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Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 01:02 AM
English
Scottish
Irish
Canadian
American
Australian (New Zealand) Is there a difference?

Why do British people say..
Maria like "Ma-REE-er"
and
Daughter like "DAW-tuh"?

beauty_is_pink
Apr 19th, 2005, 01:03 AM
English
Scottish
Irish
Canadian
American
Australian (New Zealand) Is there a difference?

Why do British people say..
Maria like "Ma-REE-er"
and
Daughter like "DAW-tuh"?
my name :p

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 01:06 AM
It's a nice one!

Rory81
Apr 19th, 2005, 01:41 AM
English
Scottish, Irish, Canadian, American, Australian (New Zealand) Is there a difference?

Why do British people say..
Maria like "Ma-REE-er"
and
Daughter like "DAW-tuh"?

You forgot South African, and the Caribbean accents.

UDiTY
Apr 19th, 2005, 03:45 AM
English

American

American....is alot!

Southern
Boston
New Yorkers
Minnesotans

who else?:lol:

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:00 AM
You forgot South African, and the Caribbean accents.

Are there a lot of South Africans with English as their primary language?

I though it was primarily Dutch.

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 05:04 AM
You forgot South African, and the Caribbean accents.

American....is alot!

Southern
Boston
New Yorkers
Minnesotans

who else?:lol:

Thanx for the additions.
Who else? Texans, Californians (valley girls)?

There are even variations in Canada. The Maritimes' English is different too I think. Newfies too eh?

MS
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:28 AM
Don't tell a kiwi that his/her accent sounds like the Aussie one! :p

Maajken
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:40 AM
there's are also new zealand, indian and african accents, there's a difference between all the english accents, you have different irish and scottish accents etc etc. way too many to list them all

Beefy
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:44 AM
Don't tell a kiwi that his/her accent sounds like the Aussie one! :p

Don't tell an Aussie his/hers accent is like a Kiwis!

But even in England, your accent is going to be different to that of someone elses from England

MS
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:30 AM
Don't tell an Aussie his/hers accent is like a Kiwis!


LOL, I have friends in Australia and NZ, that's why I know ;)

I think that in every language happens that there are many different accents everywhere, same with Spanish

fifiricci
Apr 19th, 2005, 08:33 AM
There's also about 42 versions of the Welsh accent. With all due respect, this is a pretty pointless thread.

What is the thread starter's point or where are we going with this?

xr6turbo
Apr 19th, 2005, 08:35 AM
Australian (New Zealand) Is there a difference?


Ahhh yes.. just a little ;)

ceiling_fan
Apr 19th, 2005, 08:45 AM
English
Scottish
Irish
Canadian
American
Australian (New Zealand) Is there a difference?

Why do British people say..
Maria like "Ma-REE-er"
and
Daughter like "DAW-tuh"?
Aussie and NewZealand accents... they are QUITE different!
i know by experience cuz i lived inNZ for several years and now i live in Aus

Brαm
Apr 19th, 2005, 01:27 PM
Why do British people say "Daughter" like "DAW-tuh"?Because that's how you pronounce that word :shrug:

V-MAC
Apr 19th, 2005, 03:15 PM
yeah this thread is pretty pointless and silly :o

Orangina
Apr 19th, 2005, 03:52 PM
all i know is that i love scotish accent

bis2806
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:43 PM
Why do British people say..
Maria like "Ma-REE-er"
and
Daughter like "DAW-tuh"?

Personally, I find it annoying when English people pronounce things that way - it's like they can't keep it simple. Haha. I'm used to it anywho coz my school is so britisheey....

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:53 PM
Because that's how you pronounce that word :shrug:

They add an 'r' to words that end in a like "Maria" where there is no 'r' and they don't pronounce the 'r' in words where there is one like daughter!

It's peculiar.

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:53 PM
You're just classifiying all english people...I personally dont really know what youre on about when you say Ma-REE-er...and DAW-ter? Compared to north american people who say Dauder. Firstly, I think this really is a pointless thread with not much substance to it at all. And there are a million different accents throughout the british isles and i am sure only a small percentage only say what you described :rolleyes: :retard:

Brαm
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:55 PM
they don't pronounce the 'r' in words where there is one like daughter!
Do you pronounce the "k" in knowledge? :)

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:55 PM
They add an 'r' to words that end in a like "Maria" where there is no 'r' and they don't pronounce the 'r' in words where there is one like daughter!


we do? :confused:

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:56 PM
Nathan, where have you got all these ideas from? I would really love to know

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:57 PM
What is the thread starter's point or where are we going with this?

It's quite simple...
It's for people who want to talk about the different english accents.
Ex. discuss peculariaties of different English accents.
Ex. talk about which ones you like or don't like.
It doesn't matter, whatever people want.

yeah this thread is pretty pointless and silly :o

If you don't like it, go post elsewhere. :rolleyes:

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:57 PM
There's also about 42 versions of the Welsh accent. With all due respect, this is a pretty pointless thread.

