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Shuji Shuriken
Oct 13th, 2004, 04:09 PM
Hey guys. I think this needs to be done. I've been seeing someone for the past month and I've been thinking about having sex with the person. Never had sex before and I'm kinda worried with the whole HIV pandemic. But one thing I've realised is how little I know about contracting HIV and how little some others know also. So...come and teach me something about HIV. Can I get it by performing oral? How is it transmitted during anal sex? What are the risks of even kissing? Lets discuss this in here please. Thanks :confused:

rand
Oct 13th, 2004, 04:12 PM
risks of kissing are almost nihil (if I remember correctly, to have a slightest chance of contracting you need to exchange 12 litres of saliva)

alfajeffster
Oct 13th, 2004, 04:20 PM
Hey guys. I think this needs to be done. I've been seeing someone for the past month and I've been thinking about having sex with the person. Never had sex before and I'm kinda worried with the whole HIV pandemic. But one thing I've realised is how little I know about contracting HIV and how little some others know also. So...come and teach me something about HIV. Can I get it by performing oral? How is it transmitted during anal sex? What are the risks of even kissing? Lets discuss this in here please. Thanks :confused:
I'd be happy to help you Shuji. This topic is long overdue, very informative, and educational at the same time. The HIV virus is spread primarily through blood-to-blood contact, however it has been isolated in other bodily fluids such as saliva and other secretions. The best advice I can give you is first and foremost, if you are thinking about having sex, make sure you and your prospective partner go get tested, not just for HIV exposure, but for several of the other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) out there. Then, after you are both sure you are safe, use protection anyway. While contracting HIV through performing oral sex is theoretically possible, it isn't probable unless one or both of you has a sore or bleeding gums (which are very difficult to detect, mind you). Anal sex has proven devastating to the gay male community, and more recently to women who practice unprotected anal intercourse. It is always best to be safe. There is no cure. The letters HIV stand for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. This can be confusing. In reality, the reason that there is no cure is that the virus basically adapts itself to each individual host, and mutates in the individual to the point that it's so far been impossible to come up with a vaccine for a retro-virus. Do yourself and your potential partner a favor, and take every precaution, and enjoy yourselves in a healthy relationship. Good luck, and never be afraid to ask questions- EVER!

CondiLicious
Oct 13th, 2004, 04:21 PM
Can I get it by performing oral? :confused:
You can if you have an open sore in your mouth

jimbo mack
Oct 13th, 2004, 04:26 PM
but i must add whilst its good to be cautious of HIV, you musnt let this stop you from enjoying a good sex life.

as long as you use condoms, then thats all you can do. enjoy it.

alfajeffster
Oct 13th, 2004, 07:02 PM
I would have thought that this thread would have attracted a lot more conversation than this. The fact that it hasn't is a learning experience for me.

Helen Lawson
Oct 13th, 2004, 07:05 PM
I think people are lax today, like they don't care or something, like I can just get on ADT and live indefinetly. Frankly, I was a little shocked when I read about Babs' son, I mean, at his age, he should have known better, he wasn't sexually active pre-AIDS. But apparently not, I don't know, people don't care.



If you want to be really safe, do hand jobs with rubber gloves and dry humping.

esquímaux
Oct 13th, 2004, 07:11 PM
Abstinence.


Although it is unlikely to contract HIV/AIDS through kissing, Kaposi's Sarcoma can be.

!<blocparty>!
Oct 13th, 2004, 07:23 PM
If you're still struggling from the above posts, try:

www.google.com (http://www.google.com) :)

Kart
Oct 13th, 2004, 09:21 PM
Risks of getting HIV through kissing are minimal. However there are risks of contracting other things like glandular fever.

You can get HIV through oral - every STD doctor has a story of one or two people who swear they have contracted HIV from oral alone. Your risk is increased if you have mouth ulcers etc, some people recommend you don't brush your teeth immediately prior to performing as this may cause your gums to bleed and hence increase your risk. If you're the one performing oral rather than recieving your risk is higher and the risk is increased if you actually go all the way to orgasm although by not as much as one would think. If in doubt, use a condom.

It's transmitted by exchange of bodily fluids across mucus membranes in anal - the risk is higher because of the risk of tearing and bleeding.

