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View Full Version : "Our Ginny" The Virginia Wade Corner.


Rollo
Apr 2nd, 2002, 06:07 AM
Any thoughts, memories, pics, etc. of Virginia Wade? Virginia was my very first favorite, holding a special place in my heart. Yes she could be a bitch at times, but she was a royal bitch if you know what i mean, dishing out catty quotes with her oh so upper class British accent. She acted the way she did because she had a total passion and fiery beauty unmatched.

Virginia was an enigma if ever there was one. From posts and bits I 've read she is or was said to be a closeted lesbian, but she attracted a huge group of male admirers in her time and also dated a number of men. For some reason too she had an unusual number of obsessive followers.

The contrasts and mystery extended to her game and personality. She was a minister's daughter but was notorious for arguing calls and using unladylike language. She could be fire or ice. Charming or a hellion. Friendly (Francoise Durr was one of her good friends) or aloof and distant.

Wade had a fascination for cats, often comparing herself to a lioness. The year she won Wimbledon she changed her conservative ponytail hairstyle to a lion-like mane. I'll always think of Virginia when I see a graceful cat with eyes alblaze!
I love my "Ginny" Wade:hearts:

Rollo
Apr 2nd, 2002, 06:10 AM
Here's an article from about 1975 that captures some of her enigmatic personality.


Virginia Wade not 'with it,' but still winning i tennis
By Bill Nichols

Some days Virginia Wade is the finest woman tennis player in the world. Other days she's really with it.

But you'd better believe it -- Virginia has come a long way baby. She is one of the premier performers on the Virginia Slims circuit and can beat most players even when she's not really with it.

Ginny Wade is a semi-finalist in the $75,000 Virginia Slims tussle this week at the Coliseum after eliminating Laura DuPont, Bridget Cuypers and Mima Jausovec. But she's bored.

"I'm not really with it," she smiled. "I hope I can get with it before the week is out."

"Temporarily, I've lost my fascination for hitting a tennis ball."

Miss Wade, England's gift to the tennis world, looks at the game of backhands forehands, lobs and volleys, differently than most. She has said she would rather play beautiful tennis than win.

"In fact, if I'm really playing well, really hitting the ball, I can lose track of the purpose behind it all," she added.

She considers herself as being in a slump, even though she has reached the semis in the tour's first four tournaments this winter.

"One goes through these patches once awhile," she moaned. "You get stale. I need a vacation. I'm going to take three weeks off and go home and practice."

Virginia is a regular visitor to the area having been here several times with the British Wightman Cup team. And she has never failed to attract attention.

She has won here when maybe she should have lost. And, occasionally, she lost when she had no business going so, especially when she wasn't with it.

The daughter of an Episcopal archdeacon, she was a math major. She is a girl of many moods. These moods reflect on the tennis court.

When Ginny is mad and still in control of her wits she can make short work of any opponent, but sometimes her wits are not with her. But when you see her play, you're sure she's an art major -- or English, but never mathematics. She just isn't that precise.

Virginia has had an outstanding career, which includes capturing the United States Open in 1968 but you always get the feeling she should win every tournament.

She is powerful and possessor of all the shots. "I wish I had just some of her strokes," sighed Miss Cuypers. "I definitely need a little win. That would help no end."

If it isn't this week, she will win one day soon. It would do wonders for her disposition. And she may once again become fascinated with hitting a tennis ball.

Linnie
Apr 2nd, 2002, 01:10 PM
Rollo, I was a huge fan of Ginny's. I have some photos and slides of her at the U.S. Open from the early 80's (gotta sort them out and scan them). This may take a while, but I promise they'll be posted! :)

Evonne Goolagong
Apr 2nd, 2002, 06:35 PM
Rollo, these photos are for you sweetheart! :kiss:

http://stormrocks.homestead.com/files/vw1.jpg

http://stormrocks.homestead.com/files/vw3.jpg

http://stormrocks.homestead.com/files/vw2.jpg

http://stormrocks.homestead.com/files/vw4.jpg

http://stormrocks.homestead.com/files/vw5.jpg

Rollo
Apr 2nd, 2002, 07:31 PM
Now I'm in heaven Evonne. Thank you so much:) In
particular I love the one where she's volleying with her fingers stretched out on the other hand. A classic pose!

I remember a Teddy Tinling story about how women's tennis players are noticibly larger on their dominant side(guess Seles doesn't have that problem ;) Well, Teddy said that in Virginia's case it was so extreme he had to sew extra padding on her left shoulder to even things out! Her booming serve must have put some muscles on her.

tennisvideos
Apr 3rd, 2002, 02:30 AM
Hi Rollo & Evonne

Love those pics! I have a couple of stunning pics of Ginny which I have scanned but when I go to post them it says the File size is too big. Do you have any tips so I can post them here?

I met Ginny at Wimbledon a couple of years back in the Players lounge. I was actually filming a little bit (although it wasn't allowed) and when I was scanning the area there she was with her back to me. She turned and smiled. I then asked if she could say something to all her fans at the Australian Tennis Museum on the video camera so she did a few takes but kept saying the wrong things and then she just burst into hysterics - laughing uncontrollably! She was very sweet indeed - in that moment anyway.

Frankie Durr has told me that although Ginny was one of her favourite doubles partners, she never ever got close to Ginny. Ginny just wouldn't let any of the players get close to her at all.

She was such a beautiful stylist. I have about 20 of her matches on tape and just love watching her play - very elegant. A few of the matches I have include her 77 SF win over Evert and a WTT win over Evert as well - both of them were stunning matches. Ginny actually beat Chris from the baseline in that Wimbledon Semi. The match featured some of the most wonderful rallies you would ever wish to see, and both girls were absolutely exhausted at various stages of the match, such was the ferocity of play.

Mark43
Apr 3rd, 2002, 02:57 AM
I always admired Virginia Wade and the manner in which she played. When she won Wimbledon in '77 I was shocked and very happy for her. I always wanted to see the semi win over Evert but it seems NBC only showed tennis during the weekend, and wasn't the women's final on Friday also???

I saw Wade play in person during the summer of '78 at the Oakland Coluseum. She was a member of the Golden Gators team and she faced Chris Evert in a singles set. I think Wade won, not sure. After the set my sister and I ran down to get Virginia's autograph. We asked and she replied, very sternly, "No, I can't do those". I was only 11, so I went through a period of hating the old crank. Then after all those losses to Austin, Jaeger and the kids I wanted Our Ginny to win again. Didn't Wade stick around until about '84 or so?

tennisvideos
Apr 3rd, 2002, 07:03 AM
Hi Mark

I have a WTT win by Wade over Evert, although I think it might be 77, so it might be a different one to the one you were at.

I envy you seeing all those oldies playing live, whilst I have only seen them on tape or in Veterans events. I would have preferred to see them live at their peak.

Rollo
Apr 3rd, 2002, 02:02 PM
Is the WTT set you have a 6-0 whitewash of evert by Virginia Tennisvideos? If it is I promise you it's the 1977 WTT championship finals, where Wade shocked Chris in a pivotal match. Ginny must have relished that one:)

Do you have the Goolagong-Wade Wimbledon quarter of 75
Tennisvideos? I hear that was a classic. Evonne always gave Wade major problems.

Ginny made Francoise sound like a good friend in her autobiography, but Durr's version sounds more like the truth. There's a great section in a 1973 book about Wade, calling her a
"mystery woman". Be it a pysch job(which a lot of women did) or just part of her personality, it created an aura of intrigue around the Brit.

Sorry she turned you down Mark. LOL@ the "old crank" bit:) I must admit she wasn't so friendly when I got her autograph in 1983 at Wightman Cup-Martina was nicer and Pam Shriver was a riot, joking with me because I had snuck past security!

Mark43
Apr 3rd, 2002, 07:25 PM
Hey guys,

I think in '77 Wade was playing for the New York Apples? WTT was so much fun. I know it took away all the top players from the French Open and clay court season, but it made tennis accessible to US fans in certain areas on a weekly basis. Plus all those great match ups, Goolagong/Evert/Wade/King/Navratilova/Barker etc etc. I mean there have been a few years here and there where the top players only met once or twice during an entire year (1988/90/91/92 come to mind) so it was great to have these ladies facing off on a weekly basis.

I know WTT still exists but I think back in the 70's it was a really big deal. Strange how things change so much. I know everyone who played back then thinks "I could have won Roland Garros if I just didn't play WTT!".

Well, maybe not everyone.

tennisvideos
Apr 4th, 2002, 02:16 AM
Hi Rollo & Mark

The two WTT matches with Wade v Evert had each of them winning a match 7-5. Both great matches, but not the match you were discussing.

Yes, I do have the Wimbledon 75 QF with Goolagong beating Wade in an absolute thriller 57 63 97. Certainly a great match.

I know what you mean about WTT being huge in the 70s Mark. It certainly damaged the European circuit and French Open as you mentioned.

louloubelle
May 1st, 2002, 01:52 PM
Just read in an Old Chris Evert auto that said that Wade had fan that was obsessed with her. The fan was actually a gynaecologist who was so taken with Wade that he sent her a message saying that if she ever needed any medical help he would give it to her for free!!!! (Didn't seem that the guy was joking)
I wonder if Wade ever met him, to see if it was worth taking up the examination.

Always laughed at Wade coming down to Aust in 1972 and beating Evonne. Viriginia said something like that she didn't come down to win the Aust Open, she only came this far to beat Evonne in her own country because she was sick of people doing the same to her, in her own country.

Rollo
May 1st, 2002, 04:25 PM
LOL at the gyno story:)
Ginny's win at the 72 Aussie was a rare one over Evonne, who always gave her fits. I have to get that 75 Wimbledon video!

Double Fault
May 1st, 2002, 08:36 PM
What I admired most about Ginny (and there was a lot to admire) was her longevity. She kept on coming to Wimbledon right into the 80's. I recall a very nice performance on Center Court where she upset a player that I did not expect her to trouble. Zina Garrison was in tears when they shook hands. How old was she when she finally retired? I'm sure she thought about retiring many times, but a win over such players as Zina kept her going I guess.

I have her (auto)biography. I really should get around to reading it. :) I think it only goes up to 1977. Maybe Virginia should think about writing her memoirs. It would make a great read.

Virginia Wade
May 20th, 2002, 02:33 AM
WOW! A whole thread dedicated to me ;) lol All those pictures of me in fine form! Happy memories.

Seriously - I love Ginny, she's great, really great. :)
Although I'm too young to have watched her play at the time, I've seen many tapes of her and Anne Jones (I'm a huge Anne Jones fan). And her book Courting Triumph is really good Double Fault you are right, we need a more up to date version! :) I was lucky enough to meet Virginia at Wimbledon and she was really nice - I also saw her play with Pam Shriver last year in the seniors- talk about the dream team :)

Vanity
May 20th, 2002, 04:58 AM
Virginia Wade has a really sexy voice. :p

Virginia Wade
May 20th, 2002, 03:03 PM
Why thank you Vanity;):p

On a serious note, I also think Virginia is one of the few commentators that actually talk sense. Her knowledge of the game is fantastic, and she says it how she sees.

Rollo
Dec 13th, 2002, 11:10 AM
Virginia-perhaps 1975 or 6.

http://www.tennis-betting-online.com/images/02fig12.gif

tennisvideos
Dec 16th, 2002, 11:32 AM
Stunning pic of Ginny. Thanks Rollo :) Looks like a shot from WTT.

Yes, she was beautiful, regal and so refined. And her voice is something to behold. I love listening to her commentate... she's a classy woman.

I recall watching her play in Australia in the very early 80s and she was down here with her (I assumed from their constant glances and smiles etc) partner at the time, another stunning dark haired woman.

Plus she played doubles with Frankie Durr for a number of years so I love her even more! Unfortunately I only have them as a pair on video losing together in the Wimbledon Final of 1970 to King & Casals... Ginny also played with Margaret Court in the late 60s and early 70s ... they made a great attacking pair. I have the final 10 minutes of them when they beat King & Casals in a thriller in the 73 USO Final 36 63 75. Great footage and drama. And I also have a few clips when Durr & Hard beat them in the 69 USO Final after being down something like 0-6, 0-3 or something...

She is also a very funny woman... not only did I see her in great humour when I met her, but also I have a video of her playing the legends tour and she gets a fit of the giggles during play and couldn't stop for about 5 minutes
Gotta love her!

ColinB
Dec 17th, 2002, 01:52 AM
Hi - I met Virginia at this years French Open when I worked for the BBC website there. It was approcahing the 25th anniversary of her Wimbledon win, so they asked me to interview her... Link below...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/wimbledon/2036120.stm

I must admit, I found her bery charming and full of lots of tit bits of information which I gladly took in as I love hearing stories about tennis in the 1970's when they were forming the Tour. She was very candid and honest about herself and a lot of the players, so could have wrote a great in-depth feature about her, however the BBC wanted a standard Jubilee feature, so most of my info went to waste...

She talked very candidly about winning Wimbledon and how much of a dream it was for her, but that she knew she was going to win that year around spring time - she just had the feeling... Evonne was out pregnant, Billie-Jean was just coming back, Virginia still had an edge over Martina and she knew she could take out Chrissie at Wimbledon.

She did say that Sue Barker having such a great year in 1977 took the pressure off of her as Barker was in the bottom half of the draw away from Evert, so everyone was expecting her to reach the final. She said that she doesn't remember much from the Evert mathc as she was in 'the zone' and was so concentrated that she wasn't paying attention to anyone of the score... she knew she was going to win and that was just that!!!

