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View Full Version : Is China becoming the biggest economic power in Asia?


Vidan Camille
Oct 16th, 2004, 12:32 PM
In my honest opinion China will take it away from Japan in the near future if it continues to grow at this pace.
We obviously have the man power to make it happen!

Lemonskin.
Oct 16th, 2004, 12:37 PM
China is going to be one of (if not THE) biggest economic superpowers in the world in not too distant future.

XaDavK_Kapri
Oct 16th, 2004, 07:14 PM
China is going to be one of (if not THE) biggest economic superpowers in the world in not too distant future.
I agree, and it's scary

Volcana
Oct 16th, 2004, 09:08 PM
I agree, and it's scaryI think not. There is much to admire in Chinese culture.

Depending on how you look at it, China is the oldest political entity on the planet. Certainly the oldest constant economic presence. Certainly the oldest continual cultural entity. Taking the long view, China NOT being a dominant economic power is the aberration. Having 18-20% of the world's brainpower is a decided advantage.

XaDavK_Kapri
Oct 16th, 2004, 09:58 PM
I think not. There is much to admire in Chinese culture.

Depending on how you look at it, China is the oldest political entity on the planet. Certainly the oldest constant economic presence. Certainly the oldest continual cultural entity. Taking the long view, China NOT being a dominant economic power is the aberration. Having 18-20% of the world's brainpower is a decided advantage.
There is indeed much to admire in the Chinese culture and I think that the time for new economic power has come. I just think that the way the Chinese treat theirs and other people are scary.

jbone_0307
Oct 16th, 2004, 11:23 PM
Hell No, Japan is THE superpower of Asia. Maybe in the future, but for now Japan is making all of the technological advances and becoming more and more modernized.

J_Migoe
Oct 17th, 2004, 07:59 PM
china according to some economic experts will supercede America as the most powerful nation in the world in 30 years time. I'm scared!

Hagar
Oct 17th, 2004, 08:22 PM
The WTO decided to lift quotas on textiles so the Chinese economy, which was already doing very well, will get an enormous boost.
As such this is a good thing because I believe that integration in international trade is the best way for a country to get integrated in the international political system = build up a democracy, assure civil rights,...
But the West should closely monitor the Chinese record on all this, and also on environmental issues (if the Chinese are producing at the crazy rate they are currently producing, there will be a lot of pollution I think).

Volcana
Oct 17th, 2004, 08:34 PM
There is indeed much to admire in the Chinese culture and I think that the time for new economic power has come. I just think that the way the Chinese treat theirs and other people are scary.Any scarier than how the UNited States treats other people?

XaDavK_Kapri
Oct 17th, 2004, 11:19 PM
Any scarier than how the UNited States treats other people?
No, not really. I am not defending the americans, I'm the first to disagree with most decisions they take. In a humane perspective, though, Chinese have stranger ways of thinking than Americans. Just look at what they're doing to Tibet. They have absolutely no reason to do all the atrocities they do. Neither do the Americans, you'll say and in a way it's true, but at least they have a goal : Oil... What does Tibet have ? What is China looking for ? In my opinion, they are just taking advantage of a poor peaceful territory. It's disgusting.

jbone_0307
Oct 17th, 2004, 11:26 PM
Very disgusting. Just look at what happened at Tianament Square, and that was just a protest of government control. The same think with Taiwan, are they jealous that Taiwan is becoming an economic superpower, WITH DEMOCRACY. Taipei is becoming the next Tokyo. At school, we have an exchange student from Taiwan and she said that they hate the chinese and that they have bombs aimed toward them.

Iroda_Fan
Oct 17th, 2004, 11:47 PM
Most americans prefer to buy from Japan, since the quiality is better and their reputation in products is great. China just makes imitation things.

Veritas
Oct 18th, 2004, 01:15 AM
I think China needs to 'mature-up' before they can be rightfully called a 'superpower'. Having a strong economy and a solid military force just won't do if they want to be on par with the U.S. Right now, there is problems with bad loans and debts in the banking sector, enormous disproportions in distribution of wealth and various human rights violations.

Plus it will be interesting to see if the Chinese government can continue to control their population. A strong capitalist market makes it easier to tap into a lot of wealth and a booming IT industry makes information a lot more difficult to control. The government can't completely control how the Chinese economy develops - it's really up to the population to decide what happens.

Veritas
Oct 18th, 2004, 01:20 AM
Any scarier than how the UNited States treats other people?

Not really. The U.S. has a few human rights issues to deal with, but at the very least the country is making progress. What's more, their human rights issues are recognised moreso than China, where even information distributed in the internet is tightly controlled. Look at how biased and singled-voiced the Chinese media is.

I believe the U.S. has several key human rights advantages over China. They allow information to be distributed without the excessive political control and inteference from the Chinese. Plus the U.S. government certainly won't send tanks and military supremos to gun down ordinary citizens who participate in mass demonstrations.

Very disgusting. Just look at what happened at Tianament Square, and that was just a protest of government control.

Tiananmen Square protest was focused more on students and radicalists demanding a more democratic government and political system.

I do not like what happened, especially when many innocent people were killed. But look at it in the government's POV: in the 80s, Deng Xiaopeng's administration was the key to solving all the mass economic problems that Mao's "Cultural Revolution" and "Great Leap Forward" had imposed. The Deng government was responsible for solving the widespread poverty, violence and famine that Mao had left. Because China has such a large population, it is very difficult to make sweeping changes in as less time as possible. So when you are in the middle of reforming your country's economic system, the last thing you need is having to deal with a huge group of protesters that could derail all your efforts.