If you want to be safe, use a condom for everything. Get an HIV test for yourself and your partner - as well as syphillis (which is on the increase) and hepatitis as a minimum.

Note though that you can still be HIV positive but test negative for up to six months after you become infected.

alfajeffster
Oct 13th, 2004, 09:39 PM
Note though that you can still be HIV positive but test negative for up to six months after you become infected.
Not to be argumentative (only conversive), but this is a popular misconception. The standard test for HIV exposure is still the western blot test which measures the presence of an anti-body developed as a result of exposure. One of the keys to creating a vaccine is to be able to isolate the virus itself, and since every single person on this planet living with HIV has their own individual version or mutation of the virus, testing for the presence of any specific anti-body is still not conclusive, and yes, there are people walking around with HIV who will test negative for years, and possibly never test positive at all. All the more reason to be careful and use protection. It does increase anyone's potential exposure when they expose themselves to multiple partners. The obvious conclusion to this is that yes, it is possible to spread the virus without the "host donor" actually testing positive, and there is no scientific way to isolate the incubation period of a retro (constantly changing or mutating) virus. Statistics are still founded and based on those that have tested positive for the presence of the anti-body, and to an even larger extent, on those who have actually developed full-blown AIDS and have suffered the debilitating and ravaging physical effects of the chemotherapy to treat the progression of the infection.

If you've never seen the HBO special "Wit" starring Emma Thompson, I highly recommend it for one classic line alone:

"I'm being isolated not for my cancer, but for the effects on my body from my treatment of the cancer."

I used to live in San Francisco back in the 80s, and did some volunteer work for a fledgeling group called SHANTI PROJECT. It was a learning experience, to say the least, and the treatments and knowledge about the virus have increased incredibly since the 80s, when people were dying in the streets. I have very few friends from my time in San Francisco in the 80s who are still alive.

P.S.- Kart- this wasn't meant for you personally. I just hoped there would be a little more lively conversation on this very important and serious subject, and was glad you opened the door a little. Thanks!

Kart
Oct 13th, 2004, 10:02 PM
Not to be argumentative (only conversive), but this is a popular misconception. The standard test for HIV exposure is still the western blot test which measures the presence of an anti-body developed as a result of exposure. One of the keys to creating a vaccine is to be able to isolate the virus itself, and since every single person on this planet living with HIV has their own individual version or mutation of the virus, testing for the presence of any specific anti-body is still not conclusive, and yes, there are people walking around with HIV who will test negative for years, and possibly never test positive at all. All the more reason to be careful and use protection. It does increase anyone's potential exposure when they expose themselves to multiple partners. The obvious conclusion to this is that yes, it is possible to spread the virus without the "host donor" actually testing positive, and there is no scientific way to isolate the incubation period of a retro (constantly changing or mutating) virus. Statistics are still founded and based on those that have tested positive for the presence of the anti-body, and to an even larger extent, on those who have actually developed full-blown AIDS and have suffered the debilitating and ravaging physical effects of the chemotherapy to treat the progression of the infection.

I wasn't talking about people who can be positive for years yet test negative, I was only referring to the period after infection prior to seroconversion when the test is not sensitive enough to confirm HIV infection.

I've always understood the window period as being up to three months but I have recently been led to believe we need to wait up to six months after possible exposure to test negative and be considered 'clear.' Of course, there are always going to be the few that don't fit into that criterion.

I have to admit my HIV knowledge is very much limited to basics though, it's interesting to read what you have to say.

Philbo
Oct 14th, 2004, 01:06 AM
Im a volunteer at Acon n Sydney - The Aids COuncil of NSW. I facillitate a 5 week workshop for gay and bi guys aged 26 and under..

The workshop is designed to give young guys info like the stuff you are asking about Suji - its all around HIV and other Sexually transmitted diseases or infection - aimed at preventing HIV transmission through education..