When she beat Chrissie, she knew she would win the event as she had played Stove over 3 sets in the last few matches and had dug deep to win each time - so she had done that hard work as she said - she had that mental edge over Betty.

After she won, she said that she couldn't hear a single word of what the Queen said, she asked her to repeat once, but it wouldn't be polite to ask again,. so she just smiled - she didnt care as she was in 7th heaven - she says that whenever she feels a bit sad, she can instantly get out of it by remembering the emotions after the match.

She admitted to me that she was very aloof and kept her distance from the other players... she says she regrets that a little now, as she missed some of the camaradorie, but that she was always told to keep her distance so that she didnt get too close and then lose the menatl edge when playing somone.

She saod that she didnt like Billie-Jean until later in their careers, and that Billie-Jean used to spook her out as she was the leader of the players clique - BJK, Casals, Martina etc, but That Billie-Jean gave her advice later in her career and she appreciated it.

She said that although she played with Court, she was also very aloof and hasnt spoken to her in years... She said that Goolagong was the nicest of the players...

We spoke for about 2 hours, but cant say everything on here, plus cant remember a lot of it now. I was sitting watching the women's quarter's at Roland Garros on Court Suzanne Lenglen and she came to find me to sit with me to watch the matche sin the press box which was nice... Must admit, she kept commenting and half-commentating after each point, which drove some of the other journalists around us nuts!!!

I did like her when we met, which I didn't expect to in advance - simply because of things I had heard when working at the BBC and at Eurosport beforehand. She doesn't get on with the British players like Sue Barker, Jo Durie, Anne Jones, Annabel Croft. She hates Sue Barker as she is now the darling of the BBC Tennis Team and Sue has so much power in that team. Virginia also had a fit 2/3 years ago now when she was dropped from the BBC Commentary of the Wimbledon singles final in favour of Shriver and Navratilova. But at almost 60, she is one of the older brigrade of commentators and the BBC needed a fresher image.

As much as I like her, I am not her biggest fan as a commentator, I find myself constantly screaming at the TV as she makes so many factual errors - according to a few of the other commentators I know, that also drives them nuts...

Apparantly Pam Shriver was pissed off at her at Wimbledon (I think it was last year) when they were teamed togther by the lucky ballot in the senior doubles. Pam reckoned Vriginia was too old to play in the event and had no control anymore.. They lost one match 6-0,6-0 when Pam was also injured, Pam left the court in tears and they had a fight in the locker room - this is all confidential of course... he he

So there you go, what I know about the good and bad sides of our Ginny!!!

Gallofa
Dec 17th, 2002, 02:04 AM
Originally posted by ColinB
Apparantly Pam Shriver was pissed off at her at Wimbledon (I think it was last year) when they were teamed togther by the lucky ballot in the senior doubles. Pam reckoned Vriginia was too old to play in the event and had no control anymore.. They lost one match 6-0,6-0 when Pam was also injured, Pam left the court in tears and they had a fight in the locker room - this is all confidential of course... he he


Yeah, we attended that match, it was truly awful. This year when we saw Pam, Sian asked her why she wasn't in the senior event and she said that last year was truly embarrasing and that she didn't want to go through that again!

Mark43
Dec 17th, 2002, 02:34 AM
Wow...great post ColinB. I loved reading every word. I always loved Virginia's game. I had no idea she was almost 60. We are all getting old!!!!

Sam L
Dec 17th, 2002, 05:28 AM
Originally posted by Rollo
I remember a Teddy Tinling story about how women's tennis players are noticibly larger on their dominant side(guess Seles doesn't have that problem ;)

Ouch and that's true! Sabatini was really bad too. LOL @ Seles, but you know many of the two-handed backhand players aren't really that noticeable anymore, probably cause they're using their left hands for power too :o

BTW this thread is a great read :)

ColinB
Dec 17th, 2002, 10:35 AM
yeh she must be 57 now as it is 25 years since she won Wimbedon at age of 32... so she looks not bad for her age....

She still played professionally into her early 40's.... After winning Wimbledon she never quite achieved the same heights again - she reached the semi's the following year, but never another Grand Slam semi. She dropped out of the top10 after Wimbledon 1980 when she lost in the 4th round as the 7th seed to Andrea Jaeger who was only 14 at the time - Ginny was 35!!!! Not bad to still be ranked in the top 10, 13 years after she first was!!!!

She slowly wound down her career in the next few years, but always reserved her best for Wimbledon... In 1983, aged 38 she surprisingly reached the quarters unseeded when everyone had written her off. what was worse was that she had a HUGE chance to reach the semi's as she played the tiny Yvonne Vermaak of South Africa who was only ranked 4oth at the time and no grass court expert, but she lost 6-3,2-6,6-2. If she had reached the semi's, it would have been an amazing tournament as 40 year old Billie-Jean also reached the semi's that year losing to Jaeger.

Everyone thought Virginia would retire after that, but she kept playing the Grand Slams and the odd selected event and arrived at Wimbledon 1984 ages 39 and about to drop out of the top 100 - but there she fought back the years to defeat the 5th seed Zina Garrison 3-6,6-4,7-5, although Garrison's nerves cost her the match at the end... Ginny then lost 11-9 final set to Carinna Karlsson of Sweden in the next round.

Back she came the next year aged 40 and now a member of the All England Club Committee. She reached the 3rd round and drew the 5th seed again - this time Pam Shriver... Ginny once again turned back the clock to stretch Pam to 6-2,5-7,6-2.

She played her last match at the 1985 Australian Open where she lost to 3rd seed and US Open Champion Hana Mandlikova 6-2,7-6 - not a bad feat for someone who was about to turn 41!!! In terms of success at such a late stage of their careers in the their late 30's only Billie-Jean and Martina can rival Ginny I think...

I don't think 1977 was her best year though as she didnt play very many tournaments then - only playing 2 events after Wimbledon - losing to Turnbull at the US Open and to Martina in the final of Tokyo. Her results were also mixed at the Virginia Slims indoor circuit in the first few months of 1977.

Even though she won Grand Slams in 1968 and 1972, I think 1975 was probably her best year. Up until 1975 she was very inconsistent, often challenging the top players like Court, Evert, Goolagong and King, but rarely beating them, Plus Casals and Melville were that bit more consistent.

But in 1975, she said she purposely worked on her concentration and consistency and it paid off - she had a great indoor season in the Virginia Slims Circuit finishing 3rd behind Chris and Martina, but beating all the top players including King and Goolagong, and winning Dallas and Philadelphia in consecutive weeks beating Martina and Chris in the finals of each.

She then won the pre-Wimbledon event at Eastbourne beating Goolagong and King and was unnoficially ranked 3rd behind Chris and Martina and ahead of King, Goolagong and Court for the first time in her career. But Wimbledon seeded the 3 big names above her and she had to face Evonne in the quarters losing 5-7,6-3,9-7 in what was described as an epic. The US Open rightly seeded her 2nd, but she lost to Evonne once again the semi's..., but did win 2 other events that autumn, plus the Wightman Cup for GB and made a clean sweep of the old Indoor Dewar Cup Circuit in the UK - so that when the first ever official WTA rankings were released in Nov 1975, Ginny was number 2 behind Evert and ahead of Martina, Goolagong, King and Court. She was 30 years old by then as well, just as most players get written off...

Rollo
Dec 17th, 2002, 11:15 AM
Thanks for all the great posts! I'm glad to know that Ginny can be charming off court.

Colin-I hope you'll share your other tennis colums with us. It was a fantastic read. Funy about her not hearing a word Queen Lizzy said. One suspects it wasn't a great loss......

I've one minor correction. Virginia played several events after Wimbledon in 1977. She led her WTT to the championships-including a 6-0 godsmacking of Chris Evert, lost to Turnbull at the US Open, Won Tokyo over Navratilova. played Wightman Cup, then entered Atlanta before she played the Colgate Masters.

The Colgate event was the third most important that year and Wade came very near getting to the finals. It was double elimination and Wade had Chris Evert on the ropes at 6-1 3-1 when she pitched a real fit. It must have been a zinger, because Evert got visibly mad and the crowd even started cheering Chris.
Evert dug out the match under a freezing desert moon after midnight 1-6 6-4 6-4 in what many considered the match of the year.

Evert had a huge grin on her face as she came to the net for the handshake. Afterwards she pointedly said, "There are some people I especially hate losing too." for her part, Wade ruefully admitted "I cooked my own goose at 3-1." Virginia hit the roof when she was informed that now there was no way she could make the final under the complicated format. Despite her and Evert both losing one match (Evert lost to Fromholtz) it was Chris who moved on to the final.

She was cool as ice towards me when I asked for an autograph in 1983, but at least she gave me one. Virginia didn't do a Mark 35 on me!(see his post on Wade at WTT) It was Wightman Cup
and I sneaked through security all the way down to the press interview room. Within 5 minutes I had nabbed Wade, Navratilova, and Shriver. Pam was the friendliest of all, joking about the (lack of) security with me. Martina was friendly too-and I was totally shocked by how small she was. Funny how in the 80s her image was that of a giant.

Rollo
Dec 17th, 2002, 11:28 AM
LOL@ her hating pixie Sue Barker. I knew King detested her. That deserves a post of it's own:)

Colin-I think it's fascinating that she was told to keep her distance from others. Did she say who told her that? It seems to be a common tactic among many top women. Certainly the Williams sisters practice it, as did Graf and as far back as Helen Wills.

Tennis videos-do you know if Wade was interested in men at one time? I can't recall where-but at one time I read she went through a lot of lovers right and left! Writer David Grey just adored her in print, and I saw hints of a romance there.
I know she was living with the ghost writer of her book (Mary Lou Mellace) for a while at least.

It's fitting that her image is that of a cat or lioness. She'll always be a sphinx-like mystery to me .

tennisvideos
Dec 17th, 2002, 12:01 PM
Great posts Rollo and Colin B!! Great reading more on Ginny.

I actually can't confirm anything about Ginny's love interests, except it's pretty common knowledge that she likes the gals. Not sure about her past with me though. She was also a little mysterious... only goes to add to her intrigue.

Thankfully the BBC and CBS have kept a lot of Ginny's matches in their archives, so I have been able to collect plenty of them - about 15 matches altogether.... Including some of the WTT matches (win over Evert) and the classic 77 Wimbledon SF when she beat Chris amongst others... Love watching her old matches as there was always plenty of drama and her style was so easy on the eye.

I think I love her commentary mainly for the accent! Same reason I loved Dan Maskell. It wasn't what they said, but how they said it. Just sent shivers up my spine, and their accents are just so synonomous with the history of the game....

tennisvideos
Dec 17th, 2002, 12:24 PM
Colin B - I just realised you are here in Sydney!!!! We must catch up! I live in Newtown and have a car.... but you must get over to my place, esp as you are a fan of the history of the game...

You can come over and watch some videos with me - I have just about every Wimbledon final (mens and womens) since 1952 including the complete matches from 1959 onwards, and many SF and QF clashes as well since then... Connolly, Bueno, Court, Jones, King, Wade, Evert, Navratilova, Renee Richards and so on. Plus all the great men from that era too - Laver, Rosewall, Newcombe, Ashe, (Borg from 73 onwards) etc... Plus heaps of USO, WTT & Virginia Slims since 1971. And you can check out the library of tennis books, the Teddy Tinling dresses and the display of old wooden rackets...

Have I whet your appetite???

I would love to hook up with another tennis history fan so we can watch some classic matches together and chat about the legends! You can email me at: tennisvideos1@bigpond.com

Also, are you going to the Adidas International and Aussie Open. I will be going to a few days at each of them. Anyway, get in touch when you are ready. I look forward to catching up!

Craig :)

ColinB
Dec 18th, 2002, 09:59 AM
Hi Rollo - Apologies - how could I forget about the Evert match at the end of season event - it was in Palm Springs wasn't it? If she has just finished off Evert there, she would have ended that year at number 2 as she deserved to be....

This is a great thread - good that we are all sharing our memories...If Ginny is down at the Aussie Open I will look her up and tell her about this - I;m sure she would appreciate it... but I dodnt think she will travel to Melbourne.

tennisvideo's (Craig) - Thanks for the offer! Would love to comed over for a chat about some of our old fav's and watch some of the video's... I have a few video's but most from 1980's onwards, but they are in storage back home in London. I live out in Bondi and work up in Lane Cove. Yes will be at the Adidas for the evening matches after work and will be down at the Aussie Open for the first day of 2 just - will send u a mail and lets meet up - My email is colinbanksoz@hotmail.com - Thanks colin

Rollo
Dec 18th, 2002, 04:36 PM
Don't think twice about it Colin-I "forgot" that Goolagong lost to Billie Jean King in 1976 until Mark 35 reminded me. Hey-after 30 we're allowed the odd slip up.

DO take Craig up on his offer. The two of you are walking tennis encyclopedias and should have a blast. Please tell Ginny a devoted fan sends his love if you see her!

Tennisvideos-I forgot to ask how you and Chris O'Neil did in your competition. Did you take home the gold?

tennisvideos
Dec 18th, 2002, 08:47 PM
Hi Rollo

Yes, Chris O'Neil and I did take the Gold! Thanks for asking.
We lost the first set in our very first match and that was the toughest match we had for the tournament.
Chris was great to play with, she's still very athletic and a great S&V player. So I just had to keep my returns going well and she would pounce at the net!

