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View Full Version : What do you have to do to become a chair umpire??


rhz
Apr 15th, 2005, 08:36 AM
A professional I mean... It would be cool i guess to travel on tour with the players.

anyone has info??

Jeff
Apr 15th, 2005, 08:44 AM
A professional I mean... It would be cool i guess to travel on tour with the players.

anyone has info??

You have to contact your local USTA and inform them that you would like to be a tennis official. It's a long road. You start off working at junior tournaments, and then if you are well known/liked, you can move up. This is what I was told when I asked about this to a linesman lady at the Pacific Life Open this year. I emailed my local USTA and they just keep responding to me that they have forwarded my message to someone else. So yeah, starting to see the difficulties :p Would be fun, though.

LiliaLee-Frazier
Apr 15th, 2005, 08:51 AM
Have a cool temper, binoculars as eyeballs and sleep with Billie Jean King...well...ateast on the WTA side... :lol: :lol: j/k
JEFF has the good info above...i also think that would be a hot job to have... Imagine goingfrom poland, france, to the UK in a matter of weeks..all would be good untill you have to call a capriati match.... :lol: Still Love ya jen! ;) :kiss:

Swider
Apr 15th, 2005, 10:28 AM
Still you have to work for few years before you can go on tour, especially as a chair umpire. Nevertheless, it's fun to be in the center of events.

But remember about one very very little disadvantage - noone likes the umpires :] (unless you're Mohammed Lahyani)

Jakeev
Apr 15th, 2005, 10:32 AM
You have to contact your local USTA and inform them that you would like to be a tennis official. It's a long road. You start off working at junior tournaments, and then if you are well known/liked, you can move up. This is what I was told when I asked about this to a linesman lady at the Pacific Life Open this year. I emailed my local USTA and they just keep responding to me that they have forwarded my message to someone else. So yeah, starting to see the difficulties :p Would be fun, though.

And I take it the higher the tournament the more money involved right?

TheBoiledEgg
Apr 15th, 2005, 11:23 AM
This is just a brief outling......

they all start off doing LINES at first
you got to start of by asking your National Association, attending seminars

doing local events, juniors etc
moving up levels on ITF's......... umpiring matches on ITF's/juniors
then onto WTA events, outside court lines, onto Centre Courts
then umpiring on outside courts....... to Centre Courts

could take around 2 yrs minimum to move to slam level linespersons

but to move onto umpiring on main courts at Slams...... probably around 10 yrs (some are fast tracked depending on their competence)

Umpires have badges of what level they are at and until then you can only do matches depending on what level you are at.

ozfan44
Apr 15th, 2005, 11:42 AM
This is just a brief outling......

they all start off doing LINES at first
you got to start of by asking your National Association, attending seminars

doing local events, juniors etc
moving up levels on ITF's......... umpiring matches on ITF's/juniors
then onto WTA events, outside court lines, onto Centre Courts
then umpiring on outside courts....... to Centre Courts

could take around 2 yrs minimum to move to slam level linespersons

but to move onto umpiring on main courts at Slams...... probably around 10 yrs (some are fast tracked depending on their competence)

Umpires have badges of what level they are at and until then you can only do matches depending on what level you are at.

in australia u have to do courses and continuing training before you become linesman and keep doing it other than that eggy hit the nail on the head as i have just started thinking about doing the same thing

although i don't think i would get too far as if someone argued with me i would probably snap and tell them to shut the f**k up and get on with it! :haha:

stenen
Apr 15th, 2005, 12:39 PM
A professional I mean... It would be cool i guess to travel on tour with the players.


It's a long process and not necessarily worth the trouble because you'll travelling on tour but not with the players. If you're interested in travel on tour and get closer to players there a lot better choices to look into. But of course everything is relative and people prefer different things.

Alvarillo
Apr 15th, 2005, 12:47 PM
i also want to become a chair umpire, here in Spain i had to attend a course and i passed it, i've worked in some under-12 tournaments here and last week i was a lineman in ATP Valencia, my first big experience on tour, was amazing and funny :)

rhz
Apr 16th, 2005, 02:35 AM
more info???

Justeenium
Apr 16th, 2005, 02:59 AM
I know someone who is an ATP level 3 line judge. He enjoys it but he says he is losing money on it. They pay for the hotel and maybe one meal a day, but they do not pay for your transportation costs. (I think they might if your a level 1 judge though).

He also told me that umpiring is completely different from line judging. He said you can be a chair ump without being a line judge, you just have to go to "chair school" as he called it.

KoOlMaNsEaN
Apr 16th, 2005, 04:21 AM
ive also been interested in the chair umps...

Justeenium
Apr 16th, 2005, 04:25 AM
I'd like to be a chair ump too, but I would have to focus more. When you watch a tennis match, do you pay attention for EVERY point?

tenn_ace
Apr 16th, 2005, 04:34 AM
You are NOT going to make any decent money doing it unless you are a gold badge. (if we are talking about chair umpiring). to get to the gold badge, you have to get to go to the white badge school, officiate and hope that certain people see how well you are doing. Then there is a bronze badge school. Both schools are more difficult to get in than Harvard, because there are no specific/clear requirements, exams. To get excepted to a white badge school, you have to work a lot doing lines (both WTA and ATP) first and chairing juniors. If you are doing well (and young), you might get a chance to go further (i.e. badge schools). If you attended a bronze badge school and doing very well, the rest should be a lil easier, since you'll get to work at a Pro level and ITF will pay attention to you. Bronze badge should be enough to take you to a GS (at least, the first couple of rounds)...