Anyway the principles of HIV transmission as given by ACON are:

E - Exit - the virus needs to exit the body of an infected person in bodily fluids such as blood, sperm, vaginal fluid.
S - Sufficient Qty - When the virus exits the body of an infected person, to transmit the disease it needs to be in a sufficient qty - saliva does not contain a sufficient amount of the virus for infection to occur - so you CAN NOT get it from kissing - the fluids metnioned above all hav e it in sufficient qty.
S - Survival - THe virus needs to survive whilst it is outside the body.
E - Entry - The virus needs to enter the bloodstream of another person - this can be through the vaginal or anal lining, if u get sperm in your eye it can enter through the tiny blood vessels in your eyeball, any open cuts or sores etc..It can not enter through unbroken skin.

SilK
Oct 14th, 2004, 01:16 AM
actually... the first time I performed oral sex on a guy... when I got home. I was tripping, he was my boyfriend at the time. And he was clean. He had nothing. We did not use condoms during Oral Sex, and he did not ejaculate in or near my mouth. But still I was just freaked out. I was afraid I had HIV or another STD. I kept showering myself three times a day and eventually I got myself tested. Of course I had nothing, but it just scared the shit out of me. And ever since that I have been extremely careful. Most important thing for me is, that I never have one night stands or just casual sex. I only have sex while being in some sort of relationship.

*JR*
Oct 14th, 2004, 01:27 AM
...This topic is long overdue, very informative, and educational at the same time...Pardon the bad pun, but you're damn fucking right that this topic is long overdue! There are dozens of threads about members sex lives. Griffin and Holly (DecLove) are the only ppl here (besides me) who I recall having even mentioned AIDS (who weren't commenting on a specific sufferer, or using the disease to "Save Souls For Jesus"). :rolleyes:

Celeste
Oct 14th, 2004, 02:46 AM
Here's Celeste's opinion, based on loads of sex as a hooker (that's reasonable) I got loads of STD as a hooker, but nothing deadly:

NEVER, EVER do anal sex without a condom, EVER. NO EXCEPTIONS.
Oral, that's your risk choice, it could happen, but without mouth sores, it's a "safe" bet, but safe means different things to different people, you're probably ok, but there's a risk;
Rimming--again, your own choice, keep it light without something between you and the guy's ass.
Kissing--go for it, you have to have something.
When I was a hooker, sucking toes or the like really is hot, and it's safe. That's not a bad way to get off.

This is unscientific, but somewhat realistic. No one is going to do oral with a condom, if you are not comfortable with the risk, lick the shaft and avoid the head, lick the balls, then do a hand routine, or use a condom. Use a whacky looking condom or something, that can make it fun.

Philbo
Oct 14th, 2004, 05:11 AM
It all comes down to personal risk assesment..

As mentioned above, there is a theoretical risk of getting it through unprotected oral sex.. But for it to happen, u need to have an open cut or abrasion in the mouth and the semen needs to enter that cut...pretty long odds of it happening, but not impossible..

So for some people the theoretical risk of it is enough for them to deem it unsafe - for other people they judge it as a remote possibility and for them its 'safe'..

It all comes down to what u are willing/happy to risk...

Mariangelina
Oct 14th, 2004, 11:46 AM
I basically don't know anything that hasn't been mentioned above, but to reiterate: don't do oral sex unprotected if there are open sores in your mouth; if there aren't, it's a theoretical risk. I'd be too paranoid myself, but I guess it depends on the person. And never, ever do unprotected anal sex. That's just stupid. There is next to no chance of getting it from saliva. The statistic I recall is that to have any real chance, you'd need 12 quarts of saliva injected intravenously.

And a little Mariangelinian question on which I am totally ignorant- who knows something about safe sex for lesbians? I am not in a position where I will need this information any time in the forseeable future, but it's good to know, and I know nothing. I know all this stuff about how to safely perform sex acts I'll never want to do, and nothing about what I would actually want to do! :help:

turt
Oct 14th, 2004, 12:41 PM
Never had sex before (..)
How is it transmitted during anal sex? I think you should consider other aspects of sexuality before even thinking of anal sex ;)
Even then, I don't think it should be considered, but hey it's just my view...
:wavey:

