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BelgianJuniors
Sep 10th, 2004, 09:26 PM
As a new member on this MB I may be able to contribute some useful information to those that are interested in following Belgian young tennisplayers. On another thread I read about what the future may or may not bring, tenniswise, for young Belgians. And maybe I will start out with some points that are not so well known about tenniseducation for kids that have the desire to become "pro's" one day.

How does a child start to play tennis? Some have a parent or brother or sister that are playing and at a young age they get a racket and "play tennis" at age 3 or so. Very soon a good trainer can see whether the kid is a natural talent. (It is not necessary to be a "natural" to "get far" in tennis...but it helps. Sabine Appelmans was "not a natural", but an extremely hard worker, and got to the top 20 on "willpower" and through hard work. Kim ws a natural talent...as well as a hard worker with willpower. So, she had "an edge")

I will give an example of what a "natural talent" can be. Have you ever watched a 3 year old boy nd a 3 year old girl throw a ball? It is "natural" for a girl to throw the ball "underhand" (like when playing petanque), a boy will most often throw a ball "upperhand", like a spear. It looks like girls with tennistalent are very often throwing balls like boys, nd are often good soccerplayers (this is a matter of observation).

A problem is to "scout" these young talents, find them as soon as possible. It happens very often that a child with talent starts to play tennis at say 4 or 5 and becomes "good" and "visible" on tournaments at age 8 or 9. By visible I mean for instance winning the Masters (in Wommelgem in September) earlier than expected (like a 6 or 7 year old winning from 8 year olds) or be on top of the Campina-list as an 8 year old amongst 10 year olds. I didn't check, but I am almost sure that Aude Vermoezen and Niels Desein accomplished this too. It is mainly during tournaments that talented kids are "discovered" by VTV or AFT. And in some cases they are well followed from then on. Some are invited to go to Wilrijk and Mons. This procedure takes in account every possible aspect of the future player. And it is always necessary that the parents are "supporting" the possible future tenniscareer of their kid.

At an age of 9 it is still very hard to determine which boy or girl can or will "make it" (and by that I mean having a career in tennis, at least top-100). In Belgium we are lucky to have a few capable tennisspecialists that can do these selections. Belgium has also an advantage of having several 'circuits' of tennistournaments (Campina, Delta LLoyd, "StarCircuit"...) which allow young players to enter early in the tenniscompetition. It's quite different in for instance the Netherlands, where parents have to drive all over for even a simple tournament, with very strict rules.

Lots of countries "envy" us. They put a lot of money in their programs, but don't get the results we do. Personally I believe that there is a good chance that in the next 10 years to come, several juniors from today will become "pro's". Now, how many will get into the top 10, that's something else. Predictions there are very risky. We shouldn't forget that kids at age 10-12 still have to go through puberty, can have major injuries, need to continue "growing in performance", should be able to combine studying with competitive tennis... Very few can do all that. Being in a tennisschool facilitates this, but by no means is a garantee. A number that is often given is that about 10% of the kids entering an intensive program
(Barcelona, Wilrijk, Mons...) will become professional players, play the tenniscircuit, and get in the top-100.
As an example, as you may know 23 kids are now in Wilrijk, of which 7 in 5th and 6th grade and 5 in first year secondary school.
If out of these 12 ONE would become a good top 100 player, the VTV-program can be called "a success". If TWO would make it, this would be "extra-ordinary". But you can count on it that ALL hope to be "the one"! And that is the way it should be, because once that "hope" is gone, they can't stay there. The motivation that is required is such that future possibilities must remain present. Or staying in the program becomes virtually impossible.

Yes, it is VERY demanding...but some information on other threads "is not quite correct". Do you really believe that an eleven year old trains 6 hours a day? If that would be the case, the kid would be "burnt" by age 13 or 14. You always need room for 'more intensive training'. And 6 hours a day would mean at least 36 hours of training a week! Which is a bit "inhuman", certainly for children. If you "halve" that, you are much closer to the reality. Especially for the youngest children, physical work-out is more important than pure tennistraining. Until 12, technical tennisaspects and physical exercices are way more important than "performances".
Parents and trainers that focus on "results" before the age of 12 are making huge mistakes...Their kids may be "number 1" for a while, but not anymore when they get to play internationally. It's true that it is necessary to prepare the future at age 9-12. But only long-term planning can have that result. The investments done today should result in a few good players at
age 15-16. Niels (Desein) is a good example I think. Others may follow. But it can't be "garanteed", only the chances can get optimized to get to that stage.

OK.Maybe we can start some sort of dialogue on this subject here.

arn
Sep 10th, 2004, 10:25 PM
The only thing I have to say is we have to wait and see. It's VERY hard to predict what a junior will do. Ofcourse the facilities the VTV offers will be very helpfull and I'm very glad Belgium has such a center :)

BUT, to call the VTV-center a succes, that's too early to say IMO. What true successes did they have until now (serious question, maybe I'm not too well informed who should be called a VTV-product and who not)?

1) I would call the VTV-center a succes if the training is more succesfull as other centers because of the way trainings are done and because of the facilities offered. Is it?
2) Someone like Kim Clijsters would have been a succes whereever you would have trained her (maybe not that big of a succes).
3) I have the feeling that players who are not suported by the VTV have it VERY hard to make it because they have to fight against the advantages VTV-players get (WC's,...).

I just like to stay sceptical ;)

BelgianJuniors
Sep 10th, 2004, 10:47 PM
Sceptical is good! I try to do the same...
1) first of all, success is very relative. Of course, Belgium is a small country and we have in a proportionate way "better" results than other (larger) countries. But I'll be the first to agree that a LOT more can and should be done.
I can't judge the way the trainings are done in the VTV or AFT tennisschools. I do know that the facilities are better than almost anywhere else in the country. Facilities in the largest sense that is. Meaning: infrastructure (clay and hardcourt, inside and ioutside, so training is always possible); ratio of trainers and players; the group the kids play in (same ages more or less); other facilities present (like workout room, etc...); experienced staff; affordability....
I know a few parents that are "going solo", and first of all, these have quite some money they can and want to spend on their kids tenniseducation. But I don't believe they can offer the same as VTV or AFT. Of course...only the future will tell.
2) I agree on your comment about Kim Clijsters. If she would have been "discovered" early enough that is. The problem is not always that a country - Belgium or any other -has not enough potential good tennisplayers, the problem is to find out which kids have the different talents to "have a chance" to ever make it. I think this is a tough job in any country. And I believe that in Belgium we're more fortunate than in most other countries.
3) maybe so, but that can be said about any tennisfederation in the world. Which doesn't mean that it is "OK" of course!

And like you, I "stick" to sceptical as well....

arn
Sep 11th, 2004, 09:26 AM
I do think we have a good structure to discover young talents. There are many tournaments in which you can enroll yourself very easily. That's something not a lot of sports have and the VTV has done a good job promoting those tournaments. I think that's the best thing the VTV had done in its existence. (Only stupid they are raising the enrollment fee each year by that much! I think the fee should be the amount of playing one hour in that club. But that's another discussion ;) )

Like I said; it remains to be seen if the VTV can be called a succes. When I look at the juniorranks, I just see we are were we should be in regards to the size of our country and the tennishistory we had. We don't have super results, but good results. Look at the womans side of our national tennis; Players like Kim and Justine normally only come along every 100 year or so. They would have made it anywhere (not talking about the discovering part). Next one is Els Callens, not a VTV-product. Next is Kirsten Flipkens, a good example of a VTV-product :) As I see it, The VTV should deliver someone like here at least every 4-5 years. The rest still has everything to prove, so we have to wait... So I don't see it as a succes, just as normal. Maybe it is because I'm getting used to having big tennisnames in belgium ;)

Come-on-kim
Sep 11th, 2004, 02:18 PM
There were an interview of Iva Van Acken in today's newspaper and he said that he'd be better to have a NATIONAL tennis school

Brαm
Sep 13th, 2004, 07:55 AM
There were an interview of Iva Van Acken in today's newspaper and he said that he'd be better to have a NATIONAL tennis school
Iva :spit:


No seriously, what 's the advantage of having a national tennis school?

arn
Sep 13th, 2004, 08:21 AM
My guess would be a stiffer competition so the motivation to be the best would be instigated.

Svennovitch
Sep 13th, 2004, 09:48 AM
My guess would be a stiffer competition so the motivation to be the best would be instigated.
stiffer :spit:

Arne, try to think about something else, please :tape: ;)

Brαm
Sep 13th, 2004, 10:13 AM
stiffer :spit:

Arne, try to think about something else, please :tape: ;)
Aren't you the one with a perverted mind here? :o

arn
Sep 14th, 2004, 08:34 AM
stiffer :spit:

Arne, try to think about something else, please :tape: ;)
Are you really sure you are not gay?? :scratch: :p ;)

Svennovitch
Sep 14th, 2004, 08:55 AM
Are you really sure you are not gay?? :scratch: :p ;)You should know better than me, after all: you're the one supposed to have a gaydar :p ;)

arn
Sep 14th, 2004, 09:10 AM
well, that thing is turning to orange now :p ;)

Svennovitch
Sep 14th, 2004, 09:32 AM
well, that thing is turning to orange now :p ;)
:lol: :lol: :smash:

Svennovitch
Sep 14th, 2004, 09:33 AM
Didn't know a gaydar came in colors though. Thanks for explaining ;)

DutchieGirl
Sep 14th, 2004, 09:44 AM
well, that thing is turning to orange now :p ;)
ehh so All Dutch people are gay then? :p :lol:

coene
Sep 14th, 2004, 11:52 AM
This thread is starting to get interesting. :lol: ;)

Svennovitch
Sep 14th, 2004, 01:35 PM
ohoh, if even Benji is starting to find this intersting, we'll have to get back on topic :p

Sorry, BelgianJuniors, to get off topic. I think it's great for a country like Belgium to have at least one sport where it stands out against the other countries. I think a lot has to do with the very good tenniseducation our talents get.

I like the idea of 1 tennis school as well. I think both Flanders and Wallonia would benifit from it: all those experienced coaches exchanging experiences, higher level of junior competition, better training partners,...

Come-on-kim
Sep 14th, 2004, 08:31 PM
Iva :spit:


No seriously, what 's the advantage of having a national tennis school?
Because players from Wallonia never trains with players from Flanders! So he said as they were so few good players in Belgium, they should be able to train all together to improve quicker

DutchieGirl
Sep 15th, 2004, 01:35 PM
yeah, sorry for the off topic. I find this thread interesting, and I hope that more of the Belgian juniors will make it on the main tour!