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View Full Version : 100 Photographs that changed the World


Helas
Sep 14th, 2004, 11:14 AM
http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm01.html



http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/images/life/beachdead.jpg http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0307/images/button_previous.jpg (http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm01.html) http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0307/images/button_next.jpg (http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm03.html) http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0307/images/thumbnails.jpg (http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm_index.html)







Dead on the Beach 1943

When LIFE ran this stark, haunting photograph of a beach in Papua New Guinea on September 20, 1943, the magazine felt compelled to ask in an adjacent full-page editorial, “Why print this picture, anyway, of three American boys dead upon an alien shore?” Among the reasons: “words are never enough . . . words do not exist to make us see, or know, or feel what it is like, what actually happens.” But there was more to it than that; LIFE was actually publishing in concert with government wishes. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was convinced that Americans had grown too complacent about the war, so he lifted the ban on images depicting U.S. casualties. Strock’s picture and others that followed in LIFE and elsewhere had the desired effect. The public, shocked by combat’s grim realities, was instilled with yet greater resolve to win the war.





http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/images/life/Birmingham.jpg http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0307/images/button_previous.jpg (http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm03.html) http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0307/images/button_next.jpg (http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm05.html) http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0307/images/thumbnails.jpg (http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/lm_index.html)







Birmingham 1963

For years, Birmingham, Ala., was considered “the South’s toughest city,” home to a large black population and a dominant class of whites that met in frequent, open hostility. Birmingham in 1963 had become the cause célèbre of the black civil rights movement as nonviolent demonstrators led by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. repeatedly faced jail, dogs and high-velocity hoses in their tireless quest to topple segregation. This picture of people being pummeled by a liquid battering ram rallied support for the plight of the blacks.

veryborednow
Sep 14th, 2004, 02:13 PM
Cheers. Maybe the collection should be renames Photographs that changed America - not too many world ones that I've seen so far...

Rocketta
Sep 14th, 2004, 02:49 PM
Fantastic pictures wish I could see them all. Maybe I'll order the book for my library. :bounce:

CooCooCachoo
Sep 14th, 2004, 05:02 PM
Very interesting website

decemberlove
Sep 14th, 2004, 05:28 PM
http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/images/life/lynching.jpg


Lynching 1930

A mob of 10,000 whites took sledgehammers to the county jailhouse doors to get at these two young blacks accused of raping a white girl; the girl’s uncle saved the life of a third by proclaiming the man’s innocence. Although this was Marion, Ind., most of the nearly 5,000 lynchings documented between Reconstruction and the late 1960s were perpetrated in the South. (Hangings, beatings and mutilations were called the sentence of “Judge Lynch.”) Some lynching photos were made into postcards designed to boost white supremacy, but the tortured bodies and grotesquely happy crowds ended up revolting as many as they scared. Today the images remind us that we have not come as far from barbarity as we’d like to think.

flyingmachine
Sep 14th, 2004, 09:15 PM
Very interesting Helas. Every photograph has it's story. :worship:

KoOlMaNsEaN
Sep 14th, 2004, 09:37 PM
This was very moving and saddening for me :sad:

esquímaux
Sep 20th, 2004, 05:18 PM
http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0309/images/life/lynching.jpg




Lynching 1930

A mob of 10,000 whites took sledgehammers to the county jailhouse doors to get at these two young blacks accused of raping a white girl; the girl’s uncle saved the life of a third by proclaiming the man’s innocence. Although this was Marion, Ind., most of the nearly 5,000 lynchings documented between Reconstruction and the late 1960s were perpetrated in the South. (Hangings, beatings and mutilations were called the sentence of “Judge Lynch.”) Some lynching photos were made into postcards designed to boost white supremacy, but the tortured bodies and grotesquely happy crowds ended up revolting as many as they scared. Today the images remind us that we have not come as far from barbarity as we’d like to think.


And who is the terrorist :)?