alfajeffster
Oct 14th, 2004, 12:55 PM
And a little Mariangelinian question on which I am totally ignorant- who knows something about safe sex for lesbians? I am not in a position where I will need this information any time in the forseeable future, but it's good to know, and I know nothing. I know all this stuff about how to safely perform sex acts I'll never want to do, and nothing about what I would actually want to do! :help:Again- a great question, of which there are many to discuss on this thread. Thank you very much Shuji for bringing this topic into the light. Mariangelina, I am a gay man, and as such, am not in a position (pun intended) to speak about safe sex for lesbians. There are many learned women here who I am sure will be able to address your question at length, and I am looking forward to the knowledge and learning experience. You do bring up another side issue, and that has to do with the gay community in general. The gay male portion of the community was devastated by the disease from the mid-80s through the introduction and acceptance of protease inhibitors in the mid to late-90s, while the lesbian portion of the community has remained largely unscathed. I have volunteered on and off (it does burn you out very fast, as I am sure Czechfan can attest) within the AIDS/HIV community over the years, and would like to take this little moment to thank all my lesbian sisters for not only helping, but standing by in unwavering support while a huge chunk of gay men who would now be between the ages of 45-55 died. Suffice to say that there would also be a large portion of people who are alive in that same age bracket who would not be here were it not for our sisters' love and connectedness within the family we share in our alternative lifestyles. We are family.

Shuji Shuriken
Oct 14th, 2004, 01:31 PM
Wow...thanks guys. Some of these stuff are very helpful. I don't ever plan on having anal sex without a condom, and I'm still on the fence about oral. Who would have thought that I would this ignorant about HIV/AIDS, even with a law degree :confused:. It just goes to show the level of AIDS awareness in some societies. Thanks again guys :kiss:

TimBo
Oct 14th, 2004, 03:06 PM
Make sure that when u are in a relationship, you both get tested. Alot of people believe their partner to be safe and he/she does not cheat. Well surprise... but a large percentage of people get HIV from committed relationships. They believe their partner to be with just them.
Another thing I find iteresting is that HIV and AIDS are completely different. U can have HIV and not AIDS. AIDS is when your blood cell counts get blow a sufficient number. It is possible to have AIDS, take meds and recover and go back to HIV status. There are lots of new meds out now and people are living much, much longer. I read that without treatment a person can live 9-15 years and live 20-25 to normal with treatments

Mariangelina
Oct 14th, 2004, 11:44 PM
Thanks alfajeffster. :hug: Bumping the thread to see if anyone will help me?

Martian Willow
Oct 14th, 2004, 11:59 PM
Thanks alfajeffster. :hug: Bumping the thread to see if anyone will help me?

The risk of infection between women is very low. Obviously the proviso about oral sex with open sores counts. And don't share sex toys. That's about it, I think. :)

Philbo
Oct 15th, 2004, 12:16 AM
Again- a great question, of which there are many to discuss on this thread. Thank you very much Shuji for bringing this topic into the light. Mariangelina, I am a gay man, and as such, am not in a position (pun intended) to speak about safe sex for lesbians. There are many learned women here who I am sure will be able to address your question at length, and I am looking forward to the knowledge and learning experience. You do bring up another side issue, and that has to do with the gay community in general. The gay male portion of the community was devastated by the disease from the mid-80s through the introduction and acceptance of protease inhibitors in the mid to late-90s, while the lesbian portion of the community has remained largely unscathed. I have volunteered on and off (it does burn you out very fast, as I am sure Czechfan can attest) within the AIDS/HIV community over the years, and would like to take this little moment to thank all my lesbian sisters for not only helping, but standing by in unwavering support while a huge chunk of gay men who would now be between the ages of 45-55 died. Suffice to say that there would also be a large portion of people who are alive in that same age bracket who would not be here were it not for our sisters' love and connectedness within the family we share in our alternative lifestyles. We are family.
Great post.. the last few lines gave me goosebumps..

And yes, volunteering for Aids related charities does burn you out quickly..Its just gut wrenching watching someone waste away before your eyes.. The volunteer work i do now though isnt as bad as its workign with young guys who arent infected and its more of a 'coming out' group you could say..

alfajeffster
Oct 15th, 2004, 12:32 PM
Mariangelina, the news today featured an interesting article I think you might be interested in reading regarding women and AIDS, and specific developments on the horizon. It also talks a little bit about prevention. Very interesting read (sorry about the length, but it's worth it):

BANGKOK, Thailand - Women have become especially vulnerable to the dangers of the AIDS epidemic, spurring research for a protective gel or cream. But availability on the market is still five years away, even if all goes well, a leading researcher said on Wednesday.