Of course it was not right to actually kill or even injure the protesters. Most were unarmed and I am guessing that they were asking for what many others in Western democracies have - a wide range of human rights. But it was really the bad timing of the protests that played against them. Democracy in China is nice, but it definately won't happen when the country is in the middle of rapid economic growth and the government is too authoritarian and conservative the let anything get in their way to making the country a superpower.

Veritas
Oct 18th, 2004, 01:31 AM
Oh yeah, and I'd much rather prefer U.S. hegemony than a Chinese-Communist one....

Jeleno Benesovo
Oct 18th, 2004, 07:21 AM
Oh yeah, and I'd much rather prefer U.S. hegemony than a Chinese-Communist one....
I guess the iraqis right now rather prefer China as superpower. ;)


Chinese have stranger ways of thinking than Americans. Just look at what they're doing to Tibet
did you remember what the US army did to the native indians?
or what they did to the vietnamese (3 millions killed) or about what they did to Nicaragua or Honduras or Chile or Japan or Panamá or Granada or... should I continue?

what I mean is If China becomes the next superpower (as seems it will happen) It won't change too much the world picture (in the deep meaning), it couldn't be worse, just different for some countries; surely China neighbors and the current superpower are going to feel themselves "less comfortable" but many countries in another areas will feel better if the world finds a balance for the current omnipotent power. Actually a balance between one western superpower and one eastern superpower would be better than the current situation for lots of nations (mainly in the 3rd world).

BTW we are forgetting Europe that surely will increase its integration and its economical power, so it could be a trio... much better than just one country taking all the decisions.

Veritas
Oct 18th, 2004, 09:44 AM
I guess the iraqis right now rather prefer China as superpower. ;)



did you remember what the US army did to the native indians?
or what they did to the vietnamese (3 millions killed) or about what they did to Nicaragua or Honduras or Chile or Japan or Panamá or Granada or... should I continue?

what I mean is If China becomes the next superpower (as seems it will happen) It won't change too much the world picture (in the deep meaning), it couldn't be worse, just different for some countries; surely China neighbors and the current superpower are going to feel themselves "less comfortable" but many countries in another areas will feel better if the world finds a balance for the current omnipotent power. Actually a balance between one western superpower and one eastern superpower would be better than the current situation for lots of nations (mainly in the 3rd world).

BTW we are forgetting Europe that surely will increase its integration and its economical power, so it could be a trio... much better than just one country taking all the decisions.

It might be nice to have U.S. hegemony 'balanced', but then again, we had two competing superpowers between post-WWII and 1991 - ala the U.S.S.R. I wasn't old enough to really comprehend what was going on between the two powers in the late 80s and early 90s, but I didn't think it made the world feel any more 'safe': the threat of the Cold War becoming a 'Hot' one must've played in a lot of people's minds. From the way I see it, one superpower is enough. Any more would mean risking a renewed arms-race and increasing international tension. IMO, on a global scale, the late 80s and 90s were the most peaceful and safest era of the 20th century.

Jeleno Benesovo
Oct 18th, 2004, 10:15 AM
It might be nice to have U.S. hegemony 'balanced', but then again, we had two competing superpowers between post-WWII and 1991 - ala the U.S.S.R. I wasn't old enough to really comprehend what was going on between the two powers in the late 80s and early 90s, but I didn't think it made the world feel any more 'safe': the threat of the Cold War becoming a 'Hot' one must've played in a lot of people's minds. From the way I see it, one superpower is enough. Any more would mean risking a renewed arms-race and increasing international tension. IMO, on a global scale, the late 80s and 90s were the most peaceful and safest era of the 20th century.
one superpower = imperialism. Do you really wanna that? Not me, certainly not. I don't want just one ruler but many... The more balanced power among the countries the better for the world. (seems that many ppl at the 1st world doesn't understand how unfair and dangerous is any imperialism... of course not, they used to be(are) beneficiaries of the imperial system ;))
Any system works badly with just one head ruling everything. It never worked in the past, It isn't working in the present, it won't work in the future. 2 power poles? better, 3? even better, more than 3? perfect! we have the UN back again.

Jeleno Benesovo
Oct 18th, 2004, 10:31 AM
, the late 80s and 90s were the most peaceful and safest era of the 20th century.
:scratch: did you noticed how many civil wars were running during the 90's? Ruanda, Burundi, Uganda, Timor, Haiti, etc. didn't you noticed what happened in Afghanistan and Iraq? (before US invasion), haven't you noticed the problems in Chechnya or Abjasia? sth about Israel/Palestine conflict? what about the former Yugoslavia?
:rolleyes:
I dunno which decade was the "safest" of the twentieth century, but the 90's certainly weren't "safer" at all. Maybe because this awful civil wars took place in poor countries far away from your home is the reason why you are saying this, but to live in poor countries and to be ignored by the 1st world media doesn't makes a war safer or less cruel, about 3 millions were killed just in central africa during the 90's, what a peaceful decade!

To have just one superpower ruling the world doesn't guarantee peaceful times, actually it could mean the opposite.

PhoenixStorm
Oct 18th, 2004, 01:22 PM
The notion that china is not a superpower already is ridiculous. It is a superpower.

The only reason we hypocrites in america have anything to do with china is that the corporations want the chinese the billion chinese to be drinking coca cola and starbucks while typing on their new IBM computers and driving Lincoln town cars. End of story.

Which brings up the bullshit policy on cuba which is also a communist state that somehow we cannot do business with while we can do business with china which is much more dangerous and threatening. It makes no sense.

rand
Oct 18th, 2004, 03:14 PM
anyway, I'm learning chinese, better safe than sorry...