What is the thread starter's point or where are we going with this?

me feelings too fifi

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:58 PM
Do you pronounce the "k" in knowledge? :)

Does anyone?

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:58 PM
It's quite simple...
It's for people who want to talk about the different english accents.
Ex. discuss peculariaties of different English accents.
Ex. talk about which ones you like or don't like.
It doesn't matter, whatever people want.



If you don't like it, go post elsewhere. :rolleyes:
Yes, but youre saying things which arent true...Ma-REE-er...ive never heard anyone say that

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 06:59 PM
we do? :confused:

People from England do. Maybe not everyone. Or maybe only the British people in the media in Canada... Although I doubt it.

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:01 PM
You're just classifiying all english people...I personally dont really know what youre on about when you say Ma-REE-er...and DAW-ter? Compared to north american people who say Dauder. Firstly, I think this really is a pointless thread with not much substance to it at all. And there are a million different accents throughout the british isles and i am sure only a small percentage only say what you described :rolleyes: :retard:

If only threads with a lot of substance were posted, then there would hardly be any threads at all... :rolleyes:

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:01 PM
People from England do. Maybe not everyone. Or maybe only the British people in the media in Canada... Although I doubt it.

Well i have lived in england for sixteen years, go to school with a girl called maria...i swear i have never heard anyone say "hello, ma REE er..."it's simple a straight forward Maria..

Brαm
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:03 PM
Does anyone?
My point is: you don't pronounce every single letter in an English word. When you look up daughter in a pronunciation dictionary like Longman's you will find :
http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/d.gifhttp://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/long_aw.gifhttp://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/t.gifhttp://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/schwa.gif

d-aw-t-schwa

'daw-tuh

So that's the standard pronunciation!

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:03 PM
Well, Cliff Drysdale adds an r to it. I know he's an Aussie but English people do it too. Another example is Linda. On the Simpsons, they had Paul McCartney guest starring and he says 'Linder'.

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:05 PM
You're just classifiying all english people...I personally dont really know what youre on about when you say Ma-REE-er...and DAW-ter? Compared to north american people who say Dauder. Firstly, I think this really is a pointless thread with not much substance to it at all. And there are a million different accents throughout the british isles and i am sure only a small percentage only say what you described :rolleyes: :retard:

If it's really pointless and retarded you can say so and stop posting in it. God, it's not meant to have people arguing about it.

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:05 PM
Oh god you are basing this on the simpsons,,,god please dont! The simpsons always use the same annoying english accent, always a dodgy london cockney a la oliver twist, or a posh one a la queen....:retard:

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:06 PM
My point is: you don't pronounce every single letter in an English word. When you look up daughter in a pronunciation dictionary like Longman's you will find :
http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/d.gifhttp://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/long_aw.gifhttp://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/t.gifhttp://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/images/pron/schwa.gif

d-aw-t-schwa

'daw-tuh

So that's the standard pronunciation!

I realize this. But in Canadian English dictionaries and American English dictionaries it's different.

Brαm
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:06 PM
Well, Cliff Drysdale adds an r to it. I know he's an Aussie but English people do it too. Another example is Linda. On the Simpsons, they had Paul McCartney guest starring and he says 'Linder'.
The last sound in Linda is a schwa if that's what you're talking about... Definitely not an r.

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:06 PM
If it's really pointless and retarded you can say so and stop posting in it. God, it's not meant to have people arguing about it.
I just want to know where youre getting these silly theories from - which i have, the simpsons, which says it all

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:07 PM
Oh god you are basing this on the simpsons,,,god please dont! The simpsons always use the same annoying english accent, always a dodgy london cockney a la oliver twist, or a posh one a la queen....:retard:

I said Paul McCartney guest starred. It was his actual voice.

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:08 PM
Woohoo you gave me bad rep, was waiting for it :d

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:10 PM
I just want to know where youre getting these silly theories from - which i have, the simpsons, which says it all

Once again, that was just an example. You can say it's based on the simpsons, but it's based on Paul McCartney's actual voice. The weather girl is british on TV, she adds R's to words that end in A.

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:10 PM
Woohoo you gave me bad rep, was waiting for it :d

I don't appreciate you're little :retard: smilies.

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:11 PM
You're probably so used to it that you don't notice.

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:12 PM
Awww I think the :retard: is the best out of all the smilies. And Mccartney is a Liverpudlian, they have weird accents, which are extremely annoying, there i contributed :P

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:14 PM
The last sound in Linda is a schwa if that's what you're talking about... Definitely not an r.

Maybe not in the dictionaries. But when they speak it, they add an R! Wow, k, I'm really tired of trying to explain this to you guys. Maybe you've never heard it, but I have MANY many times.

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:16 PM
Awww I think the :retard: is the best out of all the smilies. And Mccartney is a Liverpudlian, they have weird accents, which are extremely annoying, there i contributed :P

Where is Liverpool? Wales or England? It might be Welsh.

Retard is offensive slang in North America.

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:18 PM
Haha really? It is an offence over here, but most people say it jokingly.

Liverpool is a massive port city on the west coast of ENGLAND. They have really distinct accents and you can tell when someone is a Liverpudlian. Most people find it extremely annoying...and liverpool has really bad crime too...not that it has anything to do with accents or anything

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:19 PM
K, so you say that Liverpudlians have weird accents but you still have never heard them adding r's at the end of words that end in a?

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:20 PM
Ya, a lot of people use offensive terms jokingly...

Captain.Canada
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:24 PM
Anyway, my friends and I have all talked about the adding or r's and ignoring of r's in England and we all agree that it happens and wondered why.

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:32 PM
BBC recently did an accent survey around the country, take a look, i think they have audio stuff somewhere in it too

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:35 PM
Go here.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/voices/

listen to the video clip on the "how peculiah" square, scousers are liverpudlians

:Rawwb:
Apr 19th, 2005, 07:35 PM
Its the bright blue one

Brαm
Apr 20th, 2005, 09:52 AM
Anyway, my friends and I have all talked about the adding or r's and ignoring of r's in England and we all agree that it happens and wondered why.
"ignoring" r's is common in Britain, adding r's really is not..

Thanks for that link, sharpeirob :)

Ted of Teds Tennis
Apr 20th, 2005, 02:00 PM
Personally, I find it annoying when English people pronounce things that way - it's like they can't keep it simple. Haha. I'm used to it anywho coz my school is so britisheey....
I remember a report on the BBC World Service a few years back about "the two careers". I couldn't figure out what they were talking about, until the reporter mentioned "North Career" and "South Career". :)

alexusjonesfan
Apr 20th, 2005, 02:03 PM
"ignoring" r's is common in Britain, adding r's really is not..

Thanks for that link, sharpeirob :)

adding a false r to a words ending in vowels is a part of RP I think. They do do it, and the difference is obvious when you listen to some of the flatter English accents and compare.

:Rawwb:
Apr 20th, 2005, 04:37 PM
"ignoring" r's is common in Britain, adding r's really is not..

Thanks for that link, sharpeirob :)
No prob

Cassius
Apr 20th, 2005, 05:40 PM
Why do British people say..
Maria like "Ma-REE-er"
and "LIN-der"
Because that's how those words are actually pronouced (despite some protestations to the contrary - prob. by disillusioned southerners - ha ha)
Try saying "Ma-REE-ah", or "LIN-dah".
Go on try, try it.

Sounds fucking stupid doesn't it?
That's why it not pronouced like that.

Liverpool is a massive port city on the west coast of ENGLAND. They have really distinct accents and you can tell when someone is a Liverpudlian. Most people find it extremely annoying...and liverpool has really bad crime too...not that it has anything to do with accents or anything
Hey, the Scouse accent isn't that bad thank you *pointing to "location"*, except a really thick Scouse accent spoken by a girl - that really IS bad.
PS, according to stats for that past 5 years, Liverpool's crime rate is not as bad as:
1. London
2. Glasgow
3. Manchester
4. Birmingham
Liverpool is 5th. Don't let reputations fool you.
Just thought I'd clear that up.
Thank you.

:Rawwb:
Apr 20th, 2005, 05:57 PM
Thanks Cassius, sorry if i offended you...but, no way can i judge as i come from the shithole/dump that is Hull...thankgod i am not originally from here, man i think this city comes top of the list, but the lists are always bad,bad,bad....the hull accent is horrible too...at times worse then Liverpool's

Cassius
Apr 20th, 2005, 06:02 PM
It's alright sharpeirob.
I'm used to it by now, but I always correct people about it anyway.
Hull? Last year Hull was voted the UK's (or maybe just England's) worst town/city.
It could be worse though, you could be living in downtown Beirut.

:Rawwb:
Apr 20th, 2005, 06:25 PM
Exactly Cassius, put for the record, i like about 10 miles outside of hull...thankgod

Jakeev
Apr 21st, 2005, 11:22 AM
American....is alot!

Southern
Boston
New Yorkers
Minnesotans

who else?:lol:

Lol not to mention the thousand of variations of those accents.......

bis2806
May 5th, 2005, 01:40 PM
There's this girl in my school that goes like "Ma-reeee-ah" when she calls 'Maria'. The poster of this thread is trying to convey the fact that English people tend to pronounce things, such as the example i've just mentioned, differently. They prounounce the 'r' bit like 'reeeee'. Same with 'daughter'. They go like 'Dawww-tah' - seriously you would notice it.