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http://global.msads.net/ads/54731/0000054731_000000000000000104460.gif (http://g.msn.com/0AD0000W/635785.1??PID=2369794&UIT=G&TargetID=1001957&AN=18842&PG=NBCMSH)Women make up nearly 60 percent of all HIV infections in Africa and their infection rates in many regions are climbing much faster than men, experts say. Because being young, married and faithful is no protection against infection, the need has never been greater.

“There could be a product on the market in five years if the current products in large scale trials work,” Dr. Zeda Rosenberg, of the non-profit International Partnership for Microbicides, told Reuters at a global AIDS conference.

“If they do not, then it will be seven to nine years.”

No vaccine in sight
AIDS experts estimate that even a partially effective microbicide -- a cream, gel, foaming tablet or a vaginal ring that acts like an invisible condom -- could prevent 2.5 million deaths from AIDS over three years.

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• AIDS around the globe (http://javascript<b></b>:SSOpen('5431452','0');)
From sex workers in Indonesia, to babies in Russia, AIDS infects an estimated 38 million people worldwide.

In southern Africa, where the problem has been around the longest, teenage girls are five times more likely to become infected than teenage boys. In the Caribbean, which has also had a long experience with HIV, 70 percent of new infections are in women. The virus is also spreading faster among women than men in countries more recently affected, such as Russia.

Across the world, 17 million women are infected.

With no AIDS vaccine likely to be on the market for years, a microbicide offers one of the best chances to thwart the global pandemic, experts say.

Last year alone, almost three million people died and five million were infected with the virus. The most vulnerable group are poor, young women and, increasingly, married women whose husbands refuse to use condoms.

Many cultures deny women the power and confidence to demand that partners wear condoms — regarded as the key prevention tool.

U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan, in his opening address to the 15th International AIDS Conference, stressed the importance of helping women.

“We must ensure they have full access to the practical options that can protect them from HIV -- including microbicides, as they become available,” he said.

Three ways of attacking the virus
Not only does biology make women more vulnerable to HIV infection, but the current prevention policies are often not working for them, experts say.

‘The cultural challenges that face her are so huge that we’ve got to look at the issue of women’s rights when we are talking about HIV and AIDS.’

— Ludfine Anyango
AIDS victim


The approach backed by President Bush and known as “ABC,” or “abstinence, being faithful and using condoms,” has been consistently challenged at the conference, with detractors saying it is useless for many women.

The woman is the one giving up work and school to care for a sick husband, brother or child. Poverty, discrimination and violence make her more vulnerable to the disease.

“The cultural challenges that face her are so huge that we’ve got to look at the issue of women’s rights when we are talking about HIV and AIDS,” said Ludfine Anyango, a Kenyan mother who was infected, then widowed, by her husband. “If it doesn’t happen, we are going to lose a whole generation

“All those are in the context of a man,” said Anyango, who came to the Bangkok conference to campaign for women’s access to HIV prevention and care. “We are talking about the girl-child. How will she abstain when she is raped? What about 'be faithful?' I was infected in the family environment. I was faithful, but 'be faithful' did not work for me.”

Among new HIV prevention strategies being discussed are vaccines, diaphragms, anti-HIV vaginal gels, and a daily prescription of HIV drugs to prevent infection.

Scientists hope that within five years, the first batch of broad-spectrum, HIV-killing vaginal products could be available. A second generation — more specifically targeting the HIV virus and expected to be more potent and longer-lasting — is in early testing.

These products would include gels or creams, slow-release sponges, dissolving films or long-wearing vaginal rings.

While they are no substitute for condoms, they could profoundly affect how well the world’s most vulnerable women can fight HIV even if the products turn out to be no more than 30 percent effective, said Rosenberg.

Rosenberg said there were many products in different stages of clinical trials. Two have begun efficacy testing and four more are due to follow soon. The trials will involve 20,000 women over the next three years.

The microbicides would either kill HIV in semen, block the attachment of the virus to its target cell, or prevent HIV from multiplying if the virus enters the cell.

“You keep it at a local infection and stop it locally before the virus spreads throughout the body. The ideal microbicide eventually may be one that combines all three stages,” Rosenberg said.

Fact fileHIV and AIDS•Introduction•What is HIV/AIDS? (http://javascript<b></b>:Swapcopy('Health_AIDSfacts',0);)•How is it treated? (http://javascript<b></b>:Swapcopy('Health_AIDSfacts',2);)•How is it spread? (http://javascript<b></b>:Swapcopy('Health_AIDSfacts',3);)•What are the symptoms? (http://javascript<b></b>:Swapcopy('Health_AIDSfacts',4);)•Access and cost of treatment (http://javascript<b></b>:Swapcopy('Health_AIDSfacts',5);)•U.S. statistics (http://javascript<b></b>:Swapcopy('Health_AIDSfacts',6);)•Global statistics (http://javascript<b></b>:Swapcopy('Health_AIDSfacts',7);)http://www.msnbc.msn.com/images/cleardot.gifMore than 830,000 cases of AIDS have been reported in the United States since 1981. And as many as 950,000 Americans may be infected with HIV, one-quarter of whom are unaware of their infection. Every year, there are an estimated 40,000 new HIV/AIDS cases in the United States.

What is HIV/AIDS?
HIV, also known as human immunodeficiency virus, is the virus that causes AIDS. A retrovirus, the disease spreads by copying its genetic information and taking over DNA in healthy white blood cells or T-cells. AIDS, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, breaks down the immune system and prevents the body from fighting diseases. AIDS is clinically defined by a presence of HIV infection and a low level of white blood cells or T-cells. A normal adult has 500-1500 of these cells in every microliter of blood, but an AIDS patients has less than 200.

How is it treated?
<LI>A variety of drugs can suppress HIV either separately or, more commonly, in combination with one another.

<LI>The disease is chronic, meaning no available drug can cure it or eliminate it from the body.

<LI>Many people must take several types of drugs -- known as a "cocktail" -- requiring complicated, strictly-timed regimens every day.

<LI>The first two kinds of drugs to treat HIV block enzymes that the virus uses to survive. Enzymes act as catalysts, sort of like a key that unlocks a particular function.

<LI>The drugs that block the enzymes, or freeze the key, are: 1) Reverse transcriptase inhibitors -- they block the virus’ ability to copy itself and 2) Protease inhibitors -- they can stop the virus from producing infectious particles.

<LI>The newest class of HIV drugs are called "fusion inhibitors." They stop the virus from fusing with and entering healthy cells.
How is it spread?
<LI>Unprotected sex with an infected partner
HIV can enter the body through the lining of the vagina, vulva, penis, rectum or mouth during sex.
<LI>Contact with infected blood
Because of blood screening and heat treatment, the risk of getting HIV from blood transfusions is extremely small.

<LI>Mother to child
Women can transmit HIV to their babies during pregnancy, birth or through infected breast milk.

<LI>Sharing drug needles or syringes
HIV can be transmitted through the tiny amounts of blood attached to a used needle.What are the symptoms?
Many people don't have symptoms when they're first infected with HIV. However, some people have a flu-like illness within a month or two after being exposed. This illness may include:

Fever
Headache
Tiredness
Enlarged lymph nodes (glands of the immune system felt in the neck and groin)

These symptoms usually disappear within a week to a month and are often mistaken for another viral infection. During this period, people are very infectious, and HIV is present in large quantities in genital fluids.

More persistent or severe symptoms may not appear for 10 years or more after HIV first enters the body in adults, or within two years in children born with HIV infection. This period of "asymptomatic" infection is highly individual. Some people may begin to have symptoms within a few months, while others may be symptom-free for more than 10 years.

More severe symptoms include:

Lack of energy
Weight loss
Frequent fevers and sweats
Persistent or frequent yeast infections (oral or vaginal)
Persistent skin rashes or flaky skin
Pelvic inflammatory disease in women that does not respond to treatment
Short-term memory loss
Access and cost of treatment
<LI>As of December 2003, only 7 percent of people in developing countries had access to treatment.

<LI>The price of treatment is dropping, depending on the location of the patient.

<LI>In early 2000, the price of triple-therapy treatment for one patient was $10,000-$12,000 a year. By early 2002, that price had dropped to as low as $300 per person per year, due to generic drug options and changes in pricing policies.

The United Nations AIDS office estimates that $12 billion will be needed for prevention and care by 2005. That estimate jumps to $20 billion by 2007.
U.S. statistics
<LI>New York state has reported the most new cases (155,755) since the epidemic began, followed by California (128,064) and Florida (90,233).

<LI>A recent report shows 2 percent of Manhattan's population is HIV positive.

<LI>African-Americans are disproportionately affected by HIV in the United States. From the beginning of the epidemic until 2002 (most recent numbers), African-Americans have made up 39 percent of the HIV population, but are currently about 12.3 percent of the general population (2000 census figure). African-Americans accounted for 42 percent of all people living with AIDS in 2002. At that time, they were 11 times more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than whites.

Women are increasingly being diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. In 1992, women accounted for 14 percent of AIDS cases in the United States, but by 1999, that number increased to 20 percent. In 2000, 38 percent of women with HIV were infected through heterosexual contact. Some 25 percent reported infection through injection drug use.
Global statistics
<LI>The United Nations estimates 14,000 people are newly infected with HIV every day.

<LI>Some 38 million people are infected with HIV worldwide.

<LI>About 70 percent of the world's HIV population lives in sub-Saharan Africa, a region that makes up just 10 percent of the world’s overall population.

<LI>In sub-Saharan Africa, 2.2 million people died of AIDS and 3 million became newly infected in 2003.

About 7.6 million people are infected with HIV in Asia. In 2003 alone, over a million new cases were diagnosed.

Source: The Associated Press, CDC, NIH• Print this (http://javascript<b></b>:OPW('Health_AIDSfacts','printVer');)

'Feminization of the epidemic'
The IPC, which receives funding from governments and foundations, is developing its own microbicides and is working with other groups which have promising candidates.

The ideal product would be easy to produce so companies around the world could make them as rapidly as possible to ensure wide use and availability.

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“We’re looking for pennies a dose, but even that will be beyond the reach of many people around the world,” said Rosenberg. The IPC was also looking at ways to finance purchase and distribution, she said.

IPC reached a royalty-free agreement with Tibotec, a Belgian subsidiary of U.S. healthcare group Johnson & Johnson, in March to develop a drug known as TMC120 for use as a microbicide in developing countries.

“Microbicides will help give women control over their reproductive health and that will help in easing the inequity, but we need education for women,” Rosenberg said.

“We need them to be economically independent. There is a lot that needs to be done to help women, and microbicides are one tool,” she said.

“The feminization of the epidemic has brought the need for a microbicide clearly into the limelight.”

Experts predict they most likely will be used in combination with diaphragms or other techniques.

Interest in microbicides intensified in the last two years as AIDS increasingly afflicted women and as hopes dimmed for a vaccine anytime soon, Rosenberg said.

Also, many experts are now concerned that AIDS vaccines will only be partially effective — also an initial concern over microbicides.

“When you can have a partially protective vaccine in 15 years or a partially protective microbicide in 5 years, it makes a whole lot of sense now to focus on microbicides,” Rosenberg said.

alfajeffster
Oct 18th, 2004, 06:55 PM
bump

darren cahill
Oct 18th, 2004, 10:16 PM
[QUOTE=Celeste]Here's Celeste's opinion, based on loads of sex as a hooker (that's reasonable) I got loads of STD as a hooker, but nothing deadly:

NEVER, EVER do anal sex without a condom, EVER. NO EXCEPTIONS.
Oral, that's your risk choice, it could happen, but without mouth sores, it's a "safe" bet, but safe means different things to different people, you're probably ok, but there's a risk;
Rimming--again, your own choice, keep it light without something between you and the guy's ass.
Kissing--go for it, you have to have something.
When I was a hooker, sucking toes or the like really is hot, and it's safe. That's not a bad way to get off.


aint that the truth!:worship: