson
Apr 30th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Hey Doremon where are you really from? N. Koeans don't even know what internet is. Are you a S. Korea who happens to be a fan of Kim Yong Il? As for Aboriginal compensation, they can't be compensated forever. After compensation reconcilation should be complete and all communities should move ahead. Australia is a great country so I don't care if British came to colonize the country. But the aborigines should be well treated and aborigines on their part should integrate themselves in Aussie society.

Andy T
Apr 30th, 2005, 03:23 PM
As more Australians come to learn and appreciate Aboriginal culture, they want to compenstate Aborigines for what happened in the past.

I'm not sure of the meaning of "As." What word can we replace the "as" with? Can anyone explain how this "as" is used in this particular sentence?

"as" here is a conjunction which joins the two parts of the sentence. Think of it like this. You have two facts:

Australians come to learn and appreciate Aboriginal culture.

Australians want to compensate aborigines for what happened in the past.

"As" shows that the second fact is linked to the first in terms of time; that is to say that at the same time as they learn more about the culture, they also have a stronger desire to compensate the aborigines for what happened in the past.

"As" is also used to show a relationship of cause and consequence, so the sense of "as" here is both "at the same time that" and "because."

The following sentences use "as" in the same way:
As he played tennis more often, he became faster and stronger.
As you walk around the art gallery, you see many great paintings.

Hope that helps!

Andy Mac
Apr 30th, 2005, 03:43 PM
:confused: