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Albireo
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:00 PM
http://www.wtatour.com/global/pdfs/shared/thewtatour/antidoping/numbers.pdf

Talk amongst yourselves....

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:06 PM
A lot of tests on Russians. :scratch:

syd
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:07 PM
yes, i notice it too, may be they play more tournaments than others !

Spunky83
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:12 PM
LOL@the Gender specification :lol: (blood test)

wow...playing Fed Cup must be tricky

Greenout
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:12 PM
They didn't test LD or Amelie alot.

Justine only played 9 events, and she got tested for 6? :tape:

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:13 PM
yes, i notice it too, may be they play more tournaments than others !
True but still it makes me wonder if the shadows of Soviet Union are still there?

starr
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:13 PM
Three on Venus Williams and 11 on Myskina and Kuznetsova each? 10 on Suarez.

It's out of competition testing that's important though. We don't have any stats on that. If it's steroid use one is trying to control, it's fairly easy to dope and then lay off for competition but still reap the benefits. So players who have a couple of months without playing can evade detection if there is no out of competition testing.

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:15 PM
They didn't test LD or Amelie alot.

Justine only played 9 events, and she got tested for 6? :tape:

Amélie was injured a couple of months after AO 2004 maybe that explains why she was tested only 6 times.
But Justine's testing makes one wonder. :rolleyes:

starr
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:15 PM
Plus... I'm curious. It doesn't say what kind of testing or what players are being tested for.

Like for instance EPO is only going to be caught with a blood draw. But on the other hand there are other substances that will more readily be detected in a urine sample.

Brαm
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:17 PM
Elke Clijsters got tested? :haha:

Who'd expect her to take drugs? :o :o

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:18 PM
Plus... I'm curious. It doesn't say what kind of testing or what players are being tested for.

Like for instance EPO is only going to be caught with a blood draw. But on the other hand there are other substances that will more readily be detected in a urine sample.

EPO doesn't help in tennis unless you're playing a marathon match like they have sometimes in men's tennis. I'm not sure but at the Olympics many athletes got blood tested along with the traditional urine test.

bionic71
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:18 PM
I am unsure of the exact rule..but i think all Quarter Finalists at the majors (singles and doubles) and beyond are tested....all other tests are random.

Ruano Pascual and Suarez were tested 10 times.....due to the fact that they reached the QF or better so many times throughout the year. Martina Navratilova had 4 tests...all because she reached the later stages at the majors in doubles.

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:23 PM
I am unsure of the exact rule..but i think all Quarter Finalists at the majors (singles and doubles) and beyond are tested....all other tests are random.



That is correct.

vutt
Apr 19th, 2005, 02:33 PM
So much about Serena's words about she beeing tested every week :angel:

vogus
Apr 19th, 2005, 04:41 PM
EPO doesn't help in tennis unless you're playing a marathon match like they have sometimes in men's tennis. I'm not sure but at the Olympics many athletes got blood tested along with the traditional urine test.


That's not true, EPO would help a player in any match where endurance becomes a limiting factor in performance, which occurs quite often in women's tennis, although not as often as in men's.

I wonder if the WTA even knows what substances they are testing FOR in the first place. After what has happened in track & field, cycling, and now baseball, it should be obvious to everybody that there is a group of professional "consultants" operating in the shadows of pro sports, whose job it is to design drug programs and help athletes beat the testing. I can't think of any reason why tennis, both mens and womens, wouldn't be prime real estate for these types.

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:12 PM
That's not true, EPO would help a player in any match where endurance becomes a limiting factor in performance, which occurs quite often in women's tennis, although not as often as in men's.


The help it would give to any player would be so minimal since tennis is not endurance sport in the same way as long distance running or cycling is that it wouldn't be worth risking. High hemoglobine doesn't give the same benefit in tennis as in endurance sports.

vogus
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:21 PM
The help it would give to any player would be so minimal since tennis is not endurance sport in the same way as long distance running or cycling is that it wouldn't be worth risking. High hemoglobine doesn't give the same benefit in tennis as in endurance sports.


You must be kidding if you think tennis isn't an endurance sport. Clearly, endurance is often a critical element in determining the outcome of tennis matches. Why wouldn't hemoglobin boosting help a tennis player, if it helps runners or cyclists? There's nothing that backs up your assumption that it wouldn't.

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:33 PM
You must be kidding if you think tennis isn't an endurance sport. Clearly, endurance is often a critical element in determining the outcome of tennis matches. Why wouldn't hemoglobin boosting help a tennis player, if it helps runners or cyclists? There's nothing that backs up your assumption that it wouldn't.

Because long distance running and cycling is continuous and doesn't have the same explosive elements as tennis or running sprints. Also the build up of a lactic acid is different in running/cycling than in sports that allows breaks. This is why the high hemoglobine doesn't have the same effect.
As far as I know Wada doesn't consider tennis as a sport where using EPO would give any significant benefit to the athlete's performance.

vogus
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:46 PM
Because long distance running and cycling is continuous and doesn't have the same explosive elements as tennis or running sprints. Also the build up of a lactic acid is different in running/cycling than in sports that allows breaks. This is why the high hemoglobine doesn't have the same effect.
As far as I know Wada doesn't consider tennis as a sport where using EPO would give any significant benefit to the athlete's performance.


running sprints and tennis are absolutely incomparable for obvious reasons. The fact that there are breaks in tennis doesn't change the critical role of endurance, granted a somewhat different type of endurance than continuous sports, but endurance nonetheless.

lindsayno1
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:51 PM
lindsays a big spokes person for this sorta thing. she is pissed that she doesnt get tested more often!

stenen
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:54 PM
running sprints and tennis are absolutely incomparable for obvious reasons. The fact that there are breaks in tennis doesn't change the critical role of endurance, granted a somewhat different type of endurance than continuous sports, but endurance nonetheless.

Do you have an experience both from playing tennis and doing an endurance sport like running/cycling? I mean not just trying out but competition experience? I have and I can say there's a hell of difference in lactic acid build up which is one the reasons why tennis is not seen as a sport having benefits of using EPO. You have your perception of things and I have mine, fine by me.

vogus
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:39 PM
Do you have an experience both from playing tennis and doing an endurance sport like running/cycling? I mean not just trying out but competition experience? I have and I can say there's a hell of difference in lactic acid build up which is one the reasons why tennis is not seen as a sport having benefits of using EPO. You have your perception of things and I have mine, fine by me.


It depends on what level you play tennis at. Baseline style tennis (which is the style played by virtually all modern professionals) played at a high level is very taxing on the body, a totally different thing metabolically than rec-level tennis where endurance means little because the limiting factor is not endurance but skill - the player can only manage to hit the ball into the court a couple of times before he gets a rest.

FLL
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:00 PM
By looking at that, you see that the the players with the better results can tested more often..

Vivi tested 10 times because of her doubles play as well as Paola.

Sanneriet
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:30 PM
It pales in comparison to the top men (who generally only play singles). Off the top of my head, Roddick, Federer, and Agassi where all tested 18 times or more last year. A few of those tests were blood tests. They should have a uniform system between the two tours. But, that would require some cooperation and a unified governing body:eek:

Greenout
Apr 20th, 2005, 12:38 AM
This tells you alot about the WTA. They only care about the names
that will be in the newspapers; anybody going beyond the QFs. The
WTA just wants to look good.

This doesn't prevent the hundreds of othesr not to do performance
enhancement drugs. It's simply a WTA pr exercise and tells you
exactly where the loop holes are.

Only one test in Asia at Beijing. A country which will host the
Olympics and will to enforce the drug laws to show it's good side
to the world. What about Tokyo, Thailand, Doha, and Dubai? The
cash cow tournaments? Can't do a drug test there and ruin the
money flow coming in right? :tape:

dreamgoddess099
Apr 20th, 2005, 04:17 AM
So much about Serena's words about she beeing tested every week :angel:
Actually Serena was tested at 7 of 12 events, Myskina 7 of about 20, and Kuznetsova 7 of about 20. Although Serena was joking about being tested every week, she does seem to be the only one being tested at most of the events she plays. There were top ranked players who played twice as many events as Serena, but weren't test nearly as much.

tenn_ace
Apr 20th, 2005, 04:21 AM
Daniela tested only twice? Had she bribed someone who makes a decision?