She was also runner up in the Open Mixed with my other friend.

darren cahill
Dec 18th, 2002, 08:52 PM
and who was this 'other friend' ? LOL...i thought everyone knew who he was?? (just teasing you--you ole buzzard) ;) :angel:

Double Fault
Dec 18th, 2002, 09:12 PM
Thanks to Rollo for resurecting this thread.

I loved reading the posts. ColinB and tennisvideos, Rollo amongst many others. You guys really are true tennis lovers.

Tennisvideos. your video collection sounds amazing. You should start a museum. How the heck did you lay your hands on such classic matches. I wasn't aware the BBC kept matches from so long ago. However you obtained them tennisvideos, cherish them, for they are rare. LOL, I have just realised why you are called "tennisvideos" As Rollo said we are allowed our little slip-ups from time to time (at my age anyways).

Great read!! :)

tennisvideos
Dec 19th, 2002, 12:08 AM
Hi Double Fault :) Don't worry, I do cherish the collection! After spending over $40,000 on videos alone I should do! I also have affiliations with the local Tennis Museum so that was originally how I was able to start on the collection.

Hi Darren - LOL! Yes, I wasn't game to say my friends name for fear of being attacked from an unnamed source! ;)

Double Fault
Dec 19th, 2002, 08:41 PM
Hi tennisvideos. :) $40,000 is a lot, but I must say money well spent. I have been steadily buying matches over the past couple of years. Some are out of my reach, but any spare cash I have goes on these classic matches. :) I'm actually waiting for a few to arrive as I type. Your collection is amazing!! :)

alfajeffster
Sep 25th, 2005, 06:02 PM
Time to revive the old gal- a few pics of one of my all-time favorite players (and a terrific person), Miss Virginia Wade:

An early (1964) shot-
http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wade64.jpg

and from 1970 Wimbledon:

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wade70.jpg

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wade70volley.jpg

1975 Wimbledon-

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wade75slice.jpg

And last, but not least, 1978 Wimbledon-

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wade77USO.jpg

alfajeffster
Sep 26th, 2005, 02:48 PM
I've shared these in another thread- possibly the Blast Girl for Virginia, but thought I'd consolidate here:

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wadecat.jpg

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wade68USO.jpg

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/VirginiaFV.jpg

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/WadeKSwiss.jpg


http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wadestretch.jpg

1968 U.S. Open Victory:

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/WadeKing68USO.jpg

alfajeffster
Sep 26th, 2005, 02:49 PM
And this lovely picture of Virginia, the little girl-





http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Ginny.jpg

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wadehighschool.jpg

alfajeffster
Sep 26th, 2005, 03:43 PM
And of course, that powerful first serve- quite possibly the hardest first service of any woman in the 60s and 70s.

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wadeservice.jpg

alfajeffster
Dec 19th, 2005, 11:43 AM
Anyone else have any Virginia Wade pics they'd like to share?

PamShriverRockz
Dec 19th, 2005, 02:11 PM
Yeah, we attended that match, it was truly awful. This year when we saw Pam, Sian asked her why she wasn't in the senior event and she said that last year was truly embarrasing and that she didn't want to go through that again!

Yep I can confirm Pam told me exactly this...she was *SO* embarrassed about that match...

Ginny rockz though! I don't think she played the seniors at Wimby this year? Can't remember. Anyway, she's always a lot of fun and joins in.
My mum was a huge fan of Ginny and always used to go on about her when I was a kid, so she was one of the first players I was aware of. My mum had an old video tape of Wimbledon and used to play the 77 final bit to me a lot. (Although admittedly my mum liked Ann Jones best!)

Anyone read Ginny's book Courting Triumph? It's quite interesting although dare I say I thought it was a little too much about the Wimby final...which I guess is understandable! I'll try and scan some pics in. :)

cunnihingis
Dec 19th, 2005, 03:34 PM
ginny is also a good commentator. she and jill hetherington teamed up for tsn one year (the goodwill games in winnipeg) and ginny had lots of interesting things to share. :)

alfajeffster
Dec 20th, 2005, 09:38 PM
Well, I've been watching Virginia play tennis since the mid-70s, and just last night I re-watched her entire 1977 Wimbledon semi versus Evert. I know daze says that he's never seen Chris miss more forehands and make so many errors, but this time I made an effort to watch just Virgnia- her footwork, her serve, and her shot selection. She was incredibly consistent, and by the time she was up 3-0 in the third, she had this look on her face like she knew it was her day, and was going to win. It's a dangerous thing to get caught up in, because it's easy to let a lead slip, but she even smiled after a rare unforced error! I think the one shot that tipped the scales in her favor was her service. She got a good percentage of first serves in, and not just any first serves- a good mix all around the box, and quite a few aces and service winners considering who was over there to return. I'm looking forward to seeing the 1975 Wade/Goolagong 9-7 in the third match, even though Virginia lost it.

Santorofan
Dec 21st, 2005, 07:48 AM
I'm also interested in Wade's match vs Evert in the 1978 Wimbledon semi, the year Virginia defended her title. From the score (8-6 6-2) it was a very competitive match, with Evert clearly having revenge in mind. Anyone seen this one?
When I was a youngster I was fortunate to've watched Wade, Goolagong, Navratillova, Evert, Jaeger, Regina Marsikova and others play in various Florida tournaments during the early/mid-80s, but to this day must say that a simple warm up session of Virginia's (on court w/Evonne) was by far the most impressive tennis I witnessed by any female player live. Her strokes were so cunning, measured, precise and skillful - visually a truly a beautiful thing to behold.

alfajeffster
Dec 21st, 2005, 11:31 AM
I'm also interested in Wade's match vs Evert in the 1978 Wimbledon semi, the year Virginia defended her title. From the score (8-6 6-2) it was a very competitive match, with Evert clearly having revenge in mind. Anyone seen this one?
When I was a youngster I was fortunate to've watched Wade, Goolagong, Navratillova, Evert, Jaeger, Regina Marsikova and others play in various Florida tournaments during the early/mid-80s, but to this day must say that a simple warm up session of Virginia's (on court w/Evonne) was by far the most impressive tennis I witnessed by any female player live. Her strokes were so cunning, measured, precise and skillful - visually a truly a beautiful thing to behold.

I particularly like her forehand volley. If you know volleying, it's the side that nearly all great net-rushers have the most problems with. With players from Novotna to Navratilova to Goolagong and farther back, it's the volleying side (and I suppose this holds true with the forehand as well) that breaks down most often. Of the handfull of matches, and especially from seeing her play at close range a couple of years ago, it's a solid, no-nonsense controlled punch, and she can go either way equally well, although I must say I'm fond of the forehand volley down the line off her opponent's forehand crosscourt. Not that this is the shot (it is undoubtedly a forehand drop-volley), but here then is another peek at the great forehand volley of Miss Virginia Wade:

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/VirginiaFV.jpg

Rollo
Jul 13th, 2006, 10:39 PM
Here's a wonderful article in the Guardian from late 1976. Some of the quotes are priceless.

http://century.guardian.co.uk/1970-1979/Story/0,,106922,00.html


Fair tigress of the courts

By Frank Keating
Thursday November 11, 1976

Through the early 1970s a long-running West End drawing-room comedy contained the line "I hear Virginia's doing very well at Wimbledon." For eleven months it was just a bit of dialogue in a weary, dreary play. But for every night of July, it was received by the whole house with a groaning sort of titter, a tittering sort of groan. Even the Yanks got the point. For in July the knowledge was still heavy in our breast that Virginia had flunked the big one yet again.

For almost a decade now, Miss Wade's Wimbledon woe has seemed the longest-running tragedy of our whole drama season. She's been going to win the thing, no doubt about it, every year since 1967. This spectacular annual failure - especially those times when such comparative nonentities as Christine Sandberg or Ceri Martinez have put her out - has unfairly clouded appreciation and gratitude for her in this country, where eight out of ten people, I fancy, reckon top tennis is only played seriously for the last two weeks of June in SW19. But in the year-long and wickedly tough international circuit, Virginia Wade has been one of the leading five woman players in the world for a long, long time now. Sure, she's made a lot of money flying the flag. Profit, certainly, but not much honour in her own country.

Now watch her win the Wightman. But, dearie me, we are guaranteed a few palpitations on the way. That goes without saying when our Sarah Virginia comes home to play - remember that time at Nottingham a couple of years back when she was one set, 9-8 and 40-love up on her own serve to Evonne Goolagong - and still blew the thing?

Take last weekend: on Friday night at the Albert Hall she played the perky little whizz-bang merchant, Sue Barker, in the Dewar Cup semi-finals. The press had set it all up as for the British Women's championship. So what happens? Miss Barker, totally unconcerned, goes out and swipes away merrily; Miss Wade, a dozen years the senior and winner of Forest Hills the year after Sue had passed her 11-plus, is a bag of nerves, grunting and groaning like an overacting wrestler, scowling like an over- reacting dowager, her cheeks blotchily-purple. Somehow she muddles through in the end, thanks mostly to Miss Barker's late flush of generosity. "Yes, it's ludicrous to get so nervous. But I do, and it seems there's nothing I can do about it," she admits afterwards.

But Friday's tetchy spinster is Saturday's blooming bombshell. Away with the twitch and in with the sunshine. Against the incomparable Chris Evert there's not a nerve end to be seen. The world's No. 1, who hadn't lost a match in thirty since April, is swept from the court by a performance of bold, bracing beauty. "I have honestly never played better. I have tried so many times to out-think Chrissie, but this time I just decided to go out and out-play her," Miss Wade said.

She plays Miss Evert again tonight. But Saturday's win has already put her team in splendid heart. At the Crystal Palace yesterday, there was a hale and healthy confidence about the British side. Virginia is very much chief monitor, head girl. The juniors, as well as the opposition, delight in talking about her. Behind her back of course. Confided one: "We're taught and taught that the whole game today depends on percentage play, and being fully aware of the decisive points in a match, the ones you absolutely must win. Not Virginia: she'd rather lose spectacularly than win ordinarily, prefer to lose a brilliant rally than win a point by an unforced error."

Miss Wade's philosophy appeals to more than me. She has a sizeable fan club around the world. For those who like their dame to be more haughty than hearty, as bright as buttons yet as black as thunder, ever arrogant yet ever vulnerable, nice-nasty, beauty-beast, she is a veritable Miss World of any year.

Imagine Princess Anne playing Mrs Robinson in the Benenden production of The Graduate and you're getting the picture. In 1973 the American poet, Galway Kinnell, sent over a profile of praise and devotion. He had fallen for Miss Wade's "incredible lionlike beauty" at Forest Hills. "She was," he wrote, "the last amateur in the big time, the last utterly human player… She not only ignores, but appears to despise, what one might call the second-rate virtues: precision, steadiness, patience and cunning. She pursues absolute tennis, tennis by which its inner necessity will not only do that gross thing, win, but will also be recorded and remembered, stroke by stroke, much as a great championship chess match is remembered."

Christopher Brasher (who else?) once wrote that "there was someone somewhere who could do for Virginia Wade what Franz Stampfl did for Roger Bannister" and make her the best in the world every day. For my money, I think we should all praise the Lord and pass the motion that Virginia stays just as she is. Miss Barker's coming along fine, to be sure, but except for those who sit on horses, Miss Wade is surely our only world-class sportsgirl worth writing home about. Only two reservations: I wish she wouldn't squat with such straining Arabian determination when she waits to receive service, or be quite so shirty sullen with meek little linesmen.

trivfun
Jul 14th, 2006, 01:36 AM
Any thoughts, memories, pics, etc. of Virginia Wade? Virginia was my very first favorite, holding a special place in my heart. Yes she could be a bitch at times, but she was a royal bitch if you know what i mean, dishing out catty quotes with her oh so upper class British accent. She acted the way she did because she had a total passion and fiery beauty unmatched.

Virginia was an enigma if ever there was one. From posts and bits I 've read she is or was said to be a closeted lesbian, but she attracted a huge group of male admirers in her time and also dated a number of men. For some reason too she had an unusual number of obsessive followers.

The contrasts and mystery extended to her game and personality. She was a minister's daughter but was notorious for arguing calls and using unladylike language. She could be fire or ice. Charming or a hellion. Friendly (Francoise Durr was one of her good friends) or aloof and distant.

Wade had a fascination for cats, often comparing herself to a lioness. The year she won Wimbledon she changed her conservative ponytail hairstyle to a lion-like mane. I'll always think of Virginia when I see a graceful cat with eyes alblaze!
I love my "Ginny" Wade:hearts:


Just reading the posts and seeing her pictures reminds me of a Brian McKnight song "One Last Cry". As for being or not being a lesbian. I remember reading a lesbian magazine "Curve" I think. It was the movie "Something about Mary" and it mentioned that the Cameron Diaz character was a lesbian because she had all these guys attracted to her but wasn't attracted to any of them so she picked the nice dorky one who works hard for her love.

trivfun
Jul 14th, 2006, 01:50 AM
In looking at the pictures, I can't help wonder if she is Anglo-Indian. I mean she looks like Englebert Humperdink those blue eyes, the nose, and the lips.

Jakarta
Jul 14th, 2006, 11:36 AM
Don't have pictures, but I do have the reminiscences of Lita Sugiarto about Wade. She told me her experience at the French Open, I think, where she was playing doubles against Wade, and she said the Indonesians (probably Lany Kaligis too) questioned a call. And then Wade got all huggy, and said something like, "Always got that stupid smile on your faces" or something like that.

Anyway this was the story.

Lita looks at life from both sides now

Bruce Emond
The Jakarta Post
Publication Date : 2005-02-07

When memory fails her about her days on the international tennis circuit, Lita Liem Sugiarto finds the answers she needs in two small notebooks.



Within their covers, in tiny, precise handwriting, are listed all of the tournaments she played in, her win-loss record and the prize money she took home.


Some names -- Billie Jean King, Margaret Court, Virginia Wade -- are familiar to tennis fans. But there is one result in particular that stands out.


On March 25, 1973, at the now long-forgotten Ladies Gotham Classic in New York City, Lita came back from a set down to beat a young Czech player who was struggling to keep her adolescent temper under control. The final set was a resounding 6-1.


"Oh, how she cried after the match," Lita said of the 17-year-old Martina Navratilova.


Lita is a confirmed fan of her former foe; in her home in Kelapa Gading, East Jakarta, among all the memorabilia she collected from her career, there is a signed framed portrait of Navratilova.


"She is the player I enjoy watching the most," said Lita, who, along with longtime doubles partner Lany Kaligis, played Navratilova during the latter's somewhat premature "farewell tour" stop in Jakarta in 1994.


"She plays so aggressively, coming to the net all the time."


Lita, who turns 59 on Feb. 27, never quite reached the top of the game, but she had a highly respectable career. A pioneer of Indonesian women's tennis, she reached the last 16 of both the Australian Open in 1970, when it was still played on grass, and the French Open in 1974.


She was also the 1970 runner's up in the Ladies Plate -- Wimbledon's consolation prize for players who lost in the first three rounds -- to a young, free-hitting Evonne Goolagong.


With Lany, she made the Wimbledon women's doubles quarterfinals in 1973, losing to eventual winners Rosie Casals and King.


Her greatest tennis moment came when she won the women's singles at the Asian Games in Tehran in 1974. It would be another 24 years before compatriot Yayuk Basuki repeated the feat.


"It was so memorable for me, seeing the red and white flag being raised," she said, her voice catching with emotion.


Although not a marquee name, Lita was a crowd puller all the same for her unique game: She hit forehands off both flanks.


Ambidextrous players are a curiosity in tennis. American Beverly Baker Fleitz reached the 1955 Wimbledon women's singles final; Lita beat Dutchwoman Marijke Schaar in a battle of forehands at Wimbledon in 1972.


The only exponent today is Russian Evgenia Koulikovskaya.


Famous tennis fashion designer Teddy Tinling gave Lita use of his creations, an honor usually reserved for the top women.


"He told me, 'Lita, people come to watch you because you're different'."


Born of a Chinese-Manado doctor father and Dutch mother, she started playing on the court across from her home in Pangkal Pinang, South Sumatra. She also excelled at volleyball, and at age 17, she was called up to train in Jakarta for GANEFO (the Games of the New Emerging Forces), Sukarno's alternative to the Olympics.


Her potential was spotted at a junior tennis event in Bandung, and Lita was asked to try out for coach Hans Sangitan.


"I hit three strokes, and he said, 'You have to forget about school, I'll train you every day and make you a champion in two years' time'."


Her parents agreed to the proposal, and her mother moved to Jakarta to be with her. Lita wanted to be a doctor, but her coach told her: "'There are thousands of doctors, but there's only one tennis champion.' He said through tennis you can earn a living, you can coach or become a professional."


Hans had been a champion, but he learned to play with his left arm after injuring his right. He tested Lita, a natural left hander, to see if she, like his son, Samudera Sangitan, could play with her right hand as well. She passed.


Lita went through what she terms "military-style training", lifting weights to build up her right arm strength and playing with a special order 20-ounce racket -- the heaviest of all.


When she emerged after two years of training to play events, she promptly won a junior title, and 40 days later the national women's crown.


In 1966, she became the first Indonesian woman to be sent to play tournaments in Europe. Three years later, she qualified with Lany for Wimbledon.


"We jumped up and down to be playing at Wimbledon ... it was so traditional and well-organized."


Tennis was an amateur sport until 1968, and Lita was on hand when tennis magazine publisher Gladys Heldman and King set up their own women's tour with Virginia Slims in 1970.


Lita remembers the camaraderie among the players as they crisscrossed the United States and Europe. "There were players who were always alone, but those of us who always got together, like the Japanese and those from Argentina."


She has special affection for King, who would shout out a greeting of "tai (sh--)" to Indonesian players after hearing it exclaimed in a doubles match. She also told Lita she wanted to learn her trademark crosscourt dink.


The only player she has no love lost for is Wade -- "so stuck up, she wouldn't even look at you when she passed by".


She made a good living from the tour, ranking 17th on the money list in 1973, a year after her marriage to fellow player Sugiarto.


By 1974, however, she had tired of living out of a suitcase for eight months of the year. "Christmas was the worst -- you had to stay in your hotel room, and the next day was Boxing Day and everything was closed."


She returned to Jakarta, had a daughter, Bianca, (a former junior champion, she has pursued an academic career) and set up a tennis school.


Lita, who continues to teach, is grateful for all the sport has given her.


"I got to see the world, had many experiences and met all the top players. I had to take care of everything for my career. From a hobby, tennis became a way for me to make a living -- at the very least, I got to help my husband."

Jakarta
Jul 14th, 2006, 11:50 AM
Could have got all huggy, too, but I mean huffy!

trivfun
Jul 14th, 2006, 01:10 PM
Don't have pictures, but I do have the reminiscences of Lita Sugiarto about Wade. She told me her experience at the French Open, I think, where she was playing doubles against Wade, and she said the Indonesians (probably Lany Kaligis too) questioned a call. And then Wade got all huggy, and said something like, "Always got that stupid smile on your faces" or something like that.

Anyway this was the story.

Lita looks at life from both sides now

Bruce Emond
The Jakarta Post
Publication Date : 2005-02-07

When memory fails her about her days on the international tennis circuit, Lita Liem Sugiarto finds the answers she needs in two small notebooks.



Within their covers, in tiny, precise handwriting, are listed all of the tournaments she played in, her win-loss record and the prize money she took home.


Some names -- Billie Jean King, Margaret Court, Virginia Wade -- are familiar to tennis fans. But there is one result in particular that stands out.


On March 25, 1973, at the now long-forgotten Ladies Gotham Classic in New York City, Lita came back from a set down to beat a young Czech player who was struggling to keep her adolescent temper under control. The final set was a resounding 6-1.


"Oh, how she cried after the match," Lita said of the 17-year-old Martina Navratilova.


Lita is a confirmed fan of her former foe; in her home in Kelapa Gading, East Jakarta, among all the memorabilia she collected from her career, there is a signed framed portrait of Navratilova.


"She is the player I enjoy watching the most," said Lita, who, along with longtime doubles partner Lany Kaligis, played Navratilova during the latter's somewhat premature "farewell tour" stop in Jakarta in 1994.


"She plays so aggressively, coming to the net all the time."


Lita, who turns 59 on Feb. 27, never quite reached the top of the game, but she had a highly respectable career. A pioneer of Indonesian women's tennis, she reached the last 16 of both the Australian Open in 1970, when it was still played on grass, and the French Open in 1974.


She was also the 1970 runner's up in the Ladies Plate -- Wimbledon's consolation prize for players who lost in the first three rounds -- to a young, free-hitting Evonne Goolagong.


With Lany, she made the Wimbledon women's doubles quarterfinals in 1973, losing to eventual winners Rosie Casals and King.


Her greatest tennis moment came when she won the women's singles at the Asian Games in Tehran in 1974. It would be another 24 years before compatriot Yayuk Basuki repeated the feat.


"It was so memorable for me, seeing the red and white flag being raised," she said, her voice catching with emotion.


Although not a marquee name, Lita was a crowd puller all the same for her unique game: She hit forehands off both flanks.


Ambidextrous players are a curiosity in tennis. American Beverly Baker Fleitz reached the 1955 Wimbledon women's singles final; Lita beat Dutchwoman Marijke Schaar in a battle of forehands at Wimbledon in 1972.


The only exponent today is Russian Evgenia Koulikovskaya.


Famous tennis fashion designer Teddy Tinling gave Lita use of his creations, an honor usually reserved for the top women.


"He told me, 'Lita, people come to watch you because you're different'."


Born of a Chinese-Manado doctor father and Dutch mother, she started playing on the court across from her home in Pangkal Pinang, South Sumatra. She also excelled at volleyball, and at age 17, she was called up to train in Jakarta for GANEFO (the Games of the New Emerging Forces), Sukarno's alternative to the Olympics.


Her potential was spotted at a junior tennis event in Bandung, and Lita was asked to try out for coach Hans Sangitan.


"I hit three strokes, and he said, 'You have to forget about school, I'll train you every day and make you a champion in two years' time'."


Her parents agreed to the proposal, and her mother moved to Jakarta to be with her. Lita wanted to be a doctor, but her coach told her: "'There are thousands of doctors, but there's only one tennis champion.' He said through tennis you can earn a living, you can coach or become a professional."


Hans had been a champion, but he learned to play with his left arm after injuring his right. He tested Lita, a natural left hander, to see if she, like his son, Samudera Sangitan, could play with her right hand as well. She passed.


Lita went through what she terms "military-style training", lifting weights to build up her right arm strength and playing with a special order 20-ounce racket -- the heaviest of all.


When she emerged after two years of training to play events, she promptly won a junior title, and 40 days later the national women's crown.


In 1966, she became the first Indonesian woman to be sent to play tournaments in Europe. Three years later, she qualified with Lany for Wimbledon.


"We jumped up and down to be playing at Wimbledon ... it was so traditional and well-organized."


Tennis was an amateur sport until 1968, and Lita was on hand when tennis magazine publisher Gladys Heldman and King set up their own women's tour with Virginia Slims in 1970.


Lita remembers the camaraderie among the players as they crisscrossed the United States and Europe. "There were players who were always alone, but those of us who always got together, like the Japanese and those from Argentina."


She has special affection for King, who would shout out a greeting of "tai (sh--)" to Indonesian players after hearing it exclaimed in a doubles match. She also told Lita she wanted to learn her trademark crosscourt dink.


The only player she has no love lost for is Wade -- "so stuck up, she wouldn't even look at you when she passed by".


She made a good living from the tour, ranking 17th on the money list in 1973, a year after her marriage to fellow player Sugiarto.


By 1974, however, she had tired of living out of a suitcase for eight months of the year. "Christmas was the worst -- you had to stay in your hotel room, and the next day was Boxing Day and everything was closed."


She returned to Jakarta, had a daughter, Bianca, (a former junior champion, she has pursued an academic career) and set up a tennis school.


Lita, who continues to teach, is grateful for all the sport has given her.


"I got to see the world, had many experiences and met all the top players. I had to take care of everything for my career. From a hobby, tennis became a way for me to make a living -- at the very least, I got to help my husband."


She looks like she could have been a champion. But I think not living in the United States and trying to beat a Goolagoong, King, Evert, Court, and so many others is hard because lets face it many tournaments take place in the United States. Or she probably fit my theory. I remember a female drill instructor who got reprimanded because she told her recruits that the reason they are in the army is because either you are gay, nymphomaniac, or trying to find a man. I think she fits the latter in my theory. I think Evonne Goolagoong and Evert are that way but they lived in the United States and Australia and had early success/ On the other hand, Liem had gradual success which is very difficult to maintain concerning where you are from and I think she wanted to be an Indonesian first rather than sell out.

Jakarta
Jul 14th, 2006, 04:35 PM
I don't know whether she was looking for a husband -- her husband had been a successful player here, and later became a coach. And she talked about how lonely it was competing overseas, being away from her family. I think she played Chris Evert at the Italian Open in 1975 -- she showed me a photo of them before the match -- and pushed her to 7-5 in one of the sets. She did not win much in the grand scheme of things, but when you consider the great turmoil in Indonesia during the 1960s, her achievements are pretty remarkable. The only other Asians at that time who were competing on a regular basis were the Japanese (Samawatsu). And the ambidextrous thing always makes her interesting.

trivfun
Jul 14th, 2006, 05:18 PM
I don't know whether she was looking for a husband -- her husband had been a successful player here, and later became a coach. And she talked about how lonely it was competing overseas, being away from her family. I think she played Chris Evert at the Italian Open in 1975 -- she showed me a photo of them before the match -- and pushed her to 7-5 in one of the sets. She did not win much in the grand scheme of things, but when you consider the great turmoil in Indonesia during the 1960s, her achievements are pretty remarkable. The only other Asians at that time who were competing on a regular basis were the Japanese (Samawatsu). And the ambidextrous thing always makes her interesting.

That is my point. Tennis life is a lot like other institutions like the army, it is lonely and ardous without the other stuff to begin with. That drill sargeant didn't make that point to be crass. She had substance, research, and experience. Added with the political situation in countries, neighborhood, counties, and elsewhere. You saw how she kept a diary of what went on. I bet it was out of necessity.

Rollo
Mar 8th, 2007, 05:59 PM
Bump

Linnie
Jun 20th, 2007, 11:38 PM
Another bump ;)

Fabulous article about "Our Ginny's" 1977 Wimbledon:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;jsessionid=N4PS4UZKYJSHJQFIQMFSFFWAVCBQ 0IV0?xml=/sport/2007/06/20/sthodg120.xml

Adamatp
Jun 24th, 2007, 02:43 AM
Virginia fans....ignore the (for me) oddly nostalgic intro and hear Miss Wade in all her (very proper) glory talk about her defeat of Zina Garrision in 1984....priceless!

http://youtube.com/watch?v=SXBcg2kp1_Q

Adamatp
Jun 24th, 2007, 02:53 AM
Guys...I hope the above link worked. Just wonderful to hear Dan Maskell again. I'm sure there are a few here who are old enough to remember him....."Ooooh, I Say! That's a peach of a volley by Miss Wade...". Plus, the talk of Dukes and curtseys...

PamShriverRockz
Jun 25th, 2007, 04:09 PM
I'm watching Serena's opening match at Wimby....Ginny is commentating - bliss! It's a shame she's not playing the Over 34's tournament anymore. :sad:

PamShriverRockz
Jun 25th, 2007, 04:15 PM
Virginia fans....ignore the (for me) oddly nostalgic intro and hear Miss Wade in all her (very proper) glory talk about her defeat of Zina Garrision in 1984....priceless!

http://youtube.com/watch?v=SXBcg2kp1_Q

OMG! THanks for that vid! Not only was is fab to see the old Wimby titles, to hear Dan and to hear Ginny sounding so high pitched but there was chock-a-block before it AND a still of the Flumps!!!

I'm in heaven. *sob* Those were the days.

samn
Jun 25th, 2007, 04:24 PM
My colleagues are making fun of me because I admitted to them that I like Ginny's voice and accent.

PamShriverRockz
Jun 25th, 2007, 04:56 PM
My colleagues are making fun of me because I admitted to them that I like Ginny's voice and accent.

PFFFFFFFFFT! They are fools.

You need new colleagues!

samn
Jun 25th, 2007, 05:03 PM
PFFFFFFFFFT! They are fools.

You need new colleagues!

Mind you, one of these colleagues finds Gordon Brown sexy. She often raves about how our dear Chancellor makes her go weak in the knees and she then has the nerve to laugh at me because I find the Ginster's accent interesting and pleasing. ;)

PamShriverRockz
Jun 26th, 2007, 08:06 AM
Mind you, one of these colleagues finds Gordon Brown sexy. She often raves about how our dear Chancellor makes her go weak in the knees and she then has the nerve to laugh at me because I find the Ginster's accent interesting and pleasing. ;)

:speakles:

No contest. You win that one hands down! ;)

Incidentally, I don't like the way the BBC seem to have downgraded Ginny to the less important matches now :o They did the same to Ann Jones. :mad: In favour of Tracy Austin. I also miss Pammentary. I used to love it when Pam & Ginster got together :sad: the Dream Team.

Johnny O
Jun 26th, 2007, 01:00 PM
There's a video interview currently available on the BBC's tennis page with Virginia Wade, where she retells the story of her 1977 W victory. Nothing particularly new, except she does acknowledge, sort of, that Barker was having a better year than she was. The funny thing is, that when it comes to W 77, no-one ever mentions that really it was the absence of Goolagong that cleared the ground for someone to take on Evert. King was the only other serious grass court challenger at that time and she drew Evert in the quarters. Martina hadn't got her groove yet as proven when Stove took her out in the quarters in a really limp match. Wade always neglects to mention that the field was generally weaker in 77 thanks to Evonne's maternity. Had Evonne played, I seriously doubt Wade would ever have got her title.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/default.stm

jamesuk
Jul 6th, 2007, 09:53 PM
Sorry to talk about Sue ~BArker here but i cant find a thread of hers.

Anyway I have noticed over the years at Wimbledon that whenever they start speaking about the old days when Chris Virginia etc were playing, Sue would always play down her game/abilities.
The other night, during a rain delay, Sue Martina and Billie Jean were talking about MArtina's career (very interesting stuff, I was glad play was called off!) and at one point Sue made a derogatory remark about her own acheievements or style, cant remember which, but I do remember feeling bad for her to be constantly so disparaging about her career, even if it is a British trait to play everything down etc. ANyway , Billie JEan was nice , she saw Sue do this and immediatly said "No, come on Sue" and sort of stuck up for her saying how she WAS a great player too back then. I thought that was pretty cool of Billie, always with the positivity! Hope Sue doesnt seriously view her own career so negatively as it sometimes seems.

Rollo
Jul 7th, 2007, 07:26 PM
Sorry to talk about Sue ~BArker here but i cant find a thread of hers.

I bumped up a Sue Barker thread for you:)


You can always find threads by going here:
http://www.wtaworld.com/showthread.php?t=295765


Under "players" you'll find 3 threads on Sue.

PamShriverRockz
Jul 9th, 2007, 02:47 PM
I'm disappointed Ginny didn't do so much commentary for the BBC this year at Wimby...she stopped doing the final a few years ago and it seems they're phasing her out :sad:

hingis-seles
Sep 3rd, 2007, 04:43 PM
I've got Ginny commentating all the matches on Arthur Ashe. Love her commentating. :D

Jem
Apr 10th, 2008, 05:16 AM
(Also posted in the "Virginia Wade" and "You've Come a Long Way Baby" threads)

"For she's a jolly good fellow!" As much as I'd like to begrudge Virginia Wade her Wimbledon title (sure wanted Christ to win that one), you really can't. Tonight, I watched again that 1977 Wimbledon final, and it was a jolly good (richly deserved) win for Wade. I remember watching it in 1977 and actually rooting for Betty Stove. Looking back, it's hard to think I wanted Wade to lose, but even so, what a missed opportunity for the Dutchwoman.

Stove came very close to winning this one, much closer than I remembered. She was down 0-3 in the second set when she reeled off three straight to level at 3-3. What a pity at that point she simply couldn't have losened up and let the bombs fall where they would. Of course, had she been able to, this probably would not have been her only Grand Slam final.

As is, she was probably closer to a win than even Betty suspected. Looking back, the turning point was definitely at 3-3 in the second set. Wade was serving and Betty played two excellent points. But Wade played both of them one shot better! Wade held and Betty countered with a doublefault on a break point against her.

Honestly, she looked like a goner after those first two points in the seventh game, as if, "Well, I came to the party and had a good time, but this really isn't my crowd." I think BBC commentator Shirley Brasher summed it up very nicely when she noted the difference in tension Betty showed when she was "facing victory" at 3-3 in the second vs. "staring at defeat" when she staged a brilliant rally from 0-40 at 0-4 in the final set to hold her shot.

As for Ginny, I understand now her account of the match in her autobiography, "Courting Triumph." After rewatching the match, I was intrigued enough to reread those pages. Here's some of what she wrote.

From 4-3 in the third: "I had entered gthe trance-like almost hynotic state. It's one of the gear stages that absolute involvement in a match brings."

After winning the second set, she acknowledges the brief smile she allowed herself before she was "engulfed by a predatory desire for the next game."

And then, in the third game of the final set where she claimed a second break and 3-0 lead on another Stove doublefault, Wade wrote of her opponent: "Her involvement was receding into the background. She was showing signs of resignation."

And still later, "I raced from one side of the court to the other, chasing what were probable winners, but knowing that if I could scrape them back Betty would be forced to make the shot. It's demoralising if your opponent never gives up."

And that pretty much sums it up. Virginia saw destiny and grabbed it. Betty never really saw it as her to get.

Actually, this match reminds me very much of the Novotna-Tauziat Wimbledon final. In my mind, that was Tauziat's match to win. Her game gave Novotna fits over the years, and Novotna was one big nerve away from crumbling. But I think Tauziat had prepared herself for the moment she got -- an excellent result but not the whole thing. She saw herself as a potential Wimbledon semifinalist, not as a champion, and that made all the difference. I think it was the same with Betty. She had surpassed expectations with the run to the final and was a bit fearful of reaching for the whole plate!

newmark401
Aug 6th, 2009, 02:04 PM
The 1968 US Open was, of course, Virginia Wade's major breakthrough, in more ways than one. In the final she had a rare victory over Billie Jean King. This article, written at the time by David Gray for “The Guardian” newspaper in Britain, provides a good overall picture of the then 23-year-old Wade:

Virginia Wade’s victory in the United States Open Championships – the best thing that has happened for British lawn tennis since Angela Mortimer won Wimbledon in 1961 – came at the kind of time when no journalist likes to write. It was growing dark at Forest Hills; in London it was creeping towards midnight. She had been waiting to play all day, looking caged and impatient, sometime reading Kinglsey Amis’s “Take A Girl Like You”, sometimes watching Ashe and Graebner or Okker and Rosewall, who were occupying the court that she wanted to command, but mostly talking about tennis.

It had been an odd decision to play the final at five o’clock in the evening. Larry King, Billie Jean’s husband, complaining on her behalf, said that only a “rinky-dinky tournament” would play a match with a $6,000 first prize depending on it as late as that. When Virginia heard the timetable the previous night, she had been gloomy at the prospect of having to wait through a long afternoon before going on to court. There had been all kinds of official apologies. The men’s programme had fallen behind. If necessary, the women’s final could be played the next day. Everyone was flustered about the kind of television coverage that we take for granted at Wimbledon, and the referee’s box buzzed with anxiety.

The British did their best to try to make things easy for her. On this kind of trip there is a nice “esprit de corps”. Once there had been eight players from home at this tournament; now only Ann Jones remained in the doubles and everyone else had gone. The journalists remained, making polite conversation. By the middle of the afternoon she had seen Ann Jones and Francoise Durr disappear quickly from the doubles and the strain was beginning to tell. ‘I wish people wouldn’t keep wishing me luck. It makes me nervous. They’re always doing that at Wimbledon.’ She herself had made an offering to fortune by wearing the dress that had carried her safely through the early rounds. It was elegant and tingling – someone said it made her look as though she had been carved in wood by a Japanese.

Up to then, this had been the best tournament of her career. Stephanie De Fina, a little left-hander from Florida, had taken a set off her in the first round, but since then she had beaten two professionals, Rosie Casals (now, by the way, the owner of a horse called “Wimbledon”) and Ann Jones, and the Wimbledon runner-up, Judy Tegart, all without the loss of a set. Four of the games she had played against Tegart had been devastating in a way that one does not expect from a woman tennis player. Serve, volley, smash – all the spectacular weapons – plus a new accuracy in returning service and much more use of the lob. ‘I have beaten her eight times’, said Billie Jean before the final. ‘This time I feel I am playing a new woman.’

It was as if Miss Wade had suddenly put together the jigsaw of her temperament and talent. At 23 she has been slower in turning herself into a champion than the Courts, the Buenos and the Kings had been, but in this second year of full-time world-class play, she has approached her tournament programme with the logic and method that could be expected from a mathematician. She has resisted the temptation to play too much, because she realises that with her powerful game – which strains emotions as well as body and energy – she must have at least one week’s rest a month.

She made only one bad mistake. After the long haul of South Africa and Bournemouth, she agreed to play at Hurlingham, where she reached the final and lost to Margaret Court. That upset her confidence. She went to Rome, where she lost badly because she was tired and had not given herself time to get used to Italian conditions. After the Federation Cup she resisted a great many persuasions to play in the French Championships, but went to Berlin, where she played a restful tournament which enabled her to reach a peak of both mood and form in time for the Wightman Cup. ‘If I play on hard courts it is very good for me because it means that I have some groundstrokes when I go on to grass.’

She could not maintain that peak at Wimbledon. There were too many distractions for her to practise properly during Queen’s week and then she had to wait – as she did here – until early evening before she played Christian Sandberg. She was nervous because she thought that too much was expected of her and the court was damp – and she has not yet learned how to play on a slippery court. After Wimbledon she went back to hard courts and lost in the semi-finals at Munich and Hamburg.

In some ways she did not really want to come to America this year. She would have liked to have won Boston, but mostly regarded it as a training ground for Forest Hills and lost to Bueno in the semi-finals. She was a little worried about her service and discussed it with Doris Hart. Afterwards she felt that she was getting 30 per cent more first services in.

Here she thought her draw was ideal. She was seeded sixth, but she had only one easy match to play and she had beaten all her other likely opponents on the way to the final. The first match in which she looked like a champion was against Casals. The American professional had beaten her in the final of the Federation Cup in Berlin last year and always plays a kind of bear-baiting match against her. She had been nervous in her final set against De Fina, who had lobbed well into the sun, and the uncertainty persisted for half a dozen games against Casals, but suddenly her service began to work and she began to hit her forehand in the way that she done against Nancy Richey in the Wightman Cup. The path suddenly began to look clearer. No one thought it would be quite as free from trouble as it was.

Tegart, Jones and King were all beaten in the same way. She asserted her supremacy at the start and kept on hitting fierce shots until the opposition crumbled. It was like watching a heavy gun blow down walls. Every game destroyed a little more of the enemy’s will and stamina. Ann Jones nearly held her, but the eleventh game of the first set was decisive and her victory by 6-4, 6-2 over Billie Jean King , the Wimbledon champion, was executed efficiently enough to send cold shivers down most British spines.

Even she could not believe that she could have played so well. When she talked about it afterwards over champagne to a little knot of British reporters, she analysed almost every point in the match. Not a fluke, not the day of the lucky streak, but a calculated victory against the best match-player in the world. It had also been coolly accomplished – a sign that she has really grown up as a competitor. For years it used to be one of the regular parrot-cries that her real battles were not against her opponents but against her own temperament. She can still react with undue passion to the small rubs of the game on odd days, but these are getting fewer. Her concentration has improved; she is beginning to learn how accept the blindness of a linesman and while outright gamesmanship can still provoke her – as it did in a match in England recently – she can even counter that now.

This effort to eradicate a weakness made her particularly angry about a report in a sedate British newspaper – which was not represented at the tournament – about her allegedly bad behaviour in her semi-final against Bueno at Boston. It had been sportingly played without any incident and yet she was criticised for shouting at television cameramen, who were not in fact within shouting range. This plunged her into a depth of depression for two days. ‘In England they will just say that I am behaving badly again’, she said. Once again she made the effort to discipline herself this week and she was rewarded by her second victory in an Open tournament. There was never a hint of temper and at the end she laughed all the way to the bank.

iainmac
Aug 6th, 2009, 02:14 PM
The 1968 US Open was, of course, Virginia Wade's major breakthrough, in more ways than one. In the final she had a rare victory over Billie Jean King. This article, written at the time by David Gray for “The Guardian” newspaper in Britain, provides a good overall picture of the then 23-year-old Wade:

Virginia Wade’s victory in the United States Open Championships – the best thing that has happened for British lawn tennis since Angela Mortimer won Wimbledon in 1961 – came at the kind of time when no journalist likes to write. It was growing dark at Forest Hills; in London it was creeping towards midnight. She had been waiting to play all day, looking caged and impatient, sometime reading Kinglsey Amis’s “Take A Girl Like You”, sometimes watching Ashe and Graebner or Okker and Rosewall, who were occupying the court that she wanted to command, but mostly talking about tennis.

It had been an odd decision to play the final at five o’clock in the evening. Larry King, Billie Jean’s husband, complaining on her behalf, said that only a “rinky-dinky tournament” would play a match with a $6,000 first prize depending on it as late as that. When Virginia heard the timetable the previous night, she had been gloomy at the prospect of having to wait through a long afternoon before going on to court. There had been all kinds of official apologies. The men’s programme had fallen behind. If necessary, the women’s final could be played the next day. Everyone was flustered about the kind of television coverage that we take for granted at Wimbledon, and the referee’s box buzzed with anxiety.

The British did their best to try to make things easy for her. On this kind of trip there is a nice “esprit de corps”. Once there had been eight players from home at this tournament; now only Ann Jones remained in the doubles and everyone else had gone. The journalists remained, making polite conversation. By the middle of the afternoon she had seen Ann Jones and Francoise Durr disappear quickly from the doubles and the strain was beginning to tell. ‘I wish people wouldn’t keep wishing me luck. It makes me nervous. They’re always doing that at Wimbledon.’ She herself had made an offering to fortune by wearing the dress that had carried her safely through the early rounds. It was elegant and tingling – someone said it made her look as though she had been carved in wood by a Japanese.

Up to then, this had been the best tournament of her career. Stephanie De Fina, a little left-hander from Florida, had taken a set off her in the first round, but since then she had beaten two professionals, Rosie Casals (now, by the way, the owner of a horse called “Wimbledon”) and Ann Jones, and the Wimbledon runner-up, Judy Tegart, all without the loss of a set. Four of the games she had played against Tegart had been devastating in a way that one does not expect from a woman tennis player. Serve, volley, smash – all the spectacular weapons – plus a new accuracy in returning service and much more use of the lob. ‘I have beaten her eight times’, said Billie Jean before the final. ‘This time I feel I am playing a new woman.’

It was as if Miss Wade had suddenly put together the jigsaw of her temperament and talent. At 23 she has been slower in turning herself into a champion than the Courts, the Buenos and the Kings had been, but in this second year of full-time world-class play, she has approached her tournament programme with the logic and method that could be expected from a mathematician. She has resisted the temptation to play too much, because she realises that with her powerful game – which strains emotions as well as body and energy – she must have at least one week’s rest a month.

She made only one bad mistake. After the long haul of South Africa and Bournemouth, she agreed to play at Hurlingham, where she reached the final and lost to Margaret Court. That upset her confidence. She went to Rome, where she lost badly because she was tired and had not given herself time to get used to Italian conditions. After the Federation Cup she resisted a great many persuasions to play in the French Championships, but went to Berlin, where she played a restful tournament which enabled her to reach a peak of both mood and form in time for the Wightman Cup. ‘If I play on hard courts it is very good for me because it means that I have some groundstrokes when I go on to grass.’

She could not maintain that peak at Wimbledon. There were too many distractions for her to practise properly during Queen’s week and then she had to wait – as she did here – until early evening before she played Christian Sandberg. She was nervous because she thought that too much was expected of her and the court was damp – and she has not yet learned how to play on a slippery court. After Wimbledon she went back to hard courts and lost in the semi-finals at Munich and Hamburg.

In some ways she did not really want to come to America this year. She would have liked to have won Boston, but mostly regarded it as a training ground for Forest Hills and lost to Bueno in the semi-finals. She was a little worried about her service and discussed it with Doris Hart. Afterwards she felt that she was getting 30 per cent more first services in.

Here she thought her draw was ideal. She was seeded sixth, but she had only one easy match to play and she had beaten all her other likely opponents on the way to the final. The first match in which she looked like a champion was against Casals. The American professional had beaten her in the final of the Federation Cup in Berlin last year and always plays a kind of bear-baiting match against her. She had been nervous in her final set against De Fina, who had lobbed well into the sun, and the uncertainty persisted for half a dozen games against Casals, but suddenly her service began to work and she began to hit her forehand in the way that she done against Nancy Richey in the Wightman Cup. The path suddenly began to look clearer. No one thought it would be quite as free from trouble as it was.

Tegart, Jones and King were all beaten in the same way. She asserted her supremacy at the start and kept on hitting fierce shots until the opposition crumbled. It was like watching a heavy gun blow down walls. Every game destroyed a little more of the enemy’s will and stamina. Ann Jones nearly held her, but the eleventh game of the first set was decisive and her victory by 6-4, 6-2 over Billie Jean King , the Wimbledon champion, was executed efficiently enough to send cold shivers down most British spines.

Even she could not believe that she could have played so well. When she talked about it afterwards over champagne to a little knot of British reporters, she analysed almost every point in the match. Not a fluke, not the day of the lucky streak, but a calculated victory against the best match-player in the world. It had also been coolly accomplished – a sign that she has really grown up as a competitor. For years it used to be one of the regular parrot-cries that her real battles were not against her opponents but against her own temperament. She can still react with undue passion to the small rubs of the game on odd days, but these are getting fewer. Her concentration has improved; she is beginning to learn how accept the blindness of a linesman and while outright gamesmanship can still provoke her – as it did in a match in England recently – she can even counter that now.

This effort to eradicate a weakness made her particularly angry about a report in a sedate British newspaper – which was not represented at the tournament – about her allegedly bad behaviour in her semi-final against Bueno at Boston. It had been sportingly played without any incident and yet she was criticised for shouting at television cameramen, who were not in fact within shouting range. This plunged her into a depth of depression for two days. ‘In England they will just say that I am behaving badly again’, she said. Once again she made the effort to discipline herself this week and she was rewarded by her second victory in an Open tournament. There was never a hint of temper and at the end she laughed all the way to the bank.

That was a great article Mark and gives me more insight into the famous 68 win at the Open than I ever had before. How disciplined and cool she appeared to be. It is strange how erratic for a great player she could be, and yet her 3 grand slam titles were carried off fairly clinically and without any great dramas. Makes Wade even more of an enigma!!!

laschutz
Aug 7th, 2009, 11:29 PM
i've always loved virgina's accent and her way of talking also her mannerisms. regardless as to what she was actually saying!

iainmac
Aug 10th, 2009, 12:02 PM
i've always loved virgina's accent and her way of talking also her mannerisms. regardless as to what she was actually saying!

She is a class act I agree. And actually I feel that a lot of what she does say is very insightful and intelligent.Her analysis of personalities very good IMO.:worship:

tennisvideos
Aug 10th, 2009, 01:03 PM
Yes I love Ginny Wade as a commentator as well. Her accent is a joy to behold and yes, she is very intelligent and also has a great sense of humour. I have seen her burst into giggles on several occasions on court, despite being renowned for steely resolution. And on the only occasion I was lucky enough to meet this wonderful lady she was an absolute scream - giggling away uncontrollably when I was videoing her for a short interview. Love her!

nelslus
Aug 10th, 2009, 01:41 PM
Count me in with the "I Love Ginny" vote. I go out of my way to get copies of matches with BBC commentary- and have also been able to listen to Ginny recently thanks to livefeeds. She looks especially great compared to what we have to deal with here in the USA with our commentators. :sad:

iainmac
Aug 10th, 2009, 04:44 PM
Yes I love Ginny Wade as a commentator as well. Her accent is a joy to behold and yes, she is very intelligent and also has a great sense of humour. I have seen her burst into giggles on several occasions on court, despite being renowned for steely resolution. And on the only occasion I was lucky enough to meet this wonderful lady she was an absolute scream - giggling away uncontrollably when I was videoing her for a short interview. Love her!

Friend, what were your favourite Wade matches? I guess that a lot of the more dramatic affairs were at Wimbledon. However as you know there were plenty of dramatics on the VS tour, the Australian in 72, the US Open, the Wightman Cup- the list goes on. It would be great to hear what you view as her finest matches, and conversely the matches that you feel were her least commendable. With Wade there would always be a few of those.;)

iainmac
Aug 10th, 2009, 04:47 PM
Count me in with the "I Love Ginny" vote. I go out of my way to get copies of matches with BBC commentary- and have also been able to listen to Ginny recently thanks to livefeeds. She looks especially great compared to what we have to deal with here in the USA with our commentators. :sad:

Same thing here- I just love the quality of her commentary. Mind you she does look good I think for her age.Showed a non tennis pal of mine photos of Wade when she was in her twenties and she could not believe how glamorous Wade could look. She is a classy looking lady, then and now.:worship:

chris whiteside
Aug 10th, 2009, 05:37 PM
Wade matches that you feel were her least commendable. With Wade there would always be a few of those.;)

Doubt the Forum could cope with listing them all. :devil:

iainmac
Aug 11th, 2009, 09:39 AM
Doubt the Forum could cope with listing them all. :devil:

Chris, that is SO NAUGHTY- but probably true!!!!;)

Rollo
Aug 11th, 2009, 12:52 PM
Doubt the Forum could cope with listing them all. :devil:


Rollo's curse upon you for your sacrilege. May a thousand Sharapova screams and screams invade your dreams until you repent.:fiery:

iainmac
Aug 11th, 2009, 04:39 PM
Rollo's curse upon you for your sacrilege. May a thousand Sharapova screams and screams invade your dreams until you repent.:fiery:

That is a good one. And may the dreams of the Wightman Cup of 1966 haunt his nights with BJK cramping- poor woman. Why did Ann Jones use that as an excuse?;);););):deviladvocate Chris pal!!!

newmark401
Aug 11th, 2009, 08:36 PM
This article is from the British newspaper "The Independent". It was published in June 2002, to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of Virgina Wade's Wimbledon singles win:

One of the indelible images of 1977's silver jubilee summer, at the other end of the spectrum from Sid Vicious seditiously snarling "God Save The Queen", is of Virginia Wade in her pink cardie winning Wimbledon. "For she's a jolly good fellow," sang the politely thrilled Centre Court crowd. Truly, the past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.

Yet Wade is thriving in the present, too. As well as her media work, she energetically promotes the Hastings Direct tour and national championships, as the Lawn Tennis Association's official ambassador. And next week, in the women's over-35s doubles, she will be competing at Wimbledon for the 41st consecutive year.

"But it's getting much harder," she says, "because we don't have an over-45s and over-55s category, like the men. It's tough playing people who have just qualified, like Kathy Rinaldi." Still, she is about as fit as a woman can be three years off bus-pass eligibility, and as elegantly svelte as ever. We meet in the lounge of a swish London hotel, where she is the soul of charm and geniality. It is hard to picture the fiery, tormented competitor of a generation ago and more. Yet I am reminded of this former incarnation by an article, in a battered old sports book of mine, written in November 1971 by another player, Julie Heldman.

"I don't believe that Virginia plans her tantrums," Heldman wrote. "They are the product of her life and her strong belief in her superiority, a belief which unfortunately has insulated her from true self-knowledge. Virginia should have been Britain's greatest player, but at 26 she risks leaving her brilliant future behind her."

They were prescient words. For not until she had obtained that self-knowledge did Wade did realise anything like her full potential. "I did suffer from a bad back," she says, "but once, when I was complaining about it after losing in the US Open, a friend of mine said: 'You just use the bad back as an excuse'. I hated him for saying it, but I woke up the next morning and thought: 'He's absolutely right'. I think, actually, that I would have been a good player today, because there's so much more help. I had technical weaknesses, and I certainly had psychological weaknesses."

Happily, she eventually conquered them to win the most coveted title of all, and so I invite her to consider the exciting prospect of her losing her status as the last Brit to win a singles title at Wimbledon, in another jubilee year to boot.

"People are talking as if it will be straightforward for Tim [Henman] to reach the final, and of course it won't be," she says. "It's not just about being potentially the best, you have to go through that ugly business of winning.

"But Tim has a terrific record at Wimbledon, and he handles the attention damn well. If you can ride that wave of support it can really help you. If you can't, it washes you up on the shore. For me, it was tough always being the Great White Hope. But in '77 a lot of expectation had been transferred to Sue Barker, who had won the French [Open] in '76. For Tim the opposite has happened. With Rusedski not playing well, he's carrying more expectation than ever."

Whoever wins, Wade believes that the championship has lost none of its lustre. She maintains, however, that tennis itself is not the test of skill that it once was.

"With wooden rackets it was much harder technically. With today's equipment you have to develop a good technique, but basically the game is all about power. When I'm commentating I find it hard to analyse, because it's so often about one person hitting the ball harder than the other. If you hold a wooden racket now, it's terrifying how much harder it is.

"I'm not suggesting it is an easy game, just that it has been made easier. It's the same with golf. With the equipment now they can all hit the ball so much further, so the game is often down to whether they sink the putts, which increases the element of luck. If you try volleying with a wooden racket, and use the same technique as with graphite, the ball will just dribble off. You have to produce a shot, instead of just holding the racket and letting the ball do the work."

Wade does not express these convictions in a spirit of things having been better in her day; rather she is motivated, I think, by a ferocious passion for the game, and a deep concern for its future.

"I think it's a shame that top players don't play doubles," she says. "And I worry about injuries. You finally get to the stage where there are stars, with personality and charisma, and then they have to keep withdrawing with injuries. It's a major problem. There seems to be such a lot of emphasis on power and physical training, and not enough quiet time.

"Venus [Williams], funnily enough, is one of the exceptions. In the last few years she has got more introverted, almost withdrawn at times. Perhaps she understands that most of the work you can do is while sitting on the sofa at home. There are endless good young Russian players, but I'll be surprised if they produce many champions. They have such a work ethic, such incredible discipline in training, but by the matches they're drained."

And what of the rather more limited number of good young British players? After all, she might soon see another Brit winning a singles title at Wimbledon, but unless Henman or Rusedski accepts a dare, the champ won't be wearing a skirt.

She sighs. "I don't know what happened to those two youngsters, [Elena] Baltacha and [Anne] Keothavong. They were doing so well this time last year. I think in Britain there is too much emphasis on creating champions instead of getting people having fun playing tennis. It's very difficult for a 10-year-old to relate to the extreme physicality of the game today. The talk is always of how hard everybody works, and that becomes a little off-putting.

"Moreover, tennis is not a component of our everyday culture as it is in, say, France. When I was in Paris for the French Open, I kept passing courts with little cafés beside them. You don't see that here. And people use such dud balls." Her voice rises in horror on the words "dud balls". Indeed, the more animated she gets, the more pronounced her South African vowels become (she was born in England, but spent most of her childhood in Durban, where her father was Archdeacon).

So much for her reflections on the present and anxieties about the future. What, 25 years after she won her third, final and most cherished Grand Slam singles title, following wins at the US Open (in 1968) and Australian Open (in 1972), are her recollections of July 1, 1977.

"Well, I had worked very hard to change my thinking on court. It was said that I won because I controlled my temper, and lost because I didn't. But by '77 I had learnt how to use my frustration positively.

"Also, because '77 was jubilee year, as well as centenary Wimbledon, I knew that the Queen was going to be there on the Friday [for the women's singles final]. And I thought to myself: 'If she's going to be there, I'm going to be there. And if I'm going to be there I might as well win.'

"When I saw the draw I knew that Chris [Evert, the defending champion] was in my half, so she was always at the back of my mind. But I still had to keep winning. Luckily, I had a coach, Jerry Teegarden, who helped keep me on track. The big problem in a Grand Slam, because you're not playing every day as in other tournaments, is to maintain the tension at the right level.

"I beat Rosie Casals, a very tough player on grass, in the quarters, then met Chris in the semi. You had to be patient against Chris. She was so consistent, never made a mistake, and her strength was her concentration. You had to beat her at her own game."

Wade eventually prevailed 6-2, 2-6, 6-1, then in the final met the towering Dutchwoman Betty Stove, who had beaten not only Barker in the semi-final, but also, in the quarter-final, the fast-emerging Martina Navratilova. Wade was not daunted.

"I had a good record against Betty," she says. "She was a bit like Venus Williams in that she was tall, and really smacked her serve, but I knew she had trouble closing matches out against me, so I wasn't worried even when I lost the first set [4-6]. But I also knew I couldn't take anything for granted. And the mentality in tournaments is that you've got to beat X so that you can play Y, and if you beat Y you'll play Z. So when you get to the final there's nowhere else to go, and it's easy to feel a little anticlimactic.

"I felt good that day, though. I was very happy when I saw the Queen was wearing a rose-pink hat, the same colour as my sweater. I thought: 'That's good'."

Wade eventually won 4-6, 6-3, 6-1. "And there was an incredible explosion of noise. I'd seen the 1966 World Cup final on TV but in the interim I'd never seen euphoria anything like that, until that day. For a while afterwards you're just part of it, then you realise it's because you've won, which makes you feel pretty small."

Let us hope that, a fortnight tomorrow, Henman enjoys the same humbling experience. But I haven't quite finished with the nostalgia. I cheekily tell Wade that one of my abiding memories is of her dodgy tossing.

Clive James put his finger on it in a television review published on July 6, 1980, writing: "Virginia Wade tried losing to Betsy Nagelsen but couldn't make it, even when she resumed her old habit of throwing the ball out of reach when attempting to serve."

"Yes," says Wade. "I knew that opponents used to get annoyed with me, but I wasn't doing it intentionally." Never, as a means of unsettling her opponent? "Oh God, no. I can't conceive of cheating. It is one of these things that fascinates me. You see it in junior tennis, calling balls out that are in, and vice versa. Sometimes there's a temptation, but if I was responsible for a call then I couldn't possibly cheat."

There is a pause. "On the other hand, I think that gamesmanship to a certain degree is totally legitimate. If you have an opponent who's a very quick player, it makes sense to make them go slowly, in fact it's stupid not to. Or threaten them on their second serve on a big point, jump around a bit, be a little in their face."

Did she approve of the gamesmanship ploys of John McEnroe, now her BBC colleague? Another pause.

"I thought he manipulated players. Strangely enough my mother had plenty of sympathy for him, because she was used to defending me. But basically I was the butt of my own anger, whereas he picked on other people. And I think he had more control than he let on. Let's say he used gamesmanship to the very brink of what was acceptable."

Finally, speaking of mind games, what if she were advising Henman's opponents this Wimbledon? Not that we wish to offer them the slightest help, but how did she deal with opponents on their home turf?

"It is important," she says, "to walk out at the same time they do. Then you can convince yourself that the cheering is for you."

samn
Aug 11th, 2009, 08:43 PM
Rollo's curse upon you for your sacrilege. May a thousand Sharapova screams and screams invade your dreams until you repent.:fiery:

Indeed! And let's add prissy Chrissie Evillert and a cramping Billie Jean to those dream invasions.

chris whiteside
Aug 12th, 2009, 12:42 PM
Rollo's curse upon you for your sacrilege. May a thousand Sharapova screams and screams invade your dreams until you repent.:fiery:


Indeed! And let's add prissy Chrissie Evillert and a cramping Billie Jean to those dream invasions.

And of course the straw that would break the camel's back - if the name Miss J M Capriati was to re-appear on the hoardings.

I can almost feel myself wanting to puke.

Calvin M.
Aug 16th, 2009, 01:35 PM
Any thoughts, memories, pics, etc. of Virginia Wade? Virginia was my very first favorite, holding a special place in my heart. Yes she could be a bitch at times, but she was a royal bitch if you know what i mean, dishing out catty quotes with her oh so upper class British accent. She acted the way she did because she had a total passion and fiery beauty unmatched.

Virginia was an enigma if ever there was one. From posts and bits I 've read she is or was said to be a closeted lesbian, but she attracted a huge group of male admirers in her time and also dated a number of men. For some reason too she had an unusual number of obsessive followers.

The contrasts and mystery extended to her game and personality. She was a minister's daughter but was notorious for arguing calls and using unladylike language. She could be fire or ice. Charming or a hellion. Friendly (Francoise Durr was one of her good friends) or aloof and distant.

Wade had a fascination for cats, often comparing herself to a lioness. The year she won Wimbledon she changed her conservative ponytail hairstyle to a lion-like mane. I'll always think of Virginia when I see a graceful cat with eyes alblaze!
I love my "Ginny" Wade:hearts:

i can't recall any matches but I did see VW play back in the 70's. She was feisty. Just wanted to comment on your post because the way you describe her personality was how she came across when calling games with Bud Collins on the old MSG network. Wade had me laughing with her commentary. For example (discussing the 1994 French Open): "Yes, Mary gave Steffi a taste of her own medicine. Steffi got to feel what it was like to be thrashed on the court." (During a Sabatini-Date match): "Why is Gaby double faulting so much?! It's not like Kimiko is killing her with her returns."

iainmac
Aug 16th, 2009, 02:29 PM
Indeed! And let's add prissy Chrissie Evillert and a cramping Billie Jean to those dream invasions.

And Samn be really bad and add the spectre of Lesley Turner at the French to his nightmares!!!!!

iainmac
Aug 16th, 2009, 02:32 PM
And of course the straw that would break the camel's back - if the name Miss J M Capriati was to re-appear on the hoardings.

I can almost feel myself wanting to puke.

Oh but you enjoy a little wind up Chris!!!!;););)

iainmac
Aug 16th, 2009, 02:35 PM
i can't recall any matches but I did see VW play back in the 70's. She was feisty. Just wanted to comment on your post because the way you describe her personality as how she came across when calling games with Bud Collins on the old MSG network. Wade had me laughing with her commentary. For example (discussing the 1994 French Open): "Yes, Mary gave Steffi a taste of her own medicine. Steffi got to feel what it was like be thrashed on the court." (During a Sabatini-Date match): "Why is Gaby double faulting so much?! It's not like Kimiko is killing her with her returns."

Yes Wade was great with some of the commentary. I was really impressed to hear her speaking with concern along with Bud Collins as Sue Barker imploded against Austin at the 77 Open. She really was worried for the mental effects on her Federation Cup team mate. I was surprised she was commentating that early on in the tournament when she would still have been playing in the singles- knocked out by Turnbull in the quarters!!!

nelslus
Aug 17th, 2009, 02:41 PM
And Samn be really bad and add the spectre of Lesley Turner at the French to his nightmares!!!!!
Rumor (or "rumour", as Chris would put it) has it that Chris has become a huge fan of Michelle Larcher de Brito. And would appreciate it if everyone would please send him copies of all of her matches throughout her career. (Make sure to crank up your volume as high as it will go when you watch, Chris.) :bounce:

iainmac
Aug 17th, 2009, 04:14 PM
Rumor (or "rumour", as Chris would put it) has it that Chris has become a huge fan of Michelle Larcher de Brito. And would appreciate it if everyone would please send him copies of all of her matches throughout her career. (Make sure to crank up your volume as high as it will go when you watch, Chris.) :bounce:

Oh if only I did not like him so much...But wait you are right. I am going to go around Flushing Meadow and search for De Brito and take video of her. Interperse with pictures of the 66 Wightman Cup and send off to him. With a Sharapova signed programme and the Capriati fan club application of course!!!!!!!!!!!:)

Uranium
Feb 8th, 2011, 01:22 AM
http://virginia-wade.com/images/Virginia-Wade5.jpg
http://www.wtnphotos.com/data/500/FotoFlexer_Photo.jpg

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39596000/jpg/_39596209_wade270.jpg
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/06/22/article-1194725-056ECECE000005DC-699_468x333.jpg
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/12/article-0-002BDE8E00000258-538_468x362.jpg

1968 US Open and 1977 Wimbledon. No pics of 1972 Aussie Open though.:(

Rollo
Feb 8th, 2011, 08:51 PM
I love the one from her 1968 US Open win. The Forest Hills stadium as a backdrop makes it.

DennisFitz
Feb 10th, 2011, 06:34 AM
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39596000/jpg/_39596209_wade270.jpg
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/06/22/article-1194725-056ECECE000005DC-699_468x333.jpg
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/12/article-0-002BDE8E00000258-538_468x362.jpg

1968 US Open and 1977 Wimbledon. No pics of 1972 Aussie Open though.:(

1977 Wimbledon win by Wade was, IMHO, one of the nicest victories by any player of the Open era :worship: (even if she did beat Ms Evert en route to the title :fiery:)

calou
Feb 11th, 2011, 11:59 AM
1977 Wimbledon win by Wade was, IMHO, one of the nicest victories by any player of the Open era :worship: (even if she did beat Ms Evert en route to the title :fiery:)

I agree a very nice victory like Schiavone at RG last year ,very moving :D

Rollo
Apr 27th, 2012, 07:04 PM
Clearly relaxed and having fun. This shot is from her 1983 quarterfinal vs Yvonne Vermaak. An over the hill Ginny almost made the semis. This was he last final 8 showing in a slam.

http://denverpost.slideshowpro.com/albums/001/496/album-240604/cache/Wimbleton_078.sjpg_950_2000_0_75_0_50_50.sjpg?1309 143758

mistymore
Apr 27th, 2012, 07:29 PM
I liked Wade but it frusterated me she almost always lost to Evert, Goolagong, Navratilova, Court, and King. She never improved her game or mentality enough to compete with any of them.

matthirst2000
Apr 27th, 2012, 08:45 PM
Virginia Wade played in a very tough era with the group of champions that you mention.I would argue that to win 3 grand slams with those champions about was actually pretty good going.The ladies you mentioned won every Wimbledon from 1965-1987 except for Ann Jones in 1969 and Virginia herself in 1977.No other player had a look in.Whilst she had losing records to each of them she did beat them all on several occoisions and there arent many others who could boast that type of record.The players you highlight were simply better players.I do agree though about her being frustrating.I whached many matches where she had chances to win and contrived to lose.A Wimbledon semi final in 1974 against Olga Morozova and Wightman Cup match against ChrisEvert in 1980 spring to mind.But a 3 time slam champion is still a great career.

mistymore
Apr 27th, 2012, 09:06 PM
Didnt she have the talent to be closer to some of them than she was though? That is all I am thinking. Atleast she had enough talent to be more competitive with Goolagong and King than she was. Goolagong was more talented but mentally weak, inconsistent, and underachieving, so Wade maximizing her own talents should have been closer, but she didnt really either. King had a weak ground game, and wasnt overpowering, Wade with her weapons should have been able to be closer to her too.

AdeyC
Apr 30th, 2012, 09:44 PM
Clearly relaxed and having fun. This shot is from her 1983 quarterfinal vs Yvonne Vermaak. An over the hill Ginny almost made the semis. This was he last final 8 showing in a slam.


Yvonne Vermaak had a lot to answer for that year - I'd been hoping for a Ruzici v Wade quarter final. And I still espected Wade to win this match, which unfortunately didn't happen.

alfajeffster
May 14th, 2012, 07:40 AM
What a great shot! Virginia Wade has always been one of my favorites not only to watch play, but listen to in the commentary booth. She's like the bottle of bordeaux I gave her when she was here in my home town for an exhibition 15 or so years ago. She aged into her real beauty gracefully like a fine wine. You look at someone like Rosie Casals and you wouldn't even know who she is, that's how much she didn't age well, and let herself go (no offense, but it's true).

tennisvideos
May 14th, 2012, 01:23 PM
Some wonderful pics of Ginny! I loved her and it's great to see her these pics. Agree with Alfa, she has aged so gracefully and is such a wonderful fun personality, you just have to love her. She played in a very tough generation, coming up against Court, King, Goolagong, Evert and then Navratilova. She did well to win 3 slams in such tough competition.

As for Evonne being inconsistent - yes, she had some up and down moments BUT to make 17 GS finals from 21 played between 71-76 is INCREDIBLY CONSISTENT.

alfajeffster
May 14th, 2012, 05:09 PM
Some wonderful pics of Ginny! I loved her and it's great to see her these pics. Agree with Alfa, she has aged so gracefully and is such a wonderful fun personality, you just have to love her. She played in a very tough generation, coming up against Court, King, Goolagong, Evert and then Navratilova. She did well to win 3 slams in such tough competition.

As for Evonne being inconsistent - yes, she had some up and down moments BUT to make 17 GS finals from 21 played between 71-76 is INCREDIBLY CONSISTENT.

I'll never forget her telling me (I drilled her with questions on the ride from the airport to the exhibition) that "it's no secret, I never liked to play Evonne. You never knew what you were going to get" and we remembered when she once commented "she had a slice backhand that came across the net, and then landed as if it had a birds nest around it, meaning it was tough to dig it out of the grass. :lol:

alfajeffster
May 15th, 2012, 01:28 AM
She apparently kept the "one foot on the ground" rule. Probably her best shot- the serve.

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wadeservice.jpg

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a223/alfajeffster/Wade70.jpg

tennisvideos
May 15th, 2012, 04:09 AM
I'll never forget her telling me (I drilled her with questions on the ride from the airport to the exhibition) that "it's no secret, I never liked to play Evonne. You never knew what you were going to get" and we remembered when she once commented "she had a slice backhand that came across the net, and then landed as if it had a birds nest around it, meaning it was tough to dig it out of the grass. :lol:

Love it. I loved watching both Evonne and Ginny. Ginny was very elegant and graceful on court except for that forehand lol. But what a beautifully crafted backhand, volleys and serve she possessed as you mentioned. All classic shots in the traditional sense and a joy to behold.

Love that saying about the birds nest. Ginny also loved playing with Frankie because of the crazy angles she was able to get with her unorthodox grips.

I have a great Legends video of Ginny playing doubles - I think it has Evert, Austin and Navratilova on court with her - and she tosses the ball up to serve and starts to giggle and then can't stop for literally about 5 minutes! And I have seen her crack up on court a few other times too, not to that extent. But she obviously has a great sense of humour. Love her to bits. :)

amyja89
Jul 8th, 2012, 11:46 AM
Lots of fun reading through this thread! Having been born in the late eighties my only real experience of Ginny is from her commentating which has always been amongst my favourites, but I must say I am completely fascinated by her. So charismatic! Thought I'd post a few photos I've accumulated as my first contribution to this great forum. :D

http://i48.tinypic.com/m7urdz.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/24wa8f8.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/110hz4z.png
http://i47.tinypic.com/1443cyt.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/xcpzyo.png
http://i45.tinypic.com/2qut5e1.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/258cffk.jpg

tennisvideos
Jul 8th, 2012, 02:10 PM
Lots of fun reading through this thread! Having been born in the late eighties my only real experience of Ginny is from her commentating which has always been amongst my favourites, but I must say I am completely fascinated by her. So charismatic! Thought I'd post a few photos I've accumulated as my first contribution to this great forum. :D

http://i48.tinypic.com/m7urdz.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/24wa8f8.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/110hz4z.png
http://i47.tinypic.com/1443cyt.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/xcpzyo.png
http://i45.tinypic.com/2qut5e1.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/258cffk.jpg

Ooh some great pics there and of course I love the last one with Frankie ... looks like 1979 Wimbledon Semis.

amyja89
Jul 10th, 2012, 01:33 PM
Happy birthday Virginia Wade! 67 years old today and still in great shape!

Taken at the Wimbledon Championships 2012 Winners Ball.
http://www1.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/Wimbledon+Championships+2012+Winners+Ball+qvh6vpg8 djMl.jpg

alfajeffster
Jul 10th, 2012, 02:24 PM
Happy birthday Virginia Wade! 67 years old today and still in great shape!

Taken at the Wimbledon Championships 2012 Winners Ball.
http://www1.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/Wimbledon+Championships+2012+Winners+Ball+qvh6vpg8 djMl.jpg

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!

She has aged so beautifully, and I dare say better looking than any of her contemporaries. And (to me at least) all without benefit of having had work done. She looks comfortable in her age.

tennisvideos
Jul 11th, 2012, 10:17 AM
Doesn't she look fantastic! Still trim and fit looking ... and as you say, better than the vast majority of her contemporaries. Nancy Richey still looks great too I must say and keeps active and fit by walking lots.

alfajeffster
Jul 11th, 2012, 01:37 PM
Doesn't she look fantastic! Still trim and fit looking ... and as you say, better than the vast majority of her contemporaries. Nancy Richey still looks great too I must say and keeps active and fit by walking lots.

How the hell have you been doing, TV? I'm doing great. I just moved into my new flat last Friday, and what a difference! It's a tad bit on the expensive side, but the amenities are to many to list, but I'll try :lol: Fireplace, dishwasher, garbage disposal, granite counter top on bar separating kitchen from dining area. It's an open floor plan, and past the dining table, the living room has a beautiful sealed gas fireplace, above which I'm going to hang my new 46" HDTV. Huge bathroom, and facility has pool, fitness center, and indoor parking right off the elevator- all very posh. Well I shouldn't been going on like this, but I'm so excited. :bounce:

tennisvideos
Jul 12th, 2012, 01:56 PM
How the hell have you been doing, TV? I'm doing great. I just moved into my new flat last Friday, and what a difference! It's a tad bit on the expensive side, but the amenities are to many to list, but I'll try :lol: Fireplace, dishwasher, garbage disposal, granite counter top on bar separating kitchen from dining area. It's an open floor plan, and past the dining table, the living room has a beautiful sealed gas fireplace, above which I'm going to hang my new 46" HDTV. Huge bathroom, and facility has pool, fitness center, and indoor parking right off the elevator- all very posh. Well I shouldn't been going on like this, but I'm so excited. :bounce:

Sounds sensational Alfa! Gotta love the good life ... it's more important than worrying about money! I just bought a new 55" HD TV and the picture difference from the old SD TV is amazing. And I got a new Mini Cooper Countryman (I lease it) and it is awesome. So I am with you all the way on spoiling ourselves. Life is too short not to have fun.

I love the open plan and the pool, fitness centre and huge bathroom etc. Good on you! How is the tennis going? I am playing comp twice a week and loving my tennis plus playing vets tournaments with good friends. It's wonderful. :)

tennisvideos
Jul 12th, 2012, 01:57 PM
Clearly relaxed and having fun. This shot is from her 1983 quarterfinal vs Yvonne Vermaak. An over the hill Ginny almost made the semis. This was he last final 8 showing in a slam.

http://denverpost.slideshowpro.com/albums/001/496/album-240604/cache/Wimbleton_078.sjpg_950_2000_0_75_0_50_50.sjpg?1309 143758

What a wonderful pic! Love it :)

amyja89
Jul 12th, 2012, 02:00 PM
I watched an interview with Ginny about her Wimbledon win the other day and she was saying that everyone always teases her about how long and messy her hair was during the tournament. I think her hair was awesome! :lol:

Rollo
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:05 PM
Well I shouldn't been going on like this, but I'm so excited

Well, as long as you are using the word "posh" in a Ginny Wade thread, Rollo thinks it's appropriate for the occassion.

Glad you like the new digs Alfa.:D

Rollo
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:13 PM
I watched an interview with Ginny about her Wimbledon win the other day and she was saying that everyone always teases her about how long and messy her hair was during the tournament. I think her hair was awesome!

I huge and hearty welcome to the Blast Amyja89

:clap2::woohoo::cheer:

Just LOVED all those Ginny pics. I'd love to know where the one on clay is. She's all bundled up-could it be Bournemouth? It was so windy one year that Virginia threw up a toss to serve and the ball sailed up and backwards-going over the fence! That's the story anyway. The wind at Eastbourne this year made me think of it.

What part of the UK do you hail from? Do you also play tennis?

What did everyone think of Murray and Wade at Wimbledon this year? There was that minor dust up over Wade calling Andy a "Drama-queen" (or was it "king"?). Kinda funny IMO-like the pot calling the kettle black! And was she sad when he lost, or secretly happy (as John Mcrenroe suggested) that her record as the last Brit to win singles goes on?

Share your thoughts.....

Rollo
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:15 PM
I watched an interview with Ginny about her Wimbledon win the other day and she was saying that everyone always teases her about how long and messy her hair was during the tournament. I think her hair was awesome!

Yes, the Lion's mane put her whole personality on display.

There's a Ted Tinling quote I'll have to find that sums up her whole appeal to me. Something about how proper she looks at first, yet she was really an exhibitionist at heart, and he designed her dresses with that in mind.

amyja89
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:26 PM
I huge and hearty welcome to the Blast Amyja89

:clap2::woohoo::cheer:

Just LOVED all those Ginny pics. I'd love to know where the one on clay is. She's all bundled up-could it be Bournemouth? It was so windy one year that Virginia threw up a toss to serve and the ball sailed up and backwards-going over the fence! That's the story anyway. The wind at Eastbourne this year made me think of it.

What part of the UK do you hail from? Do you also play tennis?

What did everyone think of Murray and Wade at Wimbledon this year? There was that minor dust up over Wade calling Andy a "Drama-queen" (or was it "king"?). Kinda funny IMO-like the pot calling the kettle black! And was she sad when he lost, or secretly happy (as John Mcrenroe suggested) that her record as the last Brit to win singles goes on?

Share your thoughts.....

Thanks for the welcome Rollo! :wavey:

I'm an Oxford girl born and bred, an excellent tennis player in my head but very much the opposite in reality! Haven't played for years since university took over my life but I'm an avid watcher and endlessly interested in the history of the game. :)

Honestly I think Virginia's comments about Murray were blown out of all proportion, I can understand her point about the opposing player being put off their own game by what Andy was going through, there was no need for the observation to become headline news as it did! I remember a press interview some years ago in which the journalist asked Ginny if she would like to be paraded out on Centre Court as an eighty-something to mark fifty years since a British winner, and her reply was something like "I certainly hope not!", so I can't imagine that she is willing Murray to fail to keep her record intact. Besides, on the women's side of the game I don't think she has anything to be worried about for a very, VERY long time.

I'm glad you liked the photos, I believe the clay court shot was from Bournemouth in 1971. I shall scour my computer when I have a spare few minutes and try to find some others to share!

Rollo
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:38 PM
Can't wait to see more pictures Amy. I can see your point about Wade's comments get blown out of proportion. The tabs will seize on anything....and LOL with

on the women's side of the game I don't think she has anything to be worried about for a very, VERY long time.



:lol:

It's great to have more ladies on a board about female players. What do study if you don't mind my asking?

Rollo
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:40 PM
Thanks to Wally (who found a radio interview of Kitty Godfree) I was also able to find this radio interview with Virginia Wade.

I don't have time to listen today-but I will later. Here's the link:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/features/desert-island-discs/castaway/6751da31#p009y14d


http://bbc.co.uk/iplayer/images/episode/p009y14d_640_360.jpg

amyja89
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:40 PM
Can't wait to see more pictures Amy. I can see your point about Wade's comments get blown out of proportion. The tabs will seize on anything....and LOL with



:lol:

It's great to have more ladies on a board about female players. What do study if you don't mind my asking?

I study English Literature at the University of Westminster. Just finished my second year so have had a nice long summer to enjoy Wimbledon and the upcoming transport madness that will be known as the Olympic games. :lol:

Rollo
Jul 12th, 2012, 03:41 PM
Well darn it-this is an interview we can't listen too! At least there's a pic:o

amyja89
Jul 12th, 2012, 04:03 PM
Here are a few more photos as promised! A mixture of playing and non-playing. :D

http://i45.tinypic.com/2du9v69.png
http://i50.tinypic.com/se57yc.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/mj5xdz.png
http://i48.tinypic.com/2vrzty1.png
http://i49.tinypic.com/k3ka2t.png
http://i48.tinypic.com/9tljyt.png
http://i49.tinypic.com/2czf41z.png
http://i45.tinypic.com/29dgrhf.png
http://i46.tinypic.com/2irw2u